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Educating the Next Generation of Community Leaders

Alabama Youth Tour students on the steps of the U.S. Capitol in 2011

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ach June, nearly 1,500 high school students, mostly seniors-to-be, descend upon Washington, D.C., for the annual Rural Electric Youth Tour. During the weeklong excursion, the participants—all sponsored by their local electric cooperatives— learn about electric cooperatives, American history, and the role of the federal government. 10  DECEMBER 2011

Youth Tour stands as just one way co-ops help educate a vital segment of their consumer base: the children of electric co-op members. Kids who live in homes that receive coop electric service enjoy certain benefits, ranging from Youth Tour to college scholarships to school safety demonstrations. “Engaging children is an important part of the cooperative

difference,” says Fred Braswell, president and CEO of the Alabama Rural Electric Association. “They’re members in training.” Touchstone Energy Cooperatives offer lots of educational initiatives for kids, be it safety, energy efficiency, or learning how electricity works. Its Super Energy Saver program, featuring cartoon character CFL Charlie, for example, www.alabamaliving.coop

Alabama Living Tombigbee December 2011  

Alabama Living Tombigbee December 2011

Alabama Living Tombigbee December 2011  

Alabama Living Tombigbee December 2011