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H E R I TAG E L I V I NG SUMMER 2018

Election 2018: Make your vote count for our heritage


Y O U ’ R E I N V I T E D T O A P A R T Y. 150 YEARS AGO.

FA S H I O N A B L E L I V I N G I N V I C T O R I A N A D E L A I D E Be swept into a lost and magical world in this immersive fashion installation by acclaimed costume designer Marion Boyce.

OPENS

29 MARCH |

AYERS HOUSE MUSEUM

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288 NORTH TCE, ADELAIDE

www.ayershousemuseum.org.au/ageofelegance

ADMISSION: $20 Adult, $18 Concession, $15 National Trust members, Family (2 Adults, up to 3 Children) $50, Student, $12 (15+), Children (5-15) $10, under 5 free. 


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Contents

from the CEO DR DARREN PEACOCK

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e enter 2018 with a State election just weeks away. In the past four years, the National Trust has been advocating for strengthening our heritage protection system and for keeping heritage places like Martindale Hall and Fort Largs in public hands.

4 INTRODUCING DEBORAH MORGAN

The State Government’s threat to local heritage protections and the removal of citizens and communities from decision making about future developments are significant concerns. South Australia has a proud record of protecting and preserving its heritage, but that is jeopardised by the current eagerness to promote development at any cost. We need a smarter discussion about the ways in which heritage and development can co-exist creatively.

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The Trust looks to 2018 as a new year of achievement in protecting, enjoying and caring for our heritage. We welcome a new President and some exciting new initiatives including the Australian Artisan Trades Academy, which will be conducting a week long conservation workshop on the Port Pirie Railway Station in March, followed by projects at Collingrove homestead and Penola. We are preparing for a major new exhibition at Ayers House, opening in time for Easter, using our magnificent Victorian-era costume collection to recreate the famous parties staged by Sir Henry Ayers 140 years ago. Summer Sundays continue in February and March at Beaumont House with a wonderful line up of live music, wine and cheese, Devonshire teas and art and craft stalls on the lush and shady lawns. I hope to see you there.

Introducing our new President

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ELECTION 2018- NATIONAL TRUST POLICY PLATFORM

15 VALUING OUR HERITAGE 24 PLANNING OR CHAOS?

New planning and development laws are reshaping the city

5 Strengthening Protection 6 Growing Investment 7 Community Participation

28 CONSERVATION

HERITAGE POLICY STATEMENTS

29 COMPOSER IN RESIDENCE

8 Greens SA 9 Australian Conservatives 10 Liberal Party 11 Labor Party 12 SA-BEST 13 Dignity Party 14 Lord Mayor of Adelaide

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from the

Standing up for our Kangaroo Island coastline Music in the house

30 MEMBERSHIP 31 ADELAIDE TOURS

Stella Bowen’s Restless Youth

32 WHAT’S ON

Editor

ROBERT DARE

n this special election issue, we set out a new agenda for the future of heritage in South Australia. The National Trust is advocating for stronger heritage protections, greater investment in heritage and increased community participation. We also asked the major political parties to share with you what their plans are for our heritage ahead of our public forum with election candidates on 15 February. We hope you will all take the time to consider heritage as an issue when casting your vote at the state election in March. We believe in the many values of heritage: economic, social, cultural, environmental. In the Valuing our heritage feature in this issue Melissa Ballantyne explores some of the ways we can recognise the value of heritage and its conservation. We also take a look at the effects that the State Government’s new planning laws are having in the urban environment. Kevin O’Leary argues that increasingly arbitrary and inconsistent approaches to development approvals are creating uncertainty and jeopardising heritage places, streetscapes and environments. Similarly, on Kangaroo Island, public rights and amenity are at risk in a proposal to transfer 2.5km of pristine coastline into private hands for a golf course development. In this issue you can also find information about our fabulous new costume exhibition opening at Ayers House in March and meet our new President, Deborah Morgan. Enjoy!

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 I ntro d u cing D e b o rah M o rgan

Introducing our new President In November Deborah Morgan was elected as the new President of the National Trust of South Australia, succeeding Professor Norman Etherington AM, who served with distinction as President for five years.

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In the near future I plan to commence travel around SA visiting some of the 130 properties under the Trust’s custodianship and the people working in our 46 local branches across the state.

am honoured to have been elected President of The National Trust of South Australia.

My background is legal. For the past twenty years I have served on a number of Commonwealth and State tribunals and boards. I was first elected a Councillor of the NTSA in 2010. I have been a director of a family pastoral company since 2011. In 2012 I established a not-for-profit that has recently constructed two schools in South Sudan. In November 2016 I was re-elected to the NTSA Council.

Currently, the future of Ayers House and Martindale Hall are two pressing issues for the Trust. Another critical ongoing matter for NTSA is to ensure that our local heritage protection system is maintained to ensure that local heritage is assessed and managed by the community through local councils.

I am the second Morgan elected to this role as my grandfather, Sir Edward Morgan became President in 1961 and I am the second female president following Anita Aspinall who was elected in 2003.

I am unashamedly passionate about Adelaide’s historic buildings, particularly those along North Terrace and consider it one of the most attractive city precincts in the world. As President, I intend to continue to promote the National Trust’s role as South Australia’s leading advocate for heritage protection and conservation of our built, cultural and natural, tangible and intangible heritage.

We start the year with a new commitment to teaching the trade skills required to sustain our state’s heritage. The Australian Artisan Trades Academy established by the Trust in 2017 will deliver a range of training programs and workshops across the state. In mid March we have a State election. NTSA proposes policies and initiatives to strengthen our state’s heritage protections, to increase investment in our state’s unique heritage and to develop community participation in heritage conservation. I consider that recognition and support of heritage tourism, including focus on regional areas, has significant merit that will benefit our state. Currently there appears to be community uncertainty about SA’s built heritage protection system and this needs resolution. We are hopeful that all political parties and candidates will show their support for preservation of our state’s outstanding heritage. Deborah Morgan President

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MAKE YOUR VOTE COUNT

for South Australia’s heritage On 17 March, South Australians will vote in the 2018 state election. The National Trust is an independent community organisation committed to the conservation of our heritage. We call on all candidates and political parties to show their support for the future of South Australia’s heritage. In this election feature we highlight the policies and initiatives advocated by the Trust to candidates for election. We have also invited political parties contesting the election to share with you what they will do to support our heritage.

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e encourage all members to find out where the candidates in your electorate stand on heritage and to make sure that your vote supports a better future for South Australia’s heritage. South Australia’s heritage is unique, priceless and irreplaceable. The National Trust advocates for a best use approach to maximise the economic, social, cultural and environmental benefits of caring for and valuing our heritage. Valuing and caring for our heritage is a shared responsibility between individuals, government and the community. We propose the following policies and initiatives to strengthen heritage protections, to grow investment in heritage and to increase community participation in heritage conservation. Stay in touch with election heritage developments at: www.heritagewatch.net.au

Strengthening Protection South Australia’s built heritage protection system has served us well for 40 years. We have been a national leader in ensuring that our heritage is recognised and preserved. However, recent planning legislation and government proposals have created uncertainty and confusion about the future of our built heritage protection system. Heritage protection in South Australia needs to be strengthened and simplified through:

Heritage policy and legislation • • • •

Simplifying heritage listing • • • •

Establishing an integrated single heritage register covering all listings, managed by an independent statutory body. Retention of all current listings, including heritage protection zones and contributory items. Streamlining of listing criteria whilst having regard for local characteristics. Simplified and streamlined process for new listings which includes mandatory timeframes for listing (with automatic listing if timeframes are not met) and gazettal of approved listings. Removal of legislative requirement for property owners to vote for establishment of heritage conservation zones.

Regulating development of heritage listed places •

Facebook/loveyourlocalheritage

Including all heritage matters within a single Heritage Act. Establishing a single integrated statutory body to handle all heritage matters. Management of heritage protection independently of the planning system. Reviewing the capacity and resources of the South Australian Heritage Council.

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Classification of applications for demolition of listed buildings as noncomplying and automatic rejection if the building has been neglected intentionally. Minor works on heritage listed places exempted from planning approval in well defined circumstances. Mandating of a Heritage Code of Practice for adaptation of heritage buildings. Increased penalties for neglect of heritage listed structures.

Protecting special places • • •

Protecting the Adelaide Park Lands as public open space through comprehensive statutory protection. Pursuing national heritage listing for Ayers House, Edmund Wright House, Fort Largs and Martindale Hall. Returning Glenthorne Farm to community use.

