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contents

ON THE COVER 68 JANN ARDEN

28

A woman in love with wilderness

80 CHEF ANNA OLSON

Transitioning from pastry chef to public icon

38 CARSON ARTHUR

HGTV personality, with advice on how to create the perfect lunar garden

36

30 SHAWN TALBOT

Landscapes through the camera lens

STYLE 18 THE ENVELOPE PLEASE!

Landscape Ontario’s Award Winners for 2016

24 DINER EN BLANC

A magical mystery in the key of white

32 TRENDING

As always, we are all over the upcoming trends

DESIGN 42 DESIGNER PROFILES

Outstanding Landscape design talent from across the country

48 HGTV’S PAUL LAFRANCE

What has he got up his sleeve now?

61

62

52 CLEAN & CONTEMPORARY

A vision comes to reality in a snug backyard

LIVING 77 OUR FAVOURITE FRANGLISH MONTREALER

With a heads up before hiring a landscape professional

84 PATIO FARE

Three refreshing Canadian patios from across the country

90 COLLECTIVE ARTS

Micro brewing is all the rage, and when you find it all in one place...brewing bliss

DISCOVER 94 FOGO ISLAND INN

72

Newfoundland’s critically acclaimed gem

98 ART & ARTISTS

Something for every palette

108 WHITE WATER RAFTING

Ride the waves - Canadian style!

104 6 I OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

74


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36


The Hidden Gardens of Hamilton’s Historic Southwest

Publisher

Dave Maciulis CLD

Editor IN CHIEF

Staff Writers

L. A. Sweezey

OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE editor Carson Arthur

CUSTOM build editor Paul Lafrance

managing director Michael Ellis

Creative Director + designer Susan Vogan

CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Darrell Leighton

PRODUCTION MANAGER Susan Vogan

Photography/video

Glenn Curtis Lori A. Sweezey Luke Hellewell Tim Zwart Sarah Penney Susan Mate Zack Fleming Candice Klein Patrick Dixon Curtis Potter Brie Jarrett Peter Vogler Chris Gregory Ron Wilko

Shawn Talbot - Cover Roth & Ramberg Deck Agency Kristi Brianna Boulton Carole & Roy Timm Photography Ryan Szulc Ryan Emberly Evan Bergstra Dan Kern Jamey Ekins Alex Fradkin Rene Synnevag Jeff McNeill Shutterstock

ADVERTISING Sales Krista Myke

Copy Editor

Candice Klein

The Durand Neighbourhood Association presents the

2016 GRAND DURAND GARDEN TOUR Saturday, June 18, 2016 10AM - 4PM (Rain or Shine) ADVANCE TICKETS $20.00

Please join us in discovering 11 beautiful private gardens of the Durand neighbourhood in Hamilton, Ontario www.durandna.com chairgdgt2016@gmail.com

For advertising opportunities please email: info@outdoorlifestylemagazine.com PUBLISHED BY KORU CREATIVE GROUP President Dave Maciulis C.L.D Phone: 289-238-7910 Email: info@outdoorlifestylemagazine.com Outdoor Lifestyle Magazine is published twice yearly: Spring/Summer and Fall/Winter Single copy price is $8.95 SUBSCRIPTION RATES Canada 1 year (2 issues) - $17.90 2 years (4 issues) - $33.95 3 years (6 issues) - $48.95

USA 1 year (2 issues) - $22.95

Mail payment to: Outdoor Lifestyle Magazine 14 Cross Street, Unit E Dundas, ON L9H 2R3

Printed by T.C. Transcontinental Printing

Available at Chapters, Indigo, Coles, and Atlantic News Stands across Canada.

Distribution by Districor Magazine Distribution Services. Copyright 2015-2016 All rights reserved. Reproduction without express written consent is prohibited by law.


