Page 1

FEBRUARY

2016


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 1


2 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

# N AT IVE N AS H VIL LE


presents

THE UK'S BIGGEST ALTERNATIVE DANCE PARTY

ACME

LAST SATURDAY OF THE MONTH

THE ROOFTOP AT

9PM

WWW.THEACMENASHVILLE.COM WWW.ACMERADIOLIVE.COM WWW.THEPROPAGANDA.COM # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3


M E N ' S S TO R E • CU S TO M C L OT H I N G B A R • B A R B ER S H OP

BARBER SERVICES Haircut.................................$39 Two Week Haircut Special...$25 Beard Trim.....................$10-15 Complete Shave..................$35 Weekly Shave Special.........$19 T.J. KLAUSING - MASTER BARBER @TIMOTHYJOSEPH_K

Q: What can men expect when they come in for a service? A.: Off the bat, they should expect to be comfortable. Comfort is a big focus

of mine. However consistency and the ability to have a haircut grow out correctly are probably more important. Anyone can make a cut look good the day of, having the cut get better with growth shows quality work.

Q: What is the difference between your services and other places? A: Well, I'm an actual Barber. Been licensed for 12 years. So I had to learn

from the true traditional old school barbers. So you're guaranteed to get a classic barber service. I pay attention to detail because that's how I learned. I'll be upfront and honest with what's going on with the gentleman's hair.

Q: Any advice for men looking for a quality haircut? A: If you're looking for a barber and aren't sure how to distinguish between a

licensed cosmetologist and licensed Barber. The first thing you ask your person: Which license do you hold? If they aren't a Barber and that's what you want, politely leave and find a Barber. You'd be surprised how many psuedo-barbers are out there now. Don't be fooled, the real thing is better. FIND AN ACTUAL BARBER.

4 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

# N AT IVE N AS H VIL LE

615.810.9442 • 3307 WEST END AVE • WWW.HAYMAKERSANDCO.COM


THE CITY THAT LISTENS MUSICIANS CORNER TURNS THE SPOTLIGHT ON THE FINEST ARTISTS RESIDING IN MUSIC CITY

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5


6 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

# N AT IVE N AS H VIL LE


TABLE OF CONTENTS FEBRUARY 2016

20

24

52

44

18

THE GOODS 15 Beer from Here 18 Cocktail of the Month 20 Master Platers 58 Shooting the Shit: Brothers Design Co. 73 You Oughta Know 74 History Buff: War Memorial Auditorium 78 Animal of the Month

FEATURES

34

24 Artist Spotlight: Alic Daniel 34 Lilly Hansen 44 Keith Batts 52 East CAN 64 Turnip Green Creative Reuse

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7


SARAH SEVEN, CLAIRE PETTIBONE, RUE DE SEINE, SARAH JANKS, HOUGHTON, CHRISTOS, ANNA CAMPBELL, TWIGS & HONEY, TRUVELLE, KATIE MAY, HAYLEY PAIGE

THE DRESS THEORY BRIDAL SHOP (615) 440-3953 - 1201 5TH AVE N #102 -

BY APPOINTMENT ONLY

W W W . T H E D R E S S T H E O R Y . C O M @THEDRESSTHEORY 8 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

# N AT IVE N AS H VIL LE


Photo: Emily Beaver

RESPECT THE UNEXPECTED. VISIT PLOWBOYRECORDS.COM FOR NEW RELEASES

OUR ARTISTS: BLACKFOOT GYPSIES • BOBBY BARE • PAUL BURCH • BUZZ CASON • CHEETAH CHROME • CHUCK MEAD • THE FAUNTLEROYS • THE GHOST WOLVES • JD WILKES & THE DIRTDAUBERS • JIM ED BROWN # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 9


10 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


DEAR NATIVES,

T

hanks for tagging us, y’all! Be sure to check out these Instagrammers, and #nativenashville to share your photos with us.

president, founder:

ANGELIQUE PITTMAN JON PITTMAN associate publisher:  KATRINA HARTWIG publisher, founder: 

creative director:

MACKENZIE MOORE

managing editor: 

CHARLIE HICKERSON DARCIE CLEMEN

art director: 

COURTNEY SPENCER

community relations manager:

JOE CLEMONS

community representative:

POLLY RADFORD

editor:

@shan_de_leers

@prandblover

film supervisor:

          writers: ​@jesswilliamsphotos

@tnbrewworks

photographers:

production:

@kkbbkb

@closs

CASEY FULLER MATT LEFF HENRY PILE SCOTT MARQUART JONAH ELLER-ISAACS LINDSEY BUTTON CHARLIE HICKERSON COOPER BREEDEN

JEN McDONALD DANIELLE ATKINS LAURA E. PARTAIN REBECCA ADLER LEAH GRAY STELTENPOHL

GUSTI ESCALANTE

founding team: founder, brand director:

DAVE PITTMAN

founder:

CAYLA MACKEY

MACKENZIE MOORE JOSHUA SIRCHIO TAYLOR RABOIN

to advertise, contact:

for all other inquiries:

SALES@NATIVE.IS HELLO@NATIVE.IS

last month, we forgot to credit stephanie thorpe as the wardrobe stylist and kristen carbine as the hair and makeup artist for our cage the elephant cover story. sorry about that, guys! we’d also

like to extend our thanks to silver point studios for allowing us to use their space last month.

@isabel.sk

@hunterthebarber

PROUDLY DELIVERED BY RUSH BICYCLE MESSENGERS

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 1 1


12 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 1 3


14 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 1 5


16 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 1 7


TRAMONTO by Ben Clemons of No. 308 p h oto by j e n mc don a l d

Tramonto is Italian for sunset, and this cocktail was meant to break the monotony of winter by providing a nice, light escape from the cold. Something like a cross between the classic sangria and Mexico’s Kalimotxo, this low-alcohol beverage is one of our instant favorites. Enjoy!

