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EXCEPTIONAL EYEWEAR 4017 HILLSBORO PIKE SUITE 309A, NASHVILLE, TN 37215 | P: 615 891 4807 # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

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DON’T MISS THIS FESTIVAL HIGHLIGHT: MODULAR ART PODS curated by Tony Youngblood With 60 interactive “pod” installations imagined, designed, and constructed by 80 TN-based artists Installation open throughout the duration of the festival. Don’t miss a special presentation as part of the OZ Arts Nashville TNT series:

THURSDAY, JUNE 23 6 – 10 PM

$15

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mon. - fri. 6am-7pm || sat. & sun. 7am-7pm

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3431 murphy road - dosecoffeeandtea.com


TABLE OF CONTENTS JUNE 2016

22 34

58 46

THE GOODS 15 Beer from Here 18 Cocktail of the Month 22 Master Platers 77 You Oughta Know 79 Animal of the Month

FEATURES

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24 Literature Spotlight: Jeremy McAnulty 34 Music Band 46 Old Glory 58 Draconis Arcanum 66 *repeat repeat

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DEAR NATIVES,

T

hanks for tagging us, y’all! Be sure to check out these Instagrammers, and #nativenashville to share your photos with us.

president, founder:

publisher, founder: 

ANGELIQUE PITTMAN JON PITTMAN

creative director:

MACKENZIE MOORE

managing editor: 

CHARLIE HICKERSON DARCIE CLEMEN

art director: 

COURTNEY SPENCER

community relations manager:

JOE CLEMONS

editor:

community representatives:

@verticitycycling

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POLLY RADFORD KELSEY FERGUSON

film supervisor:

          writers: photographers:

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production:

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CASEY FULLER MATT LEFF SCOTT MARQUART JONAH ELLER-ISAACS LINDSEY BUTTON LUKE LEVENSON COOPER BREEDEN

JEN McDONALD DANIELLE ATKINS REBECCA ADLER ANDREA BEHRENDS DYLAN REYES

GUSTI ESCALANTE

founding team: founder, brand director:

DAVE PITTMAN

founder:

CAYLA MACKEY

MACKENZIE MOORE JOSHUA SIRCHIO TAYLOR RABOIN

to advertise, contact:

for all other inquiries:

SALES@NATIVE.IS HELLO@NATIVE.IS

PROUDLY DELIVERED BY RUSH BICYCLE MESSENGERS

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8 O F F 8 T H f t . S H A N N O N L A B R I E , WA L K I N G M A N , a n d m o r e - M E R C Y L O U N G E T H E TOA S T E R S - T H E H I G H WAT T N I G H T B L O N D E - T H E H I G H WAT T P U P w i t h R O Z W E L L K I D a n d P K E W P K E W P K E W - T H E H I G H WAT T B L A C K M O U N TA I N - M E R C Y L O U N G E A C C E P TA N C E - M E R C Y L O U N G E S A L E S - T H E H I G H WAT T T H E S TAV E S - T H E H I G H WAT T SIMO - MERCY LOUNGE W Y E OA K - M E R C Y L O U N G E B R O N C H O A N D R E P E AT R E P E AT - T H E H I G H WAT T H E Y R O C C O w i t h M O D E R N V I C E S a n d D O G S O F O Z - T H E H I G H WAT T Y O N I & G E T I w i t h C H A O S E M E R A L D S a n d BA S H F U L H I P S - T H E H I G H WAT T B L A C K P I S TO L F I R E - M E R C Y L O U N G E T U R N P I K E T R O U BA D O U R S - T H E C A N N E RY BA L L R O O M T H E WO M BAT S - T H E C A N N E RY BA L L R O O M T H E L E G E N DA RY S H A C K S H A K E R S - M E R C Y L O U N G E DEERHOOF - MERCY LOUNGE 12 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

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Photo: Emily Beaver

RESPECT THE UNEXPECTED. VISIT PLOWBOYRECORDS.COM FOR NEW RELEASES

OUR ARTISTS: BLACKFOOT GYPSIES • BOBBY BARE • PAUL BURCH • BUZZ CASON • CHEETAH CHROME • CHUCK MEAD • THE FAUNTLEROYS • THE GHOST WOLVES • JD WILKES & THE DIRTDAUBERS • JIM ED BROWN # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

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GARIBALDI by Ben Clemons of No. 308 photo by j e n m c don a l d

Summer is finally rearing its beautiful head and, to me, that means patio drinks with friends. This classic is named after the Italian revolutionary war general Giuseppe Garibaldi, responsible for liberating Italy back in the mid-1800s. The drink was first brought to my attention by my friend Naren Young (Dante, NYC) who took the Garibaldi to a new level. He found that whipping air into fresh OJ created a magical texture for the drink, similar to an Orange Julius. The result is something that tastes remarkably like fresh squeezed ruby red grapefruit juice. This drink is super simple, not too boozy, and great any time of the day (although it’s my brunch libation of choice). Enjoy!

THE GOODS 1 part Campari 2 parts fresh juiced “fluffy” orange juice*

FBuild Campari then OJ over ice into your glass of choice (no ice works too!). Garnish with an orange slice and enjoy.

*Fluffy OJ

Peel oranges as you would to eat. Juice the oranges whole in a home centrifuge juicer and do not strain. If the juice has been sitting, wake it up with a few pulses in a blender or a milkshake machine. 18 18 / // // // // // // // // // // // // // // ///// //////

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A BARBERSHOP FOR MEN & WOMEN OF ALL AGES WALK IN ANY DAY OF THE WEEK FOR A QUALITY CUT OF STYLE:

$15 BUZZ | $24 ST YLE E A S T N A S H V I L L E - S Y LVA N PA R K

W W W . S C O U T S B A R B E R S H O P. C O M


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MASTER PLATERS

ZUCCHINI AND SQUASH SALAD WIT H CHILI OIL

WITH CHEF ANDREW LITTLE OF JOSEPHINE PHO T OS BY DAN IELLE AT K IN S

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THE GOODS 3 zucchini (about 1 1/2 lbs) 2 yellow squash (about 3/4 lb) 1 tsp salt 1 garlic clove, minced 1/4 cup basil leaves, rough chopped 1/4 cup cilantro leaves, rough chopped 2 tbsp fresh lime juice 2 tbsp olive oil 3 oz mozzarella cheese, cut into 1/4-inch cubes salt and pepper to taste Chili Oil*

DIRECTIONS F Thinly slice the zucchini and squash on a mandoline or by hand. F Place the slices in a mixing bowl and sprinkle with the salt. Cover the bowl and allow it to sit for at least 15 minutes. F Drain the excess water from the zucchini/squash mixture and add the garlic, basil, cilantro, lime juice, olive oil, and mozzarella cheese. Add salt and pepper to taste. F Gently toss to combine all ingredients. Drizzle the chili oil* on top of the finished salad.

*CHILI OIL 2 3/4 cups pomace oil 3 1/2 tbsp smoked paprika 2 tsp salt

F Process all the ingredients in a blender until the oil emulsifies.