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letter from the publisher

KEEP IT SIMPLE In keeping with the theme of the recent Oscars and the current state of my beard, welcome to our “white” issue. When we were brainstorming around the storyboard for this issue, (and let me just say it was long before this disappointing Oscar business), we decided that, after a long-ish and confusing winter, it would be nice to focus on the things that make us think of all things cool…cool in temperature and level of “hipness.” As you browse through the pages of this issue, take note of how calming the visuals are throughout. Crisp, clean lines in landscape design are the order of the day. Keeping things simple in your outdoor space can, many times, be reflective of your current life situation or (maybe) of the life you are striving for…the uncomplicated one! “Uncomplicated” is something that I believe we all struggle with. Less is more… purge…keep it simple…all the wise words we’ve heard over and over again in our lives. Maybe it’s time for us to do just that?! When was the last time you walked around your own outdoor entertain-

ment area (be it large or small), and removed the things that prevented the space from feeling welcoming, peaceful and uncomplicated? Defining your space, designing your space, then keeping it from becoming a dumping ground for every flower container you have in the garage, every piece of furniture that you love (even though it won’t fit) and the unfurled garden hose that never seems to get rolled up, is always a challenge. This is not an episode of hoarders! Why not give peace a chance? Why not turn your outdoor space into one of tranquility not chaos, of uncomplicated, unmitigated pleasure? After all, it should be your refuge…the place you can go to and be in, without all of life’s chatter constantly banging around in your busy head. We hope that we can help you with your decision to design a space that suits your lifestyle and fulfills a few of those landscape dreams that you just can’t shake! We are here to inspire you. Now watch as we do our job! Have a wonderful and uncomplicated summer…

Dave Maciulis, CLD

Twitter @dave_maciulis Facebook Outdoor Lifestyle Magazine

12 I OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM


• AWARDS OF • EXCELLENCE

Toronto, Ont. (January 12, 2016) Landscape Ontario Salutes Green Industry Excellence The 2016 Awards of Excellence winners in landscape construction, maintenance and design. The inspiring talent and creativity of this year’s winners were acknowledged at Landscape Ontario Horticultural Trades Association’s Awards of Excellence Ceremony, held January 12, 2016. Over 650 industry professionals attended the gala awards ceremony held at Toronto’s International Plaza Hotel, held in conjunction with Congress, one of North America’s largest green industry events. Winners portray a competitive spirit, strive for continuous improvement, offer services distinctly different from the competition and are stewards of the horticultural trades, sharing a vision for a vibrant and prosperous future. The Awards of Excellence are judged according to specific criteria by industry experts. If no project qualifies in an area, no award is given.


CONSTRUCTION PROGRAM Abloom Landscape Contractor Inc., Metcalfe Aden Earthworks Inc., North York Aqua Spa Pools & Landscape Design, Woodbridge B.K. Baun Landscape Ltd., Ajax Balsam Creek Landscaping, Lynden Betz Pools Ltd., Stouffville Beyond Landscaping, Toronto Blue Diamond Pools and Landscaping, Barrie Bouwmeister Inc., Stouffville Cedar Springs Landscape Group, Oakville DA Gracey & Associates, Vaughan David Gaze Landscaping, Oakville Dusty Miller Landscaping, Queensville Earthscape Ontario, Wallenstein Elite Designed Concrete Inc., Thornhill Exact Interlock Ltd., Ottawa Fossil Landscapes Ltd., Etobicoke Garden Grove Landscaping, Waterdown Gelderman Landscape Services, Waterdown Gobro Con Landscaping, Brampton Green Apple Landscaping, Mono Green Things Landscaping 2010, Brockville Greentario Landscaping (2006) Inc., Hamilton Greer Design Group, Dundas Griffith Property Services Ltd., Richmond Hil Ideal Landscape Services, Barrie, MIlton It’s About Thyme Inc., Stratford Jay McKinnon Company, Strathroy JC Landscaping Inc., New Tecumseth Jen-Dan Limited, Gormley Juergen Partridge Ltd., Caledon Kent Ford Design Group Inc., Toronto Kingscape Landscape Construction Group, Richmond Hill Kreative Woodworking, Woodbridge Landscape Plus Ltd., Etobicoke Landscapes By Lucin, Toronto Landscaping Concepts, Waterdown Lawrence Park Complete Garden Care Ltd., Downsview Monarch Landscape, Waterloo OGS Landscape Services, Brooklin Paradise Decks and Landscape Design Inc., Dundas Parklane Nurseries Ltd., Beaverton Planit Green Landscapes, Ancaster Plantenance Landscape Group, Pointe Claire Pool Craft, Richmond Hill Pro-Land Landscape Construction Inc., Brampton Quality Property Services, Markham Quiet Nature Ltd., Ayr R J Rogers Landscaping Ltd., North Gower Roger Willis Contracting Ltd., Kars, Royal Stone Landscaping & Design Ltd., Woodbridge Rutherford Contracting Ltd., Aurora S Rebelo Landscapes Inc., Burlington Seferian Design Group, Burlington Shades of Summer Landscaping & Maintenance, Waterdown Stonelife Landscaping Inc., Concord Tarrascape Innovation Inc., Hamilton The Backyard Urban Farm Company, Toronto The Clark Design Group, Burlington The Landmark Group, Thornbury Tumber & Associates, Garafraxa Urban Garden Supply Co Ltd., Toronto Yards Unlimited Landscaping Inc., Ottawa

