Issuu on Google+


Many thanks to those who provided case studies and images: GreenSquare Group, Thames Valley Housing, Cross Keys Housing, Yorkshire Housing, Hyde Group, Places for People, Guinness Northern Counties Thanks to the Third Sector Research Centre at the University of Birmingham for their assistance in the questionnaire design, validation of returns and primary analysis of data. The final analysis and report writing was undertaken by the National Housing Federation.

Published 2012 by National Housing Federation

The National Housing Federation runs iN business for neighbourhoods in partnership with members to promote the neighbourhood work of housing associations.

2 Building Futures


Neighbourhood Audit 2011 The 2011 Neighbourhood Audit is the most accurate picture to date of the scale and variety of housing associations’ community investment. Drawing on learning from the 2008 audit, this project measured a more comprehensive range of activity. This report shows levels of investment in: > community spaces and facilities (covering the five-year period 2005/06 to 2010/11), and > initiatives to improve the lives and wellbeing of residents and their neighbourhoods such as employment training, advice on health and lifestyle issues, community activities (all covering the single year 2010/11). For more information, and a full explanation of the Neighbourhood Audit methodology, visit www.housing.org.uk/neighbourhoodaudit

Building Futures

3


Contents Foreword

5

Summary of findings

6

Partnership working

10

Jobs and training

11

Learning and skills

15

Health and wellbeing

19

Promoting independence

23

Safer, stronger communities

27

Creating better places to live

31

Community spaces

35

4 Building Futures


Foreword Times are tough but housing associations are still investing in people and places – over half a billion pounds in 2010/11. Why? Precisely because times are tough.

At their best, housing associations are model social enterprises. They employ tens of thousands, they exist to improve lives, and they plough surpluses back into people and places.

At the moment, people are struggling to make ends meet. Even when the economy is booming, we all know what a challenge it can be to do well at work, keep the kids on track, juggle household budgets and look after our family’s wellbeing.

They are sustainable businesses that judge their success by the prosperity and health of the communities they serve.

Housing associations are there through good times and bad, doing all they can to help people get back on their feet and ensuring they are not left behind, regardless of age or income.

In these tough times, they are organisations that any community would be glad to have in its corner.

David Orr, Chief Executive

They are not doing it alone. Working with national and local government, charities and health agencies is second nature. Bringing expertise, local knowledge and funding to the table, it’s hard to imagine better partners. For every two pounds of their own money, housing associations have pulled in around a further one pound of investment in community services from other organisations.

Building Futures

5


Summary of findings Overall

Jobs and training

In 2010/11 housing associations:

In 2010/11:

Delivered more than 9,000 neighbourhood services and provided or maintained 1,500 community spaces.

Housing associations ran 1,000 projects designed to create jobs and help people into work.

> Helped around 7.75 million people > Employed 11,000 people to carry out this work 1

Housing associations invested £746.5m: > £529.5m from their own money > £217m raised from other organisations

6 Building Futures

> Around 270,000 people took part > They employed 1,250 people2 to carry out this work Housing associations invested over £80m in jobs and skills projects: > £39.5m from their own money > £40.5m raised from other organisations

1,2

Full-time equivalent posts

p11


We run a tight ship – we always have done – because we want to maximise the money that goes to the front line. Brendan Sarsfield, Chief Executive, Family Mosaic

Learning and skills

p15

Health and wellbeing

p19

In 2010/11:

In 2010/11:

Housing associations ran 1,500 projects to boost people’s knowledge and skills.

Housing associations ran 1,100 projects to help people lead healthier, happier lives.

> Around 500,000 people took part

> Around 345,000 people took part

> They employed 1,800 people3 to carry out the work

> They employed 1,500 people4 to carry out the work

Housing associations invested over £73m in learning: > £54m from their own money > £19m raised from other organisations

3,4

Full-time equivalent posts

Housing associations invested £74m in health and wellbeing: > £50m from their own money > £23m raised from other organisations

Building Futures

7


This isn’t just a ‘nice to have’ for us, this is business imperative. Alison Thain, Chief Executive, Fabrick Group

Promoting independence

p23

Safer, stronger communities

p27

In 2010/11:

In 2010/11:

Housing associations ran 1,700 projects designed to help people out of poverty.

Housing associations ran 1,900 projects to keep communities safer and make them stronger.