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Growing Investment There is much evidence that private and public investment in heritage assets generates significant direct and indirect returns. South Australia’s built heritage has experienced insufficient investment due to outdated regulation, a lack of incentives for private owners and inadequate government leadership and investment. The National Trust believes investment in maximising the value of our heritage assets can be achieved by:

Managing governmentowned heritage assets more strategically and efficiently •

Reviewing the management and use of State Government-owned heritage assets. Adopting a strategic approach to investment in and utilisation of government-owned heritage assets. Providing leadership to local government on effective protection, conservation and utilisation of heritage assets.

Promoting private investment through incentives and support for private owners of heritage places •

Providing incentives to assist heritage building owners to conserve their properties.

Improving availability of heritage grants, expert advice and specialist skills.

Flexibility in decisions on land use and land division.

Flexible application of building regulations for adaptation of heritage places. Promoting rate rebate programs and other fee and tax concessions for private owners.

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Working with local government and nongovernment organisations to co-invest in South Australia’s heritage assets

Recognising and supporting heritage tourism

Investing in nature conservation

Establishing a rolling investment fund for publicly owned heritage assets in regional South Australia. Supporting heritage advisory services for home owners through local government and the National Trust. Supporting heritage skills trade training through the Australian Artisan Trades Academy.

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Edmund Wright House, a significant publicly-owned heritage asset has sat vacant and inaccessible to the public since 2016. Image credits: Right NTSA Below: Scott McCarten

Implementing a heritage tourism strategy for South Australia, with a focus on regional areas.

Reform Natural Resource Management administration to ensure greater investment in onground nature conservation works.


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Community Participation Communities across South Australia have a strong, long standing commitment to the preservation of our heritage. In many places, non-government organisations like the National Trust have taken a leading role in advocating for, protecting and conserving the state’s heritage. Local heritage is what is valued by local people and is best identified and managed within local communities. Heritage conservation generates economic activity and activates community social capital. Recent changes to planning laws have aimed to remove local communities and individuals from many of the decisions that affect heritage conservation. Instead of excluding communities from decisions about our heritage, we need to extend community participation and engagement to maximise the social, cultural, economic and environmental benefits of recognising and caring for our heritage. We need to find new ways for individuals and communities to be involved in heritage conservation and to restore community rights in respect of planning decisions which affect heritage places.

Restoring the role of local communities in local heritage listing and management

Reinstating citizen and community rights in planning and development decisions

Increasing community participation in the decision making process through an open public nomination system for local heritage listing. Greater transparency in decision making through the provision of reasons for listing or non-listing. Introducing third party appeal rights in relation to local heritage listing decisions. Resourcing local heritage surveys and management plans for local councils that have not completed them. Restricting ministerial powers to remove or disallow heritage listings.

Working with the National Trust to maximise community participation The National Trust is the state’s leading non-government heritage conservation organisation, with more than 6 000 members and volunteers across the state. For sixty years the Trust has played a leading role in preserving South Australia’s heritage. It manages 130 built and natural heritage places across the state and has, in the past three years, raised more than $2.5m for heritage conservation projects in South Australia through the South Australian Heritage Foundation. The Trust plays a valuable role in property management, community engagement, fundraising and skills training. We propose the following ways for the Trust to extend its work for the state’s heritage: •

Amending the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 to restore lost community consultation and appeal rights within the planning system in the assessment of development proposals.

Entrusting the management/ ownership of the following government-owned heritage places to the National Trust: • Ayers House • Martindale Hall • Edmund Wright House • Crown Land properties that have been managed and maintained by the Trust for decades.

Fundraising •

Utilising tax deductible conservation fundraising appeals through the South Australian Heritage Foundation for public buildings owned by state and local government.

Skills training •

Leading heritage trade training in the state through the new Australian Artisan Trades Academy.

Protecting our natural heritage • PI C T UR E D

Above: Green Army volunteer at Englebrook Reserve. Left: Participants in Glencoe Woolshed conservation workshop with the National Trust.

Supporting volunteers and community organisations to deliver environmental conservation programs by reinstating state funding for on ground conservation works by community organisations.

Heritage Policy Statements from each of the major political parties are presented over the following pages.

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Greens SA   THE HON MARK PARNELL MLC, PARLIAMENTARY LEADER, GREENS SA 

The SA Greens believe that heritage, in all its forms, is a community asset to be respected and protected for current and future generations. That’s why we have been working tirelessly in Parliament and in the community to make sure that important places are protected and that our laws are strong enough to make sure that protection is real and ongoing. Otherwise, each new generation will have to fight the same battles over and over again.

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ur State’s planning laws are particularly important. As we know, decisions to allow heritage to be destroyed are so often regretted later. On the other hand, decisions to conserve heritage places are rarely regretted. If they get it wrong, conservation decisions may be reversed by future generations, but once a heritage place is destroyed, it is lost forever. Our heritage laws need to be effective, enforceable, transparent and reflect community expectations. Where possible, heritage should be in the hands of local communities who best understand its local significance. Whether heritage is of local, State or National significance, citizens and organisations such as the National Trust must have a role in the identification, protection and management of heritage.

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The Greens believe local councils need adequate resources to identify and list important local heritage places. It is unacceptable that some areas in South Australia still have no local heritage listings. The Greens are campaigning to stop the corrupting influence of developer and corporate donations to political parties. We know from bitter experience that money speaks loudly and the community voice is often drowned out. These donations aren’t about the love of democracy, it’s all about making projects happen, often at the expense of heritage. The Greens support assisting owners to preserve heritage places by providing appropriate grants and differential ratings and also encourage the adaptive re-use of heritage places. We support concepts such as Heritage Banks, which make funds available to restore and maintain heritage and support training to address the shortage of tradespeople with the specialist skills required to work on heritage sites. The Greens also believe that we need to prioritise community education around the value of South Australia’s heritage, including its tourism potential. As the South Australian Parliament’s only experienced environmental lawyer and as a long-term member of the National Trust both in Australia and overseas, my commitment on behalf of the Greens SA, is to continue the fight to protect our heritage, for now and into the future.

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The Hon Mark Parnell MLC


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Australian Conservatives   THE HON ROBERT BROKENSHIRE MLC, AUSTRALIAN CONSERVATIVES 

Australian Conservatives MLC Robert Brokenshire says he is committed to making sure the heritage of South Australia is protected. “We must value and protect our heritage and we have to make sure adequate protections are put into law and ongoing funding is committed to this end,” he said.

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eritage places inform our cultural identity; they tells us the story of our past and inform future generations of what came before them.” “We only have to look overseas to see that tourism and pride are often based around the heritage of the country and historical buildings play a very big part of that.” Mr Brokenshire said he has long been concerned about protecting South Australia’s heritage and has supported a number of efforts to protect the state’s legacy. “I supported the National Trust’s bid to stop the sale and redevelopment of Martindale Hall, a beautiful piece of Georgian architecture that represents an important part of South Australia’s history. While supportive of invigorating the CBD and the precinct along North Terrace we argued that the works should not take away from the historical face of the Old Parliament House or the railway station,” he said.

For further information: Robert Brokenshire 0419 815 990 or Joanne Fosdike on 0488 550 454 conservatives.org.au

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The Hon Robert Brokenshire MLC

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“The simple fact is that the current Labor Government has done too little to protect our heritage and has allowed too many historical buildings to be knocked over in the name of progress. The state Labor government has not only failed to work with the National Trust to assist them in caring for the dozens of government owned buildings it took away hundreds of thousands of dollars from the budget needed to do so.”

“Australian Conservatives will continue to fight for the protection and preservation of this great state’s heritage, a state that has so much history to celebrate. Our buildings and our open spaces are a testament to those who planned and built our cities and towns, a testament to those who fought the elements to establish farming practices and communities and those who came here to build a new life in the midst of persecution. This history must be honoured and protected and as such and we will continue to fight for the protection of these spaces and the funding needed to preserve them for our children and future generations.”

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Liberal Party   DAVID SPEIRS MP, SHADOW MINISTER FOR ENVIRONMENT 

Heritage matters! That’s the strong message that Liberal Party MPs and candidates hear daily from members of our community.

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e know that South Australians value heritage places and want them to be nurtured, revitalised and invested in so that they continue to give our communities character and connect people with the stories of our state’s rich cultural, architectural and natural history. We believe that heritage is not just about the past, but instead a living representation of where we’ve come from, with plenty to teach us about where we could go. We want to see heritage places re-energised, some through adaptive re-use and others as places of tourism value.

