Page 1

ICK BARRETT ARCH + DESIGN PORTFOLIO


CONTACT Nick Barrett 3841 N Greenview Ave Apt 3W Chicago, IL 60657 nickreadsmail@gmail.com 803.960.2389 www.nbportfolio.com

EDUCATION Master of Architecture Clemson University, Graduate School of Architecture 2013 Bachelor of Arts in Architecture Clemson University, College of AAH 2010

EMPL0YMENT Graduate Assistant Clemson University School of Architecture_Clemson, SC 01/2013-05/2012 Teaching Assistant Clemson University School of Architecture_Clemson, SC 08/2012-12/2012 Student Intern Community Research+Design Center_Clemson, SC 05/2012-9/2012 Contract Hire Intrinsik Architecture, Inc_Bozeman, MT 05/2012 Student Intern Civic Design Center_Charleston, SC 08/2011-12/2011 Draftsman/Millworker Millwork Artisans_Charleston, SC 11/2010-5/2011

AWARDS Henry Adams Certificate Award 2013 Harlan E. McClure Award 2013 Jefferson Cup Award 2013 ACSA Sustainable Home Competition 1st Place 2012 ACSA Steel Design Competition 1st Place 2011 RE:designUNIT Competition 1st Place 2012 AIA AM Kinetic Sculpture 2nd Place 2012

SKILLS Digital Autodesk AutoCAD Adobe Photoshop Adobe Illustrator Adobe InDesign Rhino Sketchup Pro

Analog Digital Fabrication Model Making Custom Millwork MIG welding


DESIGN 01

Treaty Oak Student Housing Harlan McClure Award! Comprehensive Studio

15

NOTBLOX® 1st Place! ACSA Sustainable Home Competition

21

Religare Institute 1st Place! ACSA Steel Design Competition

27

Sassafras Mountain Studio Appalachia Design Build

35

Corrine Jones Playground CAC.C Design Build Studio

41

Sonny Jonquil AIA Architecture Month 2010

45

Dalen’s Duckling Digital Manufacturing Processes

51

CLT Bench Comprehensive Studio

55

Nick Barrett March

DESIGN+BUILD

MAKING

CONTACT


Treaty Oak Student Housing Comprehensive Studio Project

The Comprehensive Studio is the final studio course in the Master of Architecture program at Clemson University; it is what determines whether or not a student graduates with his or her accredited degree. During the spring of 2013, MArch students were challenged with the task of designing Graduate Student Housing for Clemson University using Cross-Laminated Timber as a primary structural material. This was a collaborative project in which MArch students worked in pairs. For this project, I had the privilege of working with fellow MArch student Joseph Martin. We immediately drew an incredible amount of excitement and inspiration for our proposal from our site. Clemson University is in a unique region that offers students a close proximity to outdoor recreation matched by few universities. When doing our research, we realized that a common desire among students is to have more access to these resources. We made our primary design goal using the position of our site in between the main campus and the Experimental Forest, to provide and encourage healthy and active lifestyles among the Clemson student body. An Ecotone (ec 路 o 路 tone) is an ecological term that defines the transitional zone between two distinct biomes, or biological communities. This transitional space became the focus of our process.

Team members: Nick Barrett, Joseph Martin


90%

Students want recreation facilities

06%

World deaths caused by physical inactivity

65%

Students want outdoor recreation space

89%

Students want sense of community

63%

Students interested in recreational community

Site Research

02


winter fall/spring summer

-10째F Site Analysis Diagrams

03


Site Plan Driven by the idea of occupying the ecotone, the housing was broken into four blocks. These blocks were shaped by the drainage of the site, solar angles, and unit size. 1. Parking 2. Meadow 3. Recessed wood deck paths 4. Bus Stop (CAT Pendleton Route) 5. Residential Units 6. Climbing Center 7. Community Bike Garage 8. Foot Trails 9. New Hope Cemetery 10. Agricultural Service Center 11. Beach Shelter 12. Poultry Center 13. Germ-plasm Research Center 0’ 10’ 20’

40’

80’

N

Site Plan

04


Exterior Renderings

05


Wall Section

06


Individual Units

07


Parapet Roof:

