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News source for Wyoming co-op owners since 1954

W Y O M I N G

R U R A L

E L E C T R I C

N E W S

JULY

2017

16

Saving Wyoming’s Architectural Treasure for Future Generations

Southern Lady Creates Stories in Wyoming’s Black Hills: Andi Hummel

26


Be the light. There are many reasons we reclaim land previously used for mining coal to as good or better than it was before. One, however, has just a little more buzz, and it’s a whole lot sweeter. To provide a home for bees.

Your energy starts here.

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JULY

FEATURES THE WREN MAGAZINE, WYOMING RURAL ELECTRIC NEWS

The official publication of the Wyoming Rural Electric Association

14

WYOMING WEEKENDS The WREN Magazine, Wyoming Rural Electric News, volume 63, number 6, July 2017 (ISSN 1098-2876) is published monthly except for January for $12 per year by Linden Press, Inc., 2710 Thomes Avenue, Cheyenne, WY 82001. Periodicals postage paid at Cheyenne, WY (original entry office) and at additional mailing offices. Postmaster – Send address changes to: The WREN Magazine, Wyoming Rural Electric News, c/o Linden Press, Inc., 223 S. Howes St., Fort Collins, CO 80521, (970) 221-3232. Include 3-digit co-op code. WREN Magazine is owned and controlled by rural electric cooperatives in the interest of the economic progress of rural areas specifically and the entire population of Wyoming and the nation generally. WREN Magazine has a total average monthly paid circulation of 40,006 for 11 months ending in May 2017. WREN Magazine is delivered to rural electric member/consumers and other subscribers throughout the entire state of Wyoming and the nation.

Glendo State Park

16

Saving Wyoming’s Architectural Treasure for Future Generations RACHEL GIRT

26

CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Southern Lady Creates Stories in Wyoming’s Black Hills: Andi Hummel

endorsement of the product or services advertised by the publisher or Wyoming electric cooperatives. WREN STAFF Publisher: Linden Press, Inc. Editor: Maggie Budd Managing Editor: Joanne Mai Designer: Dixie Lira BOARD OF DIRECTORS Niobrara, Lusk, Andy Greer, President Tri-State G&T, Westminster - CO, Dick Clifton, Vice President Garland Light & Power, Powell, Scott Smith, Secretary/Treasurer Big Horn REC, Basin, Tom Delaney Bridger Valley Electric, Mountain View, Ruth Rees Carbon Power, Saratoga, Jerry Rabidue High Plains Power, Riverton, Hearley Dockham High West Energy, Pine Bluffs, Ed Prosser Lower Valley Energy, Afton, Fred Brog Powder River Energy, Sundance, Mike Lohse Wheatland REA, Wheatland, Sandra Hranchak Wyrulec, Torrington, Dewey Hageman Basin Electric, Bismarck - ND, Paul Baker Deseret Power, South Jordan - UT, Gary Nix

STATE NEWS & EVENTS

6

OFFICE OF WREN PUBLISHER: Linden Press, Inc., 2710 Thomes Ave., Cheyenne, WY 82001 P R I N T E D W I T H V E G E TA B L E I N K

WREA NOTES

A Suggestion for Congress and the President…and the Media… and the Citizens of the U.S. SHAWN TAYLOR

22

VET NOTES

The Mob Boss BRUCE CONNALLY, DVM

38

ENLIGHTEN US

One Small Town TY STOCKTON

FROM OUR READERS

28

COUNTRY COOKS

Lobster

8

29

COWBOY STATE BUZZ

30

WHAT’S HAPPENING

PEN TO PAPER

“Midnight Mare Watch, March, 2 a.m.”

34

JUST PICTURE IT

Cool Photo by Neil Suntych

JUST FOR FUN

20

KIDS’ CORNER

Painted Lady Butterfly

24

SUBSCRIPTION RATES $12 per year, Single copies $1.50 each

OFFICE OF WREN OWNER: 2312 Carey Ave., Cheyenne, WY 82001

4

THE CURRENT

ADDRESS ALL CORRESPONDENCE TO WREN Magazine • 2710 Thomes Ave. • Cheyenne, WY 82001 Phone: (307) 772-1968 E-mail: wren@wyomingrea.org

ADVERTISING To purchase, contact: Dhara Rose: 970-221-3232 x33 • dhara@golinden.com

ESSAYS & ANECDOTES

GAYLE M. IRWIN

Acceptance of advertising by WREN Magazine does not imply

PUZZLE

ON THE COVER A Monarch butterfly sips the sweet nectar of Wyoming's State Flower, the Indian Paintbrush. Read about the Painted Lady Butterfly, a Wyoming native, on page 20.

2017

Cloth-Word Puzzle

25

BOOK REVIEW

Lost Forts of Casper DESCRIPTION BY THE HISTORY PRESS


WREA NOTES

I went to the Lincoln Memorial and read the Gettysburg address and Lincoln’s second inaugural address, with the inspiring words…

SHAWN TAYLOR execu t ive d irec to r

“With malice toward none; with charity for all; with firmness in the right as God gives us to see the right, let us strive on to finish the work we are in; to bind up the nation's wounds; to care for him who shall have borne the battle and for his widow and his orphan — to do all which may achieve and cherish a just and lasting peace

A SUGGESTION FOR CONGRESS AND THE PRESIDENT…AND THE MEDIA… AND THE CITIZENS OF THE U.S.

I

promise I’m keeping to my resolution of staying positive

and not getting political—or at least not too political—and this column is simply what the title says: a suggestion. It’s a suggestion that could have been made during the Obama and Bush administrations, and probably even further back, but it just came to me a couple of months ago. In March, I, along with thousands of cooperative directors, managers and employees, were in Washington D.C. to visit our elected officials and representatives from several federal agencies. The purpose of the trip is to remind folks in the Beltway what’s happening in rural America and the important role the cooperatives play in the success of America. This was all well and good and I appreciate those folks from Wyoming who made the trip out with me. But during some free time I decided to play tourist and visit some of the monuments and memorials that I hadn’t been to in a while, or in one case at all.

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WREN | JULY 2017

among ourselves and with all nations.” He talked about healing the nation that had been divided by a civil war and slavery (not petty politics). Then I stood where Martin Luther King Jr. gave his famous “I Have a Dream” speech, and I looked across the reflecting pool to the World War II, Vietnam, and Korean War memorials, with the United States Capitol off in the distance. It's truly an awe-inspiring view. Next I was off to Dr. King’s memorial. This is a newer installation that I hadn’t been to before. Like the Lincoln Memorial, Dr. King’s inspiring words are spread throughout the beautiful memorial. Quotes such as: “We shall overcome because the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice” and “The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stand in moments of convenience and comfort, but where he stands at times of challenge and

controversy.” Again like Lincoln, Dr. King was trying to heal a nation divided by color (not by political party). “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself” is a quote that comes from one of the more impressive memorials, in my opinion: the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial. It’s impressive because of the size — I assume to reflect the length of his presidency ­— but like the other memorials I find it impressive because of the words and feelings it inspires. “We have faith that future generations will know that here, in the middle of the twentieth century, there came a time when men of good will found a way to unite, and produce, and fight to destroy the forces of ignorance, and intolerance, and slavery, and war.” And one of my favorite quotes: “The only limit to our realization of tomorrow will be our doubts of today. Let us move forward with strong and active faith.” FDR was not only trying to heal a nation reeling from the Great Depression, but a world divided by war. My suggestion to Congress and the President is that this August when Congress is not in session, they should all stay in D.C. and go visit these memorials and monuments to read the words of these inspiring leaders. Maybe then they can come back to work with a new sense of patriotism and respect for not only the positions they hold but for the people who sent them there.


Always keep a pinwheel handy. At Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, our pinwheels are planted firmly in wind farms all across the West. Together with our member systems we deliver 27 percent of your electricity from renewable sources. In doing so, we’re putting the power of wind in the palm of your hand. #generatepossibilities

visit www.tristate.coop/renewables WREN | JULY 2017

5


THE CURRENT

Great Turnout at Niobrara Despite Bad Weather

Photo courtesy of Niobrara Electric

NRECA Calls for Nominations The Wyoming Rural Electric Association (WREA) Nominating Committee is accepting nominations for candidates to represent Wyoming on the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) Region VII standing committees.

D

espite a late-spring snowstorm, Niobrara Electric Association, Inc. had no problem making a quorum at their 71st Annual Meeting in Torrington

on May 18. Hickory Creek Catering provided the dinner. All three districts had directors up for election this year in Districts 1-3, respectively: President John Hester, Vice President Joel D. Wasserburger and William Wilson. None were challenged and all three were re-elected to serve another 3-year term. Several scholarship recipients were in attendance and received certificates

Region VII members have two representatives on each of three committees: Regulations; Legislative; and Cooperative Management & Employee Issues. Wyoming will be accepting nominations for one seat on the Cooperative Management & Employee Issues Committee.

and each spoke briefly about their future plans. The meeting ended with door prizes as no other issues were brought up for voting this year.

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WREN | JULY 2017

Committees generally meet once per year, and members are paid a per diem and reimbursed for all travel expenses. Board members will vote on the nominated committee members at the annual NRECA Wyoming Membership Meeting on September 14. Members and employees from any Wyoming co-op except Lower Valley are eligible (Lower Valley belongs to Region IX).