The Liberal Party’s commitment to our heritage is significant and we have released a substantial policy which gives heritage the focus from government that it deserves (and which it has sorely missed for 16 years). Our policy includes: •

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A $500,000 grant to the National Trust to undertake restoration work at Ayers House, a site we believe is a flagship heritage property in an important heritage precinct. The provision of $500,000 in heritage grants to help owners of heritage listed properties undertake vital preservation and restoration works. An easier pathway to rejuvenating heritage buildings in Adelaide’s CBD by creating a ministerial override on Building Code restrictions which tie up work in compliance and red-tape, discouraging the adaption of heritage properties. After consultation with the National Trust the free transfer of a number of heritage properties to the National Trust, giving volunteers the certainty that their stewardship of properties will continue unimpeded by government. The development of a heritage tourism strategy, recognising the tourism value of our heritage places and putting them at the centre of growing tourist numbers in our state – this will have a particular focus on regional heritage. Preservation of important heritage buildings on Glenthorne Farm as part of our plan to create Glenthorne National Park (www.glenthorne.com.au).

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David Speirs MP

Commitment to engage with the National Trust in meaningful, open and honest discussions about their role in the future of major heritage assets including Fort Largs and Martindale Hall.

Finally we are making a public commitment to work in partnership with the National Trust wherever we can. We have forged a respectful and productive relationship with the Trust and we are excited about taking this relationship into the future. The National Trust has the potential to be a great custodian of our heritage places and has the experience, resources and commitment to deliver the best stewardship for our state’s heritage.


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Labor Party   THE HON IAN HUNTER MLC, MINISTER FOR SUSTAINABILIT Y, ENVIRONMENT AND CONSERVATION 

Labor values our state’s heritage and understands protecting our heritage sites also protects our history. The Weatherill Government has made significant progress this term in protecting our state’s heritage including: •

We have an exciting vision for our State’s heritage with a particular focus on encouraging people to visit, enjoy and understand the value of our heritage sites. The Planning and Design Code under our new planning system will soon provide a new class of character protection, to better protect our character neighbourhoods. A Labor Government will continue to pursue World Heritage Listing for the Flinders Ranges for its outstanding geological and paleontological values. The Flinders Ranges is one of the worlds most magnificent landscapes with fossil evidence spanning more than 300 million years. The Weatherill Government believes our Flinders Ranges contains the world’s finest example of the Ediacaran explosion of life, when the earliest forms of complex multicellular animal life evolved.

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The Hon Ian Hunter MLC

The Weatherill Government is committed to the preservation of the historic Tram Barn site on Main North Road in Prospect and intends to purchase the site on behalf of the community to co-design the space for adaptive reuse for the community.

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A Labor Government will actively continue to look for ways to grow our heritage tourism through a partnership with the South Australian Tourism Commission and the Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources. We will also look for opportunities for private and public partnerships through the heritage sites in our nature based tourism prospectus.

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National Heritage Listing of South Australia’s Cornish mining heritage at Burra and Moonta. Release of Heritage Directions (A future for heritage in South Australia) Confirming an expanded Naracoorte Caves site as a State Heritage Place. Developing a discussion paper on heritage tourism opportunities for South Australia. Coordination of a ‘Sea Pixels’ photo competition with the community. Promoting heritage values and finding a balance between heritage protection and encouraging and stimulating economic development. The Adelaide Oval being a shining example of how our heritage has influenced the redevelopment of one of our State’s icons. Pursuing, for the first time, noncompliance with a protection order for the State Heritage Listed Bell’s Plumbers Shop in the Environment Resources and Development (ERD) Court. An amendment to the State’s Historic Shipwrecks legislation to make compliance matters and penalties more contemporary and streamlined. Recorded and registered several thousand relics in the Historic Shipwrecks Register.

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SA-BEST   NICK XENOPHON AND K AREN HOCKLEY, SA-BEST 

South Australia has a rich diversity of Heritage assets. Unfortunately, many of these have not been listed for protection either under the Heritage Places Act 1993 or under the newer Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016. Some of those assets that are listed do not receive the love and attention they need to ensure that they can be enjoyed by future generations.

SA-BEST believes that our Heritage assets should be protected. Heritage tourism is a great way to create jobs in the hospitality and tourism sector, and also to develop an artisan workforce skilled in the trades needed to maintain and enhance our heritage assets. Investing in heritage is a great way to create much needed economic development and vibrancy in suburban Adelaide and in our country towns. What needs to be done: •

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Simplify and streamline all heritage legislation into a single act – currently local heritage is dealt with by the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016 and state heritage is dealt with by the Heritage Places Act 1993. Create a ‘one stop shop’ for all heritage related issues, including for determining applications for heritage listing. Preserve existing efficiencies, such as listing of all contributory items. Existing heritage items need to be better protected so as to ensure that properties cannot be demolished if they’ve been P O L Imaking neglected, G E and by CY A demolition non-complying. T

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Encourage private investment in the purchase and maintenance of Heritage buildings by allowing concessions on state taxes and charges in recognition of the additional costs associated with these properties. Heritage grants should also be strengthened to ensure that property owners are assisted with major works. Support public ownership and investment in Heritage assets by creating mechanisms for cofunding with the local government. Enhance Heritage tourism by actively promoting Heritage areas through Tourism SA. Assist South Australian country towns in identifying their local heritage by funding surveys where these are incomplete.

Nick Xenophon, Leader of SA-BEST and Karen Hockley, SA-BEST candidate for Davenport

Encourage community buy-in by reinstating community consultation and appeal rights into the Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act 2016. Create special protection for iconic Heritage assets such as the Adelaide Park Lands, Glenthorne Farm and Fort Largs.


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Dignity Party   KELLY VINCENT, DIGNIT Y PART Y 

Heritage and Access: Foes or Friends? Heritage and modern accessibility standards are often seen as strange bedfellows, with the desire to maintain, often overriding the potential for what could be. But does this have to be the case? I find myself seeking answers to this predicament.

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n 2016, the Dignity Party successfully moved new policy through parliament, which requires developers and builders to give serious consideration to universal design principles in all new public builds, with the aim of making these spaces accessible to all, such as people with disabilities, parents with prams, and our ageing population. However, as we talk about improving access for all the great future sites our state will have to offer, we should also consider the buildings of our past. The heritage spaces that we are able to enjoy now are only here because we inherited them, and if we inherited them from our forebears, perhaps we could pass on this physical history in such a way that future generations could inherit something that might be even better.

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I am accustomed to hearing the usual arguments against modifying heritage spaces. Cost is one, even though modifications are commonly proven to be cost neutral, and add to revenue by opening up to a wider customer base. The other, is that these spaces are just old. However this doesn’t hold water when wePconsider O L I countries Ewith cities G like Norway hundreds C Y of A yearsTolder than Adelaide where policy has been introduced to ensure that all public buildings adhere to universal design standards by 2025.

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Valuing Our Heritage Forum Panel Debate with Election Candidates Thursday 15 February 6-7.30pm Allan Scott Auditorium, Hawke Building UniSA City West Campus, 55 North Terrace, Adelaide With the State election looming, the National Trust of South Australia is convening a panel of election candidates to debate the risks and opportunities ahead for South Australia’s heritage. Christine Trenorden, former judge and Senior Judge of the Environment, Resources and Development Court, will lead a Q&A session with our panel of politicians responding to your questions about the future of our heritage.

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The Hon Kelly Vincent MLC

audiences and performers alike. As a physically disabled person, I don’t expect to be able to climb Machu Picchu without any issues by this time tomorrow. However I do want to be part of a society which is willing to make continuous incremental improvements towards the respectful and holistic inclusion of all people.

You can propose a question for the panel in advance by email to heritagewatch@nationaltrustsa.org.au no later than 11 February. Find out from these candidates for election in 2018 how they will ensure that our unique heritage is protected, preserved and utilised. Doors open from 5.30pm. Admission is free, but places are limited. Reserve your seat now via the Hawke Centre website or directly at: http://e.mybookingmanager.com/ E12418555029615

Let us not look at accessibility as something which stands in the way of protecting heritage, but as something that in itself protects heritage, which honours it by ensuring it can be enjoyed for many generations to come.

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from the Lord

Mayor

  MARTIN HAESE, RIGHT HONOURABLE LORD MAYOR OF ADELAIDE 

Formed in 1840, the City of Adelaide was the first Local Government organisation created in Australia. As custodians of the City districts, North Adelaide and the Park Lands, this historical legacy provides myself and the Councillors with an extraordinary sense of responsibility. The City of Adelaide is also home to over 2,000 local heritage listed places, comprising over a quarter of South Australia’s total heritage listed places. They are an iconic part of our city’s character and speak volumes about our national and international standing. With recent research undertaken for Council showing that direct heritage tourism expenditure is valued at $375 million annually, their protection delivers significant social, cultural and economic benefits for our community.