> Around 1 million people took part

> They employed 2,100 people6 to carry out this work

> They employed 1,200 people5 to carry out the work

> Over 3 million people benefited from this work

Housing associations invested over £60m in reducing poverty and promoting independence:

Housing associations invested £100m in safer, stronger communities:

> £51m from their own money

> Over £81m from their own money

> Over £9m raised from other organisations

> Over £18m raised from other organisations

8 Building Futures

5,6

Full-time equivalent posts


Some things there are absolute, tangible returns on. For instance, putting money into initiatives that combat financial exclusion is likely to reduce rent arrears. Mark Powell Davies, Chief Executive, Colne Housing

Creating better places to live

p31

Community spaces

p35

In 2010/11:

Between 2006 and 2011:

Housing associations ran 1,700 projects to improve local areas.

Housing associations provided 1,500 community spaces.

> They employed 3,100 people7 to carry out the work

Housing associations invested over £502m in these facilities:

> Around 2.5 million people benefited from this work

> Over £264m from their own money

Housing associations invested £257m in creating better places:

> £238m raised from other organisations

> Over £199m from their own money > Around £58m raised from other organisations

7,8

Full-time equivalent posts

Building Futures

9


Partnership working Housing associations invest in communities for the long term. Partnership working is one way that they maximise their impact. The partners most frequently mentioned for 2010/11 were: Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, other housing associations, voluntary groups and charities, local authorities, private businesses, Department of Health, and the Department for Communities and Local Government.

10 Building Futures

The Localism Act 2011 shifts power from central government to local authorities and communities. Housing associations are already acting locally, working with local people, local authorities and voluntary groups to drive and coordinate investment and change. And they are now looking to the future, offering their expertise and investment know-how to the new health and wellbeing boards and local enterprise partnerships.


Jobs and training One in five young people are out of work. A record number of people are working part-time because they cannot find full-time employment8.

In 2010/11:

New jobs, and people ready to step into them, are sorely needed. Competition for work is keen, and those with flexible talents, strong aspirations and good communication skills have the edge.

> Around 270,000 people took part

From apprenticeships to job search advice, housing associations invested £80m to help people into work by building their knowledge and confidence. Ambitious local entrepreneurs can create work, increase economic activity and boost aspiration. Housing associations support Britain’s ‘hidden entrepreneurs’ in communities that are often overlooked, and who could bring over £9bn into our economy9. Housing associations are working hard to unlock the potential within every community they serve.

12 Building Futures

Housing associations ran 1,000 projects designed to create jobs and help people into work. > They employed 1,250 people10 to carry out the work Housing associations invested over £80m in jobs and skills projects: > £39.5m from their own money > £40.5m raised from other organisations

£10m

invested in youth enterprise projects

£12m

invested in helping people find a job


More than

200,000

people received training for work

Helping people into work Where the investment went

8 9

Intermediate labour market projects

Life skills for employment

5%

5%

Office for National Statistics (ONS) figures, April 2012 Unlocking the Potential of the UK’s Hidden Innovators, Cass Business School, City University London, 2008 Full-time equivalent posts

Other

7%

Qualifications for employment

8%

Business start-up initiatives

9%

Organising & offering work experience & voluntary work placements

15% 11%

Building trade skills

12%

Local employment initiatives

13%

Youth enterprise projects

Job search

15%

10

Building Futures

13


I want to do things that benefit my own community.

Victoria used to be shy around professionals, which complicated her search for a good job. That all changed after she attended the Whatever! project, run by GreenSquare Group 15%for 16-24 year-olds.

Victoria, who lives in Chippenham, Wiltshire, now has paid employment as an administrative assistant for a credit union and life has taken on a new focus. “I want to do things that benefit my own community,” she says. GreenSquare’s Whatever! scheme (and What Now! for those over 24) provides work experience but also requires people to attend teambuilding exercises. And it was these exercises that showed Victoria she had leadership skills and could help others. While the team felt the heat in the kitchen as they cooked together, or discussed a design project, Victoria was encouraged to lead. She’s no longer shy and opportunities keep coming. “Me and my children can do so much more now that I’m working,” Victoria says. “It was really nice to make people see they’ve got extra qualities which they probably didn’t think they have, or they didn’t think were really worth anything but they actually are.”

GreenSquare Group’s Whatever! project has given Victoria a new focus

14 Building Futures


Learning and skills These days, the job market requires us to be flexible, to turn our hand to new skills and be open to learning throughout our lives.