Those interested in serving or nominating someone should submit names in writing to: Nominating Committee, WREA, 2312 Carey Ave., Cheyenne, WY 82001. Include the name of the nominee along with his or her mailing address and phone number. Please mail nominations by August 15.


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COWBOY STATE BUZZ

One Tiny House + Four Epic Wyoming Destinations

Follow the “Call of the WY” at HGTV.com/CallOfTheWY

Photo courtesy of Wind River Country

S

omeone will spend six weeks exploring Wyoming’s rugged

landscape in a mobile 265-foot tiny house, designed by Casper native Shawn Rivett.

The tiny house and its selected adventurer will spend time in each of the four destinations, where he or she will be able to explore the area and experience its offerings and activities.

As part of the “Call of the WY” promotion this summer, the Wyoming Office of Tourism (WOT) has partnered with four Wyoming destinations—Buffalo Bill’s Cody/Yellowstone Country, Wind River Country, Visit Pinedale and Sweetwater County Travel & Tourism—to be the home base for the tiny house and selected adventurer this summer. “While Wyoming has so much to offer across our nearly 98,000 square miles, we’re thrilled to be working with these four in-state partners,” said Kristin Phipps, brand integration senior manager at Wyoming Office of Tourism. 8

WREN | JULY 2017

“As we continue to reinforce Wyoming’s brand to a national audience, we wanted to be sure that the destinations we worked with on this promotion are close to iconic and nationally recognized landscapes and we’re pleased to be collaborating with such great partners.” The tiny house and its selected adventurer will spend time in each of the four destinations, where he or she will be able to explore the area and experience its offerings and activities. The six-week promotion will kick off in Buffalo Bill’s Cody/

Yellowstone Country on July 2 and conclude in Sweetwater County on August 13. Part of the larger “That’s WY” campaign for the Wyoming Office of Tourism, the “Call of the WY” promotion included a casting call that invited interested adventurers to tell WOT about themselves and why they would like to spend six weeks under Wyoming’s big blue skies as they explore the state’s wide-open spaces.


Pull a Weed, Plant a Seed KAYCEE CHAMBER OF COMMERCE

Cultivating New Leaders for Agriculture

The Kaycee Chamber of Commerce is encouraging members to pull a weed and plant a seed. Recently, the chamber mailed packets of Indian Paintbrush, Wyoming’s state flower, to members with a flyer encouraging them to pull Russian Thistle weeds and scatter the Paintbrush seeds. Detailed instructions for sowing the seeds were included. For more information, call the Kaycee Chamber of Commerce at 738-2444 or send an email to kayceechamber@rtconnect.net.

“I will use the lessons I have learned in this program for years to come.” - Kelly Curuchet, Kaycee L.E.A.D. Class 14

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9


COWBOY STATE BUZZ

THIS MONTH IN HISTORY

DAT E : J U LY 3 , 192 2 PUB : DA ILY B O O M E RA N G | LARAM I E 10

WREN | JULY 2017

WHERE IN WYOMING? This red Pegasus spreads its wings in front of an auto museum, which opened in January 2016.

WHERE CAN YOU FIND IT? FIND OUT NEXT MONTH! Think you know the answer? Send your guess to wren@wyomingrea.org.

JUNE'S ANSWER: This is the last remaining bar in Shoshoni, which was founded in 1905 as a railroad stop. In 1907, a devastating fire destroyed most of the town’s structures. Photo by Maggie Budd

LANDER, Wyo., July 3.—United States Commissioner John J. Spriggs held court under the shade of the trees of the court house lawn with a group of Indian witnesses to inquire into the case of Willie Allen, the noted Shoshone rider, charged with the manufacture and sale of moonshine on the Shoshone reservation. Allen offered to plead guilty to the charge and take all the punishment upon himself, but the hearing brought out the fact that Marshall Washakie has escaped to Montana and Surrell agreed to turn state's evidence. It is thought likely that Washakie will be apprehended and brought back for a hearing. Allen claimed to have gotten the recipe and still from R. L. Evans who formerly ran the hotel at Fort Washakie. Surrell was sent out to bring in the still by the commissioner, but it is thought to have been hidden by Washakie before he took his departure for other hunting grounds. Allen was remanded to jail and probably will be held there until the meeting of the federal grand jury at Cheyenne this fall.

Courtesy photo

One Indian Is Bound Over But Washakie Is Among Those Missing

Congratulations to Vickie Wilhelm of Ucross for being the first person to correctly identify the photograph.

WANT TO STUMP YOUR FELLOW READERS?

Send us your WHERE IN WYOMING? photo to: wren@wyomingrea.org


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Photo by Leah Yetter

COWBOY STATE BUZZ

Long-time Farm and Ranch Families Sought for Honor WYOMING STATE HISTORIC PRESERVATION OFFICE Applications are being accepted for Centennial Farm and Ranch honorees, a program that recognizes farm and ranch families that have owned and operated the same agricultural property for 100 years or more. The deadline to apply is July 17. The Centennial Farm and Ranch program was re-established in 2006. Partners in the program are the Wyoming Stock Growers, the Wyoming Wool Growers, Wyoming Department of Agriculture, the Wyoming Rural Electric Association, the Wyoming Business Council, and the Wyoming Livestock Roundup. A formal ceremony will take place at the Wyoming State Fair in Douglas on August 19. Wyoming’s ranch and farmlands are disappearing at an alarming rate. Farmers and ranchers have withstood drought, economic downturns, development pressure, and other manmade and natural threats to their land and yet they have managed to preserve these important pieces of Wyoming’s agricultural heritage. These ranches and farms are not just history, but remain vital today and highlight the importance of agriculture to Wyoming.

To apply, visit wyoshpo.state. wy.us or call Erica Duvic in Cheyenne at 777-3418. 12 WREN | JULY 2017

Kids and Families Encouraged to Get Outside WY OUTSIDE

A

re you ready to get outside? The WY Outside Challenge is

For more information about WY Outside contact Ashley Rooney

underway! It’s time to show your

at ashley.rooney@wyo.gov or

outdoor enthusiasm with the WY

call 777-6560.

Outside Challenge, a fun-filled, yearlong event that encourages youths and families to explore the

snowshoeing and climbing a tree.

Wyoming outdoors.

Points are awarded for each activity

For the second year in a row,

own score, taking a photo of each

this hands-on, outdoor program provides participants with an opportunity to complete a wide variety of outdoor activities throughout 2017, then document and submit their accomplishments with photos.

and participants keep track of their completed challenge. All entries for the 2017 Challenge are due by December 31, 2017. All printed photos and scorecards should be submitted to the WY Outside Administrative Coordinator. Every participant who

To participate in the 2017 WY

obtains 200 points will receive a

Outside Challenge, Wyoming

certificate proclaiming them a

youths and families can visit

“WY Outside Challenge Master,”

wyoutside.com and download the

signed by Governor Matt Mead

official scorecard. The scorecard

and Superintendent of Public

contains WY Outside Challenge

Instruction, Jillian Balow. They will

activities such as hiking, camping

then be entered in a drawing to

in a yurt, sleeping out under

receive additional outdoor-themed

the stars, catching a fish, going

prizes.


State Parks Photo Contest Open WYOMING STATE PARKS, HISTORIC SITES AND TRAILS

Photographs must be submitted via email to park.photos@wyo.gov in JPEG format, and must be at least 300 dpi (2

WYde Open Spaces, a photo contest with prizes such as annual parks passes, outdoor gear and cameras, opened June 1. Sponsored by the Wyoming Division of State Parks, Historic Sites and Trails, the yearlong contest features three categories:

MB or greater), but not larger than 25 MB. Each photographer may enter up to 10 photos in total.

1. NATURE: the beauty of nature in State Parks 2. HISTORY: the rich history of Historic Sites 3. PEOPLE: the joy of people at State Parks and Historic Sites. Entries will be judged on creativity, aesthetic appeal, artistic quality, and whether the image exhibits the beauty and wonder of Wyoming State Parks, Historic Sites and Trails. Winners will be announced March 1, 2018. For more information, visit wyoparks.org/ photocontest or call 777-6323.

Photo by Leah Yetter

WREN | JULY 2017

13


Photo by Leah Yetter

WYOMING WEEKENDS

GLENDO STATE PARK

AMENITIES Boat Dock/Ramp Campsites Beach Fishing Swimming Hiking Trails Mountain Biking

LOOKING FOR A QUICK GETAWAY?

Playground

GLENDO

Why travel across the country when there are so many great things to see and do right here in Wyoming? This year, we'll take a look at Wyoming's State Parks. Give them a visit and enjoy everything our great state has to offer.

Hunting Store

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THIS MONTH? SPEND A FEW DAYS BOATING IN GLENDO STATE PARK.

G

lendo State Park is the perfect place to stay

and play for any water sport enthusiast. Most of the large campgrounds have access to the reservoir’s shoreline, and boat ramps also are available. Since 2010, Glendo has established over 45 miles of diverse non-motorized trail for hikers and mountain bikers, wildlife

Glendo State Park is one of southern Wyoming’s most popular boating parks. The park surrounds Glendo Reservoir on the North Platte River and offers visitors waterskiing, swimming, fishing, and other water-based activities. The fishing is so good, in fact, that anglers have caught state record fish here, including White Crappie and Quillback Suckers.

and nature watchers, with views of Glendo Reservoir and Laramie Peak, the highest and most prominent peak of the nearby Laramie Range. An additional 15 miles of trails will be completed over the next five years. 14

WREN | JULY 2017

It’s a good idea to make a reservation at Glendo State Park if you’re planning to camp over a holiday weekend. Two Moon is the largest and most popular camping area. Located on a bluff overlooking the water, it has pine trees for shade and wind protection. Most of the sites are level and there is a paved road through the area.