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outh Australia’s heritage assets also form part of our self-identity. In today’s fast moving, opportunity laden and seemingly ever changing environment, our heritage buildings provide us with a sense of continuity, stability, pride and inspiration. Many of these buildings reflect the extraordinary wealth of the late 1800s and notable acts of private philanthropy. Whilst I am the first to encourage sustainable growth, new technology, jobs creation and residential living in the city, I strongly believe that our heritage buildings play a critical role in defining who we are as a community. They are the essence of our self-identity as a city and a state. Many remember the demolition of the Aurora Hotel on Hindmarsh Square as the tipping point in our state’s heritage conservation debate and I still recall the community uproar during the final meeting held at the hotel prior to its demolition on 1 December 1983. Our state’s heritage protection has been hard fought for over the last 4 decades and it is everyone’s role to ensure this hard work is sustained.

Council is unequivocal in its support for built heritage. We believe that it is a key part of growing the City of Adelaide’s reputation as a prosperous, liveable and culturally rich city. In 2018, Council is celebrating the 30th anniversary of our Heritage Incentives Scheme, the nation’s most substantial local government heritage grant scheme. Council’s Heritage Incentives Scheme has assisted thousands of heritage building owners over the years, the results of which can be seen across many of our residential and commercial streets. From its humble beginnings of a $100,000 funding contribution in 1988, Council has since provided over $15 million for heritage restoration projects, with $1.04M allocated to 79 projects in 2016/17. A recent study has estimated a $1.68 return to our local economy for every dollar invested via the scheme.

Martin Haese, Lord Mayor of Adelaide

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The City of Adelaide is proud to be working with the National Trust of South Australia, property owners, community organisations and building professionals to protect, preserve and promote Adelaide’s unique heritage and character for the benefit of future generations. Our advocacy together must be strong, articulate and sustained.

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  Val u ing o u r heritage

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Valuing our Heritage

Heritage can be defined as that which is inherited from the past, enjoyed in the present and preserved for the future. It exists in many forms, as architecture and other material legacies that are built and made, in traditions, symbols and practices that are shared and also in the natural environment we have inherited and its ecosystems. The desire to cherish and protect our heritage is common to all cultures and across time.

Above: Heritage reactivated. Peel Street, Adelaide.

Valuing our heritage happens in many ways. Value can be defined economically and in terms of social, cultural and personal benefits. In this feature story, Melissa Ballantyne explores seven aspects of valuing our heritage.

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 Val u ing o u r heritage

When surveyed, Australians express strong beliefs about the importance of heritage. In a 2005 survey 81% of participants felt that heritage was relevant to them or their family. When questioned on relevance to national identity and culture, 93% thought that heritage was part of Australia’s identity and 88% believed that it played an important part in Australia’s culture.1

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outh Australia is no exception. We feel a strong connection with our local areas, environment and cultural traditions and understand that the presence and conservation of our heritage is an important part of our sense of identity and lifestyle. The Expert Panel established to undertake a review of the South Australian planning system reported in 2014 that “The panel’s engagement with communities across the state revealed a deep and abiding awareness of and pride in the heritage of South Australia’s buildings, landmarks and landscapes.”2 Heritage recognises important contributions from the past, provides understanding and value in the present and is our legacy for future generations. The protection and management of our heritage is important to our economic, social and environmental prosperity. Benefits flow from conserving, maintaining and adapting heritage places, from tourism, training and educational activities. Economic benefits include greater revenue in the economy and increased employment. Heritage connects us with our past and plays a significant role in creating meaningful environments, that is, the value and social significance that communities associate with certain places. Lastly, heritage has important environmental benefits which include reduced energy use through conservation and adaptation of existing buildings.

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Cape Jaffa lighthouse, Kingston. Images: Laurie Dacy.

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1

Allen Survey 2005-Nationally representative survey of over 2000 people

2

Expert Panel on Planning Reform –Our Ideas for Reform Report 2014


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  Val u ing o u r heritage

WAYS in which heritage creates economic, cultural, social and environmental value SEVEN WAYS IN WHICH

HERITAGE CREATES ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ENVIRONMENTAL VALUE

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Involvement in heritage projects can improve people’s sense of worth and self esteem

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People who live in areas where heritage is preserved are likely to have stronger sense of place

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Investment in the heritage places raises pride in areas and encourages social interaction

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Heritage places offer many opportunities for education and training

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Heritage conservation generates high-skilled local jobs.

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REGENERATION & INNOVATION

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Heritage drives tourism

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ourism is a growth industry worldwide and heritage tourism is one of the fastest growing segments of that industry. Heritage tourism refers to leisure travel that has as its primary purpose the experiencing of places and activities that connect with tangible and intangible heritage. These include the historic, architectural, technical, aesthetic, spiritual or social and cultural heritage attributes of places.

Heritage based tourism makes a significant contribution to Australia. In South Australia heritage underpins the tourism industry and is critical to the ongoing success of tourism as an export industry. Some heritage places such as Burra and Hahndorf are tourist destinations in and of themselves. Many of our acclaimed food and wine experiences are differentiated by their unique provenance and heritage. Visitors seek a unique and authentic experience when they visit our state. Everyone likes to experience the “spirit” of a place, which most often is represented through architecture, streetscapes and the natural envrionment. By seeing heritage, whether related to something famous or recognisably dramatic, tourists are able to experience the aesthetic, cultural, culinary and agricultural history of an area. Heritage enriches and makes a tourist’s visit special and memorable. The benefits of heritage tourism are significant as heritage attractions boost local economies. Unlike tourist attractions that must be built new, historic places are unique tourism assets that already exist in most communities. As an added benefit, the promotion of historic places as tourist attractions helps local residents develop a greater understanding and appreciation of their own culture and heritage. Heritage tourism can also be year round instead of seasonal, therefore revenue flows more evenly to communities. Heritage listing is a significant marketing tool both for a heritage place itself and more broadly. Direct revenue is generated through entrance fees, staging of events and tourist accommodation. Tourism also has a multiplier effect in other parts of the local economy including restaurants, wineries, retail and service businesses. Heritage visitors stay longer, spend more per day, and, therefore, have a more significant per trip economic impact than other visitors. A recent report ‘Economic Value of Heritage Tourism in the City of Adelaide 2015’ assessed the economic benefits of cultural heritage tourism within the City of Adelaide. It demonstrated that 27% of total visitor spend in Adelaide could be directly attributed to ‘cultural heritage’ related tourism. Furthermore, $375m was spent annually by visitors on cultural heritage related tourism in the City of Adelaide based on 2013/2014 visitor numbers.

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Hahndorf is a major tourism destination because of its unique blend of cultural and built heritage.

The report concludes that a place’s cultural heritage is a tangible asset to both the community and to business as tourists and locals alike are attracted to visit our generally accessible collection of built heritage. Of the visitors to Adelaide surveyed twelve per cent indicated cultural heritage was a main reason for visiting, twenty eight per cent rated cultural heritage as ‘important’ or ‘very important’ to their visit and forty one per cent of their activities were in heritage places.3 Through tourism local residents and tourists alike can be educated about our past, experience a greater appreciation for heritage and hopefully develop an interest in conservation.

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Economic Value of Heritage Tourism, Adelaide City Council , Adelaide 2015


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Heritage-based regeneration spurs investment and innovation

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aintaining, upgrading and adaptive reuse of heritage places is an important driver of public and private sector investment which in turn has significant economic benefits. Expenditure is paid into the local economy, while the situation for new construction is generally the reverse. Heritage buildings add value to regeneration projects, in terms of the economic advantage of reuse over new build and in maintaining the authenticity of a precinct. A 2010 UK report found that on average one pound of public sector expenditure on heritage led regeneration generated an additional one pound sixty in further economic activity over a ten year period.4 The value of our existing heritage drives investment in many areas of South Australia reinvigorating them as places for people to live, work and visit. Investment in heritage has significant economic benefits for investors. First, the very qualities that attracted them to the building/neighbourhood will actually endure over time. Secondly, they can safely reinvest in sensitive improvements to their building or undertake adaptive reuse projects without fear that their building or neighbourhood will be destroyed in the future and neighbouring properties will not be developed inappropriately and undermine their investment. Most historic buildings are fully capable of economic use and studies have shown that the return on heritage listed properties compares favourably with the return on unlisted properties.4 Important parts of the economy- professional services and the creative and cultural sectors-often seek to locate businesses in heritage buildings. Such businesses tend to be attracted to historic buildings as they are smaller, more flexible and cost effective. Higher building prices also mean greater revenue streams for government through higher levels of rates and taxes.