In 2010/11:

The same can be said for society more broadly. Changes in the way we communicate, access information or services, and make collective decisions mean that those who do not keep up can lose out. They may pay more for energy, be at a disadvantage when looking for work or be excluded from community life.

> Around 500,000 people took part

The Government’s social mobility strategy11 concludes that there is no single age at which life chances are determined, but that children from low income families are likely to do less well at school and in later years. Housing associations invested over £73m in learning opportunities for their communities. There are chances to learn for all ages, from parenting skills to IT training for older people. People are also helped to learn basic life skills that many of us take for granted – using the internet to search for jobs, paying bills, or getting on with neighbours. Through education, housing associations are improving people’s life chances and helping them to make the most of every opportunity. 16 Building Futures

Housing associations ran 1,500 projects to boost people’s knowledge and skills. > They employed 1,800 people12 to carry out the work Housing associations invested over £73m in learning: > £54m from their own money > £19m raised from other organisations

£4m

invested in IT skills for all

£17m

invested in parenting skills and childcare


Nearly

300,000

adults received some form of skills training

Boosting knowledge and skills Where the investment went13

11 12 13

11%

10%

7%

5%

4%

4%

Confidence building / independent living

Adult education (formal and informal)

Foyers

IT learning initiatives / digital inclusion

Link with local schools

Horticultural training

Opening Doors, Breaking Barriers: A Strategy for Social Mobility, Cabinet Office, April 2011 Full-time equivalent posts Due to rounding of figures, total may not equal 100%

Other

11%

Advice and guidance on education / training

12%

11%

Capacity building and training for residents

Parenting skills / support / childcare provision

23%

Building Futures

17


I had had no luck (with a job), then all of a sudden this housing guy says, ‘are you employed?’ ...I wouldn’t have a job without them.

Life took off for Blake Murphy after the local housing association knocked on his door and put him on the runway to a job at Heathrow Airport. The 19-year-old Hounslow resident 15%is now a fulltime ramp agent thanks to Thames Valley Housing (TVH)’s Into Work project, which provides training and helps build skills and confidence.

“They just basically came around our houses one day, asking questions,” Blake says. “I had had no luck (with a job), then all of a sudden this housing guy says, ‘are you employed?’and all that. I wouldn’t have a job without them.” The housing association suggested he apply to the Heathrow Academy. Blake felt encouraged, not pressured by TVH. “They said, ‘go to the course, have a look and get some more information’.” After passing the academy’s preliminary test, Blake was accepted on the course and then had a month’s part-time work before being offered a full-time job. “It’s baggage handling, loading and offloading planes. Everything’s got a three letter code. There are quite a few things you’ve got to learn to make sure the bags go to the correct place.”

The Into Work project provides training and helps build skills and confidence 18 Building Futures


Health and wellbeing A settled home is vital to our sense of wellbeing. As well as providing around five million people with decent homes, housing associations also invested £74m in the health of more than 300,000 local people. This is in addition to the hundreds of thousands who receive care and support services through their housing association so they can live independent lives. Many services are focused on preventing problems arising, from healthy eating classes to sports activities. Obesity is estimated to cost the NHS £5.1bn every year, so helping people to stay healthy saves public money. Housing associations also deliver vital local health services, helping to ensure that chronic health challenges (mental ill health, age or disability) do not become critical. These services reduce the need for expensive emergency intervention and help people to live more independently. By helping families facing multiple problems, from drug addiction to debt, they are improving the wellbeing of whole households and, in some cases, entire communities.

20 Building Futures

In 2010/11: Housing associations ran 1,100 projects to help people lead healthier, happier lives. > Around 345,000 people took part > They employed 1,500 people14 to carry out the work Housing associations invested £74m in health and wellbeing: > Over £50m from their own money > Over £23m raised from other organisations

£6m

invested in healthy eating and lifestyle projects

£16m

invested in older people’s health


14

12% 3% 3%

Drugs & alcohol initiatives

Other

5%

Community health workers / health equality workers

8%

Sports / fitness provision

9%

Healthy living / eating / cooking initiatives

10%

General support work

Family intervention initiatives

Mental health initiatives

22%

Adaptations

Older people’s health & wellbeing services

100,000 people took part in sport and leisure projects

Helping people to be healther and happier

Where the investment went

20% 8%

Full-time equivalent posts

Building Futures 21


(the housing association) joined forces with the NHS to focus on helping their residents to feel better... Improving your own health isn’t always simple. Improving the health of an entire community can be a massive challenge. Cross Keys Homes joined forces15% with the NHS to focus on helping their residents to feel better, including giving advice to smokers wanting to quit and providing healthy eating and lifestyle information.

