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News for members of Coahoma Electric Power Association

Two Museums devoted to Mississippi history open Dec. 9 in Jackson.

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November / December 2017

In Mississippi, we do care ext month, Mississippi will celebrate 200 years of statehood. On Dec. 10, 1817, Mississippi officially became the 20th state in the United States of America. As Mississippi prepares to blow out the candles on its bicentennial cake, I’ve been thinking about my adopted home state—more specifically, its electric co-op people. Although I grew up in Alabama, Mississippi has been home to me since my college days at Southern Miss. Since 2005, when I began working on behalf of the 26 electric cooperatives in the state, I have enjoyed working with their managers and meeting their employees from Corinth to Kiln, Clarksdale to Lucedale. These are salt-of-the-earth folks who care deeply not only about their own community but Mississippi as a whole. I am proud to know them; their skill, integrity and work ethic are evident in every task they undertake. And they are quick to use their skills to help others. Case in point: When electric cooperatives in Florida asked for help in restoring power after Hurricane Irma, Mississippi’s electric cooperatives sent them 333 workers and nearly 150 bucket and digger trucks and track machines—more aid than they received from any state, as far as I know. Our co-ops were quick to respond to Florida’s emergency; it was one way of expressing gratitude for their invaluable assistance to us after Hurricane Katrina. I just want you, as a member of an electric cooperative, to know that a strong and dedicated work force has your back when it comes to your electric service. ••• After reading our story on the new Museum of Mississippi History (and, in our January issue, the Mississippi Museum of Civil Rights), I hope you will come to Jackson to experience these impressive, world-class museums for yourself. Their grand opening on Dec. 9 caps the state’s year-long bicentennial observance. In one gallery of the Museum of Mississippi History hangs a low-relief carving of workers building a

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On the cover “One Mississippi, Many Stories” is the theme of the new Museum of Mississippi History, opening Dec . 9 along with the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, in downtown Jackson. In the first of our two-part story on both museums, we talk with MMH director Rachel Myers (pictured). The focus shifts to the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum in our January 2018 issue. Map graphic: Mississippi Department of Archives and History

rural power line. What’s so special about this commonplace activity that it should be depicted in a historical museum? The image is based on a photograph made for the Tennessee Valley Authority in the mid-1930s—during the depths of the Great Depression. Power line construction in rural America was anything but commonplace then. In Mississippi, less than one percent of farms could get electric service. The coming of the power line, inching down dirt roads toward remote homes and farmsteads, My Opinion became the symbol of hope Michael Callahan for a better life in rural Executive Vice President/CEO Mississippi. And rural elecElectric Cooperatives of Mississippi trification lived up to its promise; electricity proved to be a powerful force in boosting farm productivity, improving sanitation, and making farm homes more livable and chores less burdensome. Little else improved rural life in Mississippi as much as rural electrification did. That’s worth commemorating in a museum. ••• This being our last issue of 2017, I want to wish you and your loved ones a happy, safe and fulfilling holiday season ahead. We Mississippians have plenty of good reasons to bow our heads this Thanksgiving. Let’s also remember to share our blessings with those in need as Christmas approaches (and throughout the new year). The Salvation Army, Mississippi Food Network, Marine Toys for Tots program and many other local organizations and programs make it easy and convenient for us to help others. All we have to do is spend a few minutes buying a toy, writing a check or dropping coins into a red kettle.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith- First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Scott Cooper- Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

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The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Our Homeplace

The 200-foot-long swinging bridge over Bear Creek at Tishomingo State Park marks the start of the 3.5-mile Bear Creek Outcropping Trail. Unique in Mississippi, the trail takes users past cliffs, rock outcroppings and overhangs. The state park was built in the 1930s by the Civilian Conservation Corps, and many of the original buildings remain standing.

Mississippi is Once upon a time I was a beautiful Texas bluebonnet. Time truly marches on; one day I was shocked to see I had become an old steel magnolia. My goodness, it was almost 40 years ago when my Texas husband and I moved to Mississippi. Mississippi is made up of many things, but the greatest asset is the wonderful people who populate the state—folks who love you equally during the good and bad times. Finally, I now completely understand why “Mississippi” was one of the first words I learned to spell before I entered the first grade. Thank you, Mississippians, from an old Texan! – Virginia Zgarba, Brooksville We recently moved to Olive Branch And are happy to say we gave it a chance. Where neighbors are friendly and give of their time, Where everyone is very kind. It’s quiet and peaceful, and sunsets abound, Where’s God’s beauty and nature are all around. So take time and enjoy this beautiful place; I promise a smile will be on your face! – Kathy Hamblin, Olive Branch