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Heritage places lend themselves to innovative urban regeneration. Clever Little Tailor bar, Adelaide.

Most recently, Peel and Leigh Streets in the Adelaide Central Business District have enjoyed a resurgence, which is due largely to the adaptation of heritage buildings as cafés, bars and restaurants. Other examples include the recent renovations of a number of city buildings including 2 King William Street and Electra House. There are many innovative ways to reuse and renew heritage buildings and by doing so their useful life is extended, they are given a new identity and their relevancy is retained. Adaptive re-use involves re-using a building or structure for the purpose of giving it new life through a new function. By retaining, rethinking and reworking, an existing heritage building can continue in physical form and also evolve with new use. Investment in heritage buildings creates economic opportunities for many businesses including in the services, construction and design sectors. This is particularly so with reuse projects. While a high degree of complexity often exists to undertake such projects, to understand the existing condition and proposed design solutions, the net overall construction cost can be considerably less partly because they tend to use local rather than imported goods. There are also major cost savings through value being placed in the existing fabric, rather than just in land alone. This value is both in floor space that can be used without new construction and in the existing fabric itself which can be borrowed from, and integrated into a conservation project. This in turn can increase the real end value of the project. Many historic buildings are structurally sound and well built. They may require structural retrofits or the addition of fire sprinklers and other equipment to enhance their safety, but it is the quality of their construction not their age which is important. Older buildings are often significantly better constructed than many contemporary ones. 4

AMION and Locum Consulting 2010

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English Heritage Power of Place1998

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Heritage conservation plays an important education and training role

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eritage places are remarkable resources for learning and training in construction and conservation skills. They embody traditional knowledge and techniques and provide opportunities for training in artisan skills such as stonemasonry, carpentry, metalwork and brick laying. There is a significant relationship between a person’s understanding and knowledge of heritage and their engagement and interest in conservation. Education tools include signage and heritage trails, interactive facilities and publications such as booklets, films, maps and websites. Creating interest in heritage leads to a deeper understanding of different experiences, building tolerance, empathy and respect for diversity. A recent study in New South Wales found that nearly half of those surveyed who felt they had a good understanding of what heritage means were more likely to feel the importance personally of conservation.6 Furthermore, half of all participants felt that natural heritage was an important part of why they like living in NSW. Just under half felt that historic structures, colonial heritage and multicultural heritage provided important benefits.

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Learning traditional trades.

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Learning about heritage can encourage citizens to engage in heritage protection through various projects as a property owner, volunteer or professional. The great majority of industry-specific skills are learnt ‘on-the-job’. Heritage conservation provides a number of professional career paths including hands-on conservation, organising exhibitions, conservation science, preventive conservation, project management and advocacy work. More general skills may also be learned, for example in the areas of site and event management.

Heritage conservation shapes our identity and sense of place

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eritage sites provide tangible links between past and present and can suggest other possible futures. Heritage showcases important earlier achievements in fields such as commerce, politics, sport, education and agriculture together with patterns of development, evidence of social and cultural trends and important events.

The value of heritage is in what it means to people as it contains our cultural and personal memories. As heritage adds character and distinctiveness to an area it is fundamental in creating a ‘sense of place’ for a community. Where heritage is under threat this can be a potent driver for community action.

By retaining heritage we preserve memories which serve to create a sense of place and authenticity. Heritage gives people a connection to certain social values, beliefs, religions and customs. It allows them to identify with others of similar mindsets and backgrounds. By drawing from and investing in the past we create identity and belonging for community members. From identity comes a sense of inclusion, familiarity and continuity. By investing in heritage we raise pride in local areas, encourage community interactions and build social capital. Our heritage maintains a sense of permanency and continuity. In contrast, entirely new built environments can alienate and isolate those who have been connected to the former life of a place. 6

NSW Office of Environment and Heritage Report on Heritage November 2016

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AB OV E

Many heritage places play a special role in our communities.


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Heritage promotes well-being and builds communities

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he presence of heritage builds community by influencing decisions as to where people live, work and socialise. People purchase or lease heritage buildings for a number of reasons including their authenticity, the presence of well established gardens and attractive settings or for the creative challenge of renovation or restoration. Our heritage has long attracted people from both interstate and overseas to South Australia. The scale, charm and “feel” of Adelaide has been cited as an important factor by those choosing the city as a location to live or study. The existence of heritage has an impact on the development of a community in and around it. Heritage places promote good design which improves streetscapes and community wellbeing. Instead of architecture based on northern hemisphere design which is not suited to the South Australian climate, the presence of heritage encourages the creation and development of regional styles of housing and commercial buildings. Ultimately, our heritage contributes to the creation of sustainable communities. Involvement in heritage develops connections between people and promotes self esteem. If heritage is lost this can result in a loss of meaning and connection for communities with consequent negative impacts on the health and well-being of citizens. Through organisations like the National Trust, tens of thousands of people participate in heritage conservation works across Australia.

PI C T UR E D

Above: Volunteers on a National Trust nature reserve. Left: Sharing local knowledge through tour guiding from Ayers House museum.

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Heritage conservation promotes recycling and re-use, reduces carbon emissions and energy consumption

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eritage has major benefits for the environment through a ‘reduce, reuse and recycle’ approach. Adaptive re-use plays an important role in making good urban environments. The retention, conservation and reuse of buildings promotes sustainability, reduces waste and conserves the use of non-renewable resources. When buildings are conserved and re-used rather than demolished this reduces land fill, a serious environmental challenge. By conserving and reusing existing buildings rather than constructing new ones on land outside our cities and towns we put a “brake” on motor vehicle usage thereby reducing carbon dioxide emissions and “green fields” use. Conserving and adapting historic buildings leads to significant energy savings. Such buildings are often regarded as energy inefficient in measurement systems that focus solely on annual energy usage. However, the annual energy use in an appropriately rehabilitated historic building is not measurably greater than for a new building. There are also important energy savings when embodied energy is factored in. Embodied energy is the non-renewable energy consumed by all the processes involved with building, from the mining and manufacturing of materials, to transport, demolition and the construction process itself. For example concrete embodies 5 gigajoules of energy per cubic metre and steel 85 gigajoules per cubic metre. Studies have shown it is 35% more efficient in terms of greenhouse gas use to retain, reuse and refit existing buildings, and 53% more energy efficient.7 The energy required to erect a new building is roughly equivalent to the energy required to operate it for 40 years. When the energy consumption analysis is approached from a life cycle perspective where both the energy needed to demolish any existing building, construct the building as well as annual energy usage is included, the energy inefficiency claim against historic buildings largely disappears. The rising cost of energy is a further factor in favour of conservation and re use of heritage buildings. Much can be learnt from past design principles and practices which were developed before the ready availability of energy to our homes and commercial buildings.

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Unnecessary demolitions create waste, squander resources, destroy embodied energy and add to carbon emissions.

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7 H Bennets and S Pullen Historic Dwelling and Improvement Design and Resources Audit (Sustainability House Edwardstown 2010)


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Heritage conservation creates skilled local jobs

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aring for and restoring heritage structures generates skilled local employment for a range of people. Heritage conservation supports the development of a skilled, well-paid workforce in the building trades, including traditional crafts such as stonemasonry and blacksmithing as well as demand for professional services in design, conservation, engineering, architecture and allied fields. There are additional benefits arising from employment in this sector including the preservation and enhancement of old trades and improved employment prospects where workers are upskilled in these areas.

The numbers of jobs created is significant. In Europe, historic rehabilitation creates 16.5% more jobs than new construction, and every direct job in the cultural heritage sector creates 26.7 indirect jobs. In England an estimated 86,000 people are employed to preserve nearly 4.5 million historic houses and another 550,000 historic commercial buildings. When compared to new construction, the labour component of a building rehabilitation is a larger proportion of total project cost. Typically, labour represents 60-75% of project costs in a conservation project. As conservation work is more labour-intensive and higher paid than low skilled building works, this results in more expenditure in the local economy through the payment of wages.

As we have shown, there are many ways we can value our heritage, economically, culturally and socially. You might like to share how you value our heritage. Send your responses to publications@nationaltrustsa.org.au for an opportunity to win a free one year membership of the National Trust.

AB OV E

Heritage conservation requires a range of diverse skills which can create well paid career pathways.

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 P lanning o r chao s ?

New planning and development laws

are reshaping the city   KEVIN O’LEARY 

The new Planning, Development and Infrastructure Act passed in 2016 is putting more heritage places at risk of demolition or inappropriate development. Planner Kevin O’Leary discusses some of the issues.

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Proposed Peregrine development, Norwood.