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Find Yourself a Beach in Nashville, TN is a book about the search for balance between the poles of our existence. After failing to find a place in the career world, Dylan Brown moves back to Nashville and meets Heidi Moncrief. In an adventurous attempt to find a beach, the pair finds themselves on a long and treacherous stretch of desert. —Jeremy McAnulty

ILLUSTRATIONS BY MACKENZIE MOORE

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The following is an excerpt from Find Yourself a Beach in Nashville, TN. If you’d like to buy the whole book or check out Jeremy’s poetry collection, Echoes + Loops, visit: jeremymcanulty.bigcartel.com Highway 90 United States Route 90, also known as the “Southern 66,” stretches west from its eastern-shorelineterminus in Jacksonville, FL, to Van Horn, TX. Once through San Antonio the dusty pass hugs the Mexican border passing through ghost-towns. It is one of the most desolate stretches of road in America, mostly trampled by mules and coyotes. They passed through the town of Del Rio; built around a military base used for secret operations and housed the missiles at the center of the crisis in Cuba. The car wasn’t driving any better either, but Dylan was right about the landscape: fields of cattle backed by ridges epic and old, the occasional tumbleweed floating by. They were both still with nerves when they passed a sign reading All Vehicles Must Stop at Checkpoint. Border Patrol. “Shit I have that acid.” Dylan pulled out the foil. “I stashed my weed in your purse too.” Heidi rapidly dug through her purse as Dylan slowed down toward the government’s drive-up shack patrolled by green men in big hats with guns and dogs.  

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“Here, split the acid in half and we’ll eat it.” Heidi decided as she dumped the weed in her hand, undid her hair, then wrapped it back into a bun with the weed in it.  She threw the empty canister out the window.  They dropped 100 yards away from the agents.   Dylan cruised up, sunglasses and a smile on, rolled down the window.  “Howdy!” The agent smiled back. “How ya doin’ today?” “Doin’ just fine.” Heidi looked at the agent, nodding in agreement. “Where y’all headed?” “Big Bend. Gonna do some camping.” The agent measured them and nodded back to another officer holding a German Shepherd on a leash who began walking the dog around the car.   “Y’all don’t have anything illegal in the car do ya?”   “No sir.”  The dog pawed at the trunk.  Dylan’s heart was racing.   “You mind popping the trunk and stepping out the car?”   “I reckon not.” “You too, miss.” Dylan and Heidi got out of the car.  “How’d ya wind-up so far south?”  Dylan was distracted watching the officer with the dog pull their camping gear out of the trunk and hesitated


and went to Mexico. Tim, my mom’s husband, to answer. Heidi interjected. he and my dad were best friends. They were “This piece of shit car.”   “I’m sorry?” The agent was confused. Dylan hooking up behind his back and then I came along and made it all too real.” looked at Heidi as she started to cry.   “I doubt that’s how they saw it.” “You said we’d see the sunset. We’re not even “It doesn’t matter.  He was coming to help going to make it.” Dylan moved over to the side of the agent furthest from Heidi and spoke to me when he died. I met this older guy. He was Ecuadorian. His uncle was a slumlord and he him softly. “You see, we’re kind of supposed to be elop- managed this trailer park for him and sold coke. ing on this trip. To be honest with you, so far He was really nice at first. He adored me and it’s not going so well. Motor mounts are shot spent money on me and he seemed in-charge. I and the tranny is going out, but I promised her started staying at his place and then one night we’d see Big Bend.” Heidi was sobbing now and he got really drunk, he lost a lot of money playeven the dog had stopped to stare at her. Just ing dominoes and came back to his trailer and then a school bus of hippies, “Wayward” paint- started beating me up. He went to the bathed across the top, pulled up behind them. The room and I got a hold of my dad to come get me and I told him what was going on. He was agent looked at Dylan.   loaded too. He had been riding horses and “Y’all go on out of here. Good luck kid.”   Dylan walked Heidi to her side of the car drinking tequila all day. He busted through the with his arm around her and let her in.  He door and pulled a knife on Ernesto and then he watched the agents direct the hippies off the pulled out a gun and shot my dad in the chest bus one-by-one, took a deep breath and looked four times in front of me.”   “Jesus. How long did you actually spend with at Heidi and squeezed her thigh. She stared deeply back at him with drying eyes and began him?” She was crying and smiling at the same time. to laugh. Dylan laughed too and he turned the music up and Waylon sang loud and bold and “I didn’t know him at all. And I never cared they laughed some more and the car was driv- about him. But he was cool. We were supposed ing perfect all of the sudden. Then, with one to go to Big Bend and camp the next week.” A final exhale, it died, three miles out of Langtry, pick-up truck pulled up behind them with some Texas. The acid kept the severity of the situa- speed and parked. A barrel-chested man, bald tion at bay; too surreal to be troublesome. They headed on-top with long hair around the sides quietly packed their gear into backpacks, but and a long beard got out wearing suspenders comfort overrode their ambition and they laid over his flannel shirt and aviator sunglasses. “What the fuck are y’all doing?” He shouted across the trunk of the dormant Corolla.   concerned.   “Where are we?” “Car broke down.” Dylan looked around at the huge empty blue “Jesus Christ, kid. You gotta plan?” Dylan and sky as if it could give him an answer. “Umm, pretty much the worst place we could possibly Heidi both sat up and were grinning from earto-ear, Heidi still teary-eyed.   be broken down.” Heidi laughed.   “It kind of just happened. We don’t really “Why don’t I care?” have a plan. Trying to get to Big Bend. Figured “I don’t care either.” we could hitch with some other campers or “My dad died in Texas. Maybe I will too.” something.”   Dylan sat up. “I didn’t know he was dead.” “Y’all gotta be the dumbest looking two I’ve “Actually not too far from here. On the other side of the bend, outside of El Paso. I was sev- ever seen. The other campers are all on the enteen, staying with him for the summer. I had I-10, because they’re not idiots.  Quick hop actually just met him. He split when I was one off the car, throw what you need in the back

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of my truck.” The man crouched down, pulled out a multitool and unscrewed the license plate from the back of the car. “Name’s Tobias. I know I’m a stranger, but I’m about to help ya out here.”   “I trust him.” Heidi said. They got what they needed out of the car and squeezed into Tobias’s truck. “Hitch a ride with campers, ha.  Would’ve hitched a ride with the cartel or gotten robbed by crossers, more like it. What the fuck you doing on 90?” “Couldn’t deal with the traffic on the ten, the car couldn’t pick up enough steam.”   “Well, so you know how it works, people cross the border over the other side of the ridge, and they’re dealing with rocks, snakes, cacti, the works, they get to 90 at nightfall and they wait to get lifted by the cartel’s runners that cruise the highway picking up people, pot, meth, coke, whatever to Houston, Dallas, Little Rock. We’re talking millions of dollars’ worth of trafficking. Type of business to make someone demonstrate a lack of concern towards the lives of two lost kids.” Tobias took a sudden and sharp turn down an unmarked dirt road.   “My dad was a runner. Long time ago.”   “Well you should know better kid. Who’s your old man?” “Dale Dodd.”   “Jesus Christ.” “Did you know him?” “Are you Heidi?” “Yes.” They pulled up to a run-down saloon several miles off the main road.   “Is this where you stay?”   “It was my great-grandfather’s. Though some say he never owned it. He was a judge and ran court out of this bar. Long line of saloon-keeping in my family.”   “A judge?” “Don’t get the wrong idea, he was as crooked as anyone running the show down here now. He followed the progress of the railroad with a tent saloon, keeping the workers liquored up. He ran girls out of it too. He’d hold court and charge fines he’d just keep for himself. If he showed up to a spot that had competition he’d lace their whiskey with kerosene or shoot the place up. We’re talking about the man that named this town. That’s the type of character living in the dry dead soil around here. Bad news.”  