The Sandy Beach camping area has approximately two miles of beach for swimming, waterskiing, and kayaking. There are a limited number of sites available for reservation on the beach, with more recently built away from the shoreline. This area of the park has room for hundreds of visitors to stay and play.

Dump Station Group Picnic Shelter Restrooms Drinking Water

DID YOU KNOW? Wyoming and Nebraska tangled over rights to the North Platte River as early as the 1880s, occasionally ending up in the U.S. Supreme Court. It took 11 years to resolve one lawsuit, the Court ultimately ruling that Wyoming was entitled to 25 percent of the river. Operating under this decree, the Glendo Reservoir was authorized in 1944.

CONTACT INFO Hours: 24 hours/day 307-735-4433 state.parks.parks@wyo.gov wyoparks.state.wy.us


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Saving Wyoming’s

architectural treasure for future generations PHOTOS AND STORY BY RACHEL GIRT

1

T

2

he first comprehensive

expansion of the central utility

renovation in the Wyoming

plant; the remodel and expansion of

Capitol's 129-year history is

the tunnel that connects the Capitol

fixing critical safety issues,

to the Herschler Building; and the

replacing outdated, failing systems

rehabilitation and expansion of the

and almost doubling the building’s

Herschler Building.

public meeting spaces.

The Legislature saved more than

3

Improving safety issues To make the building safe for future generations, the Capitol is undergoing a much-needed comprehensive repair. The Capitol has very few smoke detectors and no smoke evacuation

“The time to do this project is

$100 million before authorizing the

now as the Capitol had real safety

or fire suppression systems. Fire

project in 2014. The major project

and smoke could spread quickly

components, total approximately

throughout the building, because

$219 million of the $299 million

there are no reliable smoke and fire

budget for the project. The other

partitions to separate one space

$80 million has been allocated to

from the other. In a fire, occupants

furnishings, equipment, design

would have less than five minutes

The Capitol Square Project is

services, a contingency fund to

to evacuate the building safely, and

comprised of four interrelated

address unanticipated needs

many parts of the building and

components: the rehabilitation

for the project, and temporary

the site are not compliant with

and restoration of the Capitol;

space for offices relocated due to

standards set by the Americans

replacement, relocation, and

construction.

with Disabilities Act (ADA).

issues,” said House Speaker Steve Harshman, who serves on the Capitol Rehabilitation and Restoration Oversight Group (Oversight Group).

16

WREN | JULY 2017


Photo by Cara Eastwood Baldwin

Follow the construction progress and see behind-the-scenes photos on social media.

Although the Capitol and its grounds are closed to the public during the restoration, taking a sidewalk tour around the Capitol is a way to appreciate the detail in the architecture. You can visit the Capitol exhibit at the Wyoming State Museum

 WyomingCapitolSquare

to learn more about the building's significance to our nation’s history, as well the architectural and design elements. The

 WYCapitolSquare

museum, located at 2301 Central Avenue, just a short walk from the Capitol, is open 9 am to 4:30 pm, Monday through

 WYCapitolSquare

Saturday and admission is free.

Learn more and sign up for project updates at www.wyomingcapitolsquare.com.

1

2

3

4

The damaged external entablature, made of sheet metal, is being replaced and a structurally sound steel system will secure it to the building. The repaired stone appears lighter in color but will match the rest of the sandstone as it weathers with time. The new entablature is also shown in this picture above the stone. The building’s plumbing and steam systems are badly corroded. Water and sewer pipes suffer frequent leaks causing substantial damage. The removal of the dropped ceilings has uncovered hidden archways, coffered ceilings, historic paint, and decorative columns. The invasive infrastructure work necessary to repair the building allows for the restoration of many of these elements.

4

The entire electrical system in

in some areas while in other places

issues. The existing elevators will be

the Capitol is obsolete, considered

water has infiltrated the building

replaced with larger versions and

hazardous. The building’s plumbing

through cracks. To fix this, the entire

relocated out of the monumental

and steam systems are badly

entablature, except for decorative

corridors. The internal staircases in

corroded with frequent leaks that

elements, will be replaced.

the House and Senate Chambers

cause substantial damage. The existing heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system frequently fails. While the exterior sandstone is generally sound, some stones are damaged and loose, even to the point of falling off the building. To maintain the Capitol’s historic look and stay cost–effective, the project will only replace stone for life safety issues and water management.

will extend to the garden level,

Repairing the Capitol

providing a second means of egress in an emergency. Restrooms will be

As part of the Capitol’s

located on every floor on both the

rehabilitation, all mechanical,

east and west sides of the building.

electrical, and plumbing (MEP)

Prior to the renovation, the main

systems will be reorganized in

public restrooms were on the

vertical chases from the garden

garden level.

level through the attic, removing the unnecessary piping and ductwork and allowing for more efficient systems.

The addition of new MEP systems, the replacement of elevators, and the increase in restrooms have consumed more space in the

Peeling paint on the metal

Two new elevators and interior

Capitol, requiring the relocation

entablature has caused corrosion

staircases will help address egress

of staff and functions that were WREN | JULY 2017

17


previously housed there. The

Bebout, who is the co-chairman of

altered during previous renovation

Herschler Building, due to its

the Oversight Group, along with

projects.

proximity to the Capitol, is being

Governor Matt Mead.

renovated and expanded to accommodate these displaced office needs. The Capitol Extension also will be expanded to create meeting rooms and other public service spaces like eventually a Student Learning Center.

“Visitors will see more of the

When complete, the Capitol will

original grandeur of this beautiful

have four public meeting rooms,

building than has been seen for over

including two new rooms on the

a hundred years,” said Tony Ross, a

first floor that each will seat 45

former President of the Wyoming

people, an existing third-floor meeting room that seats 45, and a

Senate, who serves on the Oversight Group.

restored Territorial Chamber that

Among the project’s most notable

will seat 70. When these rooms

features is the restoration of the

are not in use by the legislature

two-story grandeur of the historic

5

The restored room is envisioned in a watercolor design sketch by Paul Brown, a member of the project team. The stained glass laylight and the chandelier were in another room and will be returned to their original location in the historic chamber.

6

A comparison of what the ceiling of the Capitol Rotunda looks like today (black and white photo) and the preliminary design (far right, in color) which depicts the original 1888 design.

7

A design sketch showing how the removal of the Herschler Building's atrium restores the views to the Capitol.

5

Increasing public meeting space Another principal driver of the project has been to provide the

for committee meetings, they

Wyoming Territorial Assembly

will be available to the statewide

Chamber. This spectacular room,

elected officials and for official state

complete with an ornate stained-

business.

glass laylight in the ceiling, will

opportunity for increased public

The renovation also will add six

participation in the legislative

public meeting rooms in the Capitol

process. Previously, only a handful

Extension. Four of these rooms will

of people could fit into the meeting

seat 75 people, and two of them

rooms during legislative committee

will seat 100. Space for a 250-seat

hearings. That will change with the

auditorium has been set aside for

renovation.

the future.

"What I'm looking forward to is

6

become the Capitol’s largest public meeting room. The Wyoming Capitol earned its National Historic Landmark status, not for its architecture, but for its historic importance in the history of women’s suffrage. Throughout the building, dropped tile ceilings have been used to

having a real people's house where

Restoring historic elements

the citizens of Wyoming can come

The invasive work to repair

plumbing systems. With the new

here, participate in the legislative

the Capitol has created a rare

systems running through vertical

process, and see their five elected

opportunity to restore historic

chases, the dropped ceilings are

officials," said Senate President Eli

elements that were significantly

no longer necessary, and the

18

WREN | JULY 2017

cover mechanical, electrical, and


monumental ceiling heights will be restored, exposing previously hidden historic decorative elements, such as coffered ceilings, cornices, ornate columns, and arched

Completion in 2019 Visitors will see these many restored historic features when the Capitol reopens in mid-2019.

doorways.

“The restored Capitol will stand

Natural light will transform the

of Wyoming statehood and all it

building with the removal of the

encompasses,” Governor Mead said.

tile ceilings, because the windows

“It will welcome visitors and those

throughout the Capitol were

who participate in government.

partially blocked by the lower

The Capitol is, perhaps, the most

ceilings. Skylights and laylights

important building in the state. It

for the next century—a symbol

7

throughout the building are

represents the ideals of the people

being restored, which will flood

of Wyoming, now, just as it did

the building with natural light.

when the cornerstone was laid 130

Additionally, on the east wall of

years ago.”

the House Chamber, three historic windows that were filled in during the 1970s will be restored. All of the interiors will be repainted

“I have a great love for this building,” Ross added. “We are making sure that we preserve this historic treasure for future generations.” W

with historic paint finishes, including the House and Senate Chambers. The decorative ceiling in the Rotunda will be returned to its 1888 design. As for the other parts of the building, as much of the historic fabric as possible will be retained. The woodwork and marble tiles are only being replaced or repaired

Rachel Girt is a freelance writer and owner of Girt Communications based in Cheyenne.