Development decisions at odds with heritage streetscapes

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he fine-grained human scale of many of our main streets has been undermined by poorly sited and designed big box stores (such as Bunnings and Office Works), overwhelming advertising signage and large obtrusive car parking areas. However, there are still high streets or parts of them – such as King William Road, Goodwood Road and The Parade – that have a traditional main street function and appearance.

The State Government declared the Peregrine development on the Parade Norwood a major project, thus by-passing local council planning regulations. The building is totally out of sympathy with the scale, fabric and style of the three adjacent State Heritage listed places. It threatens the neighbouring Kensington Historic Conservation Zone with insoluble overshadowing, overlooking, traffic and parking problems.

Unfortunately in recent years buildings have been approved in Adelaide which are totally out of character with the heritage streetscapes in which they are located.

The massive Cremorne Plaza approved for construction in Unley Road, is likewise totally alien to the existing fine grained heritage streetscape.

Two stand out examples are development approvals for a sevenstorey building in the Norwood Parade heritage precinct and a seven-storey apartment building to be constructed opposite Unley’s historic Cremorne Hotel.

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Thirty years ago the principles governing development in heritage precincts were well understood and practiced in South Australia. The way to preserve the character was by encouraging the development of finegrained uses, restricting the height of


P lanning o r chao s ?

new development, “sleeving” big box developments with smaller stores and businesses facing the main street, and ensuring that advertising signs and large and poorly landscaped parking areas didn’t overwhelm them. New development adjoining heritage buildings and places should be complementary in terms of overall height, bulk, form and appearance. This, of course, would rule out the 27-storey office tower the premier encouraged Lang Walker to build between Old Parliament House and the Railway Station/Casino (see page 27). New development doesn’t have to copy the architecture of existing buildings but new buildings should respect the old in terms of scale, form materials, and detailing. The Woolworths supermarket on Walkerville Terrace is an excellent example of how well a big new building can be successfully incorporated into a traditional main street setting.

Development decisions which assign a low priority to heritage in the assessment process

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delaide stands at the crossroads. Do we build on our distinctive character or do we become just another modern city characterised by cut-rate high-rise towers, soulless main streets, large car parking expanses, cookie-cutter housing estates and so on? Building on our unique character means preserving the full integrity of our heritage buildings and places. We must also take steps to ensure that the design context within which they sit is not significantly altered. A number of cities, for example Toronto, Canada, which promote growth and higher density developments, give protection of the heritage fabric of buildings a high priority: ‘’The objective for the long term preservation, integration and reuse of heritage properties may mean that not all sites with or adjacent to heritage properties are appropriate for tall building development. ‘’

However in Adelaide, very low priority is being assigned to heritage protection. A typical example is the redevelopment of the State Heritage listed G and R Wills building at 203 North Terrace Adelaide incorporating a 19-storey apartment building. The former Development Assessment Commission’s report on this development concedes: …. ‘there will be some significant impacts on the heritage value of the original building but the benefits of the overall project are considered to outweigh the loss of heritage fabric.’ This ignores the success of developments where heritage features have been protected, for example 2 King William Street and Electra House, Peel Street and Leigh Street in the Adelaide central business district have a number of cafes, restaurants, bars and other businesses in adapted heritage buildings. A new restaurant, drinks and dessert bar Jekyll and Hyde has brought life to the heritage building at 11-29 Union Street as has a new restaurant in a beautiful Art Deco building in the thriving heart of Prospect, Rosemont Hall. There is an urgent need to highlight the social, economic and environmental advantages of preserving heritage in the 30 Year Plan for Greater Adelaide. We need a clear statement that the preservation of heritage takes precedence over all new forms of growth and development.

ABOVE

203 North Terrace development behind the State Heritage listed G and R Wills Building, Adelaide.

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 P lanning o r chao s ?

Spot rezoning for major developments is likely to adversely impact adjoining heritage sites

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ne of the most devastating threats to the planning system that has emerged in recent years is ‘spot zoning’ by ministerial fiat. In May 2017 12 arbitrarily chosen metropolitan sites were designated for major developments. This not only unfairly impacts on property owners but also endangers adjoining heritage assets. Proposed developments include: •

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transforming the former Caroma factory on Magill Rd into a sixstorey apartment complex; a 90-home estate in Everard Park; an apartment, office and retail development in Malvern; turning the former Schweppes plant on Payneham Road into homemaker centre; a four-storey mixed-use development in Beulah Road; and the redevelopment of the Beaurepaires store on Norwood Parade into a six-storey apartment block.

Spot zoning processes like this undermine more visionary strategic plans. A comprehensive master planning approach needs to take into account a wider range of economic, social and environmental factors – especially as they impact on heritage places. British experience shows that in consideration of proposed high-rise developments there needs to be detailed study of the likely effect on traffic movements, the neighbourhood skyline, heritage places, the existing streetscape character and important local views, prospects and panoramas. Random dispersal of individual high-rise buildings over a large area is a practice widely condemned in great cities because it adversely affects the overall quality of urban life.

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AB OV E

Sites for high-rise development Inner and Middle Metropolitan Corridor (Sites) DPA.


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The New Planning and Design Code may not lead to improved heritage protection

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any current policies in our development plans are susceptible to widely differing interpretations, which opens the way for decisions based on political expediency rather best planning practices. More precise and prescriptive policy guidelines are urgently needed.to ensure preservation of essential heritage fabric and precinct character. The yet-to-be formulated Planning and Design Code risks major failings that have bedeviled other states who adopted so called ‘performance planning’. Problems that have afflicted Queensland include excessive levels of complexity, lack of efficiency, lack of certainty and transparency, inconsistent decision making, strong feelings of injustice and high levels of confusion. A particular issue for the City of Adelaide are the so-called ‘catalyst sites’ provided for in an amendment to the State Government’s Capital City Development Plan Amendment in 2012. A ‘catalyst site’ is any site (or cluster of adjacent sites) that exceeds 1500 sq. m. Such sites are exempted from planning and heritage rules that govern smaller developments. This not only represents a clear injustice to the small property owner but will inevitably undermine the character and degrade or destroy numerous heritage places. We need a planning policy framework plan for high-rise development, similar to those produced in major UK cities which gives specific guidance on the location, form and design of tall buildings. They set out detailed policies for the protection of landmark views and heritage assets, retention of daylight and sunlight to public places and existing buildings, preservation of the privacy and amenity of

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Above: Walker Tower, Festival Plaza, Adelaide. Right: Catalyst site, August Towers, Hutt Street, Adelaide.

neighbouring properties, provision of healthy living environments, retention of local urban design contexts and creation of robust linkages with public transport and local facilities. Delivering the best outcomes in terms of these factors is likely to lead to the clustering of high-rise towers in a small number of strategic locations rather than being pepper-potted across the whole metropolitan area.

There is an urgent need to review the operation and impacts of all state government planning legislation to ensure better protection for threatened heritage assets. H E R I TAG E L I V I NG

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 C o nservati o n

Standing up for our Kangaroo Island coastline Images: Quentin Chester

Kangaroo Island is a special piece of South Australia that holds a fond place in the hearts of all who have visited it. This is, in no small part, due to its beautiful unspoilt nature. In particular the island has pristine beaches and rugged cliffs that lend a sense of wildness and remoteness that is hard to find elsewhere.

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ne of Kangaroo Island’s most cherished features is that almost all of the coastline is still in public hands and in its natural state. This means that the coast is open to the public and preserved for its natural values in National Parks, Coastal Reserves and Crown Land. A great way way to see it is via the 61km Kangaroo Island Wilderness Trail in Flinders Chase National Park which allows access to pristine bushland and sweeping coastal views, described by government publicity as “world class and iconic”. Part of that coastline is suddenly at risk of being lost as public land. Just before Christmas, the State Government announced a proposal to dispose of ‘surplus’ Crown land on the southern coast near Pelican Lagoon to become part of a golf course development. It is proposed to dispose of two parcels of Crown Land to extend an earlier approval for the development to take in 2.5km of beautiful coatline, owned by the people of South Australia. Hundreds of people have raised

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their concerns about this proposal to privatise pristine public land and a lack of due process in assessing the environmental impacts of such a development. The land has significant values because of its outstanding landscape, its remnant vegetation, and its rare species. Disposal would remove an important asset from public hands forever. In order to dispose of the land it must be declared surplus to requirements by the Environment Minister. However it is not clear what level of environmental impact

assessment will be carried out to guide decision making, nor the criteria which the Minister will use to make their decision. Furthermore, the merits of the Minister’s decision cannot be challenged in court. To allow the disposal of this land would break the continuity of protected coastline that is essential for much of our flora and fauna. It would preclude the development of any coastal wilderness walk here in the future and seriously detract from the wildness associated with Kangaroo Island by damaging an otherwise untamed coastline, values which attract so many visitors. Most importantly, it sets an extremely dangerous precedent for the privatisation of coastline elsewhere in Kangaroo Island and the rest of South Australia. If Crown Land is to be disposed of into private hands for profit, such dispositions must be subject to a transparent and accountable process. Keep our coastline public!