MAINTENANCE PROGRAM Boot’s Landscaping & Maintenance Ltd., Richmond Hill Dusty Miller Landscaping, Queensville International Landscaping, Milton Landscape Plus Ltd., Etobicoke Lawrence Park Complete Garden Care Ltd., Downsview Shades of Summer Landscaping & Maintenance, Waterdown Snider Turf & Landscape Care Ltd., Kitchener Strathmore Landscape Contractors, Pointe-Claire Sweetwater Landscapes Inc., Burlington The Backyard Urban Farm Company, Toronto The Scott Wentworth Landscape Group Ltd., Picton Yorkshire Garden Services Inc.. Concord DESIGN PROGRAM Earthscape Ontario, Wallenstein Garden Grove Landscaping, Waterdown Gelderman Landscape Services, Waterdown Plantenance Landscape Group, Pointe Claire The Landmark Group, Thornbury The Scott Wentworth Landscape Group Ltd., Picton Vaughan Landscaping Welwyn Wong Landscape Design, Manotick Yards Unlimited Landscaping Inc., Ottawa IRRIGATION PROGRAM DJ Rain & Co Ltd., North York Tydan Landscape Design Inc., London LIGHTING PROGRAM Copper Expressions Landscape Lighting & Design, St. George DiMarco Landscape Lighting, Mount Albert International Landcaping Inc., Milton Markville Landscaping & Nurseries Inc., Markham Moonstruck Lighting Ltd., Concord Royal Stone Landscaping & Design Ltd., Woodbridge Shades of Summer Landscaping & Maintenance, Waterdown Tarrascape Innovation Inc., Hamilton WEBSITES Bos Landscaping, Smithville Garden Grove Landscaping, Waterdown Hank Deenen Landscaping Ltd., Toronto Quiet Nature Ltd., Ayr Yards Unlimited Landscaping Inc., Ottawa SPECIAL AWARDS PROGRAM COMMUNITY LEADERSHIP AWARD Mark Cullen, Ryan Heath, Rich Hawkins, Karen Dobrucki, Jeanette McLellan HONOURARY LIFE MEMBERSHIP AWARD Bob Tubby HORTICULTURAL EDUCATION AMBASSADOR AWARD Aldo Cianfrini LEGACY AWARD Bob Wilton PAST PRESIDENTS AWARD John O’Leary, Jeff McMann PROSPERITY PARTNERS LEADERSHIP AWARD Yorkshire Garden Services Inc., Christine’s Touch Gardening Ltd., A Touch Of Dutch Landscaping & Garden Services, The Waterboys Contracting Inc.

Congratulations to all the winners of Landscape Ontario’s Awards of Excellence. The ceremony for the winners of the Awards of Excellence was made possible through the generous sponsorship of our presenting sponsors, G&L Group and supporting sponsor Connon Nurseries CBV. For more information about the Landscape Ontario Awards of Excellence programs, please visit www.LOawards.com

AWARD WINNERs

Landscape Ontario is pleased to recognize the winners


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30 I OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM


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style district

A CHAT WITH KELOWNA PHOTOGRAPHER SHAWN TALBOT BY LORI SWEEZEY – DUNDAS, ON

I think that all will agree…OL Magazine’s cover shot is outstanding! In the building of this magazine, we always take our readers into consideration when choosing the perfect photos to grace the pages. What we had never considered (before now) was what the photographer sees while taking these amazing photos of the breathtaking final product of a homeowner’s dream. Outdoor Lifestyle Magazine spoke with internationally acclaimed photographer Shawn Talbot of Kelowna, BC, the very talented young man who is responsible for our front cover. We needed to get inside of his head in order to see landscape design through his eyes and his camera lens.