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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After four years of construction in downtown Jackson, two major museums focused on Mississippi history will host a grand opening celebration Dec. 9, marking Mississippi’s 200th year of statehood. Our two-part story begins with a look at the Museum of Mississippi History. In the January issue, we will explore the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. An 8,000-square-foot exhibit space shared by both museums will host temporary exhibits. The first is “StoWhat defines Mississippi? What made us who we are ries Unfolded,” featuring 40 Mississippi-made quilts today? At the Museum of Mississippi History, answers can be found in a rich variety of stories conveyed Mississippi legislators provided $90 mil- from territorial times to present day, selected from the through personal narratives, artifacts, state-of-the-art lion for construction of the Museum of Mississippi His- MDAH collection. The show opens Dec. 9 and hangs through September 2018. interactive exhibits, audiovisuals, images and even visi- tory and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum. Private tors’ own recorded comments. donations added $18 million for exhibits and endowTaken together, they live up to the museum’s theme ments. A tour of the Museum of Mississippi History of “One Mississippi, Many Stories.” The goal was to Some 1,800 artifacts and photos in the museums’ begins in the orientation theater, where they watch a present “an honest and truthful representation” of Mis- permanent exhibits came from the Mississippi Depart- nine-minute overview of 15,000 years of Mississippi sissippi history throughout the state, said Rachel Myers, ment of Archives and History (MDAH), which has history. The theater was designed to give the effect of museum director. been collecting pieces of Mississippi history since 1902. sitting around a campfire—a time-honored setting for “Part of my mission here is for people to confront, The two museums, totaling 200,000 square feet, are storytelling. embrace and feel pride in Mississippi,” Myers said. connected by one lobby overlooking a large plaza. VisiThe Museum of Mississippi History’s 20,000-squareElaborate constructions, sound effects, lighting and tors can purchase a ticket to one or both museums, and foot exhibit area presents stories and artifacts from natural materials combine to heighten the realism of annual memberships are available. 13,000 BC through 2016. Upon entering, visitors are

By Debbie Stringer

world-class exhibits filling the museum’s 11 themed galleries.


November / December 2017 Far left: The new Mississippi Museum of History houses artifacts, interactive exhibits and audiovisuals presenting 15,000 years of Mississippi history. Museum director Rachel Myers, far left below, says she hopes visitors will gain a better understanding of the state through a variety of perspectives. Left, the coming of rural electrification is depicted in this low-relief carving in the gallery “Bridging the Hardships –1928-1945.” (Photo courtesy of Mississippi Department of Archives and History) As exhibit construction nears completion, a technician, below, tests the pinball-like action of an interactive exhibit on Civil War cannonball trajectories. Below left, Michael Morris, of the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, sits at a table in the museum’s spacious cafe, where food service will be available to visitors.

greeted by a 500-year-old Native American canoe. Found in 1989 buried in a muddy bank of Swan Lake, in Washington County, the 25-foot dugout was made by chipping, scraping and burning a bald cypress log. The Natchez Trace/Mt. Locust Inn exhibit comes to life with a leafy canopy overhead, deep shadows and the sound of footsteps treading the worn path. “We have full immersive experiences in here, so you will feel like you’re walking through the woods,” Myers said. A recreation of a cotton barge, lighted by lanterns, provides a place to view films featuring Mississippians and scholars reflecting on the history being interpreted in the museum. The design of another theater reflects the sanctuary of Mount Helm Baptist Church, founded in 1835 and the first historically black church in Jackson. Visitors sit in wooden pews to watch, by flickering (electric) candlelight, a film about the period from Reconstruction

through the 1927 Mississippi River flood. “How We Live” exhibits take visitors inside homes typical of the period represented in each gallery. One compares a room and furnishings of an 1833 Natchez planter’s mansion, a poor white yeoman farmer’s cabin and an enslaved family’s cabin. Another recreates a 1980s living room with a cabinet TV, video games and plush carpet. Other exhibits center on transportation, the logging industry, military conflicts (through Operation Iraqi Freedom), New Deal projects in the state, public health contributions, Hurricane Katrina, Mississippi artists and authors, politicians, science and more. Before leaving the exhibits area, visitors can stop at a video booth to record their own stories relating to their museum experience. These one-minute segments will be played in the Reflections touchscreen exhibits in four galleries in the museum. Visitors can stop for lunch in the cafe and shop the museum store for Mississippimade crafts and books, including “Telling Our Stories,” a companion book to the two museums.

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“Students will grow up knowing Mississippi in a way that their parents and grandparents did not.” – Rachel Myers

Myers hopes people leave the museum with a better understanding of Mississippi, having seen the state from perspectives other than their own. Annual visitation is estimated to reach 180,000, including school field trips. “Our goal is to have every student in Mississippi come here,” said Michael Morris, of MDAH. Students will be able to see actual artifacts from the time periods they are studying. “Students will grow up knowing Mississippi in a way that their parents and grandparents did not,” Myers said. “To be able to have [access to] this type of facility is such an opportunity for them.” The Museum of Mississippi History and the Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, located at 222 North St. in downtown Jackson, will be open Tuesday through Sunday beginning Dec. 9. Find admission prices and other details at museumofmshistory.com. Information on opening day activities is available at twomuseumsopening.com.