The Keys to Health project tackled inequalities among Peterborough’s residents in two areas where people have a life expectancy up to ten years shorter than in more affluent neighbourhoods. The project was in partnership with Peterborough Primary Care Trust, which provided two health trainers to work with residents, funded by Cross Keys. It’s still too early to assess longevity but the results look likely to reduce the NHS bill in the years ahead. One resident lost a stone in weight in just six weeks, while another dropped a few pounds by keeping a food diary. Even more dramatically, one heavy smoker on 40 cigarettes a day took the plunge and quit. His level of 27 on the carbon monoxide monitor nosedived to a far healthier seven.

The Keys to Health project tackled inequalities among Peterborough’s residents 22 Building Futures


Promoting independence The financial crisis has hit some people harder than others. Young people just starting out, people reaching the end of their working lives, and women on lower incomes are all more likely to be affected15. Housing associations invested over £60m to help people weather the storm. Together with support to find work, these projects are designed to move people out of poverty.

In 2010/11: Housing associations ran 1,700 projects designed to help people out of poverty. > Around 1 million people took part > They employed 1,200 people16 to carry out the work Housing associations invested over £60m in reducing poverty and promoting independence:

Pensioners and people unable to work are struggling to make ends meet in the face of > Over £51m from their own money rapidly rising prices. Many who are in work are > Over £9m raised from other organisations not finding life any easier. Housing associations are helping in two ways – by bringing down living costs and improving people’s ability to manage their finances. Fuel poverty initiatives, affordable household insurance, recycled furniture and white goods schemes, and reasonably priced loans are all bringing down the cost of living. Meanwhile, debt advice, teaching financial literacy, and support for credit unions are increasing people’s financial skills. Housing associations are helping their communities to become financially resilient. 24 Building Futures

£3.6m

invested in helping people with their savings

£16m

invested in helping people in fuel poverty


15

16

White goods / furniture schemes

5% 4%

Sources: NEET rates; Worse Better, Saga Group, 2011; TUC Women’s Conference 2011, Report to conference Full-time equivalent posts

Other

6%

Credit union / saving schemes

Debt advice initiatives

7%

Financial literacy / awareness initiatives

9%

Money guidance initiatives

9%

Loans schemes / community development finance initiatives

10%

Fuel poverty initiatives

Welfare / benefits advice

General tenancy / pretenancy support

More than

500,000 people given advice

Helping people out of poverty

Where the investment went

26% 16% 8%

Building Futures 25


From 2011, every new (housing association) customer has been offered a free financial health check...

Breaking up and moving house is even harder when money’s a major concern. Fortunately for Jane and her young son, Yorkshire Housing’s benefits and money advice service was there to help. It advised her on what help 15% she was missing out on, including Working Tax Credit.

“The advisor was friendly, he was very good, all the advice he gave me was very practical,” Jane says. “It helped me not to worry as much about things. When you’re going through a time like that, it was like a backup.” From 2011, every new Yorkshire Housing customer has been offered a free financial health check to make sure that they are taking responsibility for their money and making the most of it. As benefit changes start to take effect, this service will become more important. The service shows residents how to budget and deal with debt and rent arrears. In hard cash, the housing association saved customers over £780,000 with 2,779 referrals in 2010/11. For Jane, the service gave her greater control of her life just when she needed it. “I think it helped me to have the confidence and security to go on from there,” she says.