OLM: How long have you been photographing landscape design? How did you get into this type of work? ST: I have been a commercial photographer for eighteen years. Right from day one I have had a passion for architecture and design. I think what attracts me most to this type of photography, is in the ability to be a perfectionist (which is very much a part of my personality). For the most part, I control the lighting, the placement of furniture, the perspective and most of the elements within the frame – except, of course, the weather. This control allows me to shoot, adjust, shoot, adjust and continue repeating this cycle until I feel that I have the perfect shot. Arnold Newman once said that, “photography is 1% talent and 99% moving furniture.”

OLM: How is this different from photographing people or other inanimate ob-

jects? And what kind of things do you have to take into consideration during a landscape shoot? ST: Outdoor landscapes don’t require lunch breaks nor do they bill overtime. ;) The biggest consideration with any architectural photoshoot is weather. A lot of my favourite images are taken during dawn or dusk which really helps because, as long as it isn’t raining, the weather doesn’t impact the images much. Of course, in Kelowna, BC, where many of my clients are located, one of the main wishes is to have blue skies. On rare occasions this can take some patience.

OLM: Is there any kind of emotional connection that you must have with the land-

scape/design itself in order to be able to convey it’s beauty and functionality? ST: The first thing that I do when arriving at a property is to walk around and get a feel for the space and try to visualize it under different lighting conditions. I am a fairly analytical thinker so I look at a space in terms of what perspective gives a strong sense of place, while also capturing a visually appealing weight and balance. I love contrasting warm and cool colours against each other, particularly through reflections, so I’m always looking for opportunities to showcase that. I have to admit that photographing properties such as this one, is relatively easy when you have a brilliant landscape designer and builder like Gene Brown. I am fortunate in that most of the properties that we shoot are very high-end and every detail has been considered. Fire bowls, beautiful tile work and accent lighting everywhere makes for tons of reflections and endless opportunities for angles. Brown is a master at what he does and for me that means that I can point the camera in just about any direction and it’s likely to result in a beautiful image. www.shawntalbot.com | www.valleypoolandspa.com | www.questarpools.com


OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

I 27


inspiration

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36 I OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

6


Dream with eyes wide open

For 65 years, Permacon has designed the living space of your dreams in perfect harmony with its surroundings. By combining craftsmanship and cutting edge methods, Permacon brings together aesthetics and expertise.

DISCOVER THE INSPIRING PERMACON UNIVERSE AT PERMACON.CA


profiles

ADELE GOODWIN BY CURTIS POTTER – EDMONTON, AB

Adele Goodwin is the founder of the Edmonton-based landscaping company, EarthWorm Landscape Design Co. The name EarthWorm truly represents Goodwin’s philosophy and approach, as she strongly believes in the power that nature has to inspire, heal, and connect us to our true selves. Goodwin wanted a name that was lighthearted and captivating. When she hired a local graphic designer to come up with a graphic package, she also asked the designer to think of a name that people would remember easily and would make them smile, and so EarthWorm was born. Goodwin is a very accomplished designer. She has over 30 years and 3000 projects worth of experience in landscape design, and holds a Horticultural Degree from the University of Guelph, Ontario. She also started teaching at a community college right after graduating in 1986. Goodwin admits that this was a bit impulsive in hindsight, but the experience and insight that teaching has provided has proven itself invaluable. She continues to teach even today, as she now hosts workshops for those interested in making their thumb a bit greener. Goodwin’s style and working method is on-the-spot drawing, and with her vast experience, she is able to get her students and clients to catch on very quickly. She remembers her first introduction to design, thinking to herself, “how can I do this?” But after seeing her professor draw a single symbol, her visual gifts awakened and 46 I OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