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Matrix, Cool Wave pansies paint winter gardens hese days, I have to wear my hoodie sweatshirts and long pants for anything below 60 degrees. But the falling temperatures also signal something great: racks and racks of great, cool-season color as pansies fill local garden centers. People always ask me about the right time to plant pansies. The answer is, right now. This is an absolutely great time to plant, and the ones I’m planting are Matrix pansies. Matrix pansies flower early, and strong stems hold the huge blooms above the foliage, allowing the petals to flutter in the slightest breeze. For the past several years, I have thought that the Matrix group is the best for gardeners in Mississippi. They offer some of the toughest annual, cool-season color plants and should be planted in everyone’s garden and landscape. Matrix pansies come in a huge range of colors and styles. The traditional ones have dark blotches, while the Southern clear varieties are pure colors Gardening without the blotches. Matrix pansies are also available in by Dr. Gary Bachman color-coordinated mixes instead of the traditional, random color mixes. Matrixes have a freely branching growth habit and reach about 8 inches in height and width. When massed in a bed, as pansies were meant to be planted, they create an impressive, colorful landscape carpet. While it’s obvious I’m a rabid Matrix fan, I have a growing fondness for what may be an even better variety for us to grow: Cool Wave pansies. Cool Wave has a unique, trailing growth habit that makes it a must-have in your garden. These pansies are much more vigorous than standard varieties. The plants are well branched and will fill a landscape bed or hanging basket with good color from fall all the way to next spring. Flower colors are very attractive, and there is quite a selection available. Along with white, yellow and purple, there is Violet Wing, Frost, Blueberry Swirl and my favorite, Sunshine ‘N’ Wine, which is a bright, sunny yellow with mellow burgundy wing and accented flowers. All the flowers have whisker lines radiating from the center, resembling delicate artist brush strokes. Cold tolerance is one particular attribute that impresses me about pansies in the garden and landscape, and Cool Wave pansies are no exception.

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As with all annual color, always work a little compost into the soil before planting. Be sure to maintain a consistent soil moisture, and feed them with a water-soluble fertilizer, even during the winter. Pansies need at least six hours of full sun each day for the best flowering and growth. Pansies may be the perfect winter flowering annual, as the plants can freeze solid and thaw with little damage. In response to the cold, their leaves will be tinged purple, and their flowers will be nipped back. But once it gets a little warmer, the flowering will rev up again. Matrix pansies provide tough, annual, cool-season color for Mississippi gardens. Pansies are called clear, right, if the blooms lack the dark blotch displayed by those pictured below. Photos: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

Don’t wait. Get to the garden center this weekend and choose some of these colorful cool-season plants for your landscape. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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To Grandmother’s house we would go t’s a cold winter morning many years ago. I walk out into the front yard of Grandmother’s house “in the hills” at Fulton. It must have been around Christmas. Could have been a chilly Thanksgiving. Had to have been one or the other because the holidays were about the only time we made that trip across the state to Grandmother’s in winter. So let’s just say it was Christmas. Anyway, I wander out into the front yard by myself early one morning. Out to the edge of the gravel road that hangs on the hillside up from Highway 25 down below to the top where, many decades before, Granddaddy built the house where we are gathering. Mama and her brothers and sisters had all lived in that house. Now that they were grown and had families of their own, they came back here for holidays and reunions and the occasional funeral. The breeze slips past my zipped jacket and I shiver. It makes a quiet roar like you hear in your eardrums when you yawn. And it just whispers through the bare crepe myrtles where I am standing. It’s so quiet I can hear the gurgling of the creek at the foot of the hill. Acrid smoke from the living room coal heater drifts straight to my nose. The house across the road that Uncle Doc built when he married Aunt Ruby burned coal too. So did the Wilson’s just down the road. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson seemed ancient to me. He wore a hat and suspenders and had a booming voice. She always had on a long dress with long sleeves and a bonnet. Tiny lady. Probably in their 60s! All of us

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The ancient spinning wheel often served as our steering mechanism for boats of all types. Grandmother's wheel now belongs to my sister in North Carolina. This one is in one of the cabins at Tallahatchie Flats on Money Road at Greenwood. Photo: Walt Grayson

cousins would be sure to go to the Wilson’s. She had teacakes when we came! Maybe always had them. I never knew for sure. But she had plenty for us. While I “chill” in the front yard that morning, I am Mississippi alone. The Seen other cousins by Walt Grayson aren’t here yet. They would trickle in through the day and into the night from Memphis and Atlanta and