A Yorkshire Housing benefits and money advisor gives advice to a Yorkshire Housing customer 26 Building Futures


Safer, stronger communities People are the glue that binds communities together. When they feel safe and confident, they are more likely to thrive. People should feel able to walk around after dark or talk to their neighbours. The Government believes that community cohesion can be promoted by people coming together to find common ground17. Housing associations invested £100m to help create safer and more inclusive communities. They have funded extra police patrols, youth activities and community engagement – all of which encourage people from different backgrounds to tackle the issues that matter to them. Antisocial behaviour can blight lives. By encouraging people to treat their neighbourhoods with respect, and enforcing decent behaviour where necessary, many neighbourhoods are now safer, more pleasant places to live. Mediation services, community wardens and Neighbourhood Watch groups are all supported. It is impossible to feel secure if you are not safe in your own home. Domestic violence projects, fire safety programmes and home security schemes all contribute to people’s wellbeing. To help people find common ground, housing associations often support resident groups, neighbourhood events and community history initiatives. 28 Building Futures

In 2010/11: Housing associations ran 1,900 projects to keep communities safer and make them stronger. > They employed 2,100 people18 to carry out this work > More than 3 million people benefited from this work Housing associations invested £100m in safer, stronger communities: > Over £81m from their own money > Over £18m raised from other organisations Over

£48m invested in community safety Over

£15m

invested in tackling antisocial behaviour Almost

1,000

staff promote community cohesion


ÂŁ16 million invested in community events

Keeping communities safer and making them stronger Where the investment went

17 18

Creating the conditions for integration, Communities and Local Government, February 2012 Full-time equivalent posts

3%

Other

4%

Community development and cohesion work

6%

Home security and safety initiatives

7%

Police and justice partnership

14%

Domestic violence initiatives

7%

Community wardens

12%

Involving communities

15%

Youth activities

16%

Community events

Tackling and preventing anti-social behaviour

16%

Building Futures

29


...the estate is undergoing a major redevelopment. This will see a return to traditional street layouts to improve the safety and security of residents. Community safety and cohesion are top priorities for Hyde Housing Association as it deals with the very few troublesome residents on the Packington Square estate in Islington. 15% “Hyde has evicted a couple of families,” local resident Cheryl says. “It’s like a loud message

to other families that Hyde are quite serious in looking after their properties and ensuring the health and safety of their residents.” The housing association’s proactive stance against antisocial behaviour has certainly impressed the local council. The London estate, adjacent to the Regent’s Canal, was chosen to take part in a pilot for Islington Council’s new one stop antisocial behaviour service. Neglected over the years before Hyde’s involvement, the estate is undergoing a major re-development. This will see a return to traditional street layouts to improve the safety and security of residents. At the same time, Hyde Plus supports youth club activities, including bike workshops and drama groups.

Hyde have prioritised community safety and cohesion to protect the wellbeing of their residents 30 Building Futures

There’s a sense of pride that this community is going upwards. Cheryl can’t help noticing how much residents help each other out – from feeding the cat to providing support during serious illness. For Cheryl, “it’s quite a close-knit community, and it’s improved.”


Creating better places to live People’s health, security and aspiration suffers if the physical fabric of their area declines. The better the quality of your neighbourhood, the lower your tolerance for things like graffiti, dog mess and fly-tipping, and the more likely you are to know how to tackle it19.

In 2010/11:

Projects from rubbish removal to landscaping – many involving local people themselves – are creating places to take pride in. All of this is over and above housing associations’ general management duties.

> More than 2.5 million people benefited from this work

Energy efficiency measures reduce fuel bills. It is particularly important that older people and children are able to live in properly heated homes, which helps to avoid health problems. Housing associations also run trusted handyperson schemes, offering affordable, good quality help with home improvements.

> Over £199m from their own money

Other projects that are helping people to live more sustainably, and contribute to their community, include food growing schemes (on traditional allotments or in new places, such as on roofs), water saving drives and recycling schemes. Some gardening and furniture recycling projects have grown into independent social enterprises, offering training and jobs. Housing associations are ensuring local people can thrive in the places they live, now and for future generations. 32 Building Futures

Housing associations ran 1,700 projects to improve local areas. > They employed 3,100 people20 to carry out the work

Housing associations invested £257m in creating better places: > Over £58m raised from other organisations

£84m invested in energy conservation and recycling

£75m

invested in landscaping and gardening


Over

ÂŁ18.5 million

21

invested in creating cleaner communities

Creating communities to be proud of Where the investment went 28% 16%

16%

16%

19 20 21

3%

3%

2%

2%

3%

Waste and bulky items collection / recycling

Handyperson schemes

Gardening / food growing initiatives

Environmental enforcement / environmental sustainability teams

Other

Landscaping / green spaces / conservation initiatives

Amenities for community / community chest funds

General environmental improvements

Estate caretakers

Energy efficiency measures

11%

London: its people and their litter, ENCAMS, March 2009 Full-time equivalent posts Figure includes investment in abandoned vehicles removal, anti-dog fouling measures, litter/graffiti teams and tidy-up days, environmental reinforcement/sustainability team, rubbish collection, and waste and bulky items collection/recycling

Building Futures

33


health

I wanted a great place for my son to meet with other children and for me to meet other parents.