THE GOODS 2 oz peach juice 1/4 oz lemon juice 1/2 oz Amaro Segesta

F Combine in a glass with ice and top with white wine. F Garnish with a rosemary sprig and lemon wheel.

18 18 / // // // // // // // // // // // // // // ///// //////

##NNATATIVE H VIVILLE IVENNAS ASH LLE


104.1

F M

NASHVILLE WORKERS’ DIGNITY RADIO


MASTER PLATERS

Puff Pastry Donuts with Raspberry Glaze

W I T H KAT Y F U T R E L L O F D O H N A S H V I L L E PHO T OS BY DAN IELLE AT K IN S

20 ////////////////////////////////// 20 //////

ATIVE IVENNASH AS HVI VILLE LLE ##NNAT


THE GOODS 2 sheets puff pastry, thawed vegetable or canola oil for frying 1 cup fresh raspberries (can substitute blueberries or blackberries) 3 cups powdered sugar 1/2 tsp vanilla extract (or half a vanilla bean, scraped)

FOR THE DONUTS F Roll the puff pastry on a lightly floured countertop. F Using cookie cutters, cut a large circle for the outside of the donut, followed by a smaller circle in the center of each donut. (Don’t discard the centers! They can be fried for delightful donut holes!) F Fill a large pot with about 1 inch of oil and warm over medium-high heat. (If you have a thermometer, you want your oil to reach approximately 360 degrees.) F Carefully place the puff pastry rounds into the oil and fry for approximately 1 minute per side, until golden brown. Remove from the oil (a slotted spoon works best) and place on a paper towel.

FOR THE GLAZE F Place the raspberries in a fine-mesh strainer. Using a spoon or spatula, press the raspberries through the strainer, collecting the juices in a bowl underneath. Discard the seeds. F Add the powdered sugar and vanilla extract to the raspberry juice and whisk until combined. Microwave for approximately 30 seconds. F When the donuts are mostly cool, dip the tops in the raspberry glaze and set aside for 10 to 15 minutes to allow glaze to set. F Donuts are best when eaten immediately. These are best when shared with friends and loved ones. # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 2 1


mon. - fri. 6am-7pm || sat. & sun. 7am-7pm

22 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE

3431 murphy road - dosecoffeeandtea.com


Photo: Kelsey Freeman

(cos-tee-yay-ha)

1200 VILLA PLACE - SUITE 403 - (615) 730-5367 castillejanashville.com @castillejanashville # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 2 3


24 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// 24 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE # N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


ARTIST SPOTLIGHT:

ALIC DANIEL I make nonobjective lines in a little house on Electric Avenue. I was born in Ohio, but I don’t like that place and always avoid going back. All I want is warm weather; ironically I’m in Nashville. I do not take offense when I am compared to Keith Haring. I call my current work scribbles, so don’t be afraid to call them that. I appreciate Nashville’s acceptance of my work. Your booze and debauchery can make for some interesting artwork. —Alic

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 2 5


26 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// 26 / / // / / / / / / / / / / / / ////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE # N AT IVE N AS H VIL LE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 2 7


28 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# #NAT NATI VI VENAS ENASHV HVI LI LL EL E ///// ////////////////////////////////// / 2 29 9


30 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


ALIC DANIEL: Check out Alic's solo show at The Red Arrow Gallery (919 Gallatin Ave.) in August. Come see cool art and drink free alcohol. Visit alicdaniel.com or follow on Instagram @alicdaniel

W W W . M U S I C C I T Y O P T I C A L . C O M

25 MUSIC SQUARE EAST

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3 1

(615) 750-5943


Photo By Kaitlin Dunn 32 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3 3


NATURE VERSUS NURTURE

34 34 /// /////////////////////////////// //////

##NNAT H VI ATIVE IVENNAS ASH VILLE LLE


DO YOU INHERIT SONGWRITING? IS IT PASSED DOWN LIKE A DOMINANT GENE, OR IS IT LEARNED FROM THE ENVIRONMENT OF YOUR UPBRINGING? EITHER WAY, LILLY HIATT, DAUGHTER OF PERFORMING GREAT AND AMERICAN ICON JOHN HIATT, DIDN’T STAND A CHANCE BY HENRY PILE PHOTOS BY LAURA E. PARTAIN

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3 5


36 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


"I ALWAYS UNDERSTOOD THAT DAD WAS A MUSICIAN," Lilly says over a spread of home fries, eggs over medium, and a biscuit. The Biscuit House on Gallatin Pike is slammed. Families stuffed in booths drop forks on plastic plates, slurp hot coffee, and laugh loudly. It wasn’t until she went to college that her father’s place in the musical landscape became more apparent. “People would say, ‘Wow! Your dad is John Hiatt?!’” laughs Lilly. “Growing up, he was always just ‘Dad.’” As a young girl, Lilly and her sister would join their dad on tour. They rode the bus. They sold T-shirts at the merch table. “He was doing a supergroup thing called Little Village with Nick Lowe, Ry Cooder, and Jim Keltner,” Lilly recalls. “I didn’t know who those guys were, but I remember that Nick was funny and Ry was cool and Jim was really cool.” She pauses and smiles, looking into her second cup of coffee. “Looking back, it was neat. He was a sweet dad for letting us hang out on tour.” Being raised by a full-time musician, Lilly felt confident that she would follow in her father’s footsteps. She started writing songs when she was ten. By the time she was twelve, she was learning to play guitar. Her songs needed accompaniment, but her diligence with guitar left much to be desired. “My dad signed me up for lessons but I never practiced. I still don’t,” she admits. “I’m not one of those

people with a super diligent work ethic. I’m persistent, but I struggle. I did as a twelve-year-old, and I still do.” She goes on to admit that rehearsing “Joyful, Joyful, We Adore Thee” was an insurmountable hurdle, while learning “Linger” by The Cranberries was instantaneous. It was the ’90s, after all. Who wouldn’t want to learn a jingly downer of a song? Learning “Linger” on guitar was one thing. Singing the lyrics was another. “I was so quiet about singing that my parents never heard me sing until my high school senior talent show. I was never one of those kids who wanted to steal the show. I was shy about it. I still am.” This makes for a difficult career choice. She makes a conscious effort to be aware on stage, but her determination to stay present while performing can be exhausting. “It can be engaging when people connect during the show, but it’s still taxing on me. It’s worse when I don’t get anything back from the audience. It makes me vulnerable. I feel like people don’t like me,” she says with a smile. For Lilly, learning to accept vulnerability has been a process. This is especially true when it comes to reviews of her newest album, Royal Blue. “I learned a lesson last year,” she says with a slight wince. “I woke up one morning just after Royal Blue was released and saw I was tagged