she was able to tap into a natural talent for turning outdoor environments into practical and imaginative spaces. Goodwin’s designs heighten the senses with colour, texture, and balance. Moreover, she sums her design sessions up into one single word— fun. It is a very intimate and unique experience to collaborate and create a design right before her clients’ eyes, and Goodwin’s lighthearted, intuitive approach relaxes everyone she works with. Goodwin is most certainly an expert in her field. Her portfolio is both impressive and extensive, and she has no trouble choosing her favourite designs. She recalls one client that essentially gave her free reign, only asking that it resemble a Florida beach house. The end result was the equivalent of a resort by the time she was finished. It contains a beach volleyball court; a gazebo; both gas and wood burning fire pits; a deck overhanging the pond, and an outdoor kitchen and shower (just to name some of the highlights). The clients now wander through the property every morning with their coffee and savour their natural masterpiece. Goodwin is continuing her work in Edmonton. When asked if she thinks the economy will have an impact on the future of Landscaping in Edmonton, she tells us that she isn’t worried. She feels that more people will be staying home as opposed to spending their hard earned cash on travelling, so they will be investing a little more into making their home a personal paradise.


living district

BALANCING ACT BY PATRICK DIXON – TORONTO, ON

I

f you have been lucky enough to encounter the world ​of ​rock balancing prior to picking up this magazine, chances are you experienced a feeling of confusion mixed with amazement. If you have yet to experience this brain-t​ickling brand of natural art, then you, my friend, are in for a treat. Rock balancing is an art form that is as intriguing to grasp, as it is to witness.​ Those who are inclined to ​create ​these beautiful organic structures possess​ a ​considerable amount of creative ingenuity, poise, and natural form. Their structures leave a distinct impression ​that is like no​other art form: manmade creations that appear to spring​up as a part of the natural landscape. Vancouver’s John Shaver and Montreal born Peter Riedel are two​talented​artists who create these stunning natural monuments. The only binding agent ​affixing their sculptures is the force​of gravity. In fact, ​​​​the most frequently asked​question that both Riedel and Shaver have to answer is: “Are the rocks glued?​” The answer is an emphatic, yet ​awe-inspiring, “No.”​

“Just gravity, balance, and that invisible spine running down the centre,” Riedel explains. “Perplexing people with how I balance stones is very satisfying. Skeptics are left with their jaws hanging open. Structural and aerospace engineers, physicists, construction workers, science teachers and stone masons alike, stop in their tracks and are dumbfounded as to how I am able to do this.” John Shaver grew up in a “low income household as a child of the hippy generation.” He was encouraged to explore a variety of creative pursuits. Experimenting with different mediums led him to rock balancing, where he could combine naturally occurring materials into temporary installations that visually merge back into the earth from whence they came. He currently practices his art in Vancouver’s​ West End. “I am a local artist and proud of it.”​Shaver has endeared himself to the locals, earning the nickname The Stone Whisperer. Peter Riedel’s journey, on the other hand, involved a substantial​​ amount of globetrotting. ​​Riedel draws inspiration from the breathtaking natural landscapes of Norway, Morocco, England, and Germany. ​This Toronto based, part-time photographer and full-time artist describes his first foray into rock balancing as, “something that kept me grounded and calm during a difficult and tumultuous time in my life.” Shaver and Riedel share more than their love for creating art from the elements. A major source of inspiration​for both of these two men came from artists on the scenic coastline of Vancouver’s Stanley Park, where rock balancing feats were a hit with locals and tourists alike. “I asked one of the artists why he does this work, and his reply has stuck with me all these years. The older I get, the more I think back to it. He said, ‘To remind me that anything is still possible!’ I kept replaying what he had done and what he had said. Then, I figured it out,” Shaver explains.​ ​ At​the other end of the country, on the shores of Lake Ontario, Riedel has been demonstrating the harmonious yet delicate balance that we, as a species, share with our planet. His earthen monuments are symbolic of the indelible, yet fleeting nature of life. While the firm hand of gravity roots his structures to the ground, unpredictable external forces could bring them toppling down at any moment. ​“For me rock balancing has truly been therapeutic. It sort of rests my frequencies. I’m peaceful, calm, and totally in the now,” says Riedel. Both men create with the same medium, coincidentally inspired by the same place, but have separate messages behind their art. Shaver revels in the showmanship and seeming impossibility of balancing the elements. Riedel seeks to achieve inner calm and comment on the fragile oneness of those same elements. One thing can certainly be agreed upon; both​​of these uniquely gifted artists​believe that the true satisfaction​of rock balancing can be found​in that brief, shining moment when so many mismatched rocks are unified into one perfectly coordinated structure. The moment doesn’t last forever, but that little window of perfection frozen in time is truly a spectacle to behold. OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

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discover district

OPENED IN THE SUMMER OF 2013, FOGO ISLAND INN IS PERCHED ON WHAT IS DESCRIBED AS ONE OF THE “FOUR CORNERS AT THE FARTHEST EDGE OF THE EARTH,” AND IS LOCATED OFF THE REMOTE NORTHEASTERN COAST OF NEWFOUNDLAND.