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other scattered places, drawn back to that tiny dot of a town in Itawamba County that was home to them, and what we cousins have come to consider our ancestral home. The house was a wondrous playground with all sorts of places for hideand-seek. Granddaddy was a prodigious collector of locally found arrowheads, as well as other oddities—like a real hand grenade (no powder) and a captured Nazi flag and a toy wind-up duck that laid eggs as it hopped across the floor, and a thousand other things. All his treasures were kept on the shelves of an upright revolving wooden case with windowed doors on all four sides that were unlocked for occasional perusings. And Grandmother’s spinning wheel upstairs made a fine boat’s wheel for pirate ships or destroyers or submarines. Remembering those days is a special

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Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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holiday gift. And when I smell coal burning or even wood smoke, I’m carried right back to that cold morning by myself in Grandma’s front yard watching down the gravel road, eager to see who would drive up next. My holiday wish for all of us is that somehow we will try to see to it that our kids and grandkids and great-grandkids will have some pleasant memories of coming to our house that will stay with them long after we are gone, and make them glad we were ever here. We are making memories for them anyway. Why not make them good ones?

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Mississippi-made gifts for the hunter Christmas is a much-celebrated event, and a part of the tradition and celebration is gift giving. While this giving of gifts to others is not the essence or basic and true meaning of it, Christmas remains a time to give. If a hunter is on the receiving list, a pair of items offered by individuals/companies with deep Mississippi roots may be of interest. One is the Small Game Carrier. Developed by Lynn Dunson, with input from his son-in-law Timothy Day, this little device is a clever approach to toting small game. Dunson and Day are from Natchez. The Small Game Carrier, often referred to by Day and Dunson as simply the Game Carrier, is a basic unit designed to solve several issues that arise when hunting and packing by Tony Kinton small game, specifically squirrels. But, it works for other species as well—rabbits, ducks. There is even one Carrier made for doves and quail. The standard approach has been to put such game as these in a vest pouch or just tote them around in hand. Neither tactic is ideal. Holding a limit of squirrels in hand is practically impossible, and having that same limit stuffed into a pouch is problematic. So stationed, they are annoyingly obvious when the hunter sits beside a tree, and

Outdoors Today

the entire process is especially messy. Enter the Small Game Carrier. One look at this ingenious device reveals its simplicity. Still, its design is based on a great deal of experimentation and trial-and-error development. The finished product is just about perfect for its intended service and is truly one of those why-didn’t-I-think-of-that items! Consisting of a properly-sized tube with open but reinforced ends, the Carrier has a slot running from its top to near the bottom. Game is slid into that slot, where it becomes fully secured. The Carrier has a sturdy steel clasp at the top, and this is placed into the waistband/belt for easy installation, removal and convenient placement. While this works extremely well, I have opted to hang mine on a strap— actually an old belt—that I place over the opposite-side shoulder. This is simply my preference; I find it more to my liking worn in that manner. I slide it off my shoulder and lay it beside me while sitting. The Small Game Carrier designed for squirrels and similar game comes in two lengths. The shorter model will hold four or five squirrels and is my favorite between the two lengths. It would also be preferable for the young hunter. The longer model is reported to hold a full limit of eight. Inexpensive and reliable, this relatively new addition to the hunting world fulfills its purpose and should offer a long life of heavy use. For more information on the Small Game Carrier, visit www.kingstoncreekhunting.com. Another item that is near essential to the hunter is the Primos Trigger Stick®.

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The Small Game Carrier, there on the author’s right hip, is a simple but highly useful device for transporting small game during and after the hunt. Photo: Neal Brown

The Primos Trigger Stick® Gen 3 Jim Shockey Edition offers a solid rest for firearm, camera or spotting scope, whether the user is standing or sitting. Photo: Tony Kinton

The particular model highlighted here is the Jim Shockey Edition Gen 3. A newer version of similar products, it offers all the advantages a hunter could want in a ready and portable shooting rest. Perhaps the most notable update is that this Gen 3 unit can be employed for either sitting or standing, removing the need for a short and long unit that is commonly the case with most monopods, bipods or tripods. A rotating collar at the leg hinge is simply rotated a few degrees to allow the legs to spread farther out, thus permitting the user to adjust the unit for sitting. This is particularly useful for the turkey hunter. With the collar in the other position, the Gen 3 will accommodate the standing hunter. I recently used my Gen 3 while squirrel hunting. I sat at the base of an oak, rotated the collar and expanded the legs,

and then placed my Marlin lever .22 in the cradle to wait for squirrels. They came, and the Gen 3 made steady shots a certainty. And as the name implies, adjustments for leveling and height are accomplished by the simple chore of grasping a trigger at the top of the unit. Silent, quick, reliable. There is also a separate bracket that replaces the gun cradle for use with a spotting scope or camera. This unit is most impressive and will make a welcomed addition to the hunter’s gear. The name Primos is no stranger to hunters, particularly Mississippi hunters. Will Primos and his team offer a long list of products. Finding the Primos Trigger Stick ® Jim Shockey Gen 3 should be as simple as visiting any business that sells hunting gear. You can go to www.primoshunting.com for additional information about this company’s line. There you have it, a pair of viable items that should find favor with most hunters. And here also you have my sincere wishes for a pleasant holiday season filled with family and faith and good health. To all, merry Christmas!