12

1. 9-ply CLT ceiling 2. Steel flange connection 3. 5-ply CLT parapet wall 4. Sloped XPS insulation (3” min.) 5. Bituminous membranes (two layers) 6. Continuous break metal flashing 7. 1/2” Treated cover board 8. Roof deck connections 9. 2 x 4 Sleepers 10. 2 x 12 Wood roof deck 11. 2 x 6 Wood rain-screen 12. Wood Cap

06

11

03

05 09

10

07 02

04

08

01

CLT to CLT: 1. 9-ply CLT floor 2. Steel flange connection 3. 7-ply CLT wall 4. XPS insulation (2” min.) 5. Vapor retarder 6. Rain-screen structure clips 7. 2 x 4 Sleepers @ 24” O.C. 8. 2 x 6 Wood Rain-screen w/ 1” joints 9. 1 1/2” XPS insulation (acoustic) 10. 2x4 Sleepers @ 24” O.C. 11. Hardwood finish floor 12. HVAC Supply register 13. Built in shelving system

Assembly Diagrams

08

08

07

13

06 05 04

03

12

02

11 10 01

09


Concrete to CLT: 1. 12” Precast concrete wall 2. 8” Hollow-core precast slab 3. Steel flange connection 4. 7-ply CLT wall 5. XPS insulation (2” min.) 6. Vapor retarder 7. Rain-screen structure clips 8. 2 x 4 Sleepers @ 24” O.C. 9. 2 x 6 Wood Rain-screen w/ 1” joints 10. 1 1/2” XPS insulation (acoustic) 11. 2x4 Sleepers @ 24” O.C. 12. Hardwood finish floor 13. HVAC Supply register 14. Built in shelving system

09

08

14

07 06 04

05

13

03

12 11 02 10

01

Steel Circulation Detail: 1. CLT Structure 2. Continuous flashing and sealant 3. Vapor Retarder 4. Steel beam integrated w/ CLT wall 5. Wide flange steel 6. Common steel tube joists 7. Metal grate

07

06 05

01 02 03

04

09


Physical Models

10


Structural Diagrams: Loads 1. Foundation: Poured in place concrete footings w/ turned down concrete slab. 2. Bearing Shear Walls: Precast concrete on first floor, 9-ply CLT on all upper floors. 3. Shear Walls: 9-ply CLT 4. Cantilever Supports: Steel columns w/ wood cover. 5. Headers: Glulam beams.

Building Section

11


Cross Laminated Timber: Shou-Sugi-Ban

12


Full Scale Mock-up

13


NOTBLOX® 1st Place!

ACSA Sustainable Home Competition

The goal of this project is simply stated; it is to provide a more sustainable approach for affordable housing by employing simple, decent and affordable building methods and encouraging the development of communities through architectural intervention. The design is delivered with great simplicity and intent, challenging the preconceived restraints of an affordable housing project. The NOTBLOX® building system is both extremely efficient and affordable. Because Habitat for Humanity relies heavily on the efforts of a volunteer workforce, it is necessary that its construction methods are capable of being implemented by unskilled labor making this product a perfect solution. The NOTBLOX® Affordable Housing Project utilizes innovative building technology, in combination with passive strategies in order to create more sustainable communities. We chose a site that was within downtown Greenville, SC, in order to provide access to the urban infrastructure necessary to the development of a sustainable community. It is within walking distance of Greenville’s central bus stop, and is strategically placed at the developing edge of Greenville’s expanding business district. This site plan includes the implementation of low-cost, high impact strategies that take advantage of the climate and site orientation. The selection and adaptation of this site attributes to the success of the home itself, and is a critical consideration to the development of more sustainable communities within our nation’s cities.

Team members: Nick Barrett, Sam Pruitt


Floor Plan + Site Section

16


Interior Renderings

17


Exterior Rendering

18


1st Place! Competition Boards

19


Religare Institute 1st Place!