CHECK US OUT Fall registration is going on now!

307-268-2121 or 800-442-2963, ext. 2121

caspercollege.edu/ag

where needed. WREN | JULY 2017

19


KIDS’ CORNER

SCIENTIFIC NAME 1

2

Vanessa cardui. Vanessa is probably named for a woman in a poem written by Jonathan Swift in 1713. Cardui is the Latin word for thistle.

APPEARANCE • Adults have a wingspan of 2 to 3 inches.

PAINTED LADY BUTTERFLY • The upper side of the wings is orange and brown, with white spots on the margin and the forewings.

• The underside of the wings is patterned in brown, black and gray, with blue spots and marks. • Caterpillars are grayish-brown with spikes.

MEET THE

5

3

BUTTERFLY-FRIENDLY FLOWERS You can attract adult Painted Ladies to your home by growing flowers, especially ones in the Sunflower family, including asters, cosmos, sunflowers, and their favorite—thistles. Add a puddler to your garden to provide Painted Ladies and other butterflies with water.

HABITAT Painted Ladies are the most abundant butterflies in the world, and they are common in Wyoming.

4 LONG-DISTANCE FLIERS Painted Lady Butterflies have the longest yearly migration of any butterfly. They can fly more than 9,000 miles from Africa to England and up to the Arctic Circle, then back to Africa! But it takes six generations to complete the trip. The butterflies that return to Africa are the great-great-great-great grandchildren of the ones that left Africa in the spring.

thistle aster

sunflower

CONTENT PROVIDED BY:

cosmo

MAKE YOUR OWN BUTTERFLY PUDDLER! Fill a shallow, non-breakable bowl or a birdbath with sand or soil.

20

WREN | JULY 2017

Place a few smooth rocks or decorative tiles on the surface for the butterflies to stand on.

Keep the sand or soil wet at all times. (Placing it in the shade will slow down the drying.)

Be patient! It may take a while for the butterflies to discover your watering hole, but once they do, they will return again and again!


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t o N rac nt

Co

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IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc.Your invoices will come from GreatCall. 1Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a Jitterbug Flip and a one-time setup fee of $35. Coverage is not available everywhere. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can only be made when cellular service is available. 5Star Service will be able to track an approximate location when your device is turned on, but we cannot guarantee an exact location. 2We will refund the full price of the Jitterbug phone and the activation fee (or setup fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes. You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S.-based customer service. However, for calls to a Personal Operator in which a service is completed, you will be charged 99 cents per call, and minutes will be deducted from your monthly rate plan balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Personal Operator. Jitterbug, GreatCall and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2017 GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.


VET NOTES

THE MOB BOSS BY BRUCE CONNALLY, DVM

I

was driving between appointments when the cell phone rang. “My dad has a filly that can’t breathe through one nostril. Can you come out to see her?” The woman, Veronica, explained that this had begun a few days ago and the filly was not getting better. We set up an appointment.

“Hello,” he rasped in a deep, heavy voice. Marlon Brando in The Godfather could not have looked or sounded more sinister.

22

WREN | JULY 2017

The morning of the appointment, I was driving toward the foal when my phone announced an incoming text. I pulled off into a driveway to read the message from Veronica. She couldn’t be there and her dad had a physical therapy appointment. Would I be able to delay for an hour? I said I could do some errands first but I might not have time for an extended treatment if her horse needed it. The return text was grateful and assured me the filly really needed to be seen.

I arrived at the horse pasture about 10 minutes early. A big brick house was another quarter mile up the road with a long black limousine parked out front. I reached for my cell phone but the battery was dead. By this time the horses were curious and came over to the fence. A red roan yearling filly was obviously my patient. She was not breathing through her right nostril as she reached her nose over the fence to say hello.

A black Cadillac Escalade with dark tinted windows eased into the drive. The black limo and Cadillac triggered something in my mind. A mob guy? I wondered. As the door of the Escalade opened my fantasy suddenly seemed more real. Inside sat a tired-looking man in his 60s with slicked back black hair. His shirt opened low revealing a dark, olive chest adorned with a heavy gold chain. The one-bytwo-inch rectangular ring on his left hand was encrusted with what appeared to be diamonds. A huge gold watch wrapped tightly around the thick left wrist. “Hello,” he rasped in a deep, heavy voice. Marlon Brando in The Godfather could not have looked or sounded more sinister. “How are you?” I asked tentatively, my imagination doing backflips. “Not as good as you,” he said sliding slowly out of the Cadillac and


pressing his thick left hand with the big ring to his chest. “I had a heart attack three weeks ago.” Reality seemed to slap me in the face. This wasn’t The Godfather. His vocal cords had been bruised when they put an endotracheal tube in his throat in the emergency room. He is standing with his hand on his chest and my cell phone is dead. If he has another heart attack I can’t call 911. My CPR training is way out of date. I can do chest compressions but I am NOT doing mouth-to-mouth. I have a big dose syringe in the truck that I can use to give him oxygen. And why the heck didn’t Veronica mention this in one of her texts! “Did you see the filly?” he rasped between painful breaths, bringing me back to reality. “Yes,” I answered, trying to focus on the horse and not on the obviously sick man in front of me. “We need to catch her to see what is in that nostril.” He looked at me but didn’t answer. “She isn’t halter-broke, is she?” I asked with sudden understanding. “No. We will have to get her in those pens behind the house,” he rasped, holding his chest tighter as if just thinking about it made him hurt.

pens. His voice was better but his attitude was still sore. “This getting old is not what it was cracked up to be,” he growled.

WANT TO WRITE FOR VET NOTES?

We are currently looking for writers who are eager to share their stories in upcoming issues of WREN. If you are interested, email wren@wyomingrea.org.

“Is your daughter coming?” I asked, unwilling to have him helping with the horse. Before he could answer, a white Escalade appeared. A pretty woman in her 40s with the same olive complexion and black hair climbed out. Veronica’s white blouse, dark slacks, and dress shoes were not appropriate for handling an untrained horse.

“What do you want me to do?” she asked. I sent Dad for a halter and Veronica for a bucket of water. The filly was quiet and gentle but could not be restrained. I quickly injected sedation into her neck as she wheeled away. After 15 minutes and another drive-by sedation I was able to put a halter on the young horse. Veronica held the halter and I examined the nose. There was something in the nasal passage.

After several minutes I was able to grab the object with a long forceps. It was a twoinch-long piece of bone with a tooth. Apparently the filly had been kicked in the nose by another horse. The kick had fractured off a piece of her hard palate and thrust it into the nasal passage. The tooth was the small first premolar horsemen call the wolf tooth. Veronica seemed relieved that the filly could breathe normally again. Her father remained taciturn and walked toward the house. I drove away with the whole mobster fantasy replaying in my head. The foreboding voice of a black-haired man with a huge diamond ring was rasping, “If you mess with my daughter you will be sneezing teeth!” W

Dr. Bruce Connally practices equine medicine in central Wyoming and northern Colorado from his home in Berthoud, Colo.

“We are not doing that today,” I stated firmly. “That horse is in better condition than you are right now. Get your daughter to help and call me when you have her in the pen.” A day later I got another text. The filly and her mother were in the pen. When could I come out? We set up a time with a promise that Veronica would be there. Unfortunately when I arrived the young horse and her mother were in the pen but no humans were to be seen. Eventually Dad came walking down to the WREN | JULY 2017

23


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WREN | JULY 2017


BOOK REVIEW

Lost Forts of Casper BY JOHANNA WICKMAN | 2016 | 112 P.

Description by The History Press

Three army outposts built before and during the Civil War protected critical routes along the western trails at the North Platte River near what later became Casper. All had been abandoned by 1867, and their dramatic stories are mostly forgotten. The Post at Platte Bridge was a vital outpost on Albert Sidney Johnston’s Utah War supply route. Camp Dodge and Platte Bridge Station, also called Fort Caspar, guarded telegraph lines from Native American sabotage. Violent winds, horrendous blizzards and scorching summers made life miserable. Tension reached a fever pitch at

COST: $21.99

the Battle of Platte Bridge when Sioux, Cheyenne and Arapaho

ISBN: 9781467119221

attacked a cavalry detachment led by Caspar Collins. Today, a

PUBLISHER: The History Press

reconstructed Fort Caspar stands as a vigilant reminder of the struggles at those lonely frontier stations. Local historian Johanna

Available from online booksellers, in bookstores and directly from The History Press.

Wickman chronicles military efforts to keep the peace, wage war and merely survive.

Win Entries for this month’s book drawing must be received by July 31.

A FREE!

Please print clearly, or use a return address label. Name:

 Book Drawing – TO ENTER THE DRAWING:

Lost Forts of Casper c/o WREN Magazine 2710 Thomes Avenue, Cheyenne, WY 82001

Copy

Phone: Address:

CONGRATULATIONS TO TO MAY'S WINNER:

Edward Hikade OF RIVERTON

 wyomingrea.org/ NEW! wren-submissions

One entry per household, please.

WREN | JULY 2017

25


CO-OP SPOTLIGHT

Pastureland, a pond and forestlands combine on the Hummell property to welcome all types of wildlife, which often inspire Andi's creative writing.

