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PROFILES IN EXCELLENCE: 2013-14 College Swimming & Diving Honors


Princeton University team shirt

UNCW team shirt, photo; Matt Byrd

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photo; Mitch Dalton


Bryce Bohman senior stand out, WVU Communications A rare double tie occurred at the Johns Hopkins vs. Mary Washington swim meet. Hopkins tied for first in lanes 2 and 4 while!UMW tied for third in lanes 3 and 5. photo: Stephanie Hallock, UMW ’16

Previous page/upper left; A rare double tie occurred at the Johns Hopkins vs. Mary Washington swim meet. Hopkins tied for first in lanes 2 and 4 while!UMW tied for third in lanes 3 and 5. photo: Stephanie Hallock, UMW ’16

Freshman Dallas Tarkenton, UMW, photo: Stephanie Hallock

*Boise State team in the Boise River. photo: John Kelly

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Welcome to the 2013-14 College Swimming & Diving Honors. This publication exists to showcase the great stories of the most recent collegiate swimming and diving season. Given the effort required to be successful in our sport, it is important that this body of work accurately represent those exceptional efforts by the athletes as well as all involved. Like any previous season, there is much to cover as it was an eventful year in our sport.

complete documentation possible. Please consider this your invitation to contribute to the next publication in 2014-15. We welcome your content and will be happy to include you in the process. In closing, feel very free to provide your comments, ideas, and suggestions. Go Swimming & Diving! Bill Roberts, editor Etiam molestie mauris ligula eget This publication, now in its fifth Table of Contents laoreet, vehicula eleifend. Repellat orci year continues to evolve. Participation eget erat et, sem cum, ultricies increased significantly in 2014 as we Introduction!! ! ! 4-5 sollicitudin amet eleifend dolor nullam more than doubled the number of 2013-14 Honorees ! Malesuada ! 6-50 Front Cover; MacLean wins the 500, photo: erat, malesuada est leo ac. people who voted in the online Celebrity picks! Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures.com eleifend, tortor molestie,! a fusce a vel 51-52 survey. Moving forward, a profiles! 53 Above; Senior Day at Tennessee. et. Ac dolor ac adipiscing amet! constant objective will be to further Author photo:Matthew S. DeMaria/Tennessee Athletics bibendum. Varius natoque ! turpis est. In 54 increase participation and expand Noteworthy!! vitae vel lorem ipsum massa lacus coverage to make this the most Center; Retiring UNCW coach takes one final to learn more, visit 3 plunge at the 2014 CAA Championships. www.collegeswimmingawards.com photo: courtesy Matt Byrd


Introduction: “It keeps getting faster” Some brief thoughts & observations on the most recent season. One of the remarkable occurrences in our sport takes place in the form of a swim-off any championship meet. Much is revealed about the athletes and programs when they are asked to do something again...and against another opponent. At the 2014 NCAA Swimming & Diving championships in Austin, Michigan’s Richard Funk & Dartmouth’s Nejc Zupan tied for eighth in the 100 breaststroke. After taking the swimoff with a :51.76 (and nearly a .7 drop), what was remarkable was the effect it had on the Wolverine Junior as he went on to finish third at night in the finals. More fireworks were provided in Austin in the very next event where three tied for 8th as well in the 100 backstroke. This reminded me of another spectacular swim-off that took place 10 years ago at the Division I men’s NCAA Championships between Auburn’s Fred Bosquet & California’s Rolandas Gimbutas. Following a tie for eighth place in the 50 free in the morning heats, Bosquet gave the eventual team champions plenty to celebrate in winning the swim off and then eventually the subsequent final from the outside lane. With the meet in short course meters, his :21.10 was part of three consecutive world records set that night. (team mate George Bovell-200IM & Texas in the 400 Medley Relay.) Well deserved and very cool! When you think of Coach George Kennedy, one of the many superlatives that comes to mind is quality. He consistently is near the top of the Division III hierarchy

demonstrating that tradition never graduates at North Charles Street in Baltimore. Coach Kennedy was recently selected as one of the top 50 leaders in the world by Forbes magazine. One of the many reasons was for his work with freshman standout & distance swimmer Andrew Greenhalgh which is featured on page 19. Don’t Mess With This Longhorn! In preparing this publication each year, sometimes you come across a story that may not exactly fit a category yet is too good not too mention. Junior swimmer from the University of Texas Kip Darmody (pictured below) battled mono for much of the season. Out of competition for most of the first semester, ranked 69th in the 100 nationally and out of the top 100 as late as Feburary 15th, it would be hard imagine returning to his 2013 All American form. However, this is another example of why our sport rocks as the Longhorn standout made the most of his altered season. In addition to finaling in both backstroke events with new career best times by a significant amount, Kip swam on all five of the Longhorn relays at NCAA with the lowest finish being 5th in the 800 Free Relay. Leading off the 200 Medley

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relay on Friday night with a meet best :20.88 was pretty awesome. Knowing what he went through in season to get there....makes it pretty special! “Victory! Swimmers defeat......” No doubt some incredible things take place in season within the dual meets. The 2013 14 dual meet season was not without some historic meets. Included in this group was the William & Mary men who defeated CAA titan UNCW for the first time ever during the first weekend of November. Virginia Tech over Virginia for the first time in 32 years and Rice over SMU for first time ever! “Victory! Swimmers defeat SMU in dual meet 151-129” was the headline for that historic meet for the Rice Owls back in November. A pair of University of Nevada swimmers, returning writer Erin Fuss and newcomer Michelle Forman, write about the featured dual meets. As difficult as it is to pinpoint just a few meets to cover, a very big meet that takes place in California has become a regular in this publication too. Rarities Towards the end of this past season, I witnessed something that caught my attention yet did not react quickly enough to get a photo of the occurrence. At a championship meet, (cannot remember the exact event), the order of finish in the heat was the in. Though I remember saying to myself, I am sure this occurs, I cannot recall a race where I noticed this pattern. continued on next page


Introduction continued Another oddity occurred this season in a dual meet with Johns Hopkins University and the University of Mary Washington where two ties in the same event occurred. What makes this even more unique was the fact that in each case, it was the team mates that tied. Fortunately this photo was not missed, submitted by student-athlete Stephanie Hallcok ’16 of Mary Washington and can be seen on the inside cover of this publication. Swimming & Diving in the media. Reading a recent edition of Sports Illustrated, I could not help notice ( and be proud) to see not one but two of the weekly six Sports Illustrated’s Faces in the Crowd be taken up by swimmers including a well-deserved spotlight on Johns Hopkins junior standout Anastasia Boganovski and her brilliant performance at the 2014 DIII NCAA meet. Several swimmers including Georgia-bound Gunnar Bentz, Cal freshman Celina Li, Auburn-bound Jacob Molacek, and Georgia’s Chase Kalisz have made their way into Faces in the Crowd recently as it is always great to see members of our sport earn and receive notoriety in the mainstream media. Returning writer Damion Dennis covers Chase’s amazing swim in the 400 IM later in this publication. Significant Numbers. Cal Ripken Jr. made the number 2131 a household number in the sporting world back in the fall of 1995. What are swimming & diving’s most important and/or recognizable numbers? In the case of swimming & diving, arguably as numbers-rich a sport around, our most common

number is time. With many records for many events, it is hard to distinguish the most outstanding of numbers as say baseball’s home run record for a single season. When Hank Aaron hit #715 forty years ago, that was a significant and memorable number just as his 755 has become since. This year, we will begin to attempt to build an collection of significant numbers beginning with NCAA Championships which can be found in the back of the print publication. More on numbers.... The process to get to this publication is through an online nomination and vote. We want to make clear that the goal is to document the great events of the most recent swimming & diving season. By featuring a single athlete or program per category, the impression that there is a winner for these categories is understandable. There is simply to much subjectivity in trying make the declaration that one nominee is superior to another. This is especially true in the case of women’s most exciting and best upset. Voting remained extremely close from beginning to end. Each meet had their moments that would qualify it as one of the best meets to occur this past season. Though we elect to write about just one in this publication, we preface the articles with the fact that it more about recognition. Furthermore, in most cases, the featured athlete/ program also received the most votes. In others, the top vote getter is different from the one featured. This does happen and can be attributed to

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a matter of opinion or the fact that there are close races which experience multiple changes in most votes received as we get closer to beginning to write. Anyway, we fully recognize that this is still an imperfect process and will continue to fine tune how we get to this point now. This story never gets old.... Am going to plagiarize a little from last year’s publication for the next mention. Awesome job goes out to senior Cassie Sorna (Towson) in getting to her first NCAA meet this year. Similarly and on the men’s side, North Carolina’s Alex Gianino made his first and only NCAA meet last March. Neither took in enough votes to appear in the honorable mention page. However, each of their progressions are too impressive not to mention. Others names with similar rates of improvement include Morgan Hartigan (Wyoming) & Samantha Zuch (Utah.) Job well done to say the very least! A request for support A small fundraising campaign is now underway to financially support this project. In addition to raising funds to pay for the printing of the publication, I personally would like to offer a small stipend for our guest writers who to date have contributed their time at no cost. Furthermore, I envision being able to present each honoree with an actual award in addition to the recognition they are receiving. As a result and now five years into this venture, please consider making a small donation via Indiegogo at your convenience. Thank you. Bill Roberts


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Walk On Athlete ! Sometimes you just know. Kelsey Helin, our recipient for the 2013-14 female walk-on athlete of the year, always knew that she was going to do a sport in college. Once she chose swimming as the sport for her, Kelsey began talking to college coaches, including Siena College head coach Paul Kueterman. Then, according to Kelsey, things started to come together: “I was still deciding between a few options, but one morning I woke up and just said I was going to Siena and that was a decision I will never regret.” by Lisa Boyce"

And for Coach Kueterman, that feeling is mutual. Despite having walked onto the team, Kelsey has risen up through the ranks to become one of Siena’s top breaststrokers, scoring points when it matters the most at MAAC Championships. Kelsey’s success story is a result of pure hard work. According to Coach Kueterman, the biggest thing to contribute to Kelsey’s continued success if her incredible work ethic: “She puts in the extra effort that is needed to be successful. She is self-motivated and she has that drive to be the best swimmer possible.” However, Kelsey’s impact on the team extends beyond her continually improving times, “The biggest thing that Kelsey brings to the team is her leadership. She rises up to any challenge… in practice or at meets she is always encouraging her teammates.” Kelsey contributes to the team in major ways in addition to her performance in the pool, acting as an example for the entire team as she was able to work her way up from walkon status to team scorer at conference. “It shows the team that anyone can make a difference whether you are on scholarship or not,” says Kueterman. “I believe it shows that when someone is given a chance and they work hard, then good things will come.

Conference finalist in two events

100 BR: 1:15.97 in HS, now at 1:06.57

First Four time Year DIII swimmer NCAAat qualifier Princetonin 2014

Shannon Coryell FR Mary Washington

Kelsey Helin, JR Siena College

Katherine Kirkwood SR

swimmer 6

Princeton


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Walk On Athlete: Kelsey Helin For Kelsey herself, she knows how hard work translates into results: “When trying to improve in a sport it is all about hard work, and my goal at practice every day is to push myself further and further. Once I started to drop time, I wanted to keep going and pushing myself to drop even more time whether it is two seconds or .02 seconds.” Despite her incredible time drops and key contributions in terms of times and points, Kelsey remains a true team player. When asked about her goals for next year, Kelsey said, “For my senior year, my main goal is for my team to improve in our placement at our championship meet…I want to be a team player and help with the motivation of my teammates as well.” Her first focus is on her team. Though she does have her sights set on individual improvements and even team records. Her large goals are not unfounded, as Coach Kueterman sees continued success in store for his star walk-on, saying with confidence, “I expect Kelsey to have an exceptional senior year. She will be motivated. I know she will do everything that she can to prepare for a successful senior year. And despite her major improvements in the pool, for Kelsey, this is all still about the journey and the friends along the way: “The best part of being on the team is having a second family. Honestly my teammates are my best friends. The ability to be with your best friends through difficult practices and being able to celebrate a big win together is the best part of being on the Siena Swimming and Diving team.”

