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ODESSA ROSE INFO: Follow Odessa on Facebook at facebook.com/odessarosemusic

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and Townes Van Zandt. Her father was a talented musician, singer, and songwriter. “He’d get home from work and immediately start playing guitar,” she says. At only four years old, little Odessa enrolled in violin lessons that continued throughout her teens. Even though she didn’t start playing guitar or seriously writing her own melodies until about three years ago, it’s clear her dad passed down his passion for music and shared his gift for creating and performing. Twelve years after she picked up her first pint-sized violin, Odessa wrote her first song. She remembers sitting on the porch of her family’s house in front of her dad’s old Yamaha 16-track digital recorder. It was the first time she experimented with the guitar, which also belonged to her father. “I just started layering a bunch of shit, and I didn’t even let anyone hear it.” But don’t worry—Odessa still has that initial recording. Her first song seems to belong in the past because her life after moving to Nashville has changed completely. Not many twenty-six year olds can say they’ve performed their own material on three different continents. She’s jammed with the likes of Edward Sharpe & the Magnetic Zeros, Mumford & Sons, and Old Crow Medicine Show, not to mention Abigail Washburn, Gill Landry, and Rayland Baxter. After graduating high school in 2004, Odessa headed to Colorado to stay with her aunt and uncle for a few months. She ended up accompanying her uncle to a free bluegrass music festival called Hardly Strictly in San Francisco. While she was there, Odessa asked a musician where most of the bands were from. Nashville. Once the festival ended, Odessa bought a round-trip plane ticket to Music City for two weeks in early August. “I literally knew no one,” she says. She intended on staying in a hostel. On the taxi ride from the airport, Odessa asked the driver where to catch some good live music. That evening, taking the cabby’s advice, she walked all the way to Station Inn from Midtown to see her first show in Nashville. “I walked everywhere,” Odessa says, nodding emphatically. A friend of hers recommended Casey Driessen, a fiddle player and teacher in Nashville, and she scheduled a lesson. “I walked and hitchhiked down Gallatin Pike with this ridiculously huge backpack on.” She giggles and extends her hands out to either side to show the dimensions. Odessa walked down the strip in the thick summer heat until a nice old man finally pulled over and picked her up, later dropping her off at Casey’s house. That’s what I call Southern hospitality at its finest. One of the first shows she recalls attending was Julie Lee and Sarah Siskind’s band, Old Black Kettle, at the Station Inn. “I thought, ‘Oh my god, I want to know these people!’” she exclaims. And within two weeks, she had made a few friends along the way. Among them was Emily Warner, who accompanied Odessa on a flight back to

Profile for Native

Native | February 2013 | Nashville, TN  

Featuring Nashville's Justin Townes Earle, Karoake Cab, Kangaroo Press, Poetry Sucks, Odessa Rose, The Stone Fox, No. 308, Chucklet and Hone...

Native | February 2013 | Nashville, TN  

Featuring Nashville's Justin Townes Earle, Karoake Cab, Kangaroo Press, Poetry Sucks, Odessa Rose, The Stone Fox, No. 308, Chucklet and Hone...