SOUTHERN LADY CREATES STORIES IN WYOMING’S BLACK HILLS: ANDI HUMMEL BY GAYLE M. IRWIN

W

hen tourists flock to Devils Tower and motorcyclists roar into nearby Hulett for August’s Ham ’n Jam,

Andre'lle “Andi” Hummel basks in the serenity of her pine-laden quarter section north of town. She and her husband Ben purchased the first 120-plus acres more than 20 years ago. They worked up a garden, planted a small orchard, and added a few chickens. They adopted Nike, a stray pup “with a reputation,” Andi said. They also remodeled the 1932 house, and fought bats, skunks, and feral cats for “squatters’ rights.” “We found a haven, a hideaway, and added a few more acres when an

26

WREN | JULY 2017

adjoining piece came up for sale.” After her husband passed away, Andi decided to remain. “Ben did so much. I try to keep up, but my son and grandson pitch in, and together we get the work done." A native of Florida's Gulf Coast, Andi spent many years in Pennsylvania after she and Ben married. He retired in 1993 and the couple headed west, looking for adventure. "We found it,” she said. “I had never been west of the Mississippi River, and, before we came to Wyoming, I had never encountered so much quiet, so much space.” That quiet and space helps Andi, a writer, compose her historical fiction

and poetry, plus a little nonfiction. She is currently creating a collection of short stories. She also edits and tutors aspiring writers. Perseverance encompasses her life, as a person and a writer. She coaches other wordsmiths to employ that trait, telling them, "Don’t give up. When you’re writing a story, you have your own voice and style— develop both. Don’t let others talk you out of the way you write; it’s your story!” Andi studied journalism in college and has written for numerous newspapers and magazines, including Highlights for Children and GRIT. She also put her writing and editing skills to use as a member of a public relations team for a major medical center in Pennsylvania. Although she admits she misses the Gulf Coast, especially in winter, “I care about the people who live here, and they make me feel they care about me. I like the attitude, the willingness to help. I appreciate that assistance, and the nearness of family, and the respect I'm given when I need ‘alone time’ to write." Nature and people stimulate Andi’s writing, which she does in her home office. She also says she might be mowing or walking the dog when an idea, a paragraph, or a scene comes


Built in 1932, the house in Wyoming’s Black Hills region was remodeled by Andi and her late husband Ben.

to mind and she must write it down. "I stop what I'm doing, run inside and scribble down a thought—I have sticky notes all over the house.” A member of Power River Energy Corporation, Andi not only values the electricity the cooperative provides for reading and running her computer, but she also appreciates how the company has assisted her granddaughter, Faith with her college education through scholarship funds. Faith, her parents, and younger brother live in Hulett, and Andi enjoys having them nearby. This persevering woman misses Ben but finds family and friends a balm to her heart and writing helps soothe the ache. “Writing poetry relaxes me. When I’m missing Ben and see an animal I normally don’t see, I’ll sit and play the words into a poem,” Andi said. “There's also SaraBeth, my BoxerCatahoula mix rescue who rescued me, and Charles and Simon, the cats—they keep me laughing." With her resolute spirit comes recognition of dependence on others. Andi readily acknowledges many have helped her through rough times in Wyoming.

Andi and her rescue dog, SaraBeth enjoy the tranquility of Andi's property north of Hulett.

I am, having a shoulder to lean on

sunny Florida Gulf Coast! But, there

“The area is a symphony of natural and cultural history,” Andi noted. “Deer, coyotes, badgers, geese—a plethora of wildlife frequents this property. I love to look out my window and see the animals. I love the quiet. I love the land, but I don't

are more stories to tell, and there

own it . . . it owns me." W

helps. If I hadn't had shoulders, many shoulders—human and otherwise— I’d never have survived the first two years in Wyoming after I lost Ben—I’d have turned tail and run back to my

may be enough adventure left in Wyoming to keep me here a while,” she said.

Gayle M. Irwin is a freelance writer based in Casper.

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"I've learned, among other things, no matter how independent I think WREN | JULY 2017

27


COUNTRY COOKS

Deep-Fried Lobster

THIS MONTH:

Lobster

2 lobster tails per person (4-5 oz. each) Beer Batter: 1 cup flour 1 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. pepper 1 tsp. sugar 3/4 can of beer Oil for deep frying

LESLIE FISCHER, GLENDO, WYO.

Heat oil to 350-375°F Mix flour, salt, pepper, sugar and beer to make a simple beer batter (using the beer to adjust the thickness to your liking). Use kitchen shears to cut up the center of the underside of the lobster tail. Crack open the shell, and carefully peel out the large piece of tail meat. Rinse the meat and pat dry with a paper towel. Dip in beer batter mixture, and carefully lower into the hot oil (sometimes the tails curl up while frying). Fry until golden brown. Do not overcook or they will become rubbery. Drain tails on several layers of paper towels placed on a rack. Squeeze lemon over the top if desired. Dip in melted butter and enjoy.

FOR SEPTEMBER SEND US YOUR FAVORITE RECIPES WITH:

Elk

Lobster Bisque 1 cup chicken broth 1 medium onion, sliced 2 Tbsp. butter

Send by August 5 to Country Cooks:

TO SUBMIT A RECIPE:

2 Tbsp. all purpose flour

 wren@wyomingrea.org  2710 Thomes Avenue Cheyenne, WY 82001

 wyomingrea.org/ wren-submissions

NEW!

Please include your name, hometown, and a phone number (in case we have questions).

1 cup milk 1 cup whipping cream 1/2 tsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 lb. lobster meat, cooked and cubed 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1/4 tsp. dried parsley 1/4 tsp. garlic powder 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. ground cayenne pepper

28

WREN | JULY 2017

NANCY DENK, RIVERTON, WYO.

In a small frying pan place 1/4 cup chicken broth and the onion. Cook over low heat for 5 to 7 minutes. In a medium pot over medium heat melt butter. Slowly whisk in flour. Whisk until a creamy mixture is created. Gradually pour in broth, whisking constantly. Whisk in milk, whipping cream, salt, onion, lobster meat, Worcestershire sauce, black pepper, parsley, garlic powder, and cayenne pepper. Heat until soup is almost boiling. Do not boil the soup or the milk will curdle.


PEN TO PAPER

“Midnight Mare Watch” March, 2 a.m. VIRGINIA R. WAKEFIELD, CHEYENNE, WYO.

I overheard the mares a’talkin’,

Old Izzy snorted in agreement,

As I slipped inside the barn;

Her comment short and terse:

Three old heavies standing placidly,

“I’ve foaled outside for many springs;

I stopped to hear them yarn.

“Things could sure be worse!”

I shivered as I eavesdropped,

“Ya know,” said Spot, her belly sagging,

Adjusted to dim light.

“My baby’s due; this barn is warm;

Not one was a’foalin’

“We’d better get to foaling

On this cold Wyoming night.

“Before the next spring storm!”

Old Mabel nickered softly

I slipped outside in wonder

And said, “SHE ain’t so bright,

At the talk that I had heard,

“SHE’s losin’ sleep on these midnight strolls,

I’m sleep-deprived and freezing,

“Don’t SHE look a fright?

And this has just been weird!

“While WE have found the Hilton,

Back to bed I staggered—

“With room service pretty good,

Another watch in vain,

“Knee-deep in straw and alfalfa hay—

These ole mares have got it figgered—

“I like this neighborhood!”

Who’s got who well-trained?

We share a selection of WREN readers’ creative writing (poems, limericks, haiku, short verse, and prose) every issue as space and content allow. To be considered for publication, please include the author’s consent to be submitted, his or her mailing address, and confirmation that the work has not been published elsewhere. If you would like us to return your work, include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

TO SUBMIT A PIECE:

 wren@wyomingrea.org  2710 Thomes Avenue Cheyenne, WY 82001

 wyomingrea.org/

wren-submissions

WREN | JULY 2017

NEW!

29


WHAT’S HAPPENING

National Day of the Cowboy DUBOIS | JULY 21-22 Meet and mingle with real cowboys! Friday night see a real Ranch Rodeo with working cowboys at the Clarence Allison Memorial Arena. Saturday watch a cowboy parade at 10 a.m., see Wild West shootout re-enactments on Main St., savor western recipes, and shop in charming western shops and street fair. Info 455-2556, dubioswyomingchamber.org, duboiswyoming.org

Big Piney

Clearmont

TUESDAYS

TUESDAYS

Story Hour: Ages 0–5 yrs., 10:30a, free, Big Piney Branch Library, info 276-3515.

TO SUBMIT AN EVENT:

Buffalo THURSDAYS Bluegrass Jam Session: 6:30p, free, Occidental Saloon, info 6840451.

Send complete information for next issue’s events by July 5!

Story hour: 10a, Johnson County Public Library, info 684-5546.

Please remember that events from the 10th of the current month to the 10th of the next month are included in each issue. Also, please be sure to include the date, title, description, time, cost, location, and contact information for each event.

THROUGH AUG. 21

Each month we select an event for our Featured Event listing. These events have regional appeal and must be submitted with high-resolution photos.

ONGOING

Questions and Submissions:

 wren@wyomingrea.org  307-772-1968  2710 Thomes Avenue

Cheyenne, WY 82001

 wyomingrea.org/ NEW! wren-submissions

Casper Married to the Landscape: A large-scale exhibition of recent oil paintings by Aaron and Jenny Wuerker: Tues-Sat 10a-5p; Sun noon-4p, The Nicolaysen Museum, 400 E. Collins, info thenic.org or 235-5247.