Now a US Open qualifier in 200 BR

Jessica Mosbaugh SO

Pepperdine

Made conference team & posted best times in first season

Kathleen Mulligan FR Princeton Page 7

200 backstroke Conference champion in 2014.

Catherine Perrin SR Mary Washington


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Walk On Athletes by Woody Woodard

Judes and Edna Coutinho looked down upon the pool of their apartment building to see their 2 year-old son toddling around the deck, while his babysitter paid little attention. At that moment the decision the Coutinho’s decided that Pedro needed to learn how to swim. 15 years later, Pedro left his home in Brazil to continue his swimming education in America. Early on it wasn’t clear that Pedro would climb through the swimming ranks to become an impact member of the nationallyranked Louisville Cardinals and an NCAA qualifier, but Pedro has made it with a combination of what University of Louisville Head Coach, Arthur Albiero calls “intelligent swimming and a desire to ‘think big’.” A fledgling swimmer in Brazil who rarely worked out more than 5 sessions per week, Pedro continued to elevate his game; but his move to Davie, Florida in 2011 to swim with Coach

Alex Pussieldi and the Nadadores provided him with a new perspective on life. Pedro saw that he might have an opportunity to pursue his dreams of being a civil engineer AND a competitive swimmer. Pussieldi picked up the phone and called Albiero. Albiero admitted that after meeting with Pedro, he saw raw talent and admired Pedro’s personality and drive. Pedro, who was not highly recruited, found himself with a spot and an opportunity with one of the best programs in the nation. Though he had some skills, Albiero tempered expectations. “Honestly, I knew he was coming from a limited swimming background and I expected him to take some time to adjust to our program.” Obviously, Louisville was different world compared to Brazil and Florida. “It was really cold,” Pedro admits, “but God does not give you a challenge that you can’t

100 Fly: 48.32 to :46.58 to become 29th & final NCAA invitee to Austin.

CCSA Most Outstanding Diver of the Meet

Pedro Coutinho, SO, Louisville

Ryan Green, JR UMBC Page 8

handle.” And handle it he did. He strolled around his campus getting a feel for his new home and made connections with his teammates almost immediately. He eagerly soaked up all that he could in practice, from the knowledge of his coaches, to the expectations and support of his teammates. Pedro claims that watching his teammates, especially NCAA Champion and fellow countryman, Joao de Lucca helped in his education. He studied their technique and approach and adopted what he could to fit his own style. In Pedro’s first year, he competed admirably scoring in several dual meets, but found himself on the exhibition (nonscoring) team at the Big East Championships. Undeterred, Pedro put up life-time bests in his signature events, the 50 and 100 Free, as well as the 100 Fly. His 48.32 in his 100 Fly was an eyeopener. continued on next page

40 second drop in the mile to place 4th at conference meet

Colton Laramore, FR Henderson State


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Walk On Athlete: Pedro Coutinho continued from previous page

After a successful freshmen campaign, most swimmers would have ramped up their training, however, Pedro confesses to taking some time off. Despite his lack of conditioning, Pedro recommitted himself and quickly found himself improving upon his previous results. He dedicated himself to the technical aspects of his turns, underwaters and kickouts. As important as though tools are, he credits his new found approach to the mental side of his sport. “I believe my mind is my most powerful weapon.” He used that weapon well, as evidenced by his 1st place wins at the American Athletic Conference Championships this season in the 200 Medley Relay and 100 Fly. His season best in the 100 Fly of 46.58 earned him the final invitation slot for the NCAA Championships.

Four top eight finishes at conference meet

Mike Oliver, FR West Chester University

Pedro had transformed from young upstart who had problems finishing workouts, to a conference champion with an NCAA appearance on his resume. Pedro says the drive to succeed burns even brighter now. He wants a return trip to the Championships to improve upon his 28th place finish in the 100 Fly and he hopes to swim for the Brazilian National Team in the near future. What lies ahead for Pedro in his remaining years at Louisville and beyond is uncertain, but for Pedro there are no expectations too high. Pedro waxes philosophic on the next stage quoting an old Brazilian coaches saying, “The man who broke that record had two arms and two legs. You also have two arms and two legs, therefore you can do it, as well.” That may well be true. Still, Pedro’s brain remains his best weapon in his quest to be the best.

Scored at Big XII meet as freshman.

Jake Powell, FR Texas Christian Page 9

From Georgia Tech Swim Club to NCAAs in 2014.

Taylor Wilson, FR Georgia Tech


Type to enter text

Walk On Athlete Ryan Green UMBC

Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

“Because he has no diving experience he had greater will and desire to learn in order to reach the rest of the diver’s skills and level. He was never bored with the basics which are essential part of a diver’s learning curve Ryan took his time to polish these skills and to perfect them.” UMBC Diving Coach Peter Trifonov

Ryan Green arrived at the campus of UMBC in Catonsville, Maryland as an accomplished athlete yet with no competitive diving experience. His athletic biography cited Ryan’s pre-collegiate highlights as such; “three time Junior Olympic national champion in acrobatic gymnastics.” Since the fall of 2011, he has given the UMBC Athletic Communication department plenty of accomplishments to add to his bio which are listed below. "Training is essential in any sport, hobby, or anything that requires skill. There's a banner in the RAC somewhere that says "the better conditioned team usually wins..." or something like that. This year I really took that to heart and did my best to balance the pyramid of building the strength, flexibility, and speed that a diver needs to be competitive. There are three parts; nutrition, stretching/getting enough rest, and lifting/diving. After going into more detail of each component, Ryan concluded with the following, “by balancing these three aspects of training and following to my coach's strict regime and advice, I've been able to make great improvements that are reflected by my performance at recent diving meets. I'm lucky to have found the secret to success with one whole year left to go!" Junior year: CCSA Championships; placed 2nd as part of a 1-2-3 sweep in 1m (301.70.) Was CCSA champion on 3m (318.85.) At NCAA Zone competition, placed 42nd on 3m (213.10.) Advanced to finals on 1m and finished 18th. 2014 CCSA Most Outstanding Male Diver of the Meet & in April, was recognized as the CCSA Diver of the Year. Sophomore year: Qualified for NCAA Zone Diving meet. Placed 32nd in 1m competition (235.80.) Placed 34th in 3m competition (233.45.) America East; placed 5th in 1m (233.45), placed 5th in 3m (278.50.) *Freshman year: placed 10th in 1 meter diving at the 2012 America East Championships (189.05), & placed 7th in 3m with a finals Page 10 score of 210.70. Named to Conference Honor Roll. High scores for season; 1m (234.60) & 3m (254.32.)


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Break Out Athlete

D3 50 Free Champion in 2014

First ever All American honor in 100 Fly in ’14

Ana Bogdanovski, JR Johns Hopkins

Lisa Boyce, SR Princeton University

ACC A finalist in first year of collegiate competition

Taylor Ellis, FR Virginia Tech

“And Your Top Qualifiers”

Last Swim, Best Swim; significant time drops at 2014

Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these athletes made the top eight for their overall outstanding achievements in 2013-14.

Felicia Lee, SR Stanford University

New NCAA record holder in 500 Free

Brittany Maclean, SO University of Georgia

Moves from the consol to the finals heat in two events at NCAAs from 2013 to 2014

Wins three individual races at night (1st in 50, 9th in 100 Back & 100 Free) at NCAAs

Emily McClennan, SR UW-Milwaukee

Olivia Smoliga, FR University of Georgia Page 11

D1 200 Back champion

Brooklynn Snodgrass, SO

Indiana University


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Break Out Athlete

Emma Reaney by Ross Lannan Does the name Emma Reaney ring a bell? If not, you probably haven’t been paying attention to American swimming in the past several months. Emma is the current 200 SCY breaststroke American record holder and has been chosen as the “Break Out Athlete of the Year”. She has been a force to be reckoned with in the breaststroke events for the past 24 months. Even without the American record, she has been amongst the top 20 all time in the 200 and 100 breaststroke events dating back to 2012. If you are the type of swimmer, coach, fan, or average spectator who may scoff at a SCY American record, lets have a look at the facts. Emma has been in the company of athletes

Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures

such as Breeja Larson, Caitlin Leverenz, and Rebecca Soni for the past 2 years. Oh, and remember Megan Jendrick? She’s on that list too. Those names have earned 4 olympic gold metals, 3 silver metals and 1 bronze. Roughly 12 world records have been set along with 30+ American records. I’d say Emma is on the right path to big things in the near future. I had the pleasure of speaking with the Notre Dame Women’s Head coach recently about Emma and her training. Was going after the 200 breaststroke American record a goal that Emma had in mind? “Certainly not. We didn’t approach the season to get an American Page 12

Record. I would not approach it that way with any of my athletes. Emma did say that she wanted to be an NCAA champion, however. Hitting your goal is the results of making necessary changes. She had elite level goals.” So it seems with elite level goals comes elite level training. Not to take anything away from Emma and her training in the past, but something changed. continued on page 18


BreaksProfiles

in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Athlete

D3 National champ in 400IM & 200 Fly. Breaks 400 IM D3 record in 2014

Recovered from mono to have a career best NCAA meet.

Three top eight swims at 2014 NCAA meet.

Alex Anderson, JR Mary Washington

Kip Darmody, JR University of Texas

Mitch D'Arrigo, FR University of Florida

“And Your Top Qualifiers�

Two top five swims & member of two firstplace relays at NCAAs.

Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these athletes made the top eight for their overall outstanding achievements in 2013-14.

Chuck Katis, JR California Berkeley

Incredible two year progression en route to becoming a conference

Billy Russell SO William & Mary

200 Fly: 30th in 2013 to 4th in 2014 at NCAAs.

Christian McCurdy, SO North Carolina State

Best times in three major events including breaking :42.00 in 100

Nick Soedel, JR University of Utah Page 13

2013: :19.91 / :44.06 / 1:35.98, 2014: :19.11 / : 42.80 / 1:34.14

David Williams, JR North Carolina State


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in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Athlete Matt Josa

Queens University Marketing & Promotion by Ross Lannan 100 free: 42.75, 200 free: 1:34.21 (DII National Record), 100 back: 46.60, 200 back: 1:40.74, 100 fly: 45.45, 200 IM, 1:43.96. Those are just some of the personal highlights this past season from, not only an incoming freshman, but from DII National Champion Matthew Josa who represents Queens University of Charlotte and SwimMAC Carolina. Matthew also hales from Charlotte NC.