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“You knew my dad?” “Not well, kid. But I understand you hardly knew him yourself.  He was a good enough guy, so ya know. Part of the family down here.”   “Doesn’t sound like you like it much around here.” “My family rang-out this land. I’d like to bring some juice back to it. Do right. Some of the ones that cross looking for honest freedom I help out. Every-oncein-a-while a couple of dumb asses like yourselves.”  Tobias parked his truck behind the saloon.  “Hop on out, I got something for ya. Said you’re trying to make it to Big Bend, right?”   “Dale and I were supposed to go the week after he died.” “You can leave your stuff for now. C’mon back to the barn with me.”   Tobias led them back to the barn and opened the massive door. Inside there were stockpiled dry-goods, three wornout trucks, several helium tanks and weather balloons. “I got this old ranchtruck I’m just gonna give ya. It’ll get ya to Big Bend.  It’s a Ford, but it’s got a Jap motor in it so it might get ya back to Nashville if you wish it hard enough.”   “What’s in the tanks?” “That’s what I do out here. I monitor, looking for crossers that need help.  I fix cameras to the balloons and send them up on a tether.  I can tell by the paths they’re using and by where and how often they stop if they’re cartel or not.  The bad guys got it down to science.  The women and children get caught up pretty easy.  I like to give them a fair chance if I can. That’s how I spotted you.”   “Border Patrol doesn’t give you any trouble?” “I tip ‘em off on enough cartel shit to keep them off my back. I’m sure they’ll shut me down eventually.  Hop on in. We’ll drive it back up to my truck and y’all can load up. Can probably make it for sundown still.”   They loaded up the ’87 Ranger with their shit. Tobias screwed Dylan’s Tennessee tag on for him. “Now y’all get the fuck out of here.” He turned to Heidi, “Your pops wasn’t all bad. He was a son-of-a-bitch, but not all bad.”

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COFFEE BREAKFAST LUNCH OPEN DAILY 7AM-4PM

700 FATHERLAND ST. 615.770.7097 SKYBLUECOFFEE.COM E S TA B L I S H E D 2 0 1 0 # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

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WITH THEIR NEW ALBUM, WAKE UP LAUGHING,

MUSIC BAND HAS BECOME A BAND YOU HAVE TO

TAKE SERIOUSLY—EVEN IF THEY DON’T ALWAYS TAKE THEMSELVES VERY SERIOUSLY

BY SCOTT MARQUART | PHOTOS BY REBECCA ADLER

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THE EAST ROOM OFF OF GALLATIN AVENUE IS PACKED, though it’s a little hard to tell exactly how packed, since at any given time there are just as many folks smoking cigarettes out back as there are jammed onto the venue’s main floor. But once the first chords ring out from Harry Kagan’s blonde, singlepickup Telecaster as his band, Music Band, tears into their set just minutes before midnight, everyone manages to push in through the back doors pretty quickly. After years of hard work playing every show around town that would have them, Music Band’s debut album, Wake Up Laughing, just came out through Infinity Cat and Dine Alone Records—and damn near everybody who’s ever played on a bill with them is here to celebrate. Harry and his bandmates—bassist Duncan Shea and drummer Lee Putney—are lined up at the front of the stage, filling every musical bar with the vigor only a three-piece can, accentuating beats in each line in perfect lockstep with one another. Their energetic brand of rock ‘n’ roll is catchy enough to hook you on the first taste, but most of us in this room have seen these guys at least half a dozen times by now, and we don’t need any convincing. The crowd screams, howls, and banters along with the band through whole songs and the spaces in between. After the third or fourth song winds up, Harry hears something from the audience that makes him chuckle bashfully. “This is the one place I know we’ll always get heckled,” he says with a wry smile. “Here’s another track straight out of Nashville.” Harry bursts into album opener “Day Stealer,” singing, “I can

be a stranger if I want to.” Well, maybe somewhere, but not here. When I catch up to the boys again a few days later, they’re enjoying a rare afternoon off in the midst of a heavy touring schedule that by mid2016 will have taken them all across the United States and through quite a bit of Canada as well. We’re sitting around an end table on the back porch of Harry’s house, in a quiet neighborhood out past Trinity Lane. Harry leans back on a wooden director’s chair, scratching at the knife tattooed on his right forearm. “We just finished six weeks with Diarrhea Planet,” he nods his head toward Ian—the drummer for Diarrhea Planet—who’s sitting up against the glass door, trying to mind his own business. “And we’re about to leave again for the East Coast on Saturday or Sunday for like two weeks.” They’ve done stints on the road with a number of local acts, from labelmates JEFF the Brotherhood to Those Darlins. But on this next tour, they’ll be heading out all on their own, and they’re trying to get used to the idea of being a headlining band themselves. If you pay much attention to the local DIY rock ‘n’ roll scene, you probably started bumping into Music Band a few years ago when they seemed to open a show every other week at the now-defunct (and sorely missed) Stone Fox on 51st. At first, their tongue-in-cheek name made it tempting to write them off as just another punky garage rock band playing weekend shows for fun, but they kept evolving month after month. Every show, they came back with more energy, a broader dynamic range, and catchier, more developed songs, until there was no

denying that they were for real. Though Music Band has grown by leaps and bounds over the past few years, they’ve been a band for much longer, and best friends for even longer than that. Harry, Duncan, and Lee first met in 2008 when they were all students at Ithaca College in upstate New York. The band came two years later, after the name came to Harry in an epiphany. “I remember I had started writing songs, and I was home in Chicago for a holiday from school,” he says. Sitting in his friend’s backyard, the name just came to him. He got his roommates in on the act, and next thing they knew Music Band was born. There wasn’t much of a music scene in their small college town, so when touring bands came through to play at the college clubs, they were the de facto opening act. Their college friend Reece Lazarus—who now lives in Nashville and plays bass for local phenom Bully—was responsible for booking most of the shows in Ithaca, and even back then, he had a thing for Nashville bands. JEFF the Brotherhood, Those Darlins, Jessica Lea Mayfield, and Richie Kirkpatrick were just a few of the Nashville artists Music Band opened for while they were still in school. When they graduated and decided to keep playing music together, they knew they needed to find a new city where they could grow and hone their craft. After seeing firsthand how many good bands were coming out of Nashville, moving here was a no-brainer. Once they got into town, they kept living and playing music together, but they were careful not to move too fast. They even lived in town for nearly a year before playing out regularly. Eventually, Reece—