Centennial Nici Self Historical Museum: Thurs-Sun, noon-4p, 2734 Hwy 130, info Vicki Seifert at fvseifert@ msn.com

Cheyenne FOURTH MONDAYS Laramie County Cowbelles Meeting: RSVP by Friday before. $13, info 547-3423 or Carole Goertz cgoertz54@hotmail.com.

Chugwater THIRD MONDAYS The Chugwater Historical Group presentations: 7p, Community Center, info 422-3509 Ruth Vaughn.

FRIDAYS Farmers’ Market: 8–10:30a, Chugwater Town Park.

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WREN | JULY 2017

Clearmont Historical Center: 2–4p, free. Story Time: 4:30p, free, Clearmont Branch Library, info 758-4331.

Cody ONGOING

Cody Country Art League Gallery: 9a–5p Mon.–Fri., info 587-3597.

THIRD SUNDAYS

The Wyoming Fiddler Assoc. District #2 Jam: Cassie’s Supper Club: 1–4p, info 754-2687 Jerry.

Crowheart TUESDAYS

Story Time: 12:30–1:30p, free, Crowheart Elementary.

Dubois JULY 15

Fence Removal in the Whiskey Basin Habitat Management Area: Lend a hand removing unused wildlife-hazardous fencing in the habitat area. Involves a strenuous hike and outside work, but it will be fun and satisfying! 8a-4p, info 455-3429.

JULY 20

Genes, Genomes & Big Game, Oh My!: Learn new genetic insights about Wyoming’s bighorn sheep herds from UW’s Sierra Love Stowell, 7p, Dennison Lodge, info 455-3429.

JULY 21-23

Casting for Recovery Retreat: Flyfishing instruction & breast cancer information are provided. Free for those in treatment or survivors of breast cancer, Absaroka Ranch. Info castingforrecovery.org or call 1-888-553-3500.

JULY 26

Sheep Trap Trek: Strenuous hike to view an ancient Sheepeater Indian bighorn sheep trap. 10a-3p, National Bighorn Sheep Museum, 10 Bighorn Lane, info 455-3429.

AUG. 1-3

Kiwanis/WHF Wellness Screening Blood Draw: 7-10a, Headwaters Conference Center, info 455-2243.

ONGOING

Dubois Museum: 9a–5p Mon–Sat, info 455-2284.

Elk Mountain ONGOING

Elk Mountain Museum: 10a-3p Tues-Sat, info 760-0766.

Encampment JULY 22

Living History Day and Mountain Man Rendezvous: Grand Encampment Museum, 807 Barnett Ave., Info GEMuseum.com or 327-5308.

ONGOING

Grand Encampment Museum: Tues-Sat, 9a–5p; Sun noon-4p, info GEMuseum.com, 327-5308.

Ethete JULY 21-23

Annual Celebration & Indian Powwow: Native American Indian dancers and drumming. Sample Indian food and handmade traditional crafts. Ethete Road and US Hwy. 132, info info@windriver. org or 332-2992.

Fort Bridger TUESDAYS

Bingo: 6:45p, American Legion Hall, info 780-5489 or 780-8079.

Gillette JULY 13-16

Wyoming State Quilt Guild Show: Vendors and classes. Free admission, classes varied prices. Gillette Community College, 300 West Sinclair. Info wsqg.org or Kandi Davis kandidavis322@ charter.net or 752-1123.

ONGOING

Ava Community Art Center: Info avacenter.org or 682-9133.


Greybull WEDNESDAYS

Preschool Story Time: 11a, free, Greybull Library, info 765-2551.

Guernsey MONDAYS

Preschool Story Time: 11a, Guernsey Public Library, info 836-2736.

THIRD MONDAYS

Book Discussion Group: 7p, info 575-1384.

exhibition. Free, Tues-Thurs 10a-6p, and Fri & Sat 10a-4p, 214 Main Street, info 332-5772, landerartcenter.com.

AUG. 5

Lander’s Community Concert Series’ 70th Anniversary Barn Dance: Grab your partner and come scoot your boot! Tickets at door, 7-9p, 1445 W. Main Street. Tickets at the door, info 335-8778 or museumoftheamericanwest.com

ONGOING

Tri-City Arts Guild: 6:30p, info 575-1384.

Pioneer Museum: Tue–Sat 10a– 4p, free, 332-3373.

SUNDAYS

Laramie

VFW Bingo: 1p, VFW Hall, info 836-2631.

FOURTH SUNDAYS

American Legion Riders: 2p, Crazy Tony’s Bar & Grill, info 5750838.

Hartville SECOND SUNDAYS

Hartville Museum & Community Center: Free Music Jam/Carry-In. 4–6p, info 836-2288.

Hulett ONGOING

Hulett Museum and Art Gallery: 8a–4p Mon–Fri, free, info 4675292.

Jay Em

JULY 8-15

Jubilee Days: Robert Fuller, star of the Western TV show Laramie will be at multiple events July 13-15, info visitlaramie.org or call 1-800-445-5303.

JULY 22

Albany County Cattlewomen Ranch Tour: Meet at Wyoming Territorial Prison Park parking lot to visit ranches in Upper Big Laramie Area south of Woods Landing. Tour leaves at 9a, info 760-5590 Sandra Eike.

TUESDAYS

Lyman THURSDAYS

Tours of Historic Jay Em on the Rawhide: By appt. 735-4364 (Marjorie Sanborn) or 322-2839 (Hazel Mudgett).

Story Time for Preschoolers: 10:30a, Lyman Branch Library, info 787-6556, on Facebook, or at uintalibrary.org.

Kaycee

SECOND FRIDAYS

Powder River “Let ‘Er Buck” Ranch Rodeo: $10, $5 youth 10-15 yrs., Harold Jarrard Park, info kayceerancrodeo.com or Tammie Neville tammie@ rtconnect.net or 738-2450.

Lander JULY 12-16

International Climbers Festival: 500+ climbers gather to celebrate climbing. Slideshows, climbing clinics, trade fair, trail run, film festival, yoga, music, parties, an art crawl, contests, and world-class rock climbing. Multiple locations, info 332-3892 or climbersfestival.org.

JULY 14–AUG. 26

Lander Art Center: “…and then there was darkness: Great American Eclipse.” A special Eclipse Arts and Science

THIRD THURSDAYS

Birthday and Anniversary Dinner: Meat provided, Bring a side dish. 5p social hour, 6p dinner, Senior Center.

Tour of the Historic Double Dee Guest Ranch/Amelia Earhart Cabin: "Amelia Earhart" performance and live music. Tour leaves the museum at 9a, free, info info@meeteetsemuseums. org or 868-2423.

Mountain View MONDAYS & THURSDAYS

Story Time for Preschoolers: 10:30a, Uinta County Library, info 782-3161, on Facebook, or at uintalibrary.org.

JULY 29

Historic Pitchfork Ranch Tour: 9:30a tour leaves museum, free, info info@meeteetsemuseums. org or 868-2423.

Newcastle

Moorcroft

FRIDAYS

Bingo: 7:30p, free, VFW Hall.

AUGUST 4

Duffy Hudson and his One-Man Show: portraying George Burns, 6:30p. West Texas Trail Museum. Info 756-9300.

Pine Bluffs TUESDAYS

Bingo: 7p, 25¢ per card, 14 games, recreation meeting room, info 245-3301.

AUGUST 9

Rally Rib Fest: Diehl’s Supermarket, 11a-5p.

Riverton

ONGOING

JULY 14-16

West Texas Trail Museum: Mon– Fri, 9a–5p, free, info 756-9300.

Riverton Rendezvous Balloon Rally: Summer fun for young n’ old. Watch the sky fill with colorful balloons from all over the region. Friday Evening Car Cruise & Parade; Sat & Sun pancake breakfast, balloon liftoff and tethered rides, and more. rivertonrendezvous.com.

WEDNESDAYS

Story Hour: 3–5 year olds, 10a; 0–3 year olds, 11a; Moorcroft Branch Library. Coffee & Donuts and Musicians Jam: 9a–noon, Senior Center.

Prayers and Squares: 9a–noon, free, Hunter Hall, info 742-6608.

ONGOING

JULY 14-15

JULY 16

Lego Club: 10a–noon, ages 8 & up. Free, Lyman Branch Library, info 787-6556, on Facebook, or at uintalibrary.org.

Medicine Bow ONGOING

Medicine Bow Museum: 10a–5p, Mon–Sat, info 379-2383 or 7102383.

SECOND TUESDAYS

Bingo: 6:30p, Community Hall, info 399-4751.

Meeteetse JULY 14

Outdoor Cowbilly Concert: With "The Gypsy Cowbelle" and "Packin' the Mail." Authentic Mexican cuisine by "Nena's." 6-8:30p, Free admission, info info@meeteetsemuseums.org or 868-2423.