Matthew has been chosen as the “Breakout Athlete of the Year”, and he is well deserving of that title. After doing some research on his incredible freshman campaign, I was curious as to why he decided to go the DII route. It’s not like he wasn’t fast enough in High School and I’m sure that he was on the BCS radar, but after speaking with the Queens University of Charlotte Head Coach, who also happens to be the Director of High Performance at SwimMAC Carolina under Head Coach David Marsh, Coach Jeff Dugdale gave me some more insight into Matthew and his college decision. Matthews DII National Championship swims would have put him in the A final in several events at DI National Championships. Being the Page 14

Director of High Performance for SwimMAC Team Elite, you probably had your eye on Matthew for quite some time. Was he always leaning toward a DII education? “What needs to be applauded is that Matthew made the choice that was right for him. Sometimes as recruiters we try to put square pegs into round holes. What we are most proud of is that we can clearly identify that this was the right move for him. He wasn’t leaning one-way or the other. Matthew was home schooled so he thrives in a smaller environment. One of the things I told him during the college search process was how could he minimize the change in his successful training so far.” continued on page 17


BreaksProfiles

in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Break Out Diver: Mauricio Robles University of Tennessee

Donald Page

Mauricio Robles, a junior at Tennessee, suffered a season ending injury in 2012-13. He and his coach Dave Parrington shared some insight on what it took to not only return but improve on previous form. At NCAA's, you were able to improve your scores from prelims to finals in both 1m & 3m highlighted by an 18 point increase to score a 406.65 for third place. What experiences during your recovery from injury helped contribute to your success in 2014? ! “One of the things that contributed to my success in 2014 was perseverance. After my injury I had to do a lot of hard work to get back in shape and then start trying new dives. It took time but I stayed focus and cheerful. Of course my teammates and my couch helped me to keep myself motivated. So when it came down to the NCAA championship I knew I had done my best all season long and that the only thing I could do was enjoy the meet, and so I did. When we got that third place on the 3m springboard was very rewarding, and it made realize that all the hard work paid off. Now, I'm eager to start a new season and give my all for Page 15 Tennessee every day.�


BreaksProfiles

in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Break Out Diver:Coach Dave Parrington First, talk a little about the steps you and Mauricio took over the past year to get him back to competitive form? The process was very slow, because not only did Mauricio need to recover physically from his injury but there was a huge mental component to overcome due to the nature of the injury. Very early on it was difficult, especially for Mauricio because we were in the thick of our season, not too far out from SEC's and on the road quite a bit, so he was left home to his own thoughts when we traveled, during which time he seriously considered hanging it up. At some point though, he made up his mind he was going to return better and stronger than ever, and set upon the journey to do so, which by the way ! we are still traveling along. Once he was cleared to resume various parts of his training, we started VERY slowly in the water and on the boards, initially doing simple skills and basics such as feet first entries, followed by head first line ups and dives off the 1/2 meter platform and slowly progressing upwards. During this phase he had been cleared to commence with strength training, which has turned out to be an enormous part of his motivation and improvement. Prior to the injury, being that we were in midseason, we were on a two/week weight training program, but fairly quickly he built up to four times a week, with the fourth lift of the week being a brutal Saturday morning squat workout. He maintained this program throughout the summer until school

commenced again in August, at which time we dropped off to 3/week. From the diving standpoint, particularly with the dive on which he incurred the injury, we went right back to basics and did countless inward dives off the 1/2 meter and then the same off the 3 meter platform, working on the start of the dive, the direction of the throw with his hands and the drive through his legs and hips. After a while he eventually progressed to inward 1&1/2's off the 3 meter platform, which he did for a couple of months. The next big step for this particular dive was to do the actual one he injured himself on, the 405c off 5 meter, which for platform divers of his caliber is a relatively routine lead up, as we refer to it, but in his case this was no longer true, and I remember around mid-summer him doing it during training one day and it was huge mental step in the right direction. From there we worked that dive for a couple more months before taking it up to 10 meter which again was another breakthrough. In the

Page 16 photo: Amanda Pruitt

meantime he was continuing to work on his strength and conditioning which enabled him to learn new and more difficult dives as a result. By the time our first meet came in late September 2013, Mauricio had not competed since mid-November of 2012 and was biting at the bit. We started our 2013-14 season using almost a completely revamped and very big list on 1 meter which proved to be very successful for him all year. A big hurdle (so to speak) was his first platform contest in November and from there we continued to build on everything he had been working on since the injury with an eye towards championship season. As is always the case with our program the goal is always on doing whatever it takes to do our best at the Championship meets, but In Mauricio's case because he hadn't competed in quite a while, it was also getting the competitive consistency and patience back, which didn't really start to show itself until SEC's. continued on next page


BreaksProfiles

in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Break Out Diver:Coach Dave Parrington continued from previous page He was able to not only return, but improved considerably. #Talk a little about Mauricio as a person and athlete, how he was able to breakthrough to have the meet he had in Austin. The improvement was really due to his commitment to excellence and determination to come back better than ever, and his dedication and desire, every single day. As a person Mauricio is one of those guys who is very well liked by his peers and team mates, is very humble and polite, works his tail off both in and out of the pool and makes a point to do all the little things needed to improve by paying attention to rest, nutrition, and the like. He is considered an inspiration by his team mates and coaches and leads more by example

but sometimes has gems of leadership wisdom which he expresses to team members. As for being a team mate he is all in! He is incredibly appreciative of the opportunity he has been given to be a student athlete at the University of Tennessee for which he thanks me and shakes my hand after every practice, good or bad, which as a coach I truly appreciate. After watching him all year and knowing what he had done to get ready for NCAA's I was not at all surprised by his results. He is generally very calm in competition which in an NCAA preliminary is usually very helpful, but using a big list on one meter in a long drawn out prelim can be tough and in fact may have prevented him making the big final which he barely missed. Being a

sophomore and having that experience under his belt will be beneficial these next two years. He did an exceptional job staying calm and consistent in the 3 meter finals which helped enormously with his 3rd place finish. On platform I really felt he was a little more inconsistent than I anticipated and probably still needs a little more time working on getting back his full confidence back up there after his injury, especially under the pressure of an NCAA meet, but he made consolations which will help realize that goal down the road.

Josa continued from page 17 The right choice for one athlete is not going to be the right choice for another. Matthew has had a lot of success training with SwimMAC and is very familiar with Coach Dugdale and his methods. He is also shooting for a spot on the Olympic Team in 2016. So with so much success why would anyone want to change the format, especially as we get closer to the halfway point to Trials? It seems that Queens University of Charlotte was the perfect fit for Matthew and having been home schooled, he could flourish on a smaller team all without skipping a beat in his training.

before college, but to see him go from a 1:46 before his 1st collegiate season down to a 1:40.74 was incredible. “The weight room definitely helped, but he means business at practice and he tries to pay attention to the details. It’s a learning process and he’s learning about balancing his academic life and his athletic life. College is very important in keeping him grounded. Everything we do is to help him make the 2016 team. He wasn’t even tapered for NCAA Nationals, just shaved.” The safest way to earn a spot on the Olympic team is being as versatile as possible and it’s not bad to be able to train with Olympic Gold medal Champions like Lochte, and Jones. He’s not only training with them, but he sees the work they are putting in Page 17 to be at the and he sees what it takes most elite level in the swimming world.

Being so versatile, do you see him swimming any different events at future DII National Championships? “Yes absolutely. We can do a lot of different things. He may experience some distance and some other events. We balance his strengths. We look at how he’s training with the athletes he wants to be like.” It seems that Coach Dugdale and Matthew Josa have a great relationship that has led to a tremendous amount of fast swimming and I am sure there is many more great things to come from them in the coming months and years. Matthew has his sights on his long term goals which is Rio and beyond, and he chose a college that would keep him on that path and give him the best chance of making the 2016 Olympic team.

What in your opinion helped Matthew get so much faster? Was it the weight room, the water workouts, different team atmosphere? For example, he was an excellent backstroke swimmer

The day after returning from NCAA's Mauricio was in my office telling me he was ready to start for next season with his goals and a plan, which is now well under way again.


BreaksProfiles

in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Break Out Athlete:Emma Reaney Reaney continued from page 12 What was her training like this past season? Did anything change from previous seasons? “We certainly made changes from last year to this year. A specific change we made in the fall was doing a breaststroke set on Mondays after a day out the water. She has a better stroke with a day of rest. We also tried to avoid slow breaststroke. We did a lot of pace. After the 2012-2013 season, another big change came in the weight room. Emma was lifting 4 days a week with single water workouts. She killed it in the weight room. She got stronger, a lot stronger and we dialed in on the details like pullouts and stroke counts.” I have been told and have heard from several coaches over the years, including my coaching hero Dick Shoulberg, “doing the same thing will yield the same results. You have to make the necessary changes to keep progressing.” Any half decent coach can tell you that but putting it into action is what counts and that is something that Coach Barnes and Emma did months before the start of the 2013-2014 season. But that is merely one piece of the puzzle. What kind of athlete is Emma like in practice?

“She has always been a very hard worker. She’s consistent. I wouldn’t say that she was significantly better last year then this year in the water, however, her belief changed. Emma asked me if I (Coach Barnes) really believed that she had National Team potential, and I said absolutely. Her biggest strength is her belief system. She wins on the deck before she enters the water with that belief system and her work ethic, in and out of the water. She has her act together.” Two more pieces of the puzzle come to light, consistency and the belief system. Emma really seems to have a recipe for elite level success. Of course this is not anything new but it is always quite fascinating when it all comes together. I also had the pleasure of asking Emma a few questions that shed some more light on her incredibly successful season. Now that you are the 200 breaststroke American record holder and in the company of Larson, Leverenz, and Soni, do you feel any pressure internally or externally to perform better then last year? “I feel a little bit of pressure internally. I am somewhat of a perfectionist and I’m very competitive. So now that it’s mine it will be hard for

Page 18

me to let it go! I’ve never been one to listen to external pressure and my parents and teammates are so supportive no matter what, I’ve never really had to worry about it. It’s still taking some time for me to realize that I’m up there on that list of great athletes. Now I have to prove myself long course.” What do you think contributed to your successful 2013-2014 season? “I think I just kept pushing myself in the pool and the weight room. And like Coach Barnes always tells us, I was constantly updating my idea of what “good” was.” I don’t know what is going to make every athlete successful. It is a different combination of goals, methods, and coaching from athlete to athlete and sport to sport. What I do know is this: Emma Reaney has all the right things going for her at just the right time. Great coaching, goals that are related to the path not the end result, the right amount of change, consistency, the belief, and a support system from family and teammates. Time will certainly tell if Emma can continue on with her concoction of success and I am excited and hopeful for the future of breaststroke in America and Emma is certainly deserving of Breakout Athlete of they Year.


TRAINING: Distance preparation of Andrew Greenhalgh Johns Hopkins University “Here is a set progression we did with our best distance "swimmer. He improved from 15:44 to 15:12 in the mile. "It got him to really believe that he could go really fast with great turns, quadrant swimming, and a progression that made sense to him.” Coach George Kennedy, Johns Hopkins University

EVENT DISTANCE

2012-13

Power

2013-14

Power

100 Free

:50.85

594

:49.08

648

200 Free

1:45.22

697

1:41.70

756

500 Free

4:37.47

751

4:28.27

827

1000 Free

9:23.56

823

9:23.40

824

1650 Free

15:43.13

835

15:12.98

903

DURING FALL (4000 SET) 1 X 400-2 X 200-4 X 100-8 X 50-1 X 400-2 X 200-4 X 100-1 X 400-2 X 200-1 X 400 !@ 1:05-1:10/100 (EACH 400 FASTER !(WHITE TO ORANGE) !all other yards focus on quadrant swimming and turns DURING JANUARY (4000 SET) 1 X 400-2 X 200-4 X 100-8 X 50-2 X 200-4 X 100-8 X 50-4 X 100-8 X 50-8 X 50 !(EACH SET OF 8 X 50 FASTER (PINK TO BLUE) (all other yards focus on descending into the 50's, turns and holding quadrant) DURING TAPER (1600 SET) !DESCEND EACH 400 YD TOTAL ! 1 x 400 @ 5:30 held !3:52 !(quadrant, turns) 2 x 200 @ 2:15 (5:30) HELD 1:52'S !(quadrant 100, tempo 100, turns) 4 X 100 @ !1:10 (5:30) HELD 54.5 TO 55.1 (tempo and turns) 8 X 50 @ :35 HELD 26.4 AVERAGE !( easy speed and turns)

19


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Career Improvement

Top Vote Getter for this category

Elizabeth Biesel, SR University of Florida

100 Fly: 57.08 to :51.57

Lisa Boyce, SR Princeton University

Zina Grogg, SR North Carolina State

“And Your Top Qualifiers�

Amazing times drops in all three events

Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these are the top eight members of the class of 2014 for the category of career improvement.