ACSA Steel Design Competition

The Comprehensive Studio is the final studio course in the Master of Architecture program at Clemson University; it is what determines whether or not a student graduates with his or her accredited degree. During the spring of 2013, MArch students were challenged with the task of designing Graduate Student Housing for Clemson University using Cross-Laminated Timber as a primary structural material. This was a collaborative project in which MArch students worked in pairs. For this project, I had the privilege of working with fellow MArch student Joseph Martin. We immediately drew an incredible amount of excitement and inspiration for our proposal from our site. Clemson University is in a unique region that offers students a close proximity to outdoor recreation matched by few universities. When doing our research, we realized that a common desire among students is to have more access to these resources. We made our primary design goal using the position of our site in between the main campus and the Experimental Forest, to provide and encourage healthy and active lifestyles among the Clemson student body. An Ecotone (ec 路 o 路 tone) is an ecological term that defines the transitional zone between two distinct biomes, or biological communities. This transitional space became the focus of our process.

Team members: Will Allport, Nick Barrett, Jason Butz


Interior Renderings

22


CIRCULATION

MEDITATION GARDEN

MUSIC GARDEN

SOCIAL GARDEN

Circulation Diagrams

23


Floor Plans

24


1st Place! Competition Boards

25


Sassafras Mountain

Studio Appalachia Design Build

Sassafras Mountain is one of the most extraordinary sites in the state of South Carolina. This beautiful location became the site for a design+build project during the Fall 2012 semester through the collaboration between the Community Research+Design Center and the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. This project had two major goals. The first was to replace an existing lookout platform with one that would ensure the safety of visitors and increase the accessibility to one of South Carolina’s most incredible views. The second goal was to raise awareness for the ongoing Sassafras Mountain Renewal Project. This viewing platform, became the first part of the overall master-plan for Sassafras Mountain. The design of this platform was meant to be beautiful, and yet secondary to the beauty of the view itself and the surrounding wilderness. This wilderness became a powerful obstacle in the project’s construction. The entire platform had to be prefabricated off-site and then moved to the remote location to be assembled. The assembly process included custom steel fabrication, combined with dimensional lumber construction in order to achieve a creative solution to this particular design problem. The success of the project has brought a great amount of attention to the Sassafras Mountain Renewal Project. The final design of a master-plan, as well as an 80 foot tower is currently underway.

Team members: Nick Barrett, Thomas Campbell, Thomas Punzo, Priyanka Vankina


Design Build Process

28


29


01

02

03

Assembly Process

30


04

05

06

31


Photo by Nick Barrett

32


33


Corrine Jones Playground CAC.C Design Buiild Studio

The City of Charleston has an incredibly rich history that provides architecture students at the Clemson Architecture Center in Charleston an amazing environment for study. Studio V, lead by Professor David Pastre, is a design build course that gives students the unique opportunity of a creative process that ends with the construction of their proposal. The Corinne Jones project was completed in the fall semester of 2011 in collaboration with the Wagner Terrace neighborhood as an effort to restore and revitalize a historic park. We were asked to contribute to this effort with a structure for parents to sit and watch their children on the new playground. The final design included a cast in place concrete structure with an integrated bench and shading device. The beauty of this particular project is in the details of construction and the processes of assembly. The formwork for the concrete base had to be custom built in order to achieve the sweeping appearance shown above. The columns interlock with the concrete base using a series of details that take advantage of each material’s unique properties. Overhead, the structure is clad in galvanized louvers that are each cut to a custom length. The process of construction for the Corinne Jones Playground was completed in just over a month, and is one of the most intensive learning experiences about materials and assemblies that I have had.

Team members: Barrett Armstrong, Nick Barrett, Richard Chalupa​, Sara Cheikelard​, Julie Knorr Joseph Martin Tyler McLemore​, Keith Richey​, Alex Wetzel​, Lindsay Yarborough


Design Build Process

36


37


Photo by Joseph Martin

38


Photo by Nick Barrett

39


Sonny Jonquil

AIA Architecture Month 2010

The Alteration 2010 project was a kinetic sculpture design and built for the AIA Architecture Month in Greenville, SC. The project was design to be itself and nothing else; a kinetic sculpture that interacted with its environment in order to create an architectural dialoque. It is site specific to the brick fountain behind the Peace Center, and uses its existing characteristics in order to enhance the site on an experiential level. The kinetic sculpture brings attention not only to the site, but to the importance of architecture and its influence on its environment. In an effort to interact with the site’s surroundings, a decision was made in the design process to utilize the flowing water as a power source for the sculpture’s movement. This motion is captured with the use of a wheel that drives a rotating arm above. This arm creates tension on the vertical cables and transfers the rotational force, into several vertical forces that pull down on the wings. The wings are offset to allow gravity to pull their center point back up when not held in tension. The result is a constantly moving representation of how forces can be manipulated in a structure. The structure was made of steel and provides the frame from which the sculpture was suspended. It was designed and built site specific to the fountain and was prefabricated off-site to improve efficiency. The steel structure was the only non-moving piece of the scuplture, yet its subtle details provided the stability for all of the kinetic forces. Designed to utilize the properties of steel, the sculpture focuses on these properties and their role in the development of architecture.