2017 Wild Horse & Burro Adoption/ Event Schedule

Wyoming

Cheyenne Frontier Days July 21-30 Cheyenne, WY

Wyoming Honor Farm May 19-20 Riverton, WY

Wild Horse Ecosanctuary June 3 Deerwood Ranch, WY Rock Springs Wild Horse Holding Facility June 16-17 & July 7-8 Rock Springs, WY

Mustang Days Wyoming State Fair August 15-19 Douglas, WY Youth and Mustang (YAM) Veteran and Mustang (VAM) August 26-27 Rock Springs, WY

blm.gov/programs/wild-horse-and-burro 1-866-4MUSTANGS (1-866-468-7826)

Wyoming Honor Farm September 8-9 Riverton, WY

WREN | JULY 2017

31


WHAT’S HAPPENING JULY 31-AUG. 5

Fremont County Fair: PRCA rodeos, exhibits, talent contests, daily carnival fun, wiener dog races, monster truck and demolition derbies. 1010 Fairgrounds Dr. fremontcountyfair.org or 856-6611.

Saratoga ONGOING

Saratoga Museum: 10a-4p Wed-Sat, noon-4p Sun, $5 adults, $3 ages 13-17, free 12 & under, 104 E. Constitution Ave.

Shell ONGOING

Art Shelter Gallery and Shop: Open 7 days a week, free, coffee and tea for browsers.

Sheridan JULY 10-16

WYO Rodeo Week: PRCA Rodeo, World Championship Indian Relay Races Wed-Sat, info sheridanwyorodeo.com.

JULY 12-14

First Peoples’ Pow Wow and Dance: Wed & Thurs 3-5p, grand finale Fri. immediately after WYO Rodeo Week parade, free, lawn of Sheridan Inn.

JULY 20

Third Thursdays Summer Street Festival: Live music, food, cold drinks, crafts, shopping and more. 5-9p, Historic Main Street area.

TUESDAYS

Concerts in the Park: 7:30p, Kendrick Park, info Sheridanwyoming.org.

THURSDAYS

Sheridan Farmers Market: Live music, 5-7p, Grinnell Plaza.

Sundance JULY 23-30

Sew It, Grow It, Show It at the Crook County Fair: Team roping, kids activities, youth rough stock rodeo, pig wrestling, free concert and more, info crookcofair.com, crookcofair@ rangeweb.net or 283-2644.

TUESDAYS AND WEDNESDAYS IN JULY & AUGUST

Sundance Sip N Walk: Live reenactment through Sundance's Wild West History! 6p & 7:30p, Crook County Museum, East Cleveland St.

THIRD THURSDAYS

SECOND WEDNESDAYS

ONGOING

Rex Young Rock Club: 7–8p, Senior Friendship Center.

Lunch Bunch Book Discussion Group: 11a, free, Crook County Library, info 283-1006 or crookcountylib@rangeweb.net. Crook County Museum: Mon–Fri 8a–4p, free, Courthouse basement, info 283-3666. ZUMBA Dance Fitness Classes: Mon-Thurs, info dhooper123.zumba.com or 629-0575.

Ten Sleep

Alzheimer’s and Dementia Support Group: 1p, free, chapel at Torrington Community Hospital, info 534-7039.

THURSDAYS

TOPS (Taking Off Pounds Sensibly): 8–10a, Senior Friendship Center, info 334-3358 Dana Williams or 532-0728 Judy Stellpflug.

Upton

JULY 15

Ten Sleep Youth Rodeo: Free rodeo for kids 2-14 years to compete in barrel racing, pole bending, steer riding, mutton busting, Goat tail tying, stick horse race, and more. 9a, Ten Sleep Rodeo Grounds, info Becky Cooper 366-2748.

FIRST THURSDAYS

Acoustic Open Mic Night: 7p, Ten Sleep Brewing, info tensleepbrewingco.com.

THIRD THURSDAYS

Open JAM Night: 7p, Ten Sleep Brewing, info tensleepbrewingco.com.

Thermopolis JULY 10

Arts in the Park: performance by John Roberts y Pam Blanco, 7p, Pavilion, info thermopolischamber.org.

JULY 15

JULY 13

Chamber of Commerce meeting: Noon, Cedar Pines Golf Course, info 468-2642.

ALL JULY

Summer Reading Program: 722 Fourth St., info 468-2324.

TUESDAYS & FRIDAYS

Dance Exercise at the Senior Center: 1113 Second St., 9a, call Karen Carter 468-2858

WEDNESDAYS & FRIDAYS

Inyan Kara Bow Hunters Archery League Shoot: 5:30p, 1001 2nd St., info Tabby Tierce 629-0707.

Wheatland THIRD THURSDAYS

Platte County Chamber Meeting: 5-7p, location changes each month, info 322-2322.

Smokin Waters Gold Invitational: Info thermopolischamber.org.

Worland

JULY 22

Washakie Museum: Mon-Fri 9a–5:30p, Sat 9a-5p, Sun noon-4p, info washakiemuseum. org or 347-4102.

4-H/FFA Horse Show: Info thermopolischamber.org.

JULY 29-30

WJRA Rodeo: HSC Fairgrounds, info thermopolischamber.org.

Wright ONGOING

Wright Centennial Museum: Info 4641222, wrightmuseum@vcn.com, www. wrightcentennialmuseum.org.

Torrington SECOND TUESDAYS

ONGOING

Coffee with Local Commissioners: 8-9a, free, Java Jar, info, 532-5162.

THIRD FRIDAYS

Dinner: 5–7p, Wright Community Center.

ANTIQUES STORE Discover, learn, love.

Please come visit us in Gillette, WY 211 W 2nd St. Open Wednesday - Saturday | 307-686-5667

FRIDAYS IN JULY & AUGUST

Friday Nights at the Museum: Historical presentations, 6p. Crook County Museum, info 283-3666.

AUG. 9

Burnout Wednesday: Live music and street festival featuring a motorcycle burnout contest on 3rd St.

32

WREN | JULY 2017

Please come visit us in Gillette, WY 211 W 2nd St. Open Wednesday - Saturday | 307-686-5667


1. EQUIPMENT

5. POULTRY

9. OPPORTUNITIES

13. HELP WANTED

17. TRAVEL & RECREATION

2. FOR SALE

6. REAL ESTATE

10. MISCELLANEOUS

14. DOGS

18. HEALTH

3. HORSES

7. WANTED

11. BUSINESS CONSULTING

15. EMPLOYMENT SOUGHT

19. PERSONAL

4. LIVESTOCK

8. CRAFTS

12. FOR RENT

16. BUILDING SUPPLIES

20. FREE

2. FOR SALE 1” & 2” fusion water pipe, approx. 500’ rolls. 1”= $.25/ft 2”=$.60/ft. For more info call Keith (801) 898-8031 2000 Snobird Camper Trailer By Nuwa. 34’6” 3 slides outs. Very good condition! $15K. Located in Dubois, WY. Call (307) 455-3454. Ask for Elmer Zenisek. Brand for Sale A74 (LRC, RHS, LTH). Paid up to 2025. For more info call Mr. Vines at 307322-2882. Heatmor Outdoor Furnaces, heat your home with wood, coal, used oil, or pellets with a stove that is backed with Limited Lifetime Warranty. www.heatmor.com or call 307710-6264. New & Used Coal Stokers, parts, service & advice. Available for most makes. Thanks. 307754-3757. Pre-Inoculated Alfalfa seeds for sale. Ranger, Vernema, Perry, Surpass, Wrangler and TV Blend. $3.25/lb. Call Richard at 307-856-5748 or 307-851-9830. Shaver Outdoor Wood Boiler Furnance. Aermotor Windmills

and parts, cylinders, pipe, rod, submersible pumps, motors, control boxes, Hastings 12 ga. bottomless stock tanks and more. Herren Bros., Box 187, Harrison NE. 1-308-668-2582. Surplus Equipment New And Used: Generators, air heaters, engine driven pumps, (all sizes), solar pumps, 3” and 4” polypipe, etc. A variety of types and sizes available. Call for pricing and details: Premier PowerPlants & Pumps, Farson, WY 307-273-9591. Tin for sale. Attention Ranchers/Contractors! DO YOU NEED metal panel for A NEW SHOP? Need a metal panel to build a wind break for them cows? How about a roof for the wife’s house? Roll formed in Torrington, WY! #1 40 year, Paint. 16 colors in stock. Tuff Rib Panel; 29 & 26 Gauge Metal. All panels cut to the length you need and trim to go with it! Order today; pickup tomorrow all in stock items! Cherry Creek Metal: 307-532-3171. 7. WANTED Antique Collector Looking For Oil Company Gas Pumps, Globes And Signs. Will pay fair market value! Also looking for general antiques for our

CLASSIFIEDS

antique shop. Please see our Frontier Auto Museum ad and look at our website FrontierAutoMuseum.com. Located in Gillette WY, our passion is to preserve Wyoming history and the nostalgia of the past, especially Parco, Sinclair, Frontier, Husky and any car dealership along with all brands. We are also always looking for Wy license plates and Wyo highway signs and State Park signs. Please call Jeff Wandler 307-680-8647 jwandler@LNH. net or daughter Briana Brewer 307-660-2402 bbrewer@ frontierauto.net.

We Pay Cash For Mineral & Oil/ Gas Interests producing & nonproducing. 800-733- 8122.

Blacksmith equipment. Power hammer, anvils, cone, swage block. Retired now and spending time in Wyoming. Neil Brown 260-413-0626.