Christen McDonough, SR University of Notre Dame

Emily McClellan, SR UWisconsin-Milwaukee

First time D3 NCAA qualifier in Senior season

Jessica Singer, SR Mary Washington

First time NCAA qualifier in Senior season

100 Free: :51.97 to :48.04

First time NCAA qualifier in Senior season

Traycie Swartz, SR University of Utah

Samantha Zuch, SR University of Utah

Page 20


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Career Improvement

Maya DiRado Maya DiRado entered Stanford University as part of the number one ranked recruiting class in the nation. Individually, she was ranked first in her state and sixth overall according to collegeswimming.com back in July of 2010. If you look at the pre-Stanford career of the Santa Rosa native, you will hopefully agree with those numbers as she was one of the best to graduate that year.

Di Rado

StanfordPhoto.com

When you are that fast at that young of an age, very few know just how difficult it is to continue to improve. Physically, every time drop seems to be exponentially more difficult to achieve. Mentally, the challenge of more work for fractional improvements can be equally as difficult to master. For this now National Team member, DiRado only seemed to improve with the level of challenge. Already off to a terrific start through

HS

Fresh

the midway point of her career, she continued to excel with the arrival of a newer system under Coach Meehan. Not only did she nearly sweep three events at the NCAA meet her senior year, she graduates as the 200 IM school record holder. Not bad when the school’s top ten list is a who’s who in competitive swimming over many generations. The example she provides, to enter fast and get faster, is an invaluable testimony to her character and dedication.

Soph

Junior

Senior

Imp

200 IM

1:56.17

1:54.66

1:53.89

1:53.86

1:52.50

:03.67

400 IM

4:06.48

4:01.02

3:59.88

4:00.58

3:58.12

:08.36

100 Back

:55.63

:53.75

:53.85

:52.34

:51.42

:04.21

200 Fly

2:03.89

1:59.10

200 Back*

1:52.99

:10.90

Page 21

n/l


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Career Improvement 200 Back: 11 second drop to break 1:40.00

Two time NCAA qualifier

Ian Bishop, SR North Carolina State

Three relay All Americans in 2014

Jonathan Boffa, SR North Carolina State

Bryce Bohman, SR West Virginia

“And Your Top Qualifiers�

Four personal best times in 2014

Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these are the top eight members of the class of 2014 for the category of career improvement.

Tony Cox, SR California

200 Free: 1:47.15 to 1:37.78

Will Kimball, SR Johns Hopkins University

50 Free: went :18.98 or better three times in one day at 2014 NCAA meet

Bradley DeBorde, SR University of Florida

1st time NCAA qualifier in 2014.

Sean Murphy, SR US Naval Academy Page 22

Two time NCAA qualifier

Nejc Zupan, SR Dartmouth College


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Career Improvement: Connor Jaeger

Connor Jaeger Connor Jaeger is a household name in the sport of swimming and diving having accomplished so much in his career as an athlete for the University of Michigan. Included yet not limited to in his athletic resume; Big Ten Swimmer of the Year, multiple NCAA All American certificates, multiple NCAA individual titles, & 2012 USA Olympian. Perhaps the one he is most proud of is that of member of the Michigan Swimming & Diving Team. Being part of a team that won a national championship would certainly illicit that level of pride. However in his comments that follow, it is clear that having represented Michigan alongside his teammates was a significant part of the motivation that

fueled his blistering swims and accomplishments. Of note and from the onset of the poll for the College Swimming & Diving Honors, Connor Jaeger, was always in the top spot for votes received for the category of Career Improvement. Additionally and when compared with a very competitive class of 2014, his vote total gave him one of the greatest gaps between he and the other nominees. #Looking back on the improvement over the course of your collegiate career, what characteristics about you have remained the same?# “One thing that has definitely remained the same this whole time is the nervousness and excitement that Page 23

Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures.com

comes with competing. It doesn't really matter what type of success was experienced before, when it comes time to compete I'm just as anxious as I've ever been. I don't think it is a bad thing. I welcome the nerves that come with competing. If I wasn't nervous or anxious than it wouldn't be as fun in the end.! Opposite of this question, is there anything in your athletic preparation that perhaps was vital to your success early on which is no longer emphasized in your preparations?## Along the way I may have focused on new techniques or different events, but really I don't think anything in my athletic preparation has changed that drastically in the past two years. continued on the next page


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Career Improvement You are being recognized for improvement over a career.# Can you comment on your experience at Michigan and some of the motivating people or factors that helped you make this happen? I need to use this time to recognize my success as being a product of the culture that exists here at the University of Michigan. Having a team of guys making sacrifices for each other's success has really inspired me to want to be the best that I possibly could. And thats all it was, four years of wanting to do your best for the team and nothing else. Go Blue!

between his freshmen and sophomore years. !He had done a lot of technique work during his freshman year, and his training was beginning to allow him to hold that technique for more of his practices and races. !During that summer, he started to train some distance with Ryan Feeley and Sean Ryan who really helped him understand what he was capable of doing. !His improvement was truly astonishing. !He went his first Olympic Trials cut ever in the 400 Free that summer in July of 2011 at 3:59 and then made the A final at Nationals with a 3:53. !A year later he made the Olympic Team in the 1500.

The next question was to Associate Head Coach, Dr. Josh White.

Looking at Connor’s progression of improvement, what were some of the pivotal moments or periods of time in Connor’s career that perhaps fueled him to not only improve but be competitive on the highest level. Connor really started to come in to his own during the summer

Jaeger

HS

Fresh

Soph

Junior

Senior

Imp

500 FR

4:27.20

4:22.45

4:13.78

4:10.84

4:12.37

:14.83

400 IM

3:58.57

3:59.35

3:59.16

3:46.09

3:43.49

:15.08

1650 FR

n/l

n/l

14:35.14

14:34.87

14:29.27

n/a

200 FR

1:39.06

1:37.59

1:35.30

1:33.81

1:33.80

:05.26

Page 24


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Break Out Team 10th place at D3 NCAA, previous best; 21st.

3rd at D3 NCAAs, won all five relays, 11 school records

University of Chicago Coach Jason Weber

Johns Hopkins University

Coach George Kennedy

1000 point performance at 2014 CAC

Mary Washington Coach Abby Brethauer

“And Your Top Qualifiers” Also nominated and very

16th at NCAAs, 37th in 2013, highest finish

worthy of national recognition, these programs made the top 8 for their overall outstanding achievements in 2013-14.

North Carolina State Coach Braden Holloway

Tenth to fourth at D2

Queens University Coach Jeff Dugdale

Another C-USA championship while sending athletes to NCAA in ’14.

Utes double their point total at PAC-12 meet to move up a spot

Utes double their point total

Rice University Coach Seth Huston

University of Utah Coach Joe Dykstra Page 25

Top 25 finish at NCAA meet in 2014.

Virginia Tech Coach Ned Skinner


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Female Break Out Team

Stanford

Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures.com

Women’s break out team article will be available in print edition of Profiles in Excellence.

Page 26


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Team When the stakes were the highest, there was no better team in March.

California-Berkeley Coach Dave Durden

10th place at D3 NCAA, previous best; 28th

Second best NCAA finish in program

University of Chicago Coach Jason Weber

University of Georgia Coach Jack Bauerle

“And Your Top Qualifiers” Also nominated and very

2nd in ACC. 13th at NCAAs

Up three spots to National Runner-up in ’14

worthy of national recognition, these programs made the top 8 for their overall outstanding achievements in 2013-14.

North Carolina State Coach Braden Holloway

University of Texas Coach Eddie Reese Pushed reigning champs to final event at CAAs

Record setting season to finish 5th in Pac-12

1st ever ACC Championship

University of Utah Coach Joe Dykstra

Virginia Tech Coach Ned Skinner Page 27

William & Mary Coach Matt Crispino


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Team

alabama For most athletic directors at the helm of a major athletic program in the 21st century, possessing a swimming and diving program that places inside the top 25 would be sufficient given all of the other components and responsibilities that exist in this day and age. In the state of Alabama where one of college athletics’ great

Alabama Athletics

rivalries takes place and where one rival school has not only dominated the match-up but also many other programs since the late 1990s, eventually changes will be made to close that gap. What the Alabama Swimming & Diving program has accomplished in the two years since the arrival of alum and current head coach Denny Pursley has been nothing short of remarkable. One could argue that this is to be expected of a program like Alabama. They have a strong tradition in the sport. They are part of an overall athletic program that is anchored by one of the most successful football programs in college football history. And they are part of one the most influential athletic Page 28

conferences that currently commands a tremendous amount of relevance at the NCAA level. Yet there are plenty of other athletic programs that probably fit or are close to this description being part of a major athletic conference and having a strong tradition of success in our sport. In 2012, the final season for then head coach Eric McIlquam, Alabama placed 25th at the NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships. They did so with two sophomores, Alex Coci and BJ Hornikel, who were making their NCAA debut in Seattle, Washington. Both survived the meet quite well as each were able to successfully navigate the gauntlet of preliminaries to make it back at night and..... continued on next page


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Team continued from previous page ... highlighted by Coci’s sixth place finish in the 200 fly. One could argue that the Crimson Tide program was operating as it should be. Add in a few good recruits, a committed team in the off season, take advantage of the new selection rules and this program would be poised to make big jump in 2013. All of that would change within days of the 2012 meet as Coach McIlquam stepped down as reported on March 29th. Roughly six weeks later, Denny Pursley was introduced as the new head coach; an alum who wasted no time engineering the transformation. When a coaching change does take place, everyone envisions and hopes for great success. The reality is that change that produces these types of results generally takes more time to achieve than just two years. Similarly, in 2014, college athletics witnessed a storied basketball team out of Storrs, Connecticut win a NCAA championship under second year head coach Kevin Ollie. In both cases, they experienced amazing success at the end of the second year of the new head coach. For each program, predicting their eventual success as late as mid way through the 2013 14 season would have been difficult. Alabama achieved a 3-3 record in 2013 14. Their highest rankings in the polls came early and then faded. How far have they come? A 400 Free Relay that took fifth at NCAAs in 2014 was not even contested in 2013 at last year’s meet.