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FOGO ISLAND INN

By BRYEN DUNN – TORONTO, On

The farthest edge of the earth

O

TRUE NORTH MUST SEE

By BRYAN DUNN – TORONTO, On

nce a thriving fishing village, Fogo Island is now becoming desolate, as residents have been forced to leave to seek employment elsewhere. The Inn was a vision of Zita Cobb, who is a native to the island, and returned to her homeland after several years of successful business management in larger urban centers. Today the property employs approximately seventy staff members; the majority are from the island, and the island itself has become somewhat of an artist retreat. Todd Saunders, who was born in Gander, Newfoundland, is the architect behind the design of Fogo Island Inn. The Inn’s stilts draw on the longstanding building traditions of Newfoundland’s outports, and the exterior is adorned with local clapboards, providing flexibility and resilience in the face of extreme weather conditions. The wood finishing was derived from restored Newfoundland forests, consisting of yellow birch on the floors, with smooth-surfaced black spruce on the walls, ceilings, and around the exterior frame. During the construction of the Inn, 42% of costs were spent on Fogo Island, 28% of the remaining funding was contributed to the rest of Newfoundland, 27% went to the rest of Canada, while the remaining 3% was contributed to other parts of the world. Since the opening of the Inn in 2013, 93% of the labour costs have been paid to residents of the island. Under no circumstances were materials purchased from jurisdictions that don’t have basic labour and environmental laws. Stylistically, the interior of the Inn incorporates a contemporary style while maintaining traditional designs. Building on the legacy of local craft traditions, all furniture and textiles were handcrafted by local craftspeople in addition to using designs from a roster of international designers. From the locally sourced materials to the colour palette, furniture, wallpaper, and lighting fixtures, Fogo Island has been embodied in every sense. Fisherman’s Hall, a nearby heritage site is currently being restored. It was built in 1909 and is home to the Fogo Island Shop, an online retail site where all interior furnishings and accessories found at the Inn can be purchased. At the Fogo Island Inn, guests can find a bar lounge, a restaurant with a stunning waterfront view, a fitness centre, art gallery, library, and even a cinema. High above on the rooftop, visitors can also take advantage of a sauna and hot tub for relaxing beneath the starlit sky. Room rates include all meals, refreshments, non-alcoholic beverages, and gratuities. Guests are strongly encouraged to explore this tiny island, and to take in the natural landscape, art galleries, and culture.

Three things guests should definitely experience on the island, beyond their stay at the Inn: Hotel Ambassador, Paddy Barry, offers his personal “not to be missed” recommendations. A boat trip to Little Fogo Islands - an archipelago of almost one hundred tiny islands, five miles north of Fogo Island. A hike along one of the fourteen trails maintained on Fogo Island. There are also many other trails off the beaten path. An outdoor boil-up, which is a traditional brew of tea in the woods that is often prepared with a snack or a meal.

Two architectural highlights that guests should look for when staying at the Inn: The workmanship of the Inn is definitely an architectural highlight. No part of the structure is pre-fabricated. The structure of the inn is like a sculpture that melds the radically contemporary with the deeply traditional. Perhaps the most striking architectural highlight is the band of steel columns that support the eastern end of the inn, while only slightly altering the existing landscape. Visit Fogo Island Inn at www.fogoislandinn.ca, and book your stay today.