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who had since found a job booking background, then drop out entirely. because of that, and this demographic shows at The Stone Fox—started to “Something bad has happened to me,” of people is going to like it. And then slip them onto bills when he could, he continues softly. The song goes there’s the total opposite where and they made friends in the local through ups and downs but closes it just happens by circumstance. out with a hopeful turn, as Harry You’re friends with some people and scene show by show. “Moving to a new place is all about sings confidently, “Something good you learn how to play the instruhow you approach an existing scene,” is coming to me.” With his matter- ments that are sitting around in the Harry says, leaning forward to knock of-fact style, Harry never uses two living room, and then it sounds the the ash off a cigarette into the tray words when one will do, and he isn’t way it does because of where you on the table. “People have been liv- afraid to state his feelings plainly— come from.” Over the years they’ve conteming here for a long time, doing what be they dour, hopeful, or somewhere plated bringing another musician we want to be doing. And I think the in between. into the fold, but the idea has nevBut their willingness to lay it all unique thing about Nashville is the er taken flight. The flexibility and sense of community around like- on the line doesn’t preclude them transparency of a three-piece setup minded people.” Through that com- from having a little fun, too, and have become a central part of who that comes through clearly in their munity, they met people who helped they are as a band. “With three live show. Harry whips and thrashes them hone in on the music they people, there’s a conversation going about with the momentum of his wanted to make themselves. “Our on musically, whether you like it or guitar parts, and though Duncan and music sounds a lot like the bands not,” Duncan says. “When you place Lee are reserved by comparison, neithat we’re friends with and go to see restrictions on your creativity, ironither is afraid to move around when at shows,” Duncan admits. “When cally, it allows for more creativity to they come to a big part in the song. people ask what our influences are— happen.” And all of that raw energy is presided which is kind of a crazy question— That same less-is-more approach I feel like it’s just bands that we’ve over by their fourth bandmate—a flows through everything the band plush toy of the cat Garfield that’s toured with and bands that we’re does, and it’s one of the main reasat atop Harry’s Fender amp since friends with.” sons Wake Up Laughing turned out their earliest shows. Harry adopted Although Music Band’s no-frills as well as it did. They cut the record it as a totem years ago and has colbrand of rock ‘n’ roll certainly fits in five days at Andrija Tokic’s The lected Garfield paraphernalia ever well within the local rock scene, Bomb Shelter studio, which is probsince. No matter how far they go, they’ve got a sound and an attitude ably most famous for being the place Harry will always put him up there, all their own. Much of that comes where Alabama Shakes recorded every show, for no good reason exfrom Harry’s lyrics, which are hutheir now-classic debut, Boys & Girls. cept that that’s just who he is. morous, clever, and above all, honest. “We did a lot of overdubs on this Music Band isn’t afraid to be The album is full of wit and plenty record, but it wasn’t exactly what themselves, no matter who’s watchof good one-liners—“Like a rock inyou’d expect,” Duncan says. “We ing. This simple honesty—at times side my shoe / I can’t seem to get to didn’t double any guitars except for blithe and others brutal—is exactly you,” off of “Raag, pt. 2” comes to one song. Andrija’s production techwhat makes them so refreshing. mind. Even more often, Harry leads the listener down a familiar path but They aren’t trying to be the coolest nique is not adding stuff, it’s more takes a sharp-tongued turn at the guys in the room; they’re just trying just taking things away to reduce it last second. “She’s all I ever wanted to give you a glimpse of their world, to its simplest form.” Though five days is nothing / if all I ever wanted was a lie,” he unfiltered and unafraid. compared to how long some bands It’s a style that’s sincerely theirs, howls on “Day Stealer.” Many of the spend in the studio, it was the lonborn organically out of being close songs share a recurring sense of exgest Music Band had ever spent on a friends for years. “There’s two ways istential loneliness and vulnerability, recording by a long shot. They went of going about [starting a band],” and nowhere is this more palpable in planning to experiment and add Duncan says, looking up at the roof than on album highlight “Fortune all sorts of layers and textures to of the porch to get his thoughts toGuns.” their songs, but Andrija helped to gether. “One is having your sound “Sometimes I need a reminder / of steer them back to their roots. “[He] already figured out and being like, what I’m doing here / If I close my eyes I might disappear,” Harry sings, Okay, we need a synth player, we’re do- helped us realize that [with the extra as the drums build up steadily in the ing this style of music, this is marketable studio time] we just had more time

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“WHEN YOU PLACE RESTRICTIONS ON YOUR CREATIVITY, IRONICALLY, IT ALLOWS FOR MORE CREATIVITY TO HAPPEN.”

MUSIC BAND: infinity-cat-recordings.myshopify.com Follow Facebook @musicband or Twitter and Instagram @truemusicband native.is

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to spend making these songs sound as much like us as we can,” Harry says. That perspective was exactly what the band needed. They had been playing many of the songs on the record for a few years and had already built them up on the road—what they needed was to find the raw essence of the song and bring that to the fore. Plenty of rock bands hide their songwriting behind raw, fuzz-soaked soundscapes that glue everything together but make it hard to discern the individual parts. So while there’s no shortage of overdrive on this record, the album’s transparency is what really sets it apart—whether it’s in the lyrics or in the sonic landscape that supports them. “Rather than try to make a record that was really niche, or really cool, it was important [to us] to do something that was a little more accessible,” Duncan says. “When we were mixing, we would just have the vocals a little more up front so people could listen to the lyrics more. We didn’t want it to sound super blown out or lo-fi. We didn’t want to mask the sound of the songs in selfconsciousness. We’re presenting them as they are.” Lee nods. “There’s truth in the record,” he says. “Yeah,” Duncan sighs, smiling, “but it’s also goofy.” That’s the thing with Music Band— they’re fun, lighthearted guys who make honest music—and by that token, there’s plenty of fun in the music as well. The band’s willingness to indulge their sense of humor at times, and lay their emotions on the line at others, serves to make the music an even more accurate reflection of the people making it. “A lot of the lyrics and the songwriting, they’re all from really personal experiences,” Harry says. “Writers always say the more specific you get when you’re writing, the more universal the things you’re saying can be.” And by holding such a clear lens up to their unabashed selves, Music Band reaches into the id of each of us to tease at something deep down that’s a lot like they are—fearless, honest, and not afraid to have a little fun.

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Join YEAH! at Southern Girls Rock Camp

Nashville: July 11-16 at Vanderbilt University & Murfreesboro: July 25-30 at MTSU

& Tennessee Teens Rock Camp

Nashville: July 18-23 at Vanderbilt University & Murfreesboro: June 20-24 at Central Magnet www.yeahrocks.org

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SISTERS ALEXIS AND BRITT

S O L E R H AV E TURNED AN

OLD BOILER ROOM INTO NASHVILLE’S MOST UNIQUE C O C K TA I L B A R . Y O U J U S T H AV E TO FIND IT

BY JONAH ELLER-ISAACS | PHOTOS BY ANDREA BEHRENDS

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“BUILDING INTO THE SPACE INSTEAD OF CHANGING IT WAS VERY IMPORTANT TO US, MAKING IT LOOK LIKE EVERYTHING WAS HERE ALREADY.”