Three of the four athletes on that relay that went (2:50.78 at SEC) & 2:51.65 in NCAA finals were on the roster one year ago. There best time in 2013 was a 2:55.02 at SECs in February 2013. Does the addition of one swimmer make up 4 seconds is debatable. However, I would argue that though each of the three returning relay members improved and perhaps more than anything, they were now mentally ready to make that jump in 2014. The Medley Relay is a different story where three of the four athletes are freshman with the other just a sophomore. This group could be really special in 2015 and beyond as every medley relay, both 200 & 400, in front of them loses at least one athlete to graduation. Knowing they will be the only team returning all four has to be a shot in the arm this program needs to move inside the top ten. Where top eight was a major accomplishment in 2014, I could see where just top eight could be a disappointment in future seasons as they should only get better. Coach Pursley and staff have set the table for even greater success. By increasing the total of NCAA competitors ninefold, in moving from 10th to 4th with the conference along with adding over 100 points to their NCAA total from a year ago, something right is being done to create this type of rapid

improvement. Time will certainly tell how far up the NCAA Swimming and Diving ladder the Crimson Tide will under the new system. For now, we will leave you with some thoughts, comments and a sample work out from Coach Denny Pursley. You had terrific success this season.# Can you talk about the leaders within your program? If you expect your athletes to be unified in a commitment to a common cause, the coaching staff has to set the example. I couldn’t be more pleased with the performances of our coaches. Of course the athletes have to buy in, and that requires strong leadership within the team. Our team captain, Phil Deaton, was a quiet leader by example and was completely on board with the culture change. He was supported by a leadership group that exerted positive peer pressure to comply with our core values of “Attitude, Character and Commitment”. BJ Hornikel, our lone All American from the previous year also provided veteran leadership that was invaluable to the team, especially in the NCAA Championships. continued on next page

Page 29

SEC 200 Breaststroke record holder Anton McKee


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Male Break Out Team

continued from previous page Are there any key moments, periods of time or experiences within the past year that were critical to your 2014 championship success? We hit a low point in November after getting hammered in a midseason invitational against teams who were partially rested and swimming in the technical suits. Our confidence took a severe hit and I was second guessing my strategy of training through the meet in our practice suits. I told the team that it would pay off in the season ending championship competitions, but I didn’t know if they were buying it. It could have gone either way, but they ultimately decided to stay on board with the plan and were rewarded for their perseverance. On coaching, what were some of the similarities and differences between this season and your first

Long Course Meter Work Out Warm up: 600 freestyle – breathe weak side/strong side/bilateral by 200 (DPS) 4 x 150 @ 2:30 – kick/free/choice (no free) by 50 (desc 1-4) 400 free w/fins & paddles – neg. split 4 x 100 @ 2:00 – 50 drill/50 @ 200 pace 200 free recovery 4 x 50 from mid pool @ 1:20 – race turns Main Set: Lactate tolerance – best average (may be modified for some sprinters). 3 rounds of the following; 50 @ 1:20, 2 x 50 @ 50, extra 60 sec rest 4 x 50 @ 50, extra 1:20 rest (We call this a “high” set…high lactate, high heart rate, high intensity) Following the main set, the swimmers will be assigned to one of the following 4 training groups (sprint, distance, mid distance or breast/IM):

season in terms of your approach to leading the Alabama program? The approach we took to both years was very similar, but progress doesn’t come overnight. Our program touchstones are our core values and our mission which is to “build a culture of excellence that will enable the team and each individual on the team to achieve his full potential in the pool, in the classroom and in life”. The swimmers and divers did a great job of embracing the cultural change in the first year and were able to turn the ship around, but the performance results didn’t come until the second year. Training at Alabama. A typical training week for most of our swimmers will consist of 9 pool sessions (maybe 8 for some sprinters or 10 for some distance swimmers) and 3 weight room sessions with daily supplemental dry land work on the

pool deck. Three of the 9 pool sessions are long course with the entire team doing the same warm up and main set before breaking down into event specific training groups. During the other 6 sessions, they will train with one of 5 event specific training groups. I believe that the typical program today is doing some things far better and more effectively than what we were doing in years past, but is maybe doing some other things less effectively. We try to combine the best of the past and the present in our program with an eye on the future. More specifically, we put an equal emphasis on fitness and efficiency, on building a strong team dynamic and catering to the unique needs of the individual, on training the cardiovascular system and the neurological system, on developing mental toughness and racing finesse, etc.

Sprint: Recovery 1x300 choice 6x50 Kick (2 each @ 1:10/1:05/1:00) 10x100 swim or pull (2 each @ 1:40/1:30/1:25/1:20/1:40) – 50 group put fins on

4x25 double pull out (make the full 25) @:40 4x25 4-3-2-1(stroke count max sprint) @:40 200 cool down

Mid distance: Skill Development 20 minutes of: Continuous circuit changing lanes and using video feedback 1x10 run dive into turn wall impulse – take deck speed in and sub turn into a wall pop and glide 1x50 with 1 turn drill + reset each 25 – focus on sub and tumble + underwater turn at 25 1x50 with sub turn and pop at high speed in 1x50 max turn 5 in /2 cycles out IM/Breast: Breast skill development: Page 30

3 rounds of; [4x against cordz w/ sculling paddles @ tech/ 100r 25m stroke count - Go on turn

Active Recovery 1 x 1500 @ 20:00 Pull Freestyle maximum DPS 3 * [4x100s @ 1:50 kick primary stroke descend 1-4 4x50s @ 1:15 15m underwater dolphin kick @ max speed then easy to wall with fins, 1 x 400 Drill/Swim Recovery]

Distance: 5x500 fins @ 5:30 dec 1-5 (HR 160) 3x: 200 pad,buoy,band dec 1-3 @ 2:45 100 @ 1:30 snorkel technique 50 @ 1:00 200 pace


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Meet Women

#4 Georgia 150 at #2 Texas A&M 150 by Michelle Forman Two top swimming schools in the Southeastern Conference, Texas A&M and the University of Georgia, battled it out in the lanes at College Station, Texas on January 11. The men posted 173-127 points, with the University of Georgia coming out on top. The women fought for every 100th of a second in a meet so close a single

touch-out could have been the deciding factor. The meet ended in a rare tie of 150-150, the second tie in Georgia’s program history, resulting in an exciting day at the pool for all those watching. The Aggies opened with a quick 9 point lead in a close 200-yard medley relay posting a time of 1:39.47. Hot on their heels were the Bulldogs with 1:39.58, just .12 of a second shy from stealing the first place points. The Aggies’ ‘B’ and ‘C’ relays captured third and fourth respectively with the Bulldog’s ‘B’ relay placing fifth. Despite trailing through the first event, the defending SEC champion Bulldogs managed to secure a slight144-139 point lead by the final event: the 400-yard freestyle relay. The Page 31

Aggies relay of junior Sammie Bosma, senior Erica Dittmer, sophomore Meredith Oliver and junior Lili Ibanez rose to the challenge and grabbed a first place finish with a time of 3:17.89 to the Bulldog’s courageous 3:18.74 finish. The meet was ultimately decided by the race for third place, as the ‘B’ relays from both teams raced down their lanes, fingers straining to touch the wall first. continued on next page....


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Meet Women continued from previous page

The race was decided by a narrow three 100ths of a second with the Bulldogs relay of Jessica Graber, Lauren Harrington, Jordan Mattern, and Amber McDermott proving victorious. With the final race awarding the Aggies with 11 points and the Bulldogs with 6, the meet was set at a 150-150 tie. “It was an uphill battle.” University of Georgia Senior Associate Head Coach Harvey Humphries said. “You just keep doing your job, working as hard as you work, and we started scoring three in an event and creeped back in to it.” In a meet this close, even a fifth place finish would have been enough to tip the odds in one team’s favor. Aggies relay anchor Ibanez claimed one such fifth place spot in the 50-yard Freestyle with a time of 23.49, netting an important point for her team. Ibanez also swam to a third place finish in the 200-yard freestyle in 1:48.01 and fourth in the 100-yard freestyle

(50.64). Bulldog’s Emily Cameron grabbed a spot in the top five in the 200-yard breastroke (2:17.16). Finishing just .33 of a second ahead of an Aggie rival to secured the fifth place point for her team. Cameron also swam a strong 100 breastroke (1:03.75) and swam the breastroke leg of the opening ‘B’ relay. Two 2012 U.S Olympians swam first place races. Aggie senior Breeja Larson made a sweep of the breastroke races, holding off competition to take both the 100 and 200 breastrokes with 59.51 and 2:09.66 respectively. She also swam the breastroke leg of the opening medley relay. Teammate and fellow Olympian Cammile Adams showed her talent in the 200-yard butterfly finishing with close to a 2 second lead for a time of 1:57.59. Adams also took third in the 100-yard butterfly (55.02) and second in the 400-yard medley (4:15.73).

Page 32

Georgia’s Brittany MacLean dominated the 1000-yard freestyle (9:40.18), cruising to the finish with more than a 4 second lead and tying the two teams through event three. McLean also swam a pair of second place finishes in the 200yard freestyle (1:47.61) and 500yard freestyle (4:46.54). “We had kids swim who had never swam that fast,” said Harvey Humphries. “We were excited at the opportunity to compete at that level. We had a great ‘B’ relay at the end. This was a meet of character.” The Georgia Bulldogs were ranked fourth with the Texas Aggies at number two. The tie put Georgia at 7-0-1 for the season and 4-0-1 for the Aggies. In stereotypical Hollywood fashion, the whole meet came down to the final race. This time, however, the race was ultimately decided by the third place finisher, proving how the collective strength of the team as a whole is what will bring victory.


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Meet Men

January 17 & 18, 2014 Pick most any intercollegiate sport and think about the parameters for the contest. It is difficult to come up with a sport that allows for variation in the framework of their specific contest. A basketball game is comprised of two twenty minute half played on a court of identical dimensions. Further, is most sports, the varying factors have

more to whether a field is turf or grass, the amount of seats, etc. The swimming and diving rulebook allows for some variation in event line up as well as racing distance (yards or meters.) From here and infrequently, a pair or more of coaches will devise a meet format that is unlike any other meet. That is exactly what has evolved with The Classic at SMU. Now in it’s thirtieth season, each January, some of the finest programs will meet in Dallas each January for a two day line up that it a perfect blend of “outside the box,” yet true to the purpose of a dual meet line up that producing some of the most competitive racing across all of collegiate swimming and diving. Page 33

This year was nothing short of an all star competition. Six teams including the following were in action; #1 Michigan, #3 Florida, #6 USC, #8 Louisville, Purdue & host SMU. (rankings listed were at the time of competition.) Purdue would also earn a national ranking at the end of the season at NCAAs. On the strength of three relay and four individual wins, #1 Michigan would claim the top spot for the 2014 edition of The Classic. Five of six programs would an event. Times in nearly every event were under the eventual 2014 NCAA qualifying times. Said coach Dan Ross, coach of meet MVP Guillermo Blanco, as quoted in his Purdue release,, "The guys really brought it tonight; I can say honestly we had the complete package.”


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Upset Women

StanfordPhoto.com by Erin Fuss Record-breaking crowds and a rivalry meet are nothing to shrug your shoulders about. Fans from both schools packed the stands at Avery Aquatic Center. It was one final dual meet at home, senior day for the girls on the Stanford Aquatic team, and most certainly a dual meet they wouldn’t forget. With Olympians on both teams, and a rivalry bringing even more energy, senior Felicia Lee couldn’t help but notice the excitement

the meet brought. The usual low-key dual meet scenario was out of the picture, this meet had become a performance. “It was a special day for us seniors since it was our last time competing at our home pool,” Lee said. “We had junior Fiona Majeau performing a beautiful version of the National Anthem, there was fundraising for the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital. And of course, we were against our rivals, Cal. With any team, we are going to show up and compete to win, but with Cal being our rivals, there was a little bit of that pride on the line. With all of that, it was pretty impossible to have a lowkey meet.”

Page 34

Lee was not the only one to have an elevated sense of accomplishment and pride over this meet, her teammate fellow senior, Madeline DiRado had quite the accomplished meet as well. With Lee, DiRado, and teammate Katie Olsen each winning two individual events, by the end of the first break – Stanford had a lead on Cal. continued on page 36


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Upset Men

UtahAthletics by Erin Fuss It was 9:30 in the morning on the University of Utah’s campus, and history was in the making. The stands were full, as they were most meets for the Ute’s swimming and diving team, and by the time the final relay rolled around, the crowd exploded in excitement. The University of Utah had defeated nationally-ranked Arizona 152-148. The meet came down to the final event, the 400 freestyle relay,

where seconds would decide the victors of the meet. Utah needed a 1-3 finish to win, they had to hold off Arizona’s B-Relay. Captain of the Utah team, Ken Tiltges may have been on the first place A-Relay, but even he knew, that the true champions of the meet laid within Utah’s B-Relay. “I’ve never had the same feeling as I stepped on the block. !I was anchoring the relay and we were about to do something that Utah hasn’t done in a very long time, if ever,” Tiltges said. “The guys who really had to work hard were the ones on that B-Relay. !When they finished, the crowd kind of exploded. !I’ve got to give that relay credit for pulling through.”