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Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on Earth. The sun produces more energy in one hour than the world uses in an entire year.

Converting sunlight into electricity has been possible for years, but solar power generation is quickly becoming a common form of energy production across America. In Mississippi, solar installations are being constructed on an unprecedented scale as this clean form of energy is becoming an important part of our energy mix. Some may remember solar power as a feature of wristwatches and calculators, but advances in technology and favorable energy policies are pushing solar power into the mainstream—and on a much larger scale. “This is not an experimental form of energy generation. This is proven technology that works,” said Jim Compton, Cooperative Energy’s president and CEO. Cooperative Energy approved its first member-owned (residential) solar systems in 2010, and began operating five solar-powered electrical stations in 2016 in Taylorsville (at Southern Pine Electric), Lucedale (Singing River Electric), Kiln (Coast Electric), Greenwood (Delta Electric) and Lyon (Coahoma Electric). These earlier solar operations have allowed Cooperative Energy to evaluate and test the efficiencies of solar generation. The five half-acre solar sites operate approximately 375 solar panels each, but the smaller stations (each are 100 Kw or less) were just a warm-up to a much larger main event. Today, Cooperative Energy is partnering with Origis Energy USA to build one of the region’s largest solar fields. Origis Energy is a specialized developer of utility-scale and distrib-

uted generation photovoltaic (PV) projects throughout the Americas and Europe. The new 540-acre solar facility, known as MS Solar 3, is located in Lamar County near Sumrall. It will consist of 208,000 solar panels and be equipped with single-axis trackers to follow the sun as it moves throughout the day. Once operational at the end of 2017, the Sumrall facility will generate enough electricity to power roughly 10,000 homes. Cooperative Energy will purchase all power produced by the facility, which is being constructed by Origis Energy. Compton said the company is including solar as a part of its energy mix because its members expressed a desire for green energy. Cooperative Energy and its electric cooperative members—known as the “Power of 12”—provide electricity to 423,000 members across 55 counties in the state. The company has a diverse ener-

User-installed solar systems on the rise

gy portfolio that includes natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydropower and solar. As a deep south state, Mississippi is geographically situated to receive an abundance of sunlight. Compton said adding solar also makes sense for Cooperative Energy as it will enable the cooperative to diversify its energy generation portfolio while lessening the cost impact to members. “Our mission is to provide reliable and affordable energy,” Compton said. “Our members have asked for more renewables and adding solar as a generation source is friendly to the environment we all live in.” The basic process of using the sun to generate electricity was developed long ago. The most common method of converting sunlight into current is a process known as photovoltaics. Photovoltaic power generation is made possible by solar panels composed of many cells containing a photovoltaic material. Simply put, a solar

While Cooperative Energy continues to develop larger-scale solar generation facilities, a growing number of individual users are installing solar systems at their home or business. Cooperative Energy first approved a residential roof-top solar system in 2010 and recently commissioned its 156th system for a combined generation capacity of 2 MW purchased from its members. Coast Electric has the highest number of residential solar owners, with 55 residential and two commercial installations. Pearl River Valley Electric has 32 residential and seven commercial

cell is able to convert the energy of light into the energy of electricity. And the technology is getting better. Because of the growing demand for renewable energy sources, the manufacturing of solar cells and photovoltaic arrays has advanced considerably in recent years. Solar energy is the most abundant energy resource on Earth. The sun produces more energy in one hour than the world uses in an entire year. Yet, solar accounts for only about one percent of the electricity generated worldwide. The International Energy Agency projects that by 2050, solar will account for about 16 percent of electricity production. Is solar the path that leads to more abundant, reliable and affordable energy? The answer to that question is coming into view as we learn more about this form of energy. And companies like Cooperative Energy are leading the way.

installations, and Singing River Electric has 21 residential and two commercial. Southern Pine Electric, Dixie Electric, Magnolia Electric, Southwest Mississippi Electric and Yazoo Valley Electric collectively have 27 residential and 10 commercial systems. Many install solar systems to offset the retail rates they pay for electricity by generating their own, and selling any excess back to Cooperative Energy. Commercial installations such as poultry farms have benefitted greatly from solar since they use more electricity during the day when the sun is at its peak.


