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LAPA RIOS LODGE

MASHPI LODGE

Established to protect the area’s unique biodiversity in the early 1990s, Lapa Rios has a conservation easement that ensures the future protection of its 980-acre private reserve. The reserve buffers Corcovado National Park—home to 2.5% of the world’s biodiversity—and provides a safe haven for rare birds, monkeys, and mammals.

A former logging concession that is now a 3,213-acre rain forest reserve, Mashpi has a resident wildlife biologist who monitors the ecosystem and works on the conservation of its species. The lodge has established a camera-trap system to record the reserve’s unique biodiversity, leading to the scientific discovery of a new frog species on the property: the Mashpi Torrenteer.

COSTA RICA

ECUADOR

NIMMO BAY WILDERNESS RESORT THE RANCH AT ROCK CREEK CANADA

UNITED STATES

In addition to working to protect native wild salmon habitat, Nimmo Bay supports grizzly bear research and raises funds to purchase “bear hunting tenures” to reduce trophy hunting in the Great Bear Rainforest area. They provide a free vacation at Nimmo Bay to any trophy hunter who turns in their bear-hunting license.

Flowing into the Clark Fork River, the Blue Ribbon-designated Rock Creek runs through four miles of ranch property. The ranch organizes an annual river clean-up with other local organizations committed to the conservation of the watershed. The 2015 clean-up resulted in the removal of more than 3,800 pounds of refuse from area rivers, with the majority of the items being recycled.

S U S TA I N A B L E TOU RIS M IMPAC T REPORT 2 016

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National Geographic Unique Lodges of the World Sustainable Impact Report