Page 35

It was not an easy upset over Arizona. Utah fought hard against the team that had placed third at last year’s NCAA National Championships. Returning the previous day on a redeye flight from Hawaii, the team was beat from head coach, Joe Dykstra’s training regimen. This regimen, and time together to bond as a team, is one factor that Dykstra claims to have led to the success of the meet. next


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Most Exciting Upsets Cal-Stanford, continued from 34 This wasn’t just a three-woman show that led to the success of the meet. Lee emphasizes that every person on the 23-member squad, in addition to the coaching staff of Greg Meehan, Tracy Duchac, and Jordan Wolfum, had a huge impact on the success of the meet and the rest of the season. “You can’t win a championship with just one person,” Li said. “Likewise, you can’t win a dual meet with one person. This dual meet win, the success of our team at NCAA’s, that’s all attributed to all 23 girls on the team. Each person plays an important role and contributes to the collective success of the team. This dual meet win was a team win. A 23 person plus 3 coaches kind of win.” This team success is what helped drive the rest of a successful season for Stanford swimming and diving. Prepping towards their championship meets, head coach of Stanford, Greg

Meehan is hopeful for the future. In an interview with Stanford’s athletic department, Meehan acknowledges the effort both teams put forth. “It wasn’t pretty, in a lot of senses,” Meehan said. “I think both teams are struggling through some fatigue and are still working hard as we gear up towards the end of the season. But regardless it was great racing.” This focus on the end of the season is something that Cal head coach, Teri McKeever looks towards. In a post-meet interview with Cal athletics, McKeever looks to face Stanford again in the future. “There were a lot of close races, which I’m really proud of, but unfortunately, we didn’t end up on top of too many of them,” McKeever said. “A couple of those go the other way and I think it’s a different outcome. As we move forward, we have to look at how we can be on the other end of some of those. I think the depth in our

squad is showing up. Right now, we have to stay focused on our journey and be ready in 10 days for Pac-12’s.” The meet is a close meet, with both teams fighting hard. And for Lee and DiRado, the team element was the most important factor towards their success. Looking back, the athletes would have wanted to finish their season no other way. This rivalry meet was not only a notable upset, but a notable meet overall for Stanford Swimming and Diving.

Arizona-Utah, previous page “I think that we were in a really good place as a team, the team was really starting to believe in each other,” Dykstra said. !“We had an incredible week of training and team bonding and they started to believe in themselves and each other. !And actually, in the airport in the way back we discussed!strategy and keeping positive over a tough situation.”

events. The meet wasn’t the fastest meet for either team throughout the season, and being one of the first meets of Utah’s season, they still had a lot to learn as a team and as individuals.

as having a strong finish in the 100 Fly, Tiltges claims the meet would not be as successful without him.

Keeping positive over a tough situation was key to this meet. Arizona took the lead at several points during the meet and won several

As Tiltges reflects on this meet, and his senior season for the University of Utah, he recollects moments and individuals which help made all the successes possible. One individual he credits for much of the success, a sort of glue on the team is junior swimmer, Alex Fernandez. Part of the winning 400-free relay, as well Page 36

“To me, it was the perfect ending to my Stanford dual meet career,” Lee said. “After the meet, just taking it all in, it was so surreal that that would be my last time competing as a Stanford Cardinal at Avery. I could not have asked a better senior day with my classmates. My family was able to make it out, the crowd was nuts, the energy was unbelievable, and of course a win with my team was the best finale.”

“In both scoring and on personal level Alex Fernandez made a huge impact on the team,” Tiltges said. ! “He’s a really good guy, he always knows what to say, how everyone’s feeling, how to get them excited. He also contributes, he was on the A relay, he’s versatile. !He made a huge difference in not only that!but keeping everyone’s spirits up and focused


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Championship Performance Women

California-Berkeley 2014 PAC 12

University of Georgia

2014 SEC Championships

Harvard University 2014 Ivy League

“And Your Top Qualifiers� Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these programs made the top 8 for their overall outstanding championship performances in 2013-14. Johns Hopkins 2014 NCAA Division III

Rice University 2014 Conference USA

Mary Washington

2014 CAC Championships

Stanford University 2014 NCAA Division I Page 37

University of Virginia

2014 ACC Championships


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Championship Performance

Georgia

Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures

Women’s break out team article will be available in print edition of Profiles in Excellence.

Page 38


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Championship Performance Men

California-Berkeley 2014 PAC 12

University of Florida

2014 SEC Championships

Harvard University 2014 Ivy League

“And Your Top Qualifiers� Also nominated and very worthy of national recognition, these programs made the top 8 for their overall outstanding championship performances in 2013-14. Kenyon College 2014 NCAA Division III

North Carolina State

2014 ACC Championships

University of Michigan Big 10 Championships

University of Texas

2014 NCAA Division I Page 39

Virginia Tech

2014 ACC Championships


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Championship Performance

California

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Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Best Race of the 2014 Season DI NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships; 200 Free. "Missy Franklin

obliterates NCAA record (1:40.31) to earn first individual NCAA title.” Every year in college swimming, the NCAA Championships are the pinnacle of the season. Day in, day out, teams train relentlessly to make the meet and, for that one moment of swimming glory, to put their stamp on the season. Each swimmer strives to leave a mark in his or her own way, yet many times those swims that were trained for so tirelessly go unrecognized. Then, undoubtedly, there is that one swim that everyone seems to recognize and which becomes the most memorable swim of the entire year. At the 2014 Women’s NCAA Championships, that swim was Missy Franklin’s 200 free. It is the Best Race of the Year.

NDJunior smashes own conference record in 200 breaststroke finals.

Emma Reaney, ND ACC 200 Breaststroke

Now, Missy Franklin is no stranger to big-time swims. She has been a household name in the sport for the better part of the past five years. Terri McKeever also has a history of coaching her athletes to eye-popping results. So it makes perfect sense that when these two forces came together, it was only a matter of time before we would all be scratching our heads in amazement. The 200 free at the NCAA Championships can be summed up in one word— over. The race was over from the start. After the first 50, Missy was nearly a second ahead of the second-place

Bogdanovski splits a 48.48 on anchor leg to come from behind to secure win

Ana Bogdanovski, JHU NCAA 400 Medley Relay Page 41

The 200 free at the NCAA Championships can be summed up in one word— over. The race was over from the start. After the first 50, Missy was nearly a second ahead of the second-place split with a 23.49, then increased her lead to a full 1.38 seconds by the halfway point of the race with a 100 split of 48.71. By the 150-yard mark and with more than a two-second lead, the race was over, and the only thing Missy had left to do was finish for the win. But why just win when you can make history? With a final 50 split of 25.78, Missy shattered the NCAA, American, and U.S.

Georgia distance ace closes the race to set a NCAA record.

Brittany MacLean, UGA

NCAA 500 Freestyle


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Best Race of the 2014 Season TypeDI to NCAA enter text Swimming

& Diving Championships; 200 Free. "Missy Franklin

obliterates NCAA record (1:40.31) to earn first individual NCAA title.” ....Open marks, finishing with a time of 1:40.31! With that win, Missy returned the Golden Bears to the top of the podium for the first time since 2009 and for the second time in program and NCAA history! A few things about Missy: She knows how to win. As a freshman, she won 18 of the 21 individual events she swam in dual meets (she only lost the 100 free once and the 500 free twice). She placed no lower than third at Winter Nationals, Pac 12s, and the NCAA Championships. She is versatile. She raced in nine different individual events during the dual meet season and only swam the same

lineup twice. In the six different individual events in which she raced during the season, she either had an A cut for, would have qualified for, or would have placed at the NCAA Championships. She is FAST. The first 100 of her record-setting 200 free would have been fast enough for 23rd at the NCAA Championships and was faster than the invited time for the 100 free. She was a combined .29 seconds off of winning the 500 free and the 100 free. Her second-place time in the 500 free was faster than the NCAA record.

Franklin’s 200 free at the NCAA Championships was a statement swim. It was one of the swims for which you remember where you were and what you were doing. It was a swim whose legend will live on for a long time. It was a swim that makes you imagine what is possible and ask what other barriers she can break. It was a swim that opens the door to the question “Will we see a 1:39 next year?” If the Golden Bear history has anything to say about it, we haven’t seen anything yet.

It is safe to say that Missy

Brittany MacLean breaks NCAA record by nearly ten seconds en route to a 15:27.84.

Freshman swimmer Lia Neal moves Stanford from 3rd at 350 to 1st at 400

Maya DiRado, Stanford

Brittany MacLean, UGA

Arizona, Cal & Stanford

NCAA 400 IM

NCAA 1650 Free

NCAA 400 Free Relay

DiRado & Elizabeth Biesel put on an outstanding display of what sport is all about.

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Why She Went to College Missy Franklin and the Meaning of NCAAs… 

Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures by Casey Barrett She couldn’t have realized it at the time. She was rather immersed in the task at hand. Two and a half seconds back, her team a distant third, only her anchor leg to go… It was Friday night, day two of the Women’s NCAA Championships, and Missy Franklin

had a hell of a lot of ground to make up in the 800 freestyle relay. The race was down to the three best teams at the meet – Georgia, Stanford, and Cal. Already in the water for Stanford was freshman Lia Neal, Missy’s fellow high school Olympic teammate back in London. In the water for the Bulldogs, sophomore stud Brittany MacLean, the girl who beat Missy head to head a night earlier in the 500 free. She couldn’t have realized it then, but this was a moment, perhaps the moment, that she will always return to when folks ask her why she went to college. This is what college swimming is all about, this

43

is why Missy Franklin passed up millions for a few years of this priceless community of competition. What happened next was what you’d expect from the current face of American swimming. She dove in and started reeling them in. 50 yards, just a second and a half back; 100 yards, less than a second; 150 yards five one-hundredths back; and then Georgia’s MacLean dug in. She wasn’t letting Franklin by that easy. Stroke for stroke over the final lap, until Missy managed to inch by, touching the wall first for her Cal Bears by .15. Her split: an astonishing 1:40.08. Another golden feather in the cap for the golden girl… Did you expect anything less? continued on next page


Why She Went to College Actually, many probably expected more from Franklin at her NCAA debut. Her individual results: gold, silver, and bronze. Three events earlier on that Friday night, she torched the field in the 200 free, crushing the NCAA and American record by almost a full second. On the first night in the 500 free, she had to settle for a hard-fought second in the 500 behind MacLean. Both swimmers eclipsed the former NCAA record, held by Allison Schmitt, though it’s worth noting that Katie Ledecky’s American record of 4:28.71, set last month, is a good four seconds faster than that NCAA mark. Tonight in the 100 free, she rounded out her freshman campaign with a third behind Arizona’s Margo Geer and Stanford’s Lia Neal. A fine and impressive showing, but then again, the girl collected more hardware at the Olympics. And then again, why didn’t the best backstroker on earth swim any backstroke for her team? Safe to say the 100 and 200 back were fairly sure bets for Franklin. Why wouldn’t Teri McKeever use her golden goose where she’s at her best? Well, because this is a team competition, and it’s all about the points. Cal was already stacked with backstrokers; the Bears needed her skills more in the freestyles. That’s value and versatility – when you can pass on your two best events, and still be a touch away from winning your fourth or fifth or even sixth best

events, because that’s where your team needs you. Missy’s first NCAAs didn’t end the way she’d envisioned when she first signed at Cal last year, when she glowed and gushed about being a part of a college team and leading the Golden Bears to another team title. This year they were no match for the all-around depth and excellence of Georgia. A crushing DQ in the 200 medley relay didn’t help Cal’s chances, but even without it, Georgia was in a class of its own this year. However, it’s a safe bet that McKeever’s girls did not expect their cross-bay Cardinal rivals to sweep past them the way they did. The Stanford women swam over their heads at this year’s meet. Caps off to second year coach Greg Meehan and his crew for four relay victories and a surprising second place finish. Cal swam away with what must be a bittersweet third in the team race. She didn’t think it would be easy, did she? Of course not. At 19, she’s as seasoned an elite competitor as any teenager you’ll find, in any sport. Yet, everything has always seemed to turn out, well, just about perfect for Missy Franklin. The Olympics, the World Championships, the almost sickeningly well-adjusted home life… Stumbles from the script, that stuff happens to other swimmers. Don’t you think she must be just slightly surprised right now?