High Hazels was a struggling neighbourhood in the former mining village of Huthwaite, Nottinghamshire. After local pits closed in the 1980s, it became a sink estate with high levels of unemployment, poor quality15% public space and little community spirit. Regeneration and development specialists Places for People manage 87 homes in the area and were determined to do something.

They transformed a disused boggy field into a high quality park with new landscaping, a children’s play area, a water fountain and wetland area. A new community centre has lived up to its name by helping locals to get to know their neighbours. The project was backed by £225,000 from the Big Lottery Fund and formed part of a national programme called Green Spaces for People. Importantly, residents were involved in decision making throughout. A local mum says: “Before the new park the area was just an empty field. I wanted a great place for my son to meet with other children and for me to meet other parents.” Fewer people are leaving the area now, and eight in ten residents are proud of living on the estate, up from just half. Same location, different environment.

Places for People transformed a disused boggy field into a high quality park 34 Building Futures


Community spaces Spaces to work, meet and learn are an important building block in community life. Housing associations invest in the facilities that make community action, training and other activities possible. This is because they are committed for the long term.

Between 2006 and 2011:

Office spaces are supporting new businesses. Factories are creating jobs. Nurseries are offering affordable childcare. Sports facilities are helping to train and inspire future football stars. Computer centres are hosting IT training, as well as other classes. Children are learning to value nature in green spaces and gardens. Communities are being formed in meeting places like neighbourhood centres and cafes.

> Over £264m from their own money

These facilities are the infrastructure on which local people are building and strengthening their own communities.

36 Building Futures

Housing associations provided 1,500 community spaces. Housing associations invested over £502m in these facilities: > Over £238m raised from other organisations

£37m

invested over five years in sports and recreation facilities

£13m

invested over five years in community meeting places


9% 5% 4% 4%

Shop / retail space

Youth shelter / centre

Other

5%

Play area

6%

Parking facilities

General environmental upgrades

12%

Community resource / information centre / library

15%

Community space / meeting room / drop-in centre

18%

Community garden / sensory garden / green space / allotments

Walls / fencing / gating

ÂŁ6 million invested over five years in IT centres

Creating facilities that enhance communities

Where the investment went

22%

Building Futures 37


The aim was to give people of all ages the chance to have fun finding out how to use a computer and discovering what it could do for them. A computer club for older local residents is proving a big hit at Brookside sheltered housing scheme in Wigan. In just two months, members have gone from being first-time computer users to creating their own DVDs and15% calendars. The infinite universe of IT has given residents more choices, including using Skype to make free video calls to friends (and grandchildren) around the world.

“I’m thrilled to discover how to download photos and make them into my own calendars,” says 75-year-old Doreen Crawford. “It’s great fun.” Local housing provider Guinness Northern Counties, which owns the scheme, provided startup funding. Five computer clubs have been set up by Guinness and the free sessions are open to all local residents. “The aim was to give people of all ages the chance to have fun finding out how to use a computer and discovering what it could do for them,” says Celia Croft from Guinness. Most of the group had never even switched on a computer before coming to the club. The IT bug bit so badly that several members even purchased their own laptops so they could continue with their projects at home, such as creating DVDs using Windows Live Movie Maker.

Five computer clubs have been set up by Guinness and the free sessions are open to all residents 38 Building Futures


Building Futures

39


The National Housing Federation is the voice of affordable housing in England. We believe that everyone should have the home they need at a price they can afford. That’s why we represent the work of housing associations and campaign for better housing. Our members provide two and a half million homes for more than five million people. And each year they invest in a diverse range of neighbourhood projects that help create strong, vibrant communities.

National Housing Federation Lion Court, 25 Procter Street LONDON WC1V 6NY Tel: 020 7067 1010 Email: info@housing.org.uk www.housing.org.uk

Find us or follow us on:

This document is printed on re-cycled paper using bio-degradable inks as part of National Housing Federation’s commitment to protecting the environment.


Building Futures