“I’M PERSISTENT, BUT I STRUGGLE. I DID AS A TWELVEYEAR-OLD, AND I STILL DO.”

on Twitter for a review. I was so excited. But it was a bad review. At the time, I was shattered. I was crying on the phone with my dad.” Anyone who’s ever presented art to the public has, at some point, faced critical review. Negative feedback hurts. At least, it hurts at first. Many negative reviews are based on a belief that the critic thinks you can do better. They believe in you, but they publish their harsh feedback. With a bit of time and renewed selfconfidence, Lilly put the feedback in perspective. “That was my first bad review, and I didn’t know how to handle it. I panicked. Now, I think of it fondly. Bad reviews are a part of it, and not everyone is going to like you. One man’s trash is another man’s treasure. Even the good reviews, thank you for writing them, feel great. But they also get into your head. I trick myself into thinking I’m really good at this! All those voices start bouncing around and then I carry them with me when I write songs. That’s not when I write good songs.” Writing good songs is the core of Lilly’s career. Performing and recording only market the material and generate income. Writing is central. The words hold the power.

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3 7


“I write good songs when I’m in a reflective, semipeaceful state. They pour out of me. Sometimes I get fired up and have to write something right now. That was a lot of Royal Blue. I was able to translate those feelings into songs.” Indeed, Royal Blue is a swirling mix of emotions. The music is a crossroads of surf pop, synth rock, Americana, and folk punk, while the vocals are pure Tennessee twang. Created with a group of grooveoriented Nashville rockers and the trippy production of Adam Landry, the album zigzags through loss, redemption, and legacy. “During the time I wrote those songs, there was so much heartbreak in my life. Both in relationships and with some family members. I was having thoughts about those feelings. Yes, there are some embellishments and some is pure fiction,” Lilly explains. “But I channeled those feelings.” Coming to terms with her feelings has been an important part of Lilly’s life since she quit drinking. She didn’t hide booze or cling to the bottle every day, but she was concerned about her inability to control the direction of a night out with friends. “I wasn’t excessively drinking all the time. But when I started drinking, I never knew what was going to happen. It could be three beers or an all-night thing. I never knew what would happen, and it was scary.” She goes on to say, “My friends didn’t think I was an alcoholic. But I could get really fucked up sometimes. I don’t know. I don’t know what it looked like from the outside.” Drinking stifled her. Sobriety was an awakening to the world. “I felt like I was doing everything for the first time,” she says. “I reverted to the shy little kid for a while. I didn’t know how to go out without having a drink. I didn’t know how to talk to people.” In the years since she quit drinking, she has overcome her fears of talking to people. There is an unmistakable brightness in her eyes and an easiness about her. She’s engaging and excited. She’s funny. She clicks into a high-pitched voice when she makes fun of her quirkiness. Her openness is refreshing. She tells me how she loves the way our server touches her shoulder in a motherly way. She insists on boxing up the home fries that she never wanted in the first place. I have a feeling she’s giving them to someone— but she’s just not sure who yet. Most importantly, she’s in love. She’s in love with Nashville, the people, the communities, the music, and the possibilities.

38 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


LILLY HIATT: lillyhiatt.com Follow on Facebook and Instagram @LillyHiatt or Twitter @LillyHiatt1 native.is

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 3 9


40 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


“As a creative person, there’s a vibe in East Nashville that keeps me inspired. I feel motivated because everywhere you go, someone is doing something.” When she’s not writing or performing, she works at Headquarters, a coffee shop on Charlotte near Sylvan Park. Making coffee is predictable for Lilly. The work has an immediate gratification too. “I like making coffee. It keeps me sane and I know I can do it well,” she smiles. Baristas can trudge through a bad day by relying on the caffeine addictions of their desperate patrons. By contrast, musicians have to be on. “That’s the job,” Lilly says. “But it’s only about four hours of work: pre-show, the show, and post-show. Sometimes I think I’m tired and I want to complain before I snap back to reality. Kacey Musgraves and Katy Perry probably don’t complain about their job.” Everyone complains about their jobs, but some of us know better than to complain during the work day. It’s better to steal the fax machine and smash it with a baseball bat after hours. When the check comes, I notice Cody Belew from season three of The Voice sitting a few tables away. I also see Brian Elmquist of The Lone Bellow paying his bill at the cash register. Nashville is overwhelmed with exceptionally talented writers and performers, and they are all struggling to turn a desire to create something into a longshot career. They are entrepreneurs, artists, and marketers. They are dreamers. They are doers. Sitting across from me is Lilly Hiatt, “Somebody’s Daughter”—somebody who could give her career a big boost. But that’s not really how it works, and Lilly knows it. “When I was younger, I thought I would play in the same places he did,” she admits. “But the older I get the more I realize how hard my dad worked for those things. I have to do the same thing. I never thought it would be handed to me, but I didn’t know how hard it would be until I started doing it on my own.”