44

And that too is why she went to college. To go through challenges not as a lone figure on the blocks wearing stars and stripes, but to embrace the collective challenge as a teammate, as a student-athlete. Missy Franklin has had greater triumphs than a come-from-behind relay victory at NCAAs. She’ll have greater triumphs to come. But years from now, ask her about her experience swimming at Cal. Ask her what she remembers most, what were her proudest moments? She’s going to mention that 800 free relay. Article originally posted March 23, 2014 at capandgoggles.com

Cal Athletic Communications


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Best Race of the 2014 Season DI NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships; 400 IM* "Georgia SO Chase Kalisz breaks five year old NCAA record in winning the 400 IM in finals.”  by Damion Dennis. History has a way of repeating itself. At the Men’s NCAA Championships it is quite common to see past winners defend their titles, and this year’s Championships were no different. Five events were won by previous winners, with three of those wins resulting in NCAA records. But only one swim can be the Best Race of the Year, and this year’s nod goes to Chase Kalisz in the 400 IM. The Georgia sophomore is now a two-time winner in the event. ! The first 50 saw Chase in fifth place with a time of 23.56, but by the 100-yard mark he had moved up to second place with the fastest second-50 fly split of 26.48. This is the last time Chase would be playing catch up with anyone from the rest of the field. Negative splitting the backstroke 50s with times of 27.46 and 26.66, Chase established an impressive second-and-ahalf lead. During the breaststroke leg of the race the throttle was opened up, and the NCAA record was in sight. With a 59.47 overall breaststroke split and a second breaststroke 50 that was nearly faster than the rest of the field’s first breaststroke 50, the Bulldog sophomore was not going to just break the record, he was going to smash it! Chase held such a commanding lead heading into the freestyle that the race became solely against the clock. The winning time of 3:34.50 is the fastest time ever in the history of the event, setting the NCAA, American, and U.S. Open records.

Wire to wire record setting performance for Mary Washington standout

Alex Anderson, UMW NCAA DIII 400 IM

Cordes sets all new records (:50.04)

Kevin Cordes, Arizona NCAA 100 Breaststroke Page 45

Murphy dazzles everyone in attendance with a new NCAA record

Ryan Murphy, CAL NCAA 200 Backstroke


Best Race of the 2014 Season Lorem Ipsum School

DI NCAA Swimming & Diving Championships; 400 IM* "Georgia SO Chase Kalisz breaks five year old NCAA record in winning the 400 IM in finals.� 

Chase becomes the third Georgia Bulldog to ever stand atop the podium with his win in the 400 IM. If Chase is able to repeat next year, he will join an elite club of NCAA three-time 400 IM champions. This club includes the great Gary Hall, Sr., Brian Goodell, Ricardo Prado (the only one to not win it three consecutive times), David Wharton (the only four-time champion in this event), and Tim Siciliano. Each of these champions was the only three-time champion in his decade in the event, and, collectively, they represent the past 50 years of NCAA 400 IM swimming. The 400 IM is one of the most difficult races in all of swimming. It requires ultimate versatility and is the culmination of training, pacing, strategy, and patience. In many ways, it is like a complex symphony with stylistic features, free rhythms, irregular intervals, and an array of innovative instrumentation. As individual parts, it hardly resembles a classical musical celebration, but when it comes together, it is a beautiful display of art. Harvey Humphries has masterfully orchestrated a program that allows Chase to display his craft on the national stage for everyone to appreciate. And, for the second time, he has put on a show for the ages. Should history come full circle, next year will be a once-in-adecade show, and this will become the sixth consecutive decade in which we have seen a three-time 400 IM winner.

Kevin Cordes finishes in a :28.16 to establish new record by .02

Bosch makes it look easy in establishing a new NCAA record

In 2nd at the 300 mark, Freshman Kyle Darmody goes :41.48 for the win.

Kevin Cordes, Arizona 200 Breast, NCAA

Dylan Bosch, Michigan 200 Fly, NCAA

Auburn, Cal & NC State 400 Free Relay, NCAA

Page 46


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Assistant Coach Harvey Humphries by Josh Huger Webster’s dictionary defines an assistant as, “a person who assists: helper” and a coach as “to instruct, direct, or prompt as a coach.” Although these two words certainly define the duties of Coach Harvey Humphries, they do not come close to defining who he is and what he has done for his swimmers. Consistently Excellent Throughout his 33 year tenure at the University of Georgia, Humphries has achieved far more than what most coaches would hope to accomplish in their entire career. In addition to his coaching at the University of Georgia, Humphries has been a part of several other high-profile staffs including serving as Head Coach of the National Team Distance Camp (July 1998), as Assistant Coach of the National Junior Team (1999), as Head Men's Coach for the National Junior Team (2002), and as a staff member for the World University Games in Thailand (2007). In addition to his coaching, Humphries

was inducted into the Arkansas Swimming Hall of Fame in 2002 and nominated for the 2002 AFLAC National Assistant Coach of the Year Award, amongst numerous other accolades. All Around Success While Coach Humphries’ accomplishments throughout his career are highly impressive, the achievements of the Georgia Bulldogs this past season show his best years are yet to come. This past season the Georgia women won their second consecutive NCAA team title – their 6th overall. En route to their NCAA Championship run, the Lady Bulldogs won their fifth consecutive and 11th overall Southeastern Conference championship title. All of these feats culminated at the end of the season when Georgia swept the SEC Women’s Swimming and Diving individual honors, had a studentathlete presented with the Elite 89 award, and received 3 NCAA Postgraduate Scholarships.

No hiding their secrets When asked about the success of this year’s team and the goals that were set at the beginning of the season, Coach Humphries replied, “Our goals were to work every day at being the best teammates that we could be. That would be in every way possible, both in the pool and the classroom.” “We performed very well in the pool, but more satisfying to me was to watch our athletes come together as a team and truly enjoy the journey,” he added. Moving into the 2014-15 season, Coach Humphries hopes to continue raising the bar for Georgia swimming. He attributes the following people as those who have helped shape him into the person he is today. Remembering important people and why this all matters “Number one would be my parents. I’ve also taken something from all of my coaches: Jimmy Miller, continued on next page

National Runner Up in 14

Into the top 3 in Ivy League

Another Top 25 finish

Tracey Duchac Stanford University

Dani Korman Yale University

Sarah Stockwell Virginia Tech

Page 47


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Assistant Coach Harvey Humphries from previous page Robbin White, and Jack Bauerle. And from my mentors, Jack Bauerle, Dick Shoulberg, Jon Urbanchek, Bill Rose, and especially Buddy Baarcke. And finally, my wife, Wendy, and my children, Billy and Pirie, who are my world, and what keeps me looking at the big picture!”

Coach Humphries truly defines what it means to be the Women’s Assistant Coach of the Year. Despite this recognition from the College Swimming and Diving Honors, Coach Humphries remains humble and dedicated. “It is humbling to receive any award. All I can think of is how many fantastic coaches that I know and how hard I try to do the kind of job that I see them do,” he says.

photo: Tim Binning/TheSwimPictures.com

Another Top 25 finish

400 point increase at PAC12s

Alyssa Swanson DePauw University

James Winchester University of Utah Ivy 48

100 Fly All American in 2014

Suzanne Yee Princeton University


Profiles in Excellence: The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Assistant Coach Yuri Suguiyama by Josh Huger !

Two years ago, Coach Yuri Suguiyama packed up his life on the east coast and moved across the country to join the California Golden Bears. This move from the Nation’s Capital Swim Club where he coached 2012 Olympic Gold Medalist Katie Ledecky was not only a change in scenery, but also a change of pace that presented a whole new set of challenges. “Last year, between switching jobs and moving across the country, things in my life changed really quickly and I felt like I was playing catch-up for a long time,” said Suguiyama. “There are also a lot of nuances to working at the collegiate level and I don’t think you can really pick them all up until you’ve gone through at least one season.” To most people a change of this magnitude would be daunting, crazy even, but not to Suguiyama. Despite the obstacles he knew he may encounter, Suguiyama knew the success of his team was dependent upon the type of environment he created. “Early on in my career and to this day, I’ve always tried to be aware of the type of environment I create around my team and swimmers,” he stated. “You can’t always control the type of person that walks through your door, but you can control the environment that they walk into and if that’s a strong, positive one, people will want to be there, and you’re going to be successful.” The positive environment Suguiyama has created during his short time with the Bears has certainly helped the team achieve two successful seasons. During his first year at Cal the men’s team took home top honors at the Pac-12 Championships and finished 2nd at the 2013 NCAA Swimming and Diving Championships. In 2014 the Golden Bears repeated this success as Pac-12 champions and brought home the NCAA title - their 5th in school history and 3rd under head coach Dave Durden. next page

Rapid ascent to upper tier of ACC Swimming

First ACC team title ever

Aaron Bell Virginia Tech

CAA Runner Up

Todd DeSorbo North Carolina State Page 49

Josh Huger William & Mary


Profiles in Excellence:The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Assistant Coach Yuri Suguiyama This success parallels Suguiyama's success during his time at the Nation’s Capital Swim Club, where his coaching led his swimmers to 19 Potomac Valley Records, top national rankings in 12 different events, and appearances on the all-time top 100 lists for 19 different events. When asked what his goals were going into the 2013-14 season, Coach Suguiyama said, “It sounds cliché, but I really just wanted to do everything a little bit better this season – whether it was my administrative duties, recruiting, or on-deck coaching. A more specific goal was to get guys scoring points at NCAA’s in events we hadn’t previously had much success, events like the 1650 Free. Jeremy Bagshaw’s second place finish was a big step in that direction and a testament to the growth he’s shown both as a person and athlete over the last year.” Moving forward The University of California, Berkeley looks to continue their dominance of recent years in the Pac-12, as well as on the national level. To achieve this Suguiyama knows it will take a team effort. “Dave Durden has done an incredible job of building our program and I feel very fortunate to have a role in that,” added Coach Suguiyama. “It really takes a small village to help a collegiate team be successful – not just one person – so I feel like this award is an affirmation of the time and effort our whole staff puts into the program.” As he reflects on the success of the past few years and his recognition as College Swimming and Diving Honors’ Men’s Assistant Coach of the Year, Coach Suguiyama has one simple, yet unique piece of advice to aspiring coaches: to read. “Read – and not just about swimming,” he said. “I think the more well-read you are, the better you’ll be able to connect with different types of people. Also, I’ve found inspiration and ideas applicable to coaching in some of the most unlikely of sources – everything from a book on ancient Samurai to a collection of short stories by Ernest Hemingway.”