C o mp o ser in R esidence

Music in the house New music is being made at Beaumont House with the arrival of composer in residence, Gabriella Smart.

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he Prelude composer in residence is a national program providing opportunities for Australian composers to create new works whilst living in a beautiful heritage home. Prelude is made possible by a unique collaboration between Bundanon Trust, Peggy Glanville-Hicks Composers Trust, The National Trust, APRA, the Helpmann Academy, Arts SA and the Australian Government through the Australia Council for the Arts. Shane Simpson AM, Chairman of Bundanon Trust says, “Composers produce the raw material of Australian music. They are essential. Without them, we are reliant on outside voices, songs and stories. Yet very few can make a living from composing alone. And then there are historic houses around the country whose preservation is essential for keeping us in touch with our heritage, and which are seeking a new and vibrant role in the community. Prelude was created to bring these two together: to support the contemporary and bring new life to the historic. Prelude is the only program in Australia to provide long-term residencies to support and nurture composers and composition.” Gabriella, who commenced her Prelude residency with the National Trust of South Australia in January says, “I’m so grateful to receive the Beaumont Cottage residency. It will give me time out to seed ideas and develop collaborative

projects that I’ve been too busy to give attention to, as a result of a busy career. The National Trust have been most generous in offering several stunning buildings for use as concert and workshop spaces: Beaumont House, Ayers House and Z Ward. I’ve moved my grand piano into the music room at Beaumont House for daily use, one of the most beautiful locations in Australia.”

Gabriella is a leading advocate of new music in Australia. She has over thirty years’ experience as a pianist, improviser, curator, creator, collaborator, initiator, commissioner and producer. She has been recognised as a cultural leader through various awards and has successfully conceived and realised dozens of original projects, collaborating closely with musicians, dancers, filmmakers and video artists and in theatre and opera. She is artistic director of Soundstream, New Music Ensemble in Residence at the University of Adelaide. In 2012 Gabriella established the Soundstream Emerging Composers, a national event supporting emerging composers through the creation, workshopping, performance and recording of their works. In 2015 theTitjikala Project, an Arts for Health initiative by Titjikala Community (NT) in partnership with Soundstream, was established. This year, Gabriella will continue her improvisation performance series Blue Touch, collaborating with acclaimed Australian and international musicians and will continue to perform nationally.

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Gabriella Smart, composer in residence at Beaumont House. Credit: Marnie Hawson.

Stay tuned for more details of music events as part of Gabriella’s residency with the National Trust at Beaumont House.

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 M em b ership

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T o u rs

Adelaide Tours: Stella Bowen’s Restless Youth   WALTER MARSH 

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What’s the connection between quiet 1890s North Adelaide and the radical world of 1920s European art and literature? Meet Stella Bowen.

rowing up amongst the muslin dresses, hot nights and endless tennis matches of turn of the century Adelaide, Esther “Stella” Bowen bristled at her hometown’s social and cultural constraints. Her mother’s death in 1914 freed the 20 year old Bowen to chase her artistic ambitions to England and later France, where she rubbed shoulders with influential iconoclasts like Aldous Huxley, T.S. Eliot and Gertrude Stein, and embarked on an at-times tempestuous relationship with writer Ford Madox Ford (Parade’s End). Bowen’s 1941 memoir Drawn from Life recalls her early years with an incisive wit, offering an amusing and subversive view of turn of the century Adelaide.

“I wish I knew the truth about that strangely dim and distant life in Adelaide before the war,” she writes.“I have reconstructed it in my memory as a queer little backwater of intellectual timidity – a kind of hangover ofVictorian provincialism, isolated by three immense oceans and a great desert, and stricken by recurrent waves of paralysing heat. It lies shimmering on a plain encircled by soft blue hills, prettyish, banal, and filled to the brim with an anguish of boredom.”

Bowen would become best known for her late career work as an official artist for the Australian War Memorial, only the second woman to be granted the position. Notable pieces from this period include a striking group portrait of a bomber crew who perished over Germany before the painting’s completion, and a portrait of a longunknown Aboriginal soldier, recently identified as Western Australian Private David Harris. Bowen was diagnosed with cancer just as she was beginning to gain recognition, and having left Australia at a young age made efforts to return home one final time. They were ultimately unsuccessful, and she died in England in October 1947. Today Bowen’s work can be seen the Australian War Memorial, and the National Gallery in Canberra, as well as in the United States and Great Britain. A late 1920s self-portrait was donated to the Art Gallery of South Australia in 1999 by her niece – a belated homecoming. “I must be wrong,” Stella wrote of her at times less-than-flattering memories of Adelaide. There must have been more in it than ever met my eye. My poor small eye was placed very close to the ground, and my view was doubtless a worm’s-eye view. But it was the only view I had.”

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Above: Stella Bowen, Self portrait c.1929. Art Gallery of South Australia. Below: Stella Bowen’s former home in North Adelaide features on the walk.

Explore the North Adelaide of Bowen’s childhood with our In The Steps of Stella Bowen walking tour on Friday 23 February, Details: http://bit.ly/StellaBowen

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What’s on Adelaide Tours

FA S H I O N A B L E L I V I N G I N V I C T O R I A N A D E L A I D E

Age of Elegance is an immersive fashion installation in one of Adelaide’s most beautiful heritage homes. Be swept into the spirit of Adelaide high society during the Victorian era. Ayers House, home of Sir Henry Ayers during South Australia’s most glittering decades, will be alive again with the sights, sounds and smells of the most lavish parties ever seen in Adelaide. Acclaimed costumier Marion Boyce has created a unique experience with more than 40 authentic period costumes organised into breathtaking tableaux that invite you to immerse yourself in a whimsical world of elegant living in Adelaide’s grandest Victorian home. Opens Thursday 29 March Tuesday-Sunday, 10am- 4pm, Fridays late till 9pm Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace, Adelaide Cost: $20 Adult, $18 Concession, $15 National Trust members, Family (2 adults, up to 3 children) $50, Student, $12 (15+),  Children (5-15) $10, under 5 free.   Enquiries: (08) 8223 1234, bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au www.ayershousemuseum.org.au/ ageofelegance Book online at www.trybooking.com/UBGW

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Walk: In the steps of Stella Bowen What’s the link between quiet 1890s North Adelaide and the radical world of 1920s European art and literature? Meet Stella Bowen. One of Australia’s great war artists, Bowen was a remarkable South Australian who abandoned the home she dismissed as a “queer little backwater of intellectual timidity” at the age of 20. Exploring turnof-the-century North Adelaide life through Bowen’s own words and oft-incisive observations. Friday 23 February Time: 11am – 12:30pm Place: Starting point: Wellington Square, North Adelaide. Cost: Adults $15, Concession $12, NT Members $10, Child $8 Enquiries: (08) 8223 1234, email: bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au Book online at http://bit.ly/StellaBowen Walk: Hidden Stories, Small Details Heritage buildings can be imposing sights, but look closer and you’ll find that sometimes the most intriguing stories from the past lie in the smaller details. This tour highlights the hidden elements and architectural Easter eggs that tell the real story behind some iconic city structures. Thursday 1 March Time: 11am Starting point: Ayers House Museum, 288 North Terrace, Adelaide Book online: https://trybooking.com/NSEC Walk: Southwest Corner Discover the rich history behind this lesstravelled corner of the city. Get to know the people, businesses and organisations who created this fascinating neighbourhood. Friday 16 March, Time: 11am Starting point: Whitmore Square, Adelaide. Book online: https://trybooking.com/KJGA

Tour: Old Adelaide Treasury and Tunnels Journey above and below ground to explore the secrets of one of Adelaide’s most fascinating colonial buildings! From the founding of the colony, through the gold rush era, Federation and two World Wars, the old Treasury building sat at the heart of South Australia’s political life. The tour includes the former Cabinet Room and underground passages where gold from Victoria was stored to be smelted into the Adelaide Pound. Sundays. New dates added regularly Time: 11am & 1pm Place: Adina Treasury Hotel, 2 Flinders Street, Adelaide. Cost: Adults $15, Concession $13, NT Members $10, Child $10 Enquiries: (08) 8223 1234, email: bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au Book online at https://www.trybooking. com/NSDP

Z Ward Z Ward: Behind the Walls Go behind the walls of the notorious Z Ward at the former Glenside Mental Hospital. For almost 90 years it was home to those classified as “criminally insane” on the overlapping edges of criminality and mental illness. This guided tour explores the architecture and social history of this remarkable building. Sunday 25 February Time: 2pm Place: Z Ward. Access to Z Ward is via 63 Conyngham Street, Glenside. Cost: Adults $15, Concession $12, NT Members $10, Child $8 Enquiries: (08) 8223 1234, email: bookings@nationaltrustsa.org.au Book online at https://www.trybooking. com/KJDM

Visit www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa for more event information.