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November/December 2017

Bylaws outline procedure for annual meeting Coahoma Electric Power Association will hold its Annual Meeting of the Membership at 10 a.m. Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018, at Coahoma Electric’s Training Center in Lyon, Miss. The following is an excerpt from the association’s bylaws pertaining to the Annual Meeting of the Membership.

ARTICLE III MEETING OF MEMBERS Section 3.01. Annual Meeting. For the purposes of electing directors, hearing and passing upon reports covering the previous fiscal year, and transacting such other business as may properly come before the meeting, the annual meeting of the members shall be held on the second Thursday of February of each year, at such place in the County of Coahoma, State of Mississippi, and beginning at such hour, as the Board of Directors shall from year to year fix; provided, that, for cause sufficient, the Board of Directors may fix a different date for such annual meeting not more than thirty (30) days prior or subsequent to the day otherwise established for such meeting in this Section. Failure to hold the annual meeting at the designated time and place shall not work a forfeiture or dissolution of the Association. Section 3.02. Special Meetings. Special meetings of the members may be called by a majority of directors, or upon written petition submitted to the Board of Directors signed by at least 400 members; any such petition(s) shall be submitted on forms provided by the Association, and the same shall be signed, completed and verified in the same manner as are petitions submitted under Section 4.04 of these bylaws. Special meetings shall be held at such place within Coahoma County, Mississippi, on such date, and at such hour as the Board of Directors shall fix and determine, and the Secretary shall cause notice of such meetings to be given as hereinafter provided. Section 3.03. Notice of Members’ Meetings. Written or printed notice stating the place, day and hour of the meeting, and in case of a special meeting, the purpose or purposes for which the meeting is called, shall be delivered to each member not less that fifteen (15) days nor more than twenty-five (25) days before

Notice to Members Coahoma Electric Power Association’s

Annual Meeting of Members

Thursday, Feb. 8, 2018

at 10 a.m. at Coahoma Electric’s Training Center, Lyon, Miss. the date of the meeting, either personally or by mail, by or at the direction of the Secretary. If directors are to be elected at such meeting, the notice of members’ meeting shall include a statement of the board members to be elected as provided in Section 4.04. Unless contained with such notice, no matter may be acted upon at that meeting which requires the affirmative votes of at least a majority of the members. If mailed such notice shall be deemed to be delivered when deposited in the United States mail, addressed to the member as it appears on the records of the Association, with postage thereon prepaid. The failure of any member to receive notice of an annual or special meeting of the members shall not invalidate any action which may be taken by the members at any such meeting. Section 3.04. Quorum. Three hundred (300) members shall constitute a quorum at a meeting of members. This number shall be arrived at by adding the number of members present in person at the meeting to the number of members represented at that meeting by valid proxies filed as provided by these bylaws. If less than a quorum is present at any meeting of members, the officer of the Association who is presiding at the meeting may, at the time stated in the notice and without a motion, declare the meet-

ing adjourned and closed or he may hold the meeting open for not longer than thirty (30) minutes to see if a quorum is present within that time; and the meeting shall automatically be adjourned and closed if a quorum shall not be present at the end of said thirty (30) minute period. The members present at a meeting at which a quorum is not present shall not have the power to take any kind of action, including, but not by way of limitations, adjourning said meeting to another time or place. Section 3.05. Voting. Each member who is not in a status of suspension, as provided for in Section 2.01, shall be entitled to only one vote upon each matter submitted to a vote at any meeting of the members. A member may vote in person or by proxy. At a meeting of the members where directors are to be elected, all members present in person or by proxy may cast one vote for each director to be elected; each member may vote their own vote plus those proxies executed in their favor, pursuant to Sections 3.06 and 3.07 of these bylaws. Voting by members other than members who are natural persons shall be allowed upon the presentation to the Association, prior to or upon registration at each member meeting, of satisfactory evidence entitling the person presenting same to vote. At all meetings of the

members, all questions shall be decided by a majority of the members voting thereon, except as otherwise provided by law or by the Association’s Certificate of Incorporation or these bylaws. Members may not cumulate their votes. Section 3.06. Proxies. At all meetings of the members, a member may vote by proxy executed in writing by the member, subject to the provisions hereinafter set forth, provided, however, any member intending to vote by proxy must file the executed proxy at the Association’s headquarters not less than three (3) days prior to the meeting. A member may personally deliver his proxy to the said offices of the Association or mail the proxy by United States mail, postage prepaid, addressed to the Secretary, Coahoma Electric Power Association, P.O. Box 188, Lyon, Mississippi 38645. If the proxy is sent by mail, the date of its receipt in the Association’s office at the above address shall be its filing date. No proxy shall be voted at any meeting of the members unless it shall designate the particular meeting at which it is to be voted, and no proxy shall be voted at any meeting other than the one so designated, or any adjournment of such meeting. No proxy shall be voted by anyone except a member. A member may appoint any other individual member to vote his proxy, or a member may appoint the individual members of the Board of Directors, collectively, to vote said proxy. No member shall vote as proxy for more than one hundred fifty (150) members at any meeting of the members, but this restriction shall not apply to the individual members of the Board of Directors. In the event an individual member is appointed to vote as proxy for more than one hundred fifty (150) other members, such proxies in excess of one hundred fifty (150) shall be assigned to the individual members of the Board of Directors for voting; and the proxies so assigned and those proxies appointing the individual members of the Board of Directors shall be voted according to the will of a majority of the members of the Board of Directors. The presence of a member at a meeting of the members shall revoke a proxy theretofore executed by that member, and such member shall be entitled to vote at such meeting in the same manner and with


November/December 2017 the same effect as if the proxy had not been executed. In case of a joint membership, a proxy may be executed either by the husband or wife. The presence of either husband or wife at a meeting of the members shall revoke a proxy theretofore executed by either of them and such joint member or members shall be entitled to vote at such meeting in the same manner and with the same effect as if a proxy had not been executed. A standard proxy form shall be used which identifies the member by name and member number, in order to assure authenticity and facilitate the tabulation of votes. If the proxy form of a member is lost, stolen, or destroyed, the Association shall furnish the member with a replacement proxy form upon request, provided that the member executes a revocation of the lost, stolen or destroyed form, to be witnessed by an employee of the Association. Blank proxy forms will not be distributed in bulk to any member. Designation of proxies shall be upon forms prescribed by the Board of Directors and furnished by the Association and no other shall be recognized or accepted.

ARTICLE IV Section 4.04. Committee on Nominations. (a) It shall be the duty of the Board to appoint, no less than forty (40) days nor more than ninety (90) days before the date

Members of Coahoma EPA’s Committee on Nominations Audrey Ball Hamp Bass

Robert A. Boyce William Peal

of the meeting of the members at which directors are to be elected, a Committee on Nominations consisting of not less than five (5) nor more than eleven (11) members who shall be selected with consideration being given to provide equitable geographic representation of the Association’s service area. No existing Association employees, agents, officers, directors or known candidates for director, and close relatives (as hereinafter defined) or members of the same household of existing association employees, agents, officers, directors or known candidates for director may serve on such committees. The Committee shall receive and consider any suggestion as to nominees submitted by members of the Association. The Committee shall meet at a time and place set by the Board of Directors. The Committee shall prepare and post at the principal office of the

Harvey B. Rodgers Jr. Ann Ruscoe Tommy Sides

Association at least thirty-five (35) days before the meeting a list of nominations for board members. The Secretary must mail with the notice of the meeting or separately a statement of the number of board members to be elected and the names and addresses of the candidates nominated by the Committee on Nominations. Any fifty (50) members acting together may make other nominations by petition and the Secretary shall post such nominations at the same place where the list of nominations by the Committee is posted. Any petition for nomination shall be submitted on a form designated and provided by the Association. Each member signing such petition shall place thereon the date of signing, address and account number of the member. The person or persons presenting the nomination petition(s) for posting shall present the

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same to the Secretary of the Association, or the Assistant Secretary, or the Manager of the Association, or other officer or employee of the Association designated to receive such petition(s) by the Manager, at the office of the Association in Lyon, Mississippi, and shall then and there assist either such Association official or employee in verifying the correct name and address of the persons who actually signed such petition(s). Whereupon, and while said person(s) so presenting such nomination petition(s) are present, the official or employee of the Association receiving the same shall have the names of those signing the same verified as the membership in the Association. Nominations made by petition, if any, received at least five (5) days before the meeting shall be included on the official ballot. Additional nominations for the office of director may be made from the floor at the meeting of members by any member then present in person. Any member(s) nominated from the floor must also be present in person. No member may nominate more than one candidate. (b) Notwithstanding anything in this section contained, failure to comply with any of the provisions of this section shall not affect in any manner whatsoever the validity of any election of directors.

HAPPY HOLIDAYS FROM OUR FAMILY TO YOURS!

We will be closed November 23 and 24 for Thanksgiving, December 25 and 26 for Christmas and January 1 for New Year’s Day. May all the blessings of Thanksgiving and Christmas follow you and yours throughout the New Year! Happy Holidays from Coahoma Electric Power Association!


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November / December 2017

Co-ops play a key role in growing Mississippi The Mississippi Council of Cooperatives (MCC), organized in 1945, is the principal organization charged with promoting cooperatives in the state. Comprising local, state and regional cooperatives, MCC’s membership represents nearly every form of co-op operating in Mississippi, including agricultural, electric, financial, marketing and food. It is estimated more than 2.25 million Mississippians receive services or products from their member-owned cooperative. The non-profit council embodies the spirit of cooperation, bringing together the leaders of cooperatives and other agencies and associations to better serve the interests of their co-op members. MCC has developed numerous programs through the years, all with the goal of encouraging a closer working FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.MSCOUNCIL.COOP relationship among cooperatives. Owned and operated by their members, coopera- arship awards and educational trips. tives do many things for their collective memberThe council also awards annual scholarships. ships that they are unable to do individually. As a During the past 10 years, MCC has awarded more result, MCC serves as an educational tool for its than $60,000 in scholarships to students attending member cooperatives. senior and community colleges in Mississippi. Since 1955 MCC has sponsored the cooperative “Co-ops throughout Mississippi have a strong trabusiness programs of various student organizations. dition of supporting our future leaders and ensuring These programs teach the value of cooperatives to they have the opportunity to excel,” said Ron students involved in 4-H, FFA and DECA. Through Stewart, senior vice president of Electric the years, hundreds of young men and women have Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM) and a MCC entered contests sponsored by the MCC through board member. “And, the cooperative business these organizations, with the winners earning schol- model is an outstanding way to teach the impor-

Katie Cupit, left, and Gabrielle Simpson are the 2017 MCC scholarship winners. Katie, a resident of Ellisville, is a graduate of South Jones High and attends the University of Mississippi. She received the Hobson Waits Leadership Scholarship and is majoring in finance. Gabrielle graduated from Mantachie High School and is pursuing a degree in biochemistry at Mississippi State University with a pre-veterinary medicine concentration. She is the recipient of the L. L. “Red” Monroe Scholarship.

tance of working together to reach a common goal.” MCC proudly supports programs such as these, recognizing their importance to the future growth and progress of all the state’s coops. Electric cooperatives in Mississippi have been strong supporters of MCC since their beginning. “Cooperatives continue to play a key role in the economic growth in communities throughout Mississippi,” Stewart said. “Co-ops provide important services, products and employment opportunities that are vital to the growth and development of local economies. “In the true cooperative spirit, MCC’s members have an ongoing commitment to demonstrate the value of the cooperative business model and its history of success,” Stewart said.

Winter Storm Safety Warning I Stay safe

I Stay warm

• Assume all power lines are energized and dangerous. Even lines that are de-energized could become energized at any time.

• Plan to use a safe alternative heating source such as a fireplace or wood-burning stove during a power outage. Remember, always read the manufacturer’s directions before using.

• Never touch a downed power line! And never touch a person or object that is touching a power line. • Call 911 immediately to report a downed power line. Then call your local electric cooperative.

If you plan to use a generator, always remember to follow the manufacturer’s safety directions before using.

A safety message from your local electric cooperative


November / December 2017

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Where oh where have the clotheslines gone?

M

y partner, Mr. Roy, and I were having one of our sunset meetings a few days ago and he said, “Do you know what I

miss?” I said, “No, but give me a hint or more information.” Mr. Roy then asked, “Do remember how clothes and especially sheets smelled so fresh after they had dried outside on the clothesline?” I scowled. “They may have smelled good, but they were not soft, and if you think I am going back to hanging clothes out on a clothesline, you’re crazy.” After that Grin ‘n’ exchange we Bare It started remembering and talkby Kay Grafe ing about days in the past, and especially clothes lines. As I have mentioned numerous times to you, Roy and I married a few days after I graduated from high school and he had finished college and worked a

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year. The first couple years of our marriage were spent at Pine Bluff Arsenal in Pine Bluff, Ark., where he was stationed in the Army. We lived in military housing left over from World War II. One row of apartments backed up to another row of apartments. Out the back door of our apartment was a clothesline that was for my use. A few feet from my clothesline was a line that belonged to the apartment facing my back door. They were only about six feet apart. I knew all the neighborhood girls, and we normally met every morning at Clothesline City to hang out our clothes, relate the latest gossip, discuss our problems or just visit. I was the youngest and recently had good news that I was pregnant. Other girls with young children set up play pens nearby. As I think about those times, I have to wipe away tears, not because of the work of hanging and taking in the clothes but because of those special, innocent days. A funny story Roy Jr. remembers, but I tried to forget, goes like this. One night as we got ready for bed, my sweetheart said, “Why don’t you wear sexy underwear like Carol Ann?” I was infuriated. My hands immediately went to my hips. “Have you seen her wear it?” He laughed and said, “Of course not,

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but it sure looks nice hanging on the clothesline.” Clotheslines came in various designs, from just two posts with a wire stretched between them, to the “T” design where a board was nailed across the top of the each post with two wires stretched between them. Twice as many clothes could dry at the same time. Mr. Roy said that since his daddy had a welding machine, he made two metal “T” posts and attached the wires so that the tightness could be adjusted with a wrench. If