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WILLIAM DRIVER, THE FORMER SEA CAPTAIN, turned into entertainment venues in the past, but this was a Union man beset on all sides by the Confeder- new addition to Nashville’s cocktail scene has an inacy. In 1837, the Massachusetts-born Driver settled in comparable grandeur. William Driver would be proud. The Soler sisters, Alexis and Britt, are the mixoloNashville after a long career at sea, bringing with him the seventeen-foot-long United States flag that served gists behind this insane masterpiece of industrial conas the masthead on his journeys around the globe. On version. Alexis and Ben Clemons opened No. 308 in holidays, Driver proudly displayed the flag above the 2011, and their Gallatin Avenue bar quickly became a street in front of his home, hanging the enormous beloved Eastside staple. Britt hopped on after finishbanner between his attic and the high branches of a ing college, and now the sisters have established their locust tree across what is now Fifth Avenue South. But own foothold on the other side of the river. When I when Tennessee seceded from the Union in 1861, the arrive, Britt welcomes me from behind the bar with Stars and Stripes was less welcome. When the new a smile. She and her sister join me at a cushy leather Confederate governor sent his men to collect Driver’s booth and tell me all about their new adventure. Our conversation is loud and enthusiastic, with libfamous flag, the fearless mariner turned them away. An armed squad arrived for a second attempt. Again, eral expletives. Old Glory opened its doors in March, Driver refused to yield. Fearing for the safety of his less than two months ago. “That was a whirlwind! I beloved flag, he asked local women who were friendly don’t even fucking remember,” Britt exclaims. “It feels to the Union cause to sew the flag within a calico quilt. like we’ve been open a year,” Alexis adds, with a hint Despite repeated searches of Driver’s home, his flag of weariness. Britt counters, “A year, and then like two remained concealed in its ingenious disguise. No one weeks at the same time!” Five-plus years at 308 gave the Soler sisters a solid managed to find William Driver’s flag—the one he sense of the Eastside vibe, but Edgehill was totally called “Old Glory.” The captain’s flag now resides at the Smithsonian, foreign, as Alexis explains. “Coming to a new neighbut another Old Glory has arrived in Nashville. It’s borhood, we were kind of unsure of what was gonna just as grand as its namesake and almost as well-hid- happen because we don’t really know the dynamic den. Strolling through the shops at Edgehill Village, around here.” Their fears quickly proved unfounded. “When we you could walk past the entrance to Old Glory a hundred times and still miss it. The black door is unas- were building out, people would come to us and be suming, situated in an interior courtyard that weaves like, ‘Oh! I’m so excited! We need something like that.’ between Taco Mamacita and Bella Napoli Pizzeria. A So that was reassuring,” Britt shares. “I don’t think we wide golden triangle painted on the surrounding brick expected quite the response that we received, ‘cause it is the only clue that something out of the ordinary was just all at once. [We were] flooded with awesome people coming and visiting us.” might be inside. The build-out was a complicated affair, tangling I’ll admit I wander for a while, walking with false certainty past diners in the portico, pausing at random the Solers in the massive undertaking for more than doorways that most likely contain brooms. Eventually a year. “We designed the space,” Alexis states proudly, the sounds of a classic country song drift from behind then pauses for a beat as she and her sister take a satisthe triangle and draw me toward my destination. I fied glance around us. I ask about their reaction when step into Old Glory, and moving down into the space they first saw the remarkable space. They both laugh. via a curling staircase with a gorgeous Art Deco brass “We didn’t really say anything,” Britt tells me. “It was railing, the magnificent scope of the place comes into one of those sisterly moments where we just walked view. Tall brick walls soar up to a ceiling high above around . . . and we just looked at each other and just me­—it must be at least fifty feet up. A broad smoke- kept looking, and we were like, ‘Yeah. This is it.’” Though the fundamental design concept was all stack rises toward rows of clerestory windows. Rusted chains and knotted ropes hang from various metal re- the Solers’, they had plenty of help: Powell Architects mainders of the room’s previous life. Two terrace lev- assisted with contracting; Lindsay Meacham of Red els are stacked above the bar. This was once the boiler Rock Tileworks added the “OG” custom tiles that room of White Way Cleaners, a commercial laundry feature prominently; Andrew Ferrin of Ferrin Ironcompany that owned the space going back to the Works designed the metal elements, such as the rail1920s. I’ve seen rehabbed warehouses and factories ing of the central stair. “They’ve made our vision what

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OLD GLORY: Follow on Facebook @oldglory or Instagram @oldglorynashville native.is

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we wanted it to be,” Britt tells me. will highlight the wide variety of Alexis also recognizes the value of ice they offer: pebble ice; Koldeverything the community brought Draft half cubes, preferred by barto Old Glory. “I think that’s what tenders for their ease of service; made the space really special. Ob- and custom-cut, crystal-clear ice viously it’s super cool as it was, the carved from three-hundred-pound day we walked in. But building into blocks crafted in a massive Clinethe space instead of changing it bell machine. Unique cocktails in was very important to us, making an unparalleled space deserve only it look like everything was here al- the best in frozen water. Craft cocktails also merit a fine ready.” Luckily for the cocktail enthusi- meal. Though the ceilings of Old asts of Nashville, Old Glory is more Glory are actually sixty feet tall, the than just a pretty, wrought-iron floor space below is limited, makface. Their distinctive menu fea- ing food production a particular tures flavors from the Solers’ Mi- challenge. Alexis and Britt brought ami childhood, giving Nashvillians on Rachel Tumerman, a chef origia sip of Latin American and Carib- nally from Madison, Wisconsin, but bean fare with drinks like the Cow- didn’t give her much in the way of boy Curtis, which consists of tequi- a kitchen. Rachel joins our converla, fresh grapefruit, and Cholula hot sation, and I ask her how she mansauce. Or the Beet Happening, with ages. “They said, ‘You’re not going mezcal, beets, greek yogurt, and to have a hood system,’” she recalls dill, which is, as Britt puts it with with a resigned sigh. “Not having a a smile, “inspired by our Jewiness!” hood system means that you don’t To accompany their unusual have a fryer, or an oven, or a stove, beverages, the sisters developed or fire in general—which are typiwhat they call their “ice program.” cal cooking methods.” Everyone at Old Glory sports some of the finest the table laughs. Rachel continues, ice in Nashville, and their summer “I’m just quite insane enough to be menu currently in development like, ‘Oh yeah, yeah, no, it’s totally # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

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fine.’” As a veteran of underground restaurants, Rachel was used to working with constraints, recalling one multicourse meal she had to prepare without access to running water. Lacking fire, Old Glory’s food offerings could easily be pedestrian. Instead of basic, bland sandwiches, Rachel turned to alternative techniques: “Curing, fermentations, different methods of breaking down food and making it edible without necessarily having to apply heat.” Rachel’s effervescent personality and gung ho attitude blend well with the Soler sisters. The team instantly hit it off after meeting through mutual friends, and the exuberance these three talented women share gives Old Glory a high-energy atmosphere. Alexis fell in love with the industry at an early age, dropping out of high school and working in every facet of the business: “There was no other choice for me. I feel so passionately that I get teary when I talk about it!” She explains that with both 308 and Old Glory, their focus is on providing a good time for their customers. And they lead by example. “We’re bartenders. We have fun in life,” Alexis points out, but that’s not the only reason people have enjoyed their establishments over the years. “Ultimately, it’s the people that draw you in—the family, the hospitality,” she adds. Their hospitality in action: Saturday night at Old Glory is a hot, sexy mess. College students fresh from finals mingle with folks coming to check out Nashville’s newest hot spot. A line of patrons snakes up the central staircase. Metal blends into brick, stone into flesh. The distinctive squiggles of recent NATIVE cover artist Alic Daniel trace a path to the mezzanines. The platforms and balconies give the place a cinematic scope. People are watching people who are watching people. Trays of food make their way around the crowd: smoked potatoes with tasso ham; house-cured lox; glass jars full of pickled vegetables. In the dim light, the towering ceiling seems even higher. And in the middle of it all, Alexis and Britt Soler stand together, watching Old Glory unfurl.

MEN. WOMEN. HOME. GIFT.

Nutrition + Lifes tyl e Coaching

Offering Complimentary Consultations, Pantry Makeovers, Healthy Recipes, & More!

www.sararosehealth.com

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THE CITY THAT LISTENS MUSICIANS CORNER TURNS THE SPOTLIGHT ON THE FINEST ARTISTS RESIDING AND MAKING MUSIC IN MUSIC CITY

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Marathon Pilates will be having a pop-up series of classes throughout the summer! The first pop-up is an HIIT class on June 4th and 25th. This class will be 90 minutes of high intensity interval training using pilates equipment, pilates movement and alignment principles. You'll be circulating around the studio, using equipment, and also incorporating some ma jor Pilates strength training.

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615-988-0513 - 525 Hagan St. - AmericanHotelLiquidators.com / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// # N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE Open 10am-6pm Mon-Sat and 12-5pm Sunday


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YOUR FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD OCCULT SHOP

A LOOK INTO THE MAGICKAL WORLD OF DRACONIS ARCANUM

BY LINDSEY BUTTON | PHOTOS BY DANIELLE ATKINS 58 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// 58 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

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WITH A CRYPTIC NAME LIKE “DRACONIS AR- active in the church, read the Bible cover to cover, I CANUM,” one might expect to find a dark, cave-like started having more questions. So I started explorshop full of satanist tools and black magic. But what ing and meeting tons of people and learning about I (and hopefully many others seriously interested all different paths.” The two main areas Rebecca focuses on are hooin the spiritual wisdom that can be taken from the doo/conjure and ceremonial magick. “They mesh so different paths of pagan-based religions and folk well because there are so many people that practice magick) want to share with others is that there’s a lot of that folk magick . . . even though those paths nothing satanically scary about an occult shop or seem entirely opposite. The folk magick is candles, taking an interest in these spiritual paths. Rebecca herbs, oils, and incense, and the ceremonial magick Petersen’s shop, Draconis Arcanum, is the perfect is a lot more dramatic rituals that don’t utilize example of how open and inviting an occult shop candle magick. You’re not going to find very many can be. Wicca books here because there are a couple of other Draconis arcanum is Latin for “the hidden dragplaces here in town that offer that and specialize in on.” “My original logo was an ouroboros,” Rebecca that and do very well. But I feel comfortable with the explains, “which is the snake or the dragon eating conjure and the ceremonial magick. I feel comfortits own tail. And that’s about discovering the inable talking to people about it, helping to guide them, ner truth and it also represents the cycle of nature. and figuring out where they need to go on their path Dragons are known for being protective and guardnext or helping them with a situation.” ing treasures. The European ones are hidden in caves, Rebecca’s business can be traced back to the midand you know with the occult, it’s a lot of delving 90s when she began working at metaphysical festiinto the hidden and bringing it to light. So I thought vals. “I was living up in Milwaukee at the time, and that name really fit because it’s about that journey of the big metaphysical shop had closed,” she explains. finding out about your inner self and bringing that “People kept coming to me, asking, ‘Do you have any to light.” extra lavender? Do you have any extra patchouli?’ One particular online blurb about Draconis ArSo I started buying a little bit more just to help out canum mildly associates the shop with satanism. and started developing from there.” In 2003, ReSatanism, however, is not equivalent to paganism becca moved to Chicago and started teaching classes and magick as many tend to believe. “I was very enthrough metaphysical bookstores and developing tertained by that,” Rebecca says. “Maybe because I her online store. “We had already been talking about know that we’re in the Bible Belt, so you’ve got this opening up a shop in Chicago when my husband endwhole ‘Witchcraft is evil, it’s from Satan’ [mentality] ed up getting a job offer down here about three years . . . Considering that anywhere between a third to ago, so we decided to figure out what the [metaphyshalf of my customers are devout Christians that go ical] needs for Nashville were and opened the store to church every Sunday, I’m like, ‘Yeah, right,’” she about two years ago.” laughs. “I know that there’s been that battle within What you’ll actually find in Draconis Arcanum are a lot of pagan movements about trying to shed that rare and limited edition books; incense; tarot cards satanic connotation . . . so that can be a little bit frusand other divination sets; sage for smudging; books trating. But also, I saw it as appealing to some of the full of information about dream interpretation, hooones that are on the darker side. And I’m okay with doo, voodoo, Santeria, and other forms of spellwork; that too.” resins for incense; an extensive variety of herbs, Folk magick and metaphysics were always a part bath blends, essential oils, and zodiac oils (which of Rebecca’s family growing up. “It was never called are made with the herbs associated with the planet ‘spellwork’ or ‘witchcraft’ or anything,” she explains. and element that coordinate with the sign, using a “It was just what we did and I saw the effects of it and combination of old hoodoo formulas and alchemical was curious how it worked and whether or not my working); and candles galore, some that are already family was the only one doing it. Although I was very

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loaded with oils and herbs for specific situations. I notice she has a couple copies of Buckland’s Complete Book of Witchcraft by Raymond Buckland, which was the book that raised my own personal interest in Wicca. She tells me it is one of the few books on Wicca that she does like to keep in the store. “It’s a great introduction,” she states. “It’s the one I always suggest if people are interested but not sure what path to go down. It allows you to experiment, and you learn that nothing bad is going to happen; you’re not going to raise a demon. The most you’re going to do is clear out the bad stuff.” Rebecca curates her store very carefully. She tries to only stock items that she is truly knowledgeable about. “The shops that I loved were the ones where the people working there were able to help if there was a question. Most of the customers have questions, and they may be stuck or overwhelmed with everything and they’re looking for new information. So most of my days here have been doing

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mini consultations. One of the things I have been finding that I really enjoy about running the shop is that I get to interact with people on all parts of their spiritual journeys. Whether they’re beginning or advanced, there’s always something they can gain.” Rebecca also offers classes and workshops in her space. “We do classes almost every single weekend, ranging from hoodoo and conjure to something as simple as how to dress a seven-day candle. We offer full-moon rituals that are open to everyone and familyfriendly. The lady who runs it incorporates any children who are present in helping out, and with those, it’s more focused on the folklore associated with the energy of that month’s moon. For example, the most recent one was the snow moon, and it was about cleaning out, doing that spring cleaning, thinking about what we want to clean out of our lives, that clutter that prevents us from laying a good foundation. It’s like with gardens, you’ve got to clean out all of the debris that has ended


“With any candle you get, you up there over the winter to be able want to clean it,” She continues. to plant.” Rebecca offers to give me a per- “It cleans off dust and dirt, but it sonal mini class on how to dress a also cleans off whatever energy seven-day candle. She asks if there that could have been on there is a particular situation in my life from before, because you never that I want a little magical help know who was touching it or with, because she can tailor the what their energy was. You want candle dressing to my specific situ- to make sure it’s as clean as posation. I tell her I want to focus on sible. You can use Florida water, or letting go of past relationships so I salt water, or blessed water. And can open myself up to new friend- blessed water can be something as ships and letting new people in. simple as water you have concenIn short, letting go in order to be trated good intents into. Florida open to change. She immediately water is used more in conjure and knows which herbs and oils she’s voodoo and Santeria. The blessed going to use. She goes and grabs water is more on the ceremonial a candle. “What I picked was a side. The next step would be addwhite candle,” she explains to me. ing an oil that’s either a ‘simple,’ “White represents all colors, and so which would be things like lavenit is a good basis. You mentioned der or patchouli essential oil, or a wanting to let go, and typically blended oil, which would be called letting go would be a black one a ‘conditioned’ oil. With this one, to release, but at the same time, I picked ‘Cut and Clear’ because you’re wanting to bring in connec- you’re cutting through the old tions. Attraction is usually a pink stuff to make way.” It appropriateone, but since this is a bit of a dual ly has a clean scent, slightly citrus. Because she is using a candle purpose—clearing out to bring in—I wanted to do something that in a glass cylinder and she can’t captures both, and that white one directly rub the oil down the sides of the candle, she takes a screwcaptures both.”

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DRACONIS ARCANUM: draconis-arcanum.com Follow on Facebook and Twitter @DraconisArcanum native.is

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driver and pushes it deep into the wax to make three holes and then drips the oil into each hole with a dropper. The next step is to add the herbs into the candle. “I picked jasmine because it draws in love and prosperity, which addresses general friendships, and it’s good also for dream magick, which helps keep your dreams nice and positive. It also heightens your intuition, so it will help direct you in those ways that you’re going to meet those people that you want to meet.” She uses the buds of jasmine to plug up the holes of the candle. “And now what we want to do is focus that intent, and as you’re picturing that intent, you want to envision [it] coming through your hands, going through your fingertips, flowing out. You’re sending that idea out into the universe. Then, once you’ve got that vision going, that intent strong in your mind and going through your fingers, you want to send that into the candle. You want to visualize that energy, that intent going into the candle.” She focuses and slowly moves her fingers up and down the candle. “Then, once you’ve got that intent in there, you want to seal it off. There’s a couple different ways you can seal it off. One way would be tapping it on top three times, the other would be tapping it on the table three times. Also, [practically], it helps get the oil in those holes a little bit better.” “With this candle, it’s now dressed, it’s ready to do its job, all you would need to do is light it and let it go. As the candle burns, it’s taking that intent you put into it and sending it to the universe.” She warns me to never blow it out, because breath is intent and if you blow it out, you’re saying you’re done with your intent. Instead, if you must extinguish it while you leave the house, you can suffocate the flame with a plate or other tool. Rebecca is a bit like a “Draconis Arcanum” herself, tucked away on Trinity Lane in deep East Nashville, her shop full of magical treasures. She is becoming less and less “arcanum” with so many locals approaching her for aid in their spiritual journeys. Rebecca and Draconis Arcanum are only here to help.

NASHVILLE’S COMMUNITY CENTER FOR JAZZ

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THE MEMBERS OF *REPEAT

REPEAT TALK ABOUT ROAD LIFE, NEW BEGINNINGS, AND BEING A FAMILY BUSINESS

BY LUKE LEVENSON | PHOTOS BY DYLAN REYES

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JARED CORDER AND ANDY glamorous band in the world, and disguised as a curse—he broke HERRIN are sitting shoulder to the soul in their music isn’t fu- his foot while trying to impress a shoulder in the back corner of eled by marketable heartbreak, but girl by doing tricks on a carnival Pinewood Social on a Wednesday that’s the way they like it. What slide. It was right at the beginning night. Kristyn Corder is catty-cor- they lack in world-weariness they of summer break, and there wasn’t ner to Jared, her husband, who’s make up for in road-trodden ro- much to do in his small town when sipping a Miller High Life. It’s mance, talent, and band chemistry. you couldn’t use your foot, so he “To us, this is legitimately a stayed indoors and practiced on their date night. family business,” Kristyn explains. his dad’s electric guitar and amp. Sorry for third-wheeling—fourth “I just sat there for months teach“We’re inseparable.” wheeling, I guess. ing myself the instrument,” he Like most family businesses, “Oh no!” Kristyn reassures me says. “I realized that was the thing this one started at home. after setting down her almond that could impress all the cute Jared and Kristyn married in milk cappuccino. “We’re not like, girls.” October 2012 and started living at on a date, but we’re definitely in Years later, after begging his date-night mode. When you travel a house on Shelby Avenue. Kristyn parents to let him enroll in normal was doing branding and design for a lot, you have to set aside certain school, they let him try and test Jared’s then-dwindling pop rock times.” into community college, which he band via her marketing company *repeat repeat, the musical did at age sixteen. Unsurprisingly, Apple Road. Jared had lost his manifestation of this date night he was exposed to some of the job at FYE (where he met Andy) trio, just got back from a twoless-than-pious habits of early- to months before when the legendweek stint in the Northeast. They mid-twentysomethings in college ary record store closed its doors. should be tired from the constant 101 courses—smoking, drinking, They were at a bit of a crossroads, slew of short tours, the promotion and rock music. where Jared had a particular vifor their upcoming sophomore al“It was a totally different world bum, Floral Canyon (set to release sion for how he wanted his music than what I had grown up with,” to sound but he wasn’t getting it digitally July 15), and the strain he says. “But I ate it up and loved from his band, and Kristyn was that comes with touring the counevery second of it.” dedicated to helping him develop try in a small Virgin van, but they Two years in, he transferred to any new projects that might come don’t look it. Jared’s brown hair Arizona State, where he earned his along. On the other end of things, is somewhat messy as usual, but bachelor’s in classical guitar at age Andy had also lost his job when it’s not because he’s sluggish. He twenty-one. After graduating, he FYE shut down, and his own band seems oddly composed and cafmoved to Nashville in 2009 to purfell apart a few months later. It feinated at the same time. “I have a lot of energy,” he says. was the perfect storm that led to sue a career in music, and he got a “I just want to rock out, and Kristyn the beachy pop rock inception of job at FYE to make ends meet. Enter Andy—a softer-spoken is very good at being poised. That *repeat repeat, but to appreciate band member than Jared, but the story you have to explore each dynamic plays out on the road. If it louder on the drums than Jared is member’s musical backgrounds. were just Andy and me, we could on the guitar and Kristyn is on the Jared grew up in Gilbert, Arizoprobably make do cramming in synthesizer. He grew up in Alton, na—a suburban town he compares the van, getting sweaty, and sleepIllinois, and, like Jared, came upon to the neighborhood on Weeds—in ing on the couch. Kristyn helps his instrument by way of seema devout Christian home. He was keep things together.” ing misfortune. When he was ten homeschooled, something he al“So we turned the middle of the years old, he asked for a guitar for ways hated, and his parents signed van into a living room,” Kristyn Christmas. His dad, who was a lithim up for club sports every year. adds. “It’s got a bean bag chair, tle tipsy when Andy asked, thought “I was so bad at all of them,” he tapestry, and you can push a buthe said drums, and when Christsays. “I was young and adolescent, ton and the backseat turns into a mas morning came Andy was too and I was starting to like girls. I bed.” polite to act disappointed. didn’t have a way to impress them “It’s very romantic,” Jared says, “So I just sat down, and here because I sucked at sports.” and Kristyn laughs. I am all these years later!” he reBut then—an ironic blessing No, they don’t roll like the most

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members fondly. “I would have enjoyed drums more than guitar anyway, so maybe my dad just knew that.” When the time came, Andy went to community college and earned an associate of arts degree, then in 2011 he moved to Nashville to try and find studio work. In October he got a job at FYE. “I remember the first time we met,” Andy says to Jared. “It was my first day at FYE, and all they had to give me was this XXL store shirt to wear. So I was embarrassed because I had this nightgown of a shirt on, and someone introduced us and you were wearing a leather jacket and sunglasses. You were clocking in, and you looked at me and said, ‘Right on,’ and walked away. I remember thinking, Man, that guy is cool.” Everyone laughs, and Kristyn and Jared look at each other. Their love is obvious by these looks, if not by their forearm tattoos of each other’s initials, and it’s hard to believe they haven’t always known each other. But Kristyn moved to Nashville two years before Jared, and she didn’t come here to be a pop rock singer. She grew up in Katy, Texas, before attending SMU in Dallas with hopes of pursuing a career in acting. After one semester, she transferred to UC Santa Barbara in California, and then she transferred to the American Academy of Dramatic Arts in L.A. “I wanted to be in sitcoms originally,” she says. “After I graduated, though, I got some work at one of the top ten PR firms. They did

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Taco Bell and Hilton Hotels and stuff like that. I wanted to keep moving, and I ended up in Nashville. I started Apple Road here.” It was Apple Road that brought her and Jared together. While working with the headlining band at a show Jared’s old band was playing, she met him afterward and they started talking. “I just got the biggest kick out of him as a front man,” Kristyn says. “So I started helping him develop his band with branding and graphic design stuff. Later on we started dating, and the rest is history.” Now we’re back to that crossroads in 2012. Just a few months after the wedding, Jared and Andy were looking for work and new musical outlets, and Kristyn was trying to get Apple Road off the ground. Jared was also in the midst of working with Nashville producer Gregory Lattimer (Albert Hammond Jr. of The Strokes), who was pushing him to seek out bandmates to play his new music. Jared called Andy out of the blue. “My initial thought was no way,” Andy remembers. “Just because starting a band, starting another one, is such a hard thing, you know? But I told him we could see how it goes, and we started practicing. Kristyn kind of hung around and gave us tips every now and again.” Kristyn started singing the same unintentional way that Andy and Jared had picked up their instruments. While showing some of their tunes to Lattimer, the boys called Kristyn in to sing harmonies as a model for what they would


*repeat repeat: repeatrepeatmusic.com Follow on Facebook @repeatrepeat or Twitter and Instagram @repeatx2 native.is

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be if they could find a female singer. “Lattimer just started laughing,” Jared says. “He turned around and said, ‘You’ve found your girl singer.’ We were all a bit shocked. I mean, we knew Kristyn could sing, but we never planned on being in a band together. Then I thought, Well, most of the songs are about you anyway, so it kind of makes sense!” These first songs ended up being recorded in the basement of the Corders’ house and became the band’s debut, Bad Latitude, released March 2014. It’s an upbeat album all about love, with poppy, high-octane songs like “Not the One,” which still gets frequent airplay on Lightning 100, and simple surf rock anthems like the band’s first-ever single, “12345678.” Bad Latitude put *repeat repeat on the map in Nashville not only because of the attention it got from Lightning 100, but also because of the hard work and planning that went into the project. “This is the only band I’ve been in that has built every year just the way we’ve wanted it to,” Andy says. “It’s great because every time something good happens to this band, it kind of erases something bad from the old days with other bands.” Jared cites one particularly good night in Washington, DC, a few months back when around sixty people showed just to see them. Some of them had driven two hours. It’s shows like these that encourage the band to keep touring and growing the way they are. Their two single releases in anticipation of Floral Canyon—“Mostly” in May 2015 and “Plugged In” in March—show the members’ maturing sonic disposition, which invites their fans to a heavier, headier soundscape. “I allowed myself to touch on more themes writing the songs for the new album,” Jared says. “There’s more stuff in there, you know? We like the sexiness with the darkness. We like the punchiness. We like the maturity. Floral Canyon is making way for that, and I think it’s good.” If *repeat repeat really is a family business, the kids are growing up.

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ANIMAL OF THE MONTH

You can catch me at my most sadistic right after I pull a tick out of my nethers. If I’m at home during the occasion, the extraction turns ceremonial and concludes with a ritualistic burning by blowtorch. However, the purist naturalist in me wants to respect the little guys. Aren’t they just trying to get by like the rest of us? As an arachnid, some of the tick’s most distinguishing characteristics are its eight legs and its mouthparts called chelicerae. Most of us are all too familiar with the flesh-tearing and blood-sucking mouthparts of the tick. But if you can take a step back from the vampiric acts, the logistics required for a tick to get a meal might give you some respect for the little parasite. A tick must suck blood—there are no substitutes. In order to find its meal, it senses carbon dioxide or heat released from a mammal host and positions itself in its victim’s trajectory by crawling to the highest point, like the tip of a blade of grass. Poised with its front four legs in the air, it waits to grab onto an unsuspecting passerby. Once aboard, the tick finds a hidden crevice in the hinterlands of the host and digs in. Normally, our body would react to such a breach by clotting the wound, but ticks release a chemical that prevents clotting, thereby getting a steady fountain of blood. In addition, ticks release a mild painkiller so that the host is none the wiser (hence the reason tick bites don’t itch until after you pull them out). If there are any pesky microbes in the tick’s gut, the blood will trigger the microbes to migrate to the tick’s saliva glands, where they will be drooled into the host. That last step is when a tick bite can turn from inconvenient to threatening. Ticks carry a number of bacteria and viruses that can give us diseases, the most well-known of these being Lyme disease. Fortunately for us, the threat of catching this is much greater for our friends farther north. Black-legged ticks (also called deer ticks) carry

Written by Cooper Breeden*

Lyme, and they’re not common this far south. The most common tick we have is the American dog tick, which can harbor the bugs that cause Rocky Mountain spotted fever. However, this is rare since only a small percentage of ticks are carriers of this disease. A tick-borne disease is transmitted when it drools its disease-laden bacteria into your body. It can take a while for the bacteria to make its way from the tick’s gut to its salivary gland, so as long as a tick is removed before that happens, then you’ll probably escape disease-free. The key is to remove a tick as soon as you see it—typically it takes a day or two of blood sucking before the disease is passed. Aside from the American dog tick and rare deer tick, we have two other ticks that are commonly found in Tennessee: lone star ticks and brown dog ticks. The female lone star tick is by far the easiest to identify with a white dot in the center of her back. While it may be difficult to restrain your bloodlust after finding one of these suckers on your body, you might consider saving a tick if you’re not sure how long it’s been latched on. In the unfortunate event that a doctor’s visit is necessary, the tick could help with a diagnosis. Experts have noticed a spread of ticks in recent years. The cause remains unknown, but there are a host of guesses—climate change, larger deer and other host populations, land use practices, etc. If fewer deer mean fewer ticks, then recent cougar sightings could be a boon for public health. As interesting as a tick might be through the objective lens of an entomologist, I wouldn’t be displeased if I never had one suck my blood again. I, for one, would rejoice at the return of cougars and any other Pleistocene megafauna, especially if it means fewer of these disease-ridden microfauna.

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NATIVE | JUNE 2016 | NASHVILLE, TN  

FEATURING: Old Glory, Music Band, *repeat repeat, Jeremy McAnulty, Draconis Arcanum, and many more.

NATIVE | JUNE 2016 | NASHVILLE, TN  

FEATURING: Old Glory, Music Band, *repeat repeat, Jeremy McAnulty, Draconis Arcanum, and many more.

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