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Beaumont House Summer Sundays at Beaumont House Enjoy live music, food, entertainment and wine on the shady lawns of Beaumont House. Treat yourself to a Devonshire tea on the veranda and browse our exclusive market stalls. Sunday 18 February Sunday 18 March Time: Noon - 4pm Place: Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Rd Beaumont. Cost: $10 at the gate (National Trust Members $8, children under 15 free). Enquiries: 8202 9200 or email: events@nationaltrustsa.org.au

Auburn Courthouse Adelaide Songs - Directors Cut 2018 presentation of Adelaide Songs (Director’s Cut) of the popular show that look closely at the issues that define the city and our State. Adelaide Songs songwriter/performer ensemble comprises: Keith Preston (project director) Alan Hartley (Music Coordinator) Ivo Kirkpatrick, Paula Standing and Paul Roberts. ‘Adelaide –The Songs’ is presented by Ruby Award winning arts organisation HATs Inc Friday 2 March Time: 8 - 10pm Place: HATs Courthouse Centre, 4 St Vincent St Auburn. Enquiries: enquiries@hatsincsa.com or (08) 8849 2420, 0414836574 Bookings https://www.adelaidefringe. com.au/fringetix/adelaide-songs-director-scut-af2018 The HATs Alan Kelly Gang (Ireland)  HATs Fringe Finale Fronted by Ireland’s piano accordion maestro and with four critically acclaimed masters of their craft in tow they sit firmly at the cutting edge of the consummate musicianship and powerful emotive performance they deliver a unique and diverse perspective to Celtic music. 

Friday 16 March Time: 8pm Place: HATs Courthouse Centre, 4 St Vincent St Auburn Cost: $30.00 CONC $27.00 Group 6+ $25.00 Book through HATs bookings@ hatsincsa.com or (08) 8849 2420 Book online https://adelaidefringe.com.au/

Burnside Branch Beaumont House Open Day Sunday 4 March and Sunday 1 April Beaumont House is a State Heritage listed property built in 1849 by Augustus Short, the first Anglican Bishop of Adelaide, then the home of Sir Samuel Davenport, politician, horticulturist & pioneer of the olive oil industry in SA. Burnside Branch guided tours. Time: 2 – 4.30pm Cost: Adults $10, including afternoon tea Place: Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Rd Beaumont. Talk: George French Angas lithographs George French Angas (25 Apr 1822–4 Oct 1886), was an English explorer, naturalist and painter who emigrated to Australia. His paintings are held in a number of important Australian public art collections. Speaker: John Boyce Friday 9 March Time: 7 – 8.30pm Cost: Adult $10 and bring a supper plate to share All Burnside branch enquiries: telephone (08) 8362 3036 or 0411 036 491, email: perriamci@bigpond.com.au

Millicent National Trust Museum Murder at the Millicent Museum During the Geltwood Craft Festival Millicent Museum will present “Murder at the Museum” a 1920s theme, the end of the First World War. A mystery to be solved! Saturday 14 April Enquiries: Details available at the Millicent Visitor Information Centre 8733 0904 closer to the date.

Mount Barker Branch Talk: “Those wild rabbits – how they shaped Australia”. Speaker: Bruce Munday Tuesday March 6 Time: 1.30pm Place: Dunn Uniting Church Hall, 13 Mann Street Mount Barker. Enquiries: (08) 8388 7133, (08) 8398 6815

Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum Breakfast with the Birds - Special event Enjoy a leisurely continental or full breakfast in the beautiful gardens surrounding the museum. Bookings include free entry to the museum. Sunday 18 February Time: 8.30 – 11am Place: 3 Perseverance Road, Tea Tree Gully Enquiries: Mark Taylor on (08) 8540 5491 Bookings essential on eventbrite.com.au (search for ‘breakfast with’) Tea Tree Gully Heritage Museum is also open on the third Sunday of every month February to November.

Hahndorf Branch

Victor Harbor Museum

Combined History Groups of the Hills Speaker: Jane James Tuesday April 3 Time: 7pm Place: Hahndorf Academy, 68 Main Street. Hahndorf. Enquiries: (08) 8388 7133, (08) 8398 6815

Special event 20 years celebration of the opening of the Visitor centre building showcasing the history of Victor Harbor 1800 to 1900. Thursday 22 March Time: 2pm Place: 1 Flinders Parade, Victor Harbor. Enquiries: email: ntvh@bigpond.com

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 T he N ati o nal T ru st o f S o u th Au stralia

your Trust PUBLISHER

National Trust of South Australia Beaumont House 631 Glynburn Road Beaumont SA 5066 T: 08 8202 9200 F: 08 8202 9201 E: publications@nationaltrustsa.org.au W: www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa DESIGN

Dessein T: 08 9228 0661 E: tracy@dessein.com.au DISTRIBUTION

Heritage Living is published four times a year. PP 536155/0036 ISSN 0815-7871 FRONT COVER:

Martindale Hall Image credit: Marnie Hawson.

PRESIDENT

PATRON IN CHIEF

Ms Deborah Morgan

His Excellency the Honourable Hieu Van Le AC Governor of South Australia

VICE PRESIDENT

Mr George Hobbs COUNCILLORS

Dr Liz Burge Mr Bob Cornwell Dr Robert Dare Dr Walter Dollman Mr James Harvey Ms Melanie Kiriacou Mr Brian McMillan Mrs Caren Martin Mr John Northwood Ms Kath Rayner Mrs Sue Scheiffers Mrs Robyn Wight

Dr Darren Peacock Chief Executive Officer Ms Helen Cartmel Executive Administrator Ms Ellen Martin Finance Manager Mr Christopher Grant Natural Heritage Manager Dr Jill MacKenzie Public Programs Manager Mr Mario Russo Assets Manager Ms Joseanne Visentin Senior Administration Officer

Audit, Finance and Governance Collections, Regions and Branches Cultural Heritage Advisory Natural Heritage Advisory NTSA BRANCHES (46)

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Adelaide Metropolitan, Ardrossan, Burnside, Coromandel Valley, Gawler, Port of Adelaide, Tea Tree Gully, Ceduna, Cleve, Koppio, Streaky Bay, Tumby Bay, Whyalla, Auburn, Burra, Clare, Jamestown, Port Pirie, Barmera, Overland Corner, Renmark, Waikerie, Beachport, Glencoe, Keith, Kingston SE, Millicent, Mount Gambier, Naracoorte, Penola, Robe, Goolwa, Hahndorf, Kingscote KI, Mount Barker, Mount Lofty, Penneshaw, Port Elliot, Strathalbyn, Victor Harbor, Willunga, Central Yorke Peninsula, Kadina, Minlaton, Moonta, Wallaroo. Telephone (08) 8202 9200 for contact / information details on the website.

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The National Trust of South Australia acknowledges its partners and supporters. CIVIC PARTNERS

Adelaide City Council CORPORATE PARTNERS

NTSA STATE OFFICE STAFF

COUNCIL COMMITTEES

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Supporters

Beerenberg Farms Bickfords Coopers Laucke Flour Mills Tech-Dry Theodore Bruce Thomson Geer Wines by Geoff Hardy GOVERNMENT RELATIONSHIPS

Australian Government –– Department of the Environment and Energy –– National Library of Australia South Australian Government –– Department of the Environment, Water and Natural Resources –– SA Water –– History Trust of South Australia


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BEAUMONT HOUSE

Spend a leisurely afternoon lounging on the shady lawns of Beaumont House at our Summer garden party. Enjoy the smooth sounds of live music and relax on the veranda of Beaumont House with a champagne flute or Devonshire tea. Indulge in a delicious food truck lunch and browse craft and vintage stalls.

SUNDAY 18 FEBRUARY • SUNDAY 18 MARCH 2018 Beaumont House, 631 Glynburn Road, Beaumont Open 12pm to 4pm, Tickets $10 at the gate Free entry for children under 15

For further information email: events@nationaltrustsa.org.au Phone: 8202 9200 www.nationaltrust.org.au/sa LIVE MUSIC • FOOD • WINE • CRAFT STALLS

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