Team members: Will Allport, Nick Barrett, Matt Brown, Jason Butz, Matt Clever, Frank D’Andrea, Jacob Edmond, Chris Newell, David Odom, Erika Rasmussen, Brandon Rogers


Photo by Jason Butz

42


43


Dalen’s Ducking

Digital Manufacturing Processes

The Comprehensive Studio is the final studio course in the Master of Architecture program at Clemson University; it is what determines whether or not a student graduates with his or her accredited degree. During the spring of 2013, MArch students were challenged with the task of designing Graduate Student Housing for Clemson University using Cross-Laminated Timber as a primary structural material. This was a collaborative project in which MArch students worked in pairs. For this project, I had the privilege of working with fellow MArch student Joseph Martin. We immediately drew an incredible amount of excitement and inspiration for our proposal from our site. Clemson University is in a unique region that offers students a close proximity to outdoor recreation matched by few universities. When doing our research, we realized that a common desire among students is to have more access to these resources. We made our primary design goal using the position of our site in between the main campus and the Experimental Forest, to provide and encourage healthy and active lifestyles among the Clemson student body. An Ecotone (ec · o · tone) is an ecological term that defines the transitional zone between two distinct biomes, or biological communities. This transitional space became the focus of our process.

Team members: Josh Atria, Nick Barrett, Ryan Woods, Vanessa Ewais


cones by weight

25% of the weight is in the cardboard cones

thread

cardboard

dimensional variability

75% of the weight is used for production of textiles

1/2” 1-3/4”

? 2-3/4”

?

2-5/8”

‘Up’ Cycled Material Research

46

Dalen’s Duckling Digital Manufacturing Processes

?


cutting the cone

the slice

cutting the cone

Material + Light Studies

Team members: Josh Atria, Nick Barrett, Ryan Woods, Vanessa Ewais

47


Fabrication Process

48


Final Assembly

49


CLT Bench

Comprehensive Studio

As part of our Comprehensive Studio project, my partner Joseph Martin and I decided to fabricate a bench. This bench served as a demonstration of our investigation of Crosslaminated Timber, as well as a platform on which to present our models and drawings during our final review. The design for the bench was intended to be simple, with details that were sophisticated and architectural in the way they joined the chosen materials. The bench surface itself was made from salvaged redwood, once used as the hand railing of Lee Hall, the newly renovated architecture building. The legs of the bench are made of laminated southern pine, a local material that would likely be used in the construction of an actual CLT project in this part of the country. The entire assembly relies on a welded steel frame that is embedded within the wooden portions of the bench. This frame strengthens the assembly and provides a strong and stable surface across a 10’ span. This bench is yet another representation of my interest in materials, and a desire to test and investigate these materials through the process of making. My passion for architecture is represented in this project. It is my desire to pursue a design process that carries the same level of craft, combined with a never-ceasing curiosity of assembly.

Team members: Nick Barrett, Joseph Martin


Sketches

52


Process Photos

53


Nick Barrett Contact Info

3841 N Greenview Ave Apt 3W Chicago, IL 60657 803.960.2389 nickreadsmail@gmail.com

References Contact Info

John D. Jacques Professor Emeritus of Architecture Director, Clemson Advancement Foundation Clemson University 864.656.3904 jjohn@clemson.edu Daniel N. Harding Associate Professor of Architecture Director, Community Research+Design Center Clemson University 406.223.2179 hardin4@clemson.edu Jacob A. Lindsey Principal, Fabric Urban Design Lecturer, Clemson Architecture Center, Charleston Clemson University 843.410.9014 jacob@fabricurbandesign.com Kate Schwennsen, FAIA Professor of Architecture Chair of School of Architecture Clemson University 864.656.3895 kschwen@clemson.edu


Nick Barrett  

Architecture + Design Portfolio

Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you