Fogo Island Inn 2016 Conde Nast Traveler Gold List. 2015 PURE Award for Community Engagement. EnRoute Magazine 2015 Hotel Design Award - Best Overall Architecture. GoMedia 2015 Culinary Award. Trip Advisor 2015 Travellers’ Choice Award. Grand Award 2015 Hideaway of the Year. OUTDOORLIFESTYLEMAGAZINE.COM

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PLANT PICKS

discover district

By JAMES PITSON – TORONTO, ON

AMELANCHIER CANADENSIS Serviceberry

BETULA PAPYRIFERA Paper Birch

VIBURNUM LENTAGO Nannyberry

ACHILLEA MILLEFOLIUM Yarrow

VERONICASTRUM VIRGINICUM Culver’s Root

It seems as though the serviceberry is as common as a rose, and for good reason. It is indispensable in a landscape and best known for its white spring flower, edible fruit, and good fall colour. The fruit attracts humans, birds and other wildlife, and is relatively disease free, except for the occasional attack of a rather harmless rust or powdery mildew. Best grown in full sun to part shade and requires average moisture. Established plants can tolerate drier soil. This native is generally seen with a multi-stem habit but is also available as a single stem tree form. Named cultivars and selections do exist but often it is a mismatched taxonomy that is sold under the serviceberry banner. Seldom growing over seven meters, it is a good choice for the urban landscape and naturalized areas or as a transition plant from the forest edge.

This easily recognizable large growing shade tree is available in the nursery trade as a single or multi-stemmed specimen, and is best planted in full sun with cool, moist soil. Pests or diseases except for the incidence of birch borer, which can be reduced by maintaining plant health, including supplemental watering during the growing season and the heat of summer, rarely trouble birch. The white bark and yellow fall leaf are best displayed when birch trees are planted with evergreens in the background.

The viburnum family represents a treasure-trove of varied and useful ornamental native plants. Of these, the nannyberry is one of the most versatile. It is a suckering, upright, narrow shrub, growing three to five meters high and is fairly deer resistant. The clusters of creamywhite flowers appear in late May to mid-June and can last for up to two weeks. Flowering is strongest in full sun, but the plant will tolerate canopy shade. It can develop a purple-red fall colour and birds love the ornamental bluish-black fruit. Thriving in moist or dry soils, it is best utilized for naturalizing or as a border, and not as a stand-alone specimen. Overgrown shrubs can be rejuvenated by being cut back and thinned out in the spring.

Yarrow is a full–sun, drought tolerant native perennial that does double-duty as garden border or as a cut-and-dried flower. Growing 40-80 cm high, it is useful in naturalized areas, wildflower meadows, mass plantings and the medicine cabinet, as it is also one of the most widely used medicinal plants in the world. It is a spreading plant, but given adequate room it is not problematic. The white flowers show in early summer and cutting back the plant will encourage a second flowering later in the season. Over-fertilization or overly rich soil promotes a weak-stemmed, floppy plant; cutting the plant back before budding will ensure a more compact configuration. Always use only the native species outside of the urban environment as nursery cultivars are known to self-seed into wild areas.

This hardy, seldom used, native perennial is a good choice for the back of the garden border. Its stately white flowers appear from July through to late summer. Reaching a height of up to two meters, the gentle airiness of its flowers contrast with the robust structure of the plant. It thrives in moist soils and tolerates filtered shade or half-day sun exposure. Culver’s root derives its name from Dr. Culver, an 18th Century physician who actively promoted the plant for medicinal use. It is a close relative to digitalis and can be harmful or fatal when ingested in a large quantity. The difficulty in regulating its strong potency led to the plant falling out of favour medicinally.

106 I outdoorlifestylemagazine.com


If you’ve been toying with the idea of building a swimming pool or hot tub on your property, or remodeling your existing pool, look no further than Eco-Pools Inc. We specialize in various swimming pool styles and designs; Custom Concrete, Cocktail, Vinyl Liner, Fiberglass and Natural. Eco-Pools Inc.’s passion to elevate beyond its competition echoes throughout every project. With continuous education at Genesis 3 University and sound construction practices, every swimming pool is designed to meld seamlessly into the structural architecture and landscape of the property. Genesis 3 is synonymous with ‘superior quality” which is reflected in all of Eco-Pools builds. Also integrated into every project is energy efficiency through product, sanitation, automation and hydraulic design. The end result is an outdoor entertainment space beyond expectation and one that will last a lifetime. We travel throughout the GTA and serve many of the surrounding areas.


SPRING/SUMMER 2016

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OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE // SPRING & SUMMER 2016  

OUTDOOR LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE // SPRING & SUMMER 2016  

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