One of best seasons ever

National Runners Up in ’14

PAC 12 improvement & placment at NCAAs

Harvey Humphries University of Georgia

Kris Kubik University of Texas

James Winchester University of Utah

Ivy 50


Celebrity Picks

Profiles in Excellence:The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Jim Bolster Columbia

Jeff Commings Swimming World

Sage Hopkins San Jose State

Scott Lemley Alaska-Fairbanks

Walk On (W)

Catherine Perrin

Kathleen Mulligan

Bailey Pressey

Jessica Mosbaugh

Walk On (M)

Colton Laramore

Pedro Coutinho

Pedro Coutinho

Taylor Wilson

Break out Athlete (W)

Emma Reaney

Brooklynn Snodgrass

Olivia Smoliga

Emma Reaney

Break out Athlete (M)

Matt Josa

Mitch D'Arrigo

Chuck Katis

Matt Josa

Career Improvement(W)

Maya DiRado

Emma Reaney

Erica Dittmer

Erica Dittmer

Career Improvement(M)

Sean Murphy

Bradley DeBorde

Mason Shaw

Sean Murphy

Break out Team (W)

Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins

Stanford

Johns Hopkins

Break out Team (M)

Virginia Tech

Alabama

California

Univ. of Chicago

Exciting Dual Meet (W)

#9 Virginia 152 @ #7 North Carolina 146

#4 Georgia 150 @ #2 Texas A&M 150

#1 California 133 @ #4 Stanford 167

#1 California 133 @ #4 Stanford 167

Exciting Dual Meet (M)

FINAL RELAY: Yale 147 @ Columbia 153

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

#1 Michigan 151 @ #9 Ohio State 147

Notre Dame & N’western tie 150-150

Dual meet Upset (W)

#8 Florida 148 @ #12 Tennessee 152

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5

#8 Florida 148 @ #12 Tennessee 152.

Dual meet Upset (M)

Virginia 153 @ #15 Virginia Tech 217

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

#23 UNLV 114 @ UCSB 148

Championship Performance (W)

Georgia, NCAA Championships

Stanford, NCAA Championships

Georgia, NCAA Championships

Drury, NCAA Division II (1st)

Championship Performance (M)

Virginia Tech, ACC Championships

Texas, NCAA Championships

California, NCAA Championships

California, NCAA Championships

Best Race (W)

400 Free Relay, D1 NCAA

Brittany MacLean, 500 Free, NCAA

Brittany MacLean, 1650 Free, NCAA

Kirsten Nitz, 100 Fly, NCAA D3

Best Race (M)

Alex Anderson,

Dylan Bosch, 200 Fly NCAA

Kevin Cordes,

400 IM, D3 NCAA

200 Breast, NCAA

Chase Kalisz, 400 IM, NCAA

Assistant Coach (W)

Harvey Humphries

HarveyIvy Humphries 51

Harvey Humphries

Jerry Champer

Assistant Coach (M)

Todd DeSorbo

Kris Kubik

Yuri Suguiyama

Harvey Humphries


Celebrity Picks

Profiles in Excellence:The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Paula Miller Ithaca College

Rick Schavone Stanford

Joel Shinofield

OVERALL

CSCAA

Walk On (W)

Kelsey Helin,

Kathleen Mulligan

Jeanne Miller

Kathleen Mulligan

Walk On (M)

Pedro Coutinho

Ryan Green

Taylor Wilson

Pedro Coutinho

Break out Athlete (W)

Emma Reaney

Katie Olsen

Ana Bogdanovski

Emma Reaney

Break out Athlete (M)

Alex Anderson

Chuck Katis

Christian McCurdy

Matt Josa, Chuck Katis

Career Improvement(W)

Emily McClellan

Maya DiRado

Maya DiRado

Maya DiRado

Career Improvement(M)

Garrett Trebilcock

Jeremy Bagshaw

Will Kimball

Sean Murphy

Break out Team (W)

Johns Hopkins

Stanford

Johns Hopkins

Johns Hopkins

Break out Team (M)

Queens University

Georgia

Virginia Tech

Virginia Tech

Exciting Dual Meet (W)

#4 Georgia 150 @ #2 Texas A&M 150

#4 Georgia 150 @ #2 Texas A&M 150

#1 California 133 @ #4 Stanford 167

Georgia@Texas A&M & California@ Stanford

Exciting Dual Meet (M)

TCNJ 129 @ Stevens 133.

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

Harvard, Princeton @ Yale

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

Dual meet Upset (W)

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5

Dual meet Upset (M)

#22 Notre Dame 92 @ (NR) Purdue 208.

Championship Performance (W)

Johns Hopkins, NCAA Division III

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

#1 California 119.5 @ #5 USC 180.5 Arizona 148 @ Utah 152

Georgia, NCAA Championships

Stanford, NCAA Championships

Georgia, NCAA Championships

Championship Performance (M)

Florida

California, NCAA Championships

Virginia Tech

SEC Championships

ACC Championships

California, NCAA Championships

Best Race (W)

Kirsten Nitz, 100 Fly, NCAA D3

Brittany MacLean, 1650 Free, NCAA

Missy Franklin 200 Free, NCAA

Kirsten Nitz, 100 Fly & B. MacLean, 500 Free

NCAA Division III 100

Cordes, 100 BR

Samuel Gill & Ross Spock, D3 100 Back

Samuel Gill & Ross Spock, D3 100 Back

Best Race (M)

Back, tie Assistant Coach (W)

Alyssa Swanson

Tracy Duchac

Tracy Duchac

Harvey Humphries

Assistant Coach (M)

Yuri Suguiyama

Yuri Suguiyama

Yuri Suguiyama

Yuri Suguiyama

Ivy 52


Profiles in Excellence:The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

About the writers Casey Barrett, Imagine Swimming Casey Barrett (right) competed for both Southern California and SMU in addition to competing in the 1996 Summer Olympic Games. He is a co-founder for Imagine Swimming; a learn-to-swim school in New York City. You can read more of Casey’s work at http://capandgoggles.com/ Tim Binning, TheSwimPictures.com Tim Binning owns and manages TheSwimPictures.com. He is one of the most active swimming and diving photographers in the United States. Many Tim Binning photographs can also be found on a regular basis at the website SwimSwam. Lisa Boyce, Princeton University Lisa is a member of the Princeton University Class of 2014. She is a highly decorated athlete for Princeton with a resume that includes; four year team member, varsity record holder, conference record holder Olympic Trials qualifier, NCAA qualifier & Honorable Mention All American.

Damion Dennis, West Virginia University Damion is the associate head coach where he is entering his eighth season. A 2000 graduate of Western Illinois University, he contributed to a a banner season for the men who placed 23rd at NCAAs. Michelle Forman, University of Nevada-Reno Michelle is a varsity swimmer for Coach Abby Steketee. In addition to swimming for the Wolfpack, she is a double major in psychology and English. Erin Fuss, University of Nevada Erin, who just completed her sophomore year, returns as a guest writer. Originally from Nampa, Idaho, Erin is a journalism major. In the water, Erin is a fly specialist. Josh Huger, William & Mary Josh Huger is currently the assistant coach at William & Mary. Josh finds the time to Ivy 53

write for Profiles on an annual basis while serving as the founder and manager of the website; Swimutopia. Ross Lannan, Dartmouth Ross just completed his 2nd season with Coach Jim Wilson and the Big Green. Ross, 2008 graduate of the University of Pittsburgh, is a returning writer for this publication. Mike Litzinger, North Carolina Michael Litzinger is currently the associate head coach at the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. Mike, a Hobart graduate, is a regular contributor to the College Swim ming Diving Honors.

Woody Woodard, Colorado State Christopher “Woody” Woodard is a graduate of Hartwick College in Oneonta, New York. He is currently the Head Coach for Colorado State University where he just completed his third season.


Profiles in Excellence:The 2013 14 College Swimming & Diving Honors

Noteworthy The followings programs were nominated for at least one category Assumption College-Women Augustana College-M&W Bates College - Women Boise State - Women California-Bakersfield-Men California-Berkeley-M&W California-Los Angeles-Women California-Santa Barbara-M&W Claremont Mudd Scripps-Men Cleveland State-M&W Columbia University-Men Connecticut College-Men Dartmouth College - Men Denison University-Men Denver University-Men & Women DePauw University-Men & Women Drury University-Men & Women Duke University - Men & Women East Carolina University-Women Emory University-Men & Women Florida Gulf Coast Univ.-Women Florida International-Women George Mason-Women Georgia Tech-Men Harvard University-M&W Henderson State-M&W Indiana University-Women Indiana Univ. of PA - Women Ithaca College-Men & Women Iowa State - Women James Madison University-W Johns Hopkins University-M&W Keene State College - Men Kenyon College - Men Liberty University-Women Louisville - Men & Women Maryland-Baltimore County-M&W Messiah College-Women Miami (OH) - Men Naval Academy - Men North Carolina-Chapel Hill-Men North Carolina-Wilmington-Men

North Carolina State - M&W Northern Arizona-Women Northern Iowa-Women Northern Michigan-Women Northwestern University-Men Notre Dame-Men & Women Oakland University-M&W Ohio State University-M&W Penn State - Men Pepperdine Univ-Women Princeton University-M&W Purdue University-Men Queens University-Men & Women Rice University - Women UMBC- Men & Women Saint Louis University - Men San Diego State - Women Siena College-Women Southern Connecticut-Men Springfield College-Women Stanford University-Women Stevens Tech - Men Texas A&M - Men & Women Texas Christian University-M&W Towson University-Women University of Akron - Women University of Alabama - M&W University of Arizona-M&W University of Chicago-M&W University of Florida-M&W University of Georgia-M&W University of Kentucky-M&W University of Houston-Women Univ. Mary Washington-M&W University of Michigan-Men University of Minnesota-M&W University of Nevada-Women University of Pennsylvania-Men Univ. Nevada-Las Vegas-Men Univ. of Southern California-Men University of Tampa-Men University of Tennessee-M&W University of Texas-Men University of Utah-M&W Ivy 54

57

UW-Milwaukee - Men & Women University of Virginia - M&W University of West Virginia-Men University of Wyoming-M&W Virginia Tech - Men & Women Washington & Lee - Women West Chester University-M&W Wheaton College (IL)-M&W Whitman College - Men William & Mary - Men Yale University-Men & Women Dedicated this year to an extraordinary group of now-retired coaches. Years with most recent program listed (see back cover): Coach Dave Allen, UNCW, 37 years, photo; Matthew Byrd Coach Tony LIsa, Rowan University, 35 years, Rowanathletics.com Coach Rick Schavone, Stanford University, 36 years, StanfordPhoto.com Coach Tim Welsh, Notre Dame, 29 years (37 total),ND Media Relations Special thank you to the following for making this happen; Casey Barrett, ImagineSwimming, Tim Binning,TheSwimPictures.com Lisa Boyce, Princeton University Damion Dennis, West Virginia Univ. Michelle Forman, Univ. of Nevada Erin Fuss, University of Nevada Josh Huger, Swimutopia.com Braden Keith, SwimSwam Ross Lannan, Dartmouth College Michael Litzinger, North Carolina Univ. Jason Marstellar, Swimming World Chris Woodard, Colorado State And to all current collegiate swimmers and divers for another remarkable season in the pool and on the boards.


PROFILES IN EXCELLENCE Congratulations to our newly retired coaches! 55


PROFILES IN EXCELLENCE: Drury sweeps Division II Nationals


Profiles in excellence 2013 14 pdf