Free Butcher Supply Catalog. Meat Grinders, Saws, Slicers, Cutlery, Seasonings – everything for the home butcher. Pioneer Butcher Supplies in Loveland CO, since 1975. 1-888-891-7057 toll free.

Collector buying old gas pumps and advertising signs. Auto or Farm Dealership signs. Service Station signs, oil cans. Husky, Frontier, etc. I can’t put you on TV, but I will pay fair market value for your items, as a collector, not a picker. Call or text 403-860-1445. Want To Purchase Minerals & other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201.

17. TRAVEL & RECREATION Condo Rental on Beautiful Table Rock Lake near Branson, MO. 2 Bedrooms - 2 Bathrooms, large kitchen and great room with balcony. 3rd floor with elevator, use of pool & BBQ grill. $150.00 per night. Great fishing, golf, shows, and PERFECT FOR ECLIPSE VIEWING! 308-520-3815. 20. FREE

Soon Church and Government uniting, will suppress “Religious Liberty” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark” of the Beast.” Be informed / Be forewarned! Need mailing address for FREE materials. TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771, thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715.

Interested in reaching 98,000 rural Wyoming readers? WREN’s monthly distribution is 50 percent larger than the only other statewide publication, giving your ad the highest possible exposure to Wyoming's rural readership.  dhara@golinden.com TO SUBMIT AN AD:

 2710 Thomes Avenue

Cheyenne, WY 82001

Use exact wording for ad.

Name: Email: Phone:

WREN classified ads are $0.75 per six characters, and each ad must run for a minimum of three months. If the classified item sells or becomes out of date before the three months are over, WREN will ad a “sold” or “no longer available” note to the ad.

Ad:

Questions?

Contact Dhara Rose at dhara@golinden.com.


JUST PICTURE IT

JULY’S THEME:

Cool

1

Teagan Just Drifting, Nicky Groenewold, Newcastle

2

Cool Pool Party, Carol Enderson, Cheyenne

3

Linda’s Horses in Wyoming “spring” weather, Desiree Gray, Manville

4

Aiden Splashing in Owl Creek, Marilyn Vass, Thermopolis

5

Frost on the Windshield, Jana Ginter, Carpenter

6

Hoar-Frosted Trees, Naomi Fertig, Cheyenne

7

Coolin’ Off on a Hot Day, Linda Torczon, Cody

1

2 4

UP & COMING AUG:

Eclipse

Deadline: JUL 5

SEP:

Nests

Deadline: AUG 5

OCT:

Shadows Deadline: SEP 5

34

WREN | JULY 2017

3


5

6

7

Please include high-quality digital files* or an original we can scan, as well as details about the artwork, the artist’s name, and the co-op. *Use the highest quality setting on your camera, or save digital artwork as a .jpg or .tif file with at least 300 dpi resolution. Don’t use Kodak Easy Share®. If you would like us to return your work, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

 wren@wyomingrea.org. TO SUBMIT A PHOTO:

 Just Picture It c/o WREN, 2710 Thomes Ave. Cheyenne, WY 82001

 wyomingrea.org/ NEW! wren-submissions


PUZZLE ANSWERS 1

PUZZLE ON PAGE 24

2

D A R T B

B I A S A T

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F R O G

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E S P A D R I L L E K Z Y C

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E Y E L E T O A O K V I E

S

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M A C R A M E

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3

R

C K I N G

14

A G L E T E

ONE-CALL OF WYOMING

Call 2 business days before you dig. It's fast, it's free, and it's the law!

811 or 1-800-849-2476

36

WREN | JULY 2017


ENLIGHTEN US

One Small Town

PHOTOS AND ESSAY BY TY STOCKTON

S

ome say Wyoming is basically just one small town with really long streets. That may be an oversimplification, but there’s also some truth to it. WREN | JULY 2017

37


ENLIGHTEN US

Since the advent of social media, we’re even closer to others all across the state, and even a bit beyond Wyoming’s borders. You may recall that my son Colby got interested in raising and showing cattle with the CatchA-Calf program at the National Western Stock Show. Despite our lack of experience with growing and showing cattle, we were delighted when Colby was awarded a NILE Merit Heifer. The 20 to 25 youngsters selected for the program are required to complete monthly tasks, get the heifer bred, bring it back to Billings the following October and show it in the NILE livestock show’s bred heifer class. Colby's heifer was donated to him by Bob and Cathy Redland of Redland Red Angus near Hysham, Montana. We had a sizeable learning curve to tackle at the beginning, but that’s one of the great things about the NILE program—it’s a built-in network of help for greenhorns like us. Bob was only a phone call away when we needed help, and he always gave us great advice. We can now halter and lead the heifer with ease, and she’s even stood still for a few baths. With his newfound confidence, Colby is now off and running on his plans to build his own cattle empire. “I think I want to start selling calves to other 4-H and FFA kids,” he told me shortly after we brought the heifer home. 38

WREN | JULY 2017

“Don’t you think you ought to concentrate on raising your first heifer?” I asked him. “Oh, I can do that,” he said, “but if I get 20 or 30 more heifers or cows, I can have more calves to sell.” I knew right then we were at the precipice of a bumpy ride down a very steep slope, and we were going to need some help to find the brakes. Additional help came through Facebook. My wife Amy read a post about a 17-year-old girl in Sheridan who is doing what Colby was hoping to do. Haley Timm has been raising and selling club calves for three years. She started with a single heifer, and now has 10 cows that are producing some very impressive calves. Amy tracked down the girl’s mom, Marci, and arranged a meeting of our respective entrepreneurial offspring. Haley and Marci took us on a tour of their ranch and answered questions about how Haley got started raising the calves, how she chooses which bulls to breed to which cows, and how she avoids genetic problems. They also asked about Cheyenne, and we learned they used to live there. At one point, an answer to one of our questions involved the girl’s father, who was out working and wasn’t able to join us that day. “Arland pulled that calf,” Marci said. “That’s my husband.” Amy and I looked at each other, because it’s not a very common

name, but it sparked something in the recesses of our minds. “If you don’t mind my asking,” Amy said, “where exactly did you live when you were in Cheyenne?” Marci named the county road we live on, and Amy and I grinned at each other. This was just too weird. “The house number wouldn’t happen to have been…” I began, and Marci named the exact address my family now calls home. “How did you know?” she asked. “I didn’t know,” Amy said, “but I thought it might be possible, because your husband’s name is scratched into the concrete on the pad outside our garage.” Sure enough, these people we’d never met before had built and lived in our current house. Maybe it’s a good omen. Haley has turned her passion into a successful business, and Colby has the same dream. Maybe if Colby—if he listens to Haley’s advice and learns from the generosity and guidance of the NILE Merit Heifer program and Mr. Redland—will be similarly successful. We’re lucky to live in this spread-out small town with its very long streets that lead to such great people who are always willing to help. W Ty Stockton is an outdoor writer and photographer based near Cheyenne. His work can be found at tystockton.com where you also can listen to his The Great Outdoors radio show and blog.


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Have you ever said to yourself “I’d love to get a computer, if only I could figure out how to use it.” Well, you’re not alone. Computers were supposed to make our lives simpler, but they’ve gotten so complicated that they are not worth the trouble. With all of the “pointing and clicking” and “dragging and dropping” you’re lucky if you can figure out where you are. Plus, you are constantly worrying about viruses and freeze-ups. If this sounds familiar, we have great news for you. There is finally a computer that’s designed for simplicity and ease of use. It’s the WOW Computer, and it was designed with you in mind. This computer is easy-to-use, worry-free and literally puts the world at your fingertips.

From the moment you open the box, you’ll realize how different the WOW Computer is. The components are all connected; all you do is plug it into an outlet and your high-speed Internet connection. Then you’ll see the screen – it’s now 22 inches. This is a completely new touch screen system, without the cluttered look of the normal computer screen. The “buttons” on the screen are easy to see and easy to understand. All you do is touch one of them, from the Web, Email, Calendar to Games– you name it… and a new screen opens up. It’s so easy to use you won’t have to ask your children or grandchildren for help. Until now, the very people who could benefit most from E-mail and the Internet are the ones that have had the hardest time accessing it. Now, thanks to the WOW Computer, countless older Americans are discovering the wonderful world of the Internet every day. Isn’t it time you took part? Call

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LET’S EXPLORE

the Park A WY Quality Counts Explorers Club Feature

Children are natural explorers and luckily there’s a lot to explore in Wyoming! You don’t need to go on a road trip to discover something new or interesting—you just have to go outside.

Pick a few small rocks. Share them with someone else and talk about which one you each like best! Find 4 objects you can climb over, climb under, climb up and climb down. Turn over a rock and use a magnifying glass. What do you see under there? Take a photo of a bug or animal. When you get home, work with an adult to learn its name.

Exploring your park this month?

WE’D LOVE TO SEE WHAT YOU FIND! Tag @WYQUALITYCOUNTS on Instagram!

WY Quality Counts, housed in the Department of Workforce Services, helps Wyoming parents and child care providers identify and create quality learning experience for children, thanks to the funding of the Wyoming State Legislature. All WY Quality Counts activities are supported by the Wyoming Early Learning Foundations and Guidelines, as well as the Domains of Development, which include:

COMMUNICATION

SENSE OF SELF & RELATIONSHIPS

CURIOUS MINDS

STRONG & HEALTHY BODIES

WREN July 2017  

WREN July 2017

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