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 4 1


42 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 4 3


44 44 / ///////////////////////////////// ////// 44 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

##NNATATIVE IVENNASH ASHVIVILLE LLE # N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


BETWEEN SERVING MORE THAN A THOUSAND MEALS A DAY AS DIRECTOR OF FOOD SERVICES AT THE MARTHA O’BRYAN CENTER AND DELIVERING HIS COOKIES BY KEITH ALL OVER TOWN WHEN HE GETS OFF, CHEF KEITH BATTS HAS A FULL PLATE BY SCOTT MARQUART PHOTOS BY REBECCA ADLER # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 4 5


46 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


Keith Batts doesn’t have your typical chef gig. He doesn’t hobnob with VIP tables

or agonize over the placement of a garnish on a fifty-dollar plate—heck, most of the people who eat his food don’t even pay for it. It’s not that Keith can’t keep pace with other chefs—he’s done that at Johnson & Wales University’s College of Culinary Arts and TomKats Catering (which manages Acme Feed & Seed, The Southern Steak & Oyster, and the Loveless Café)—it’s just that for as much as Keith cares about cuisine, he cares even more about his community. Chef Batts, as he’s known, took an unconventional path to the kitchen we’re standing in now. We’re at the Martha O’Bryan Center, in the heart of the city’s largest public housing complex, Cayce Homes. Everyone’s heard the story of the chef who started out as a prep or fry cook in a greasy burger joint, then moved up one step at a time, progressing into cooking increasingly upscale fare at more critically acclaimed restaurants. Keith has taken somewhat of the opposite approach, but if you ask him, things have only moved in one direction—up. At Johnson & Wales, Keith absorbed everything he could about different cooking methods and types of cuisine. He liked all of it—except for baking in his pastry class, ironically. After graduating school he got an internship with TomKats Catering, which had him cooking everywhere from the VIP area at Bonnaroo to the kitchen at Saffire in Franklin. Soon after, he got a permanent gig working at Old Hickory Steakhouse in the Opryland Hotel. By jumping straight into culinary school, Keith was able to shave off quite a few years of paying his dues behind the line. “A year of culinary school is worth, like, sixteen years’

experience in the culinary world,” Keith says, raising his eyebrows. After excelling in his first two positions, Keith could have gone to work in a number of kitchens, but one opportunity in particular caught his eye—an opening for a new sous chef at the Martha O’Bryan Center, one of the city’s longest-standing anti-poverty nonprofit organizations. For many chefs, this might have seemed like a strange move. There’s not a lot of money or glamour in cooking for the impoverished, but for Keith it was more than that. “Martha O’Bryan really holds a special place in my heart,” he says. “I’m from East Nashville, and as a kid I came to the center. I was in room 101 all the way through 106.” Even after he left for college, Keith stayed plugged in with the center, coming by to volunteer with his fraternity. So when the position opened up, Keith saw it as an opportunity to give his talents back to the community he came from. Without hesitation, he took the job. Keith started in January 2012, and by February he was already running the place. The director of food services at the time had to take a two-month leave of absence to care for a loved one, and Keith was called upon to take over for the two months she was gone. “I guess I held the ship together and they were impressed,” he shrugs humbly. Only a few months after that, the previous director left and Keith took over for good. “I think it was timing and luck,” he says. “The previous director recommended me for the job. They did put the job out there, but I guess they didn’t find anybody that would do better than me.” Every morning, Keith wakes up at sunrise, drives from the far west side all the way to Cayce Homes, and works hard all day, some-

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 4 7


times until nightfall. He has a three- ‘No, the can doesn’t taste right,’” he the right. “So I waited until the last man team that works together in the says. Other challenges are inevi- minute. We needed them on a MonMartha O’Bryan Center kitchen to table—the older Meals on Wheels day, and I was so confident in my crank out balanced, healthy meals recipients tend to be less adventur- abilities that I didn’t come in until every day for everyone from chil- ous than the younger clientele. But Sunday. They needed three hundred dren to the elderly. “I make about when you’re providing food for folks cookies. So I look up a recipe. I get one thousand meals a day,” he says, that might otherwise go hungry, it, tweak it how I want to tweak it, nodding his head. “We have an early pleasing everyone is a less impor- make three hundred cookies. Scoop learning center and daycare that we tant goal than making sure everyone them out, put them on a pan, cook them up. So the timer goes off the cook for. We have Explore! Commu- is getting fed. When your work matters this last time, I pull it out, and it’s just nity School that we cook for. We do a Meals on Wheels program, and we much, it isn’t optional. Keith is there a sheet of chocolate chips—no also do an after-school snack pro- every day, he doesn’t leave early, cookies.” He tweaked the recipe a and he doesn’t come in late. Be- bit and had another go at it. Three gram.” Cooking for such a broad swath fore Thanksgiving, he organizes 100 hundred more cookies—same thing. of people can be tough, particularly Dreams Turkey Drive, preparing cra- “So I slowed it down, tweaked it one when you’re cooking for a lot of the zy amounts of sides to accompany more time, made twelve cookies this time, and they came same faces every day. Keith admits the turkeys they give out perfectly. Well, he’s had a few culinary missteps to families in need. maybe not perfectly, along the way—usually from get- The day it all comes but they came out ting a bit too ambitious for his audi- together, Keith usulike cookies.” ence—but over time he’s been able ally ends up working The next day, the to find a good balance. “We do a lot nearly twenty-four cookies were a hit. of ‘from scratch’ cooking here, and hours straight to By popular demand, I also like to incorporate different pull the whole thing Keith started making genres of food for the kids,” he says. off. Though I’m in them from time to “We have turkey Bolognese; we have awe of Keith’s work time for special ocjerk chicken; we do a harvest salad. ethic, he doesn’t see casions and events I like to expand their palates with it as work at all, even only. One day, one when the days get fresh fruits and vegetables.” of the volunteers at The trick is to push their boundar- long. the center tried one Keith absolutely ies just enough to keep things from and swore up and getting stale, but not so much that loves his job, and I down that Keith had they feel alienated or look at a plate don’t think he could to start selling them. and have no idea what’s on it. Still, see himself doing Something clicked, there will always be an element of anything else in the trial and error. “For the kids, I used world. Which makes you wonder, and he decided she was right. In January 2015, he started in earto make an orange couscous salad. what business does a guy like this They weren’t very fond of that . . . have starting a cookie company on nest, calling his confections CookI had to stop making it,” he laughs, the side? He sure isn’t hurting for ies by Keith. At first he would drive something to do in his spare time— the cookies all around town, handleaning back on a desk in his office. Some challenges are recurring, if he has any. It turns out, like a lot delivering each batch. Soon after, he like when kids taste fresh vegetables of great ideas, the cookies were an got in touch with a friend of his from college who owned a store in DC. that they’re used to eating from a accident. “The center needed cookies for an Keith sent her some cookies, but by can and think there’s something wrong with them. “They always tell event, and I was like, that’s not that the time she knew they had arrived, me it doesn’t taste right, and I say, hard,” he says, rolling his eyes to her employees had eaten every last

“FOR THE KIDS, I USED TO MAKE AN ORANGE COUSCOUS SALAD. THEY WEREN’T VERY FOND OF THAT.”

48 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


COOKIES BY KEITH: shop.chefbatts.com Follow on Twitter @chefbatts or Instagram @cookiesbykeith native.is # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 4 9


50 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


one. “She put her order in that same day,” Keith smiles. Everybody who tastes one of Keith’s cookies seems to go out and tell three more people, which has helped spread the word fast. Keith now ships cookies to customers outside of Nashville as well, but he still personally delivers local orders when he gets off work. This year he wants to expand even further. “Before the year’s up, I plan on having a store to sell cookies, and I want to move to shipping frozen cookie dough out of state so people can get the outof-the-oven taste of the cookies.” I ask how he’ll have time to keep things running at the Martha O’Bryan Center when he’s also juggling a cookie shop on the side, but he doesn’t seem concerned. “The center is in my heart; I want to keep giving them my talents . . . If it ever gets to [where I have to give it up], I’m going to make sure that there’s someone here who can take the lead.” Finally, we decide it’s time to bake some cookies. We round the corner from Keith’s office into the center’s relatively spacious older kitchen. Keith scoops out perfect little dough balls from the batter he mixed earlier, flips a switch on the bottom of the oven, and slides the baking sheet in. We wait seven minutes, then he swings open the oven door, turns the tray around, and closes it back up again. Seven more minutes pass. Finally, out they come—a golden-brown batch of the ChocolateChip-Heath-Almond cookies I’ve heard so much about. We try to wait for them to cool but don’t get very far. Mine falls apart in my hands but tastes like gooey, chocolatey heaven. “It melts in your mouth,” Keith says, pleased with his work. “I wanted every bite that you take . . . to make sure that you got every ingredient.” I ask if there’s any proper way to eat a cookie, but he shakes his head. “Dip it in some milk and just eat it.” Can do.

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5 1


THE DEDICATED VOLUNTEERS OF EAST COMMUNITY ACTION NETWORK (EAST CAN) CARE FOR ALL RESIDENTS OF EAST NASHVILLE, REGARDLESS OF SPECIES

BY JONAH ELLER-ISAACS | PHOTOS BY DANIELLE ATKINS

52 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5 3


MORE INFO: EAST CAN: eastcan.org Follow on Facebook @EastCan or Instagram and Twitter @NashEastCan native.is

54 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// # N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE 54 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / /// # N AT IVE N ASH VILL E

If you’d like to learn about volunteering at Studio NPL, visit: nashvillepubliclibrary.org/studionpl/ native.is


THINGS SLIP THROUGH THE CRACKS AND ARE FORGOTTEN. Pennies, for instance. A trauma occurs, support systems fail, and the people left behind are broken and lost. A high-maintenance pet becomes too much to bear and is abandoned. Unkempt and uncollared, stray dogs are a common sight in East Nashville. But they are far less frequent than they once were, thanks to the dedicated volunteers of East CAN. And importantly, East CAN understands that dogs aren’t the only species that might need a helping hand. I’m sitting outside Portland Brew with some of the group’s core leadership. We’re out on the sidewalk because I’ve brought my dog along. Rosie Pants goes everywhere with me, but this time it actually seems appropriate. Sharon Green, a founding member of East CAN, welcomes my puppy into her lap and tells me, “I’ve been rescuing dogs by myself for

years and owned rescues and have always had the heart for animals.” But I’m surprised when she clarifies the goals of East CAN: “At its core, our mission is to facilitate neighbors helping neighbors. So we’re not a rescue. We’re more like a resource.” Sharon is the current president of East CAN, but she explains that it’s only a paper title; everyone ends up doing whatever is necessary each day. They don’t have an official leader, but after years of existing under the fiscal umbrella of Rediscover East, the group recently achieved 501(c)(3) nonprofit status, and they’ve had to adopt a few formal appellations. Callie Jennings, East CAN’s secretary, shares stories from her many years with the organization: heartbreaking stories of caring for puppies in dire need of medical attention; joyful tales of lonesome retirees, revitalized when paired with furry companions; remarkable anecdotes of people living with PTSD, or

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5 5


children on the autism spectrum, finding solace and peace with a dog at their side. The shared thread running through each is the personal connection: human welfare alongside animal welfare. Callie emphasizes, “It’s all about us supporting each other and making sure we’re all taken care of. And if it’s through a dog—alright.” East CAN began life as postings on the East Nashville LISTSERV, but the ease of mass communication on Facebook led to a shift in operations. The East CAN Facebook group now has more than six thousand followers and a high volume of regular postings. The group page is packed with pictures of dozens of adorable dogs; some are tagged as adopted, but many are still in foster care, waiting for their forever homes. Callie oversees the group, and she believes that the page makes a difference simply by showing people that the Community Action Network is ready to help: “When people feel like they have a support system, it often changes the way they react to a situation. I think that’s a big deal, because that’s what’s so great about East Nashville and that’s why so many people love it—it has that sense of community.” East CAN’s network of foster caregivers is a critical part of the organization, as their website points out: “Our foster families (including furry siblings) are our greatest tool since they have the capacity to nourish, love, and train homeless and abandoned dogs into wonderful companions.” After my initial meeting with East CAN, I witness this capacity later in the week when I meet a handful of East CAN volunteers at Cornelia Fort Airpark.

56 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE

Sharon and Callie are joined by Megan Southern, a volunteer foster provider, and Elizabeth Chauncey, a cofounder of East CAN. The four women have brought four dogs: Esther and Vega, two full-grown, medium-large dogs; and Annie Oakley and Mae West, two tiny, aww-inducing puppies recently found behind Cross Point Church. Annie and Mae have been with Megan and Esther for a week. Megan tells me when she first met Annie and Mae, they were terrified, very fearful of people, and biting defensively. Today the puppies are shy but well-behaved and certainly not terrified. Megan credits her dog, Esther, for much of the change. Callie, an experienced foster care provider, explains that part of the puppies’ resocialization involves “trust by association.” After playing together and sharing meals with Esther, the puppies trust the older dog. And since Esther trusts her owner, Megan, the puppies slowly come to trust Megan as well. I’ll admit that I’ve long thought the C in East CAN stood for canine. When I ask the East CAN volunteers why they’re called to this work, I get variations on the same answer. Yes, they love dogs, but they love people too, and they don’t want to see either species suffer. It’s far more appropriate that the C stands for community. I like Callie’s explanation: “In the end, it’s not about the dogs. Just by helping the dogs, you create a better neighborhood. You create a better community.” It gives me great comfort to know that, should I ever fall through the cracks, East CAN is there to lend a hand. Or a paw.


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5 7


Shooting the Shit with . . .

Brothers Design Co.

PORTRAITS BY LAURA E. PARTAIN

Brothers Design Co. is a local creative team founded by Samuel and Juan Solorzano. They work in traditional branding, film photography, illustration, and writing. Check out their stuff at brothersdesignco.com

58 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / ////// 58 / // / / / / / / / / / / / / /////

IVE N ASH VI LLE ##NNATATIVE N ASH VIL LE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 5 9


60 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


How and when did Brothers Design Co. start? Our first collaboration was Joseph LeMay’s album Seventeen Acres in 2013, but we didn’t officially start until September 2014. Juan had just finished recording guitars for his album, and Joseph asked us separately to do the art for his record. A year later, Sam got the idea to start a company with the Brothers name kind of as a joke. How does your experience in one medium affect your work in another, and is there a binding message or theme throughout all of your work? The unifying element is some part of our subconscious that allows us to think very alike. It’s been this way since we were kids, and now it has translated to our respective work in Brothers. We’re both trying to see how far we can push traditional methods. You cite Eddie Bauer’s designs and Karl Ferris’ photography as two of your major influences. Those two styles are seemingly pretty different— can you elaborate on how they impact your art? The early 1900s to 1950s, and World War II specifically, have been periods in history that we’ve always been obsessed with. It was a time where designs were heavily based on hand-drawn illustration and simplicity. Karl Ferris’ work was the biggest influence on the photography for Evan Donohue’s album cover. Those worlds are far apart but met once we had our photo, since the typography was hand drawn over the image.

You guys only shoot on film, and you only use natural light. How do you bridge the gap between classic and contemporary design while still working with traditional tools? Our friend Ryan Nole once said, “A lot of people are trying to create designs that look vintage but really just look like something you would buy at Walmart.” We’re using traditional tools, like film or pen and paper, with the intention of making something that will hopefully be timeless. Tell us about the work you did with Google Fiber. And do you have any leads on how we can get it here faster? (We’re just kidding on that last bit. Well, sort of. . .) Basically, Google Fiber anonymously contacted a few designers in town. They hired us to create the design that would go on the installer vans with the intention of showcasing the personality of Nashville. Our design got shot down, but it was a rewarding experience. As for when they’ll actually come to town, unfortunately that still remains a secret.

Tell us about a few upcoming projects you’re excited about. We just finished the art for Natalie Royal’s new record Harbinger, and we’re about to start working on the art for Caleb Groh’s musical masterpiece Ocelot. We’re also working on some illustrations for Liza Anne that we’re excited to finish up.

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 6 1


62 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 6 3


64 ////////////////////////////////// 64 //////

ATIVE IVENNASH ASHVI VILLE LLE ##NNAT


HOW TURNIP GREEN CREATIVE REUSE HAS USED IMAGINATION TO DIVERT MORE THAN FORTYFIVE TONS OF WASTE FROM A LANDFILL

BY LINDSEY BUTTON | PHOTOS BY LEAH GRAY STELTENPOH L

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 6 5


SEEING THE ART IN TRASH is worked in nonprofits for more than not always easy for the adult mind. I twenty years. “I had left a social work can only vaguely recall a time when I nonprofit career and wanted to do would anxiously wait for the rolls of something more creative,” she explains. wrapping paper at Christmastime to “So I got together with some other likebe completely used up so I could ask minded, sustainable-minded friends for the long cardboard cylinder that who have businesses that are green or was trash to everyone else. As a child, I have extensive experience in nonprofit saw endless possibilities in it—it could work, and we started doing research on be a huge spyglass or a sword or a peg this. Originally I just wanted to work leg. As an adult with a slightly dulled with artists that did reuse work and imagination and a fear of becoming a try to help them with promotion and hoarder, it becomes harder to hang marketing and maybe an online gallery. on to trash. But here at Turnip Green And as I started researching [that], I Creative Reuse, they hold on to the be- found out about creative reuse centers, lief that imagination is key to reducing and then it just clicked with me.” The first creative reuse centers startwaste. ed about twenty-five years ago. Turnip As you walk through the retail space Green has been in existence in Nashof Turnip Green, you might find boxes ville for about five years. “We started of textile samples, vintage fabrics, regoing to other creative reuse centers used canvases, canvas frames, small to take notes on what worked and what figurines, googly eyes, beads, pipe we could bring back and put into a plan cleaners, popsicle sticks, sheet music, for Nashville,” Kelly continues. “We photographs, CDs, stickers, wallpaper went to North Carolina, we went to samples, carpet samples, frame pieces, California, and we went to New York. stained glass pieces, leftover house We brought everything back we learned paints, spray paints, and the wax from in those creative reuse centers and creburnt-down candles. In the front secated a plan that looks very much like tion of the building, you’ll find an art gallery displaying works from artists what we have here. We took the parts that use recycled and reused materials we loved from each of those places and melded them together. But we originalin their work. ly just started by doing free workshops Kelly Tipler is the founder and presiin libraries and giving away materials dent of Turnip Green Creative Reuse. that we had donated and we kept in a Before starting Turnip Green, she

66 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 6 7


TURNIP GREEN CREATIVE REUSE: turnipgreencreativereuse.org Follow on Facebook @TurnipGreenCreativeReuse Twitter @TurnipGrnReuse native.is

68 / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////// //////

# N AT IVE N ASH AS H VI LLE


shed. Everybody was working out of the trunks of their cars.” Eventually, Turnip Green outgrew the shed. “We were poor, and we had a drive and a mission, and we made it work,” Kelly says. “We just had the idea that if you keep doing the right thing and it’s creative and good for the earth, then good things will happen. And we are now self-sustaining.” When they originally started working as a nonprofit, they partnered up with artists’ group Untitled Nashville, who was their fiscal sponsor. Through a networking group, they came in contact with a Platetone Printmaking member and found out they were looking for a building mate. The printmaking co-op is now Turnip Green’s building mate and professional partner. Every third Thursday, they host a free public event. Platetone does an open studio activity, Turnip Green has a gallery show, the shop is open, and everyone pitches in to provide food and drinks. The Turnip Green shop works through a pay-what-you-can donation system. Nothing in the store is priced. “The only thing that’s

priced in our entire building is the art that’s locally made with reused material. Everything else in the place is available to be taken, and we ask if it’s a possibility for whoever takes it that they leave us a donation that they feel is fair or that they can afford. We’ve had people come in and take a few things and give us a hundred dollars, and we’ve had people who will come in and take things and not be able to give us anything. Our goal is to make sure that materials are available to creative people and that all people have access to them regardless of their ability to pay.” Their material donations (the actual items in the store) come from businesses, design companies, schools, artists, and community members. Anyone can bring in materials as long as the materials are clean and have not had food in them. “However, we do encourage people to not bring clothing in because we feel like it has one more life before us,” Kelly says. “We feel like if there’s a pair of jeans and somebody else could use those, they should use [them] one more time before we just use

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 6 9


the denim off of them.” They keep a tally of the weight of donated items so that by the end of the year they know how much waste they have diverted from the landfill. “Last year we diverted over twenty tons. Since we’ve started, we’ve diverted over forty-five tons.” Ryan Bukowski and Jake Wells, who are both a vital part of Turnip Green, join us. Ryan is the gallery coordinator; he does everything from working directly with the artists to building the gallery walls. Jake is a board member of Turnip Green, an artist, a teacher, and a workshop leader. “I’ve been around for all of those five years,” Jake explains. “And I’ve really only been in Nashville for about six years. Before I

70 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE

was here, I was in graduate school, getting a master’s degree in painting. My work was really about ecology, and I didn’t have a lot of money, so I was always about repurposing material. I got that from my family. My grandma was always one of those types who used every rag until it was a strand, then she might use that strand to tie her tomatoes up outside. So I come from a background of reusers.” As “green” movements have taken shape around the country, the general public has become more interested in recycling. The issue, however, is that the right way to recycle has not been given as much attention. The phrase goes, “Reduce. Reuse. Recycle.” But unfortunately, the reuse part often


gets overlooked. Recycling should always be a last resort only if something can’t be reused in a new way. The reasoning behind this is that recycling is a complicated process, often using a lot of energy. “It should be reduce, reuse, then recycle, but the reuse piece has to be bigger,” Kelly says. “But what happens is ‘recycle’ becomes bigger . . . reuse has to become bigger in order for us to really make an impact . . . [reuse] is what community waste departments deal with all over the nation . . . We work with Metro Beautification to try to teach people how to recycle right through art and education. One of the things they are coming up against is that when people don’t recycle right, it actually completely contaminates huge batches of materials, and that’s the problem. We got everyone thinking about recycling and reusing, and now we have to teach them how to do it correctly.” “What we’re doing here is the artistic angle of reuse,” Jake elaborates. “It’s not just reuse for the sake of it— it’s creative reuse. It’s all the mad potential that comes with that. Kids can see so many things out of this piece of waste. They can make it into something else. When I was a kid, the trash can was my other toy box . . . What we’re really doing here is trying to be a kid again, tapping into that whole creative side, and then suddenly the possibilities really open up. Suddenly, it’s not just waste, it’s not just one thing . . . And it can be functional or it can just be aesthetic . . . I know I’ve certainly taken those plastic bottles and cut the bottoms off and used those as grommets on sculptures I was hanging. You start to see that everything has potential.” What Turnip Green aims to share with Nashville and beyond is a sense of artistic awareness when it comes to waste. Before you throw something away, try to imagine if it’s something an artist can breathe new life into.

615-988-0513 - 525 Hagan St. - AmericanHotelLiquidators.com Open 10am-6pm Mon-Sat and 12-5pm Sunday

CASUAL AND CONTEMPORARY DESIGNER APPAREL AND ACCESSORIES

Monday-Wednesday 10am - 6pm - Thursday-Saturday 10am-7pm - Sunday 12pm - 5pm # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 1

1813 21st Ave S - s h o p n a t i v e a n d n o m a d . c o m


72 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


ETH PORCELAIN TE thmusic.com porcelaintee e book & YouTub ce Fa on ow Foll eth @PorcelainTe or Instagram eeth_Music @Porcelain_T

YOU OUGHTA KNOW: PORCELAIN TEETH

In a 1952 issue of Galaxy Science Fiction magazine, Robert A. Heinlein claimed we’d find Martians by 2000, while Back to the Future Part II famously envisioned a 2015 that involved hoverboards and flying cars. This stuff obviously didn’t come true, but retrofuturism can be fun to think about—just ask Derek Pearson and Ryan LaFave, the masterminds behind electronic duo Porcelain Teeth. They debuted their first full-length, Hurry Up and Wait, at the Belcourt, where the album was accompanied by footage of vintage sci-fi and horror films. Hurry Up weaves analog synths, answering machine messages, and the hum of antique appliances together to create soundscapes that call to mind Trent Reznor’s film scores or Brian Eno’s ambient projects. And when paired with their oftensurreal music videos, it makes for a glimpse into a glitchy, lo-fi future that never came.

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 3


PHOTOS BY DUSTY DRAPER, NOSSI COLLEGE OF ART


HISTORY BUFF WAR MEMORIAL IN HISTORY BUFF, WE TALK ABOUT THE HISTORY BEHIND SOME NOTABLE NASHVILLE PEOPLE AND PLACES. THIS MONTH, WE’RE FOCUSING ON WAR MEMORIAL AUDITORIUM BY CHARLIE HICKERSON

On April 2, 1917, President Woodrow Wilson called for Congress to convene for what is known as an “extraordinary,” or emergency, session. Citing increased German aggression overseas (more specifically, a series of German submarine attacks on neutral ships crossing the Atlantic) and Germany’s failed alliance with Mexico as probable cause, Wilson urged Congress to enter World War I. He ended the address—later simply dubbed “Wilson’s War Message”—by stating: “America is privileged to spend her blood and her might for the principles that gave her birth and happiness and the peace which she has treasured.” Four days later, Congress formally declared war in a landslide vote. Eight years after that, Wilson’s words were engraved above the front steps of the War Memorial Auditorium (WMA). Constructed in honor of those lost in World War I (including 3,400 Tennesseans, whose names are now inscribed on tablets in the auditorium’s courtyard), War Memorial Building and Square was designed by architect Edward E. Dougherty. A

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 5


76 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


Paris-educated Atlanta native, Dougherty Albert Tobacco), in 1939 via NBC’s Red relocated to Nashville in 1916, where he Network. It marked the beginning of Roy worked on the Belle Meade Country Club Acuff’s three-year run as the host of the proand Nashville, Chattanooga, and St. Louis gram, which ran for nearly twenty years and Railroad. War Memorial would become his solidified Acuff’s status as a bonafide counflagship piece, earning him the American try legend. Post-Opry, WMA broadened its Institute of Architects’ Gold Medal Award musical horizons by hosting the Fantabulous Rock ‘n’ Roll Show of ’57 (featuring Ray in 1925. Victory, the statue in War Memorial’s Charles, Bo Diddley, and The Drifters) and courtyard, was sculpted by Belle Kinney, a artists from the African American Theater Nashville native and child prodigy of sorts Circuit (also known as the Chitlin’ Circuit). By the ’60s, War Memorial Plaza emerged (in 1897, when she seven years old, she won the youth prize at the Tennessee Centenni- as a town square for some of Nashville’s al Celebration for sculpting a bust of her fa- most prominent political and civil gatherther). In addition to representing the fallen ings. Four Tennessee governors were sworn Tennessee youths that served in WWI, Vic- in on the plaza steps, and John F. Kennedy, tory also represents the US military branch- Richard Nixon, and Lyndon B. Johnson all es: his left hand holds a winged Nike, rep- made campaign stops at the plaza. Perhaps resenting the air forces of WWI; his right most notably, Martin Luther King Jr. prohand holds a sword and wreath, represent- claimed that he “came to Nashville not to ing the ground forces; and his left foot rests bring inspiration, but to gain inspiration from the great movement that has taken on a ship’s prow, representing the navy. The model for Victory was a New York place in this community” from the WMA City police officer, and because he was nude, stage on September 28, 1961. In the time since, WMA has brought—and Kinney allegedly wasn’t allowed to sculpt him without her husband being present. continues to bring—countless classic acts Despite facing these sorts of sexist hurdles such as David Bowie (on the Ziggy Stardust throughout her career, Kinney went on to Tour)*, Willie Nelson, Waylon Jennings, Elcreate other work in Nashville, including ton John, Bette Midler and Barry Manilow, the pediment of the Parthenon and the Frank Zappa, and The Eagles. More recently, Women of the Confederacy statue on 7th and they’ve hosted hometown heroes like Diarrhea Planet, Jeff the Brotherhood, All Them Union. Following stints at the Belcourt Theatre Witches, and (past NATIVE cover feature) and the Dixie Tabernacle in East Nashville, Moon Taxi. So next time you go to an event at WMA, the Grand Ole Opry relocated to War Memorial Auditorium in 1939. It stayed there maybe get there a little early and check until 1943, when it began its legendary resi- out Victory. Or at the very least, take a look dency at the Ryman. Opry inductees during around while you’re waiting in the beer the WMA years included Minnie Pearl, Bill line—some incredible people have walked Monroe, and Ernest Tubb, who introduced through those halls. the first electric guitar to the Opry in 1943. *Rest in peace. Side note: As a teenager, my dad begged WMA also hosted the Opry’s first nation- my grandmother to let him go to this show. No dice, al radio broadcast, The Prince Albert Show though she did let him see Alice Cooper at Municipal (named for the show’s sponsor, Prince the following year. Go figure.

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 7 ///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 7


78 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E # NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 9 ////// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 7 9


80 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

# N AT IVE N ASH VI LLE


LOVE YOGA, LOVE YOURSELF

10

CLASSES FOR $20

# NAT I V ENAS HV I L L E

///// / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 8 1


model: @hugh_masterson lens: @nolanfeldpausch

82 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / //////

E#AN AT S IVE T NNASH A VIS LLE H V I L L E + S Y LVA N PA R K

W W W . S C O U T S B A R B E R S H O P. C O M

NATIVE | ISSUE 44 | FEBRUARY 2016 | NASHVILLE, TN  

FEATURING: Alic Daniel, Lilly Hiatt, Keith Batts, East CAN, Turnip Green Creative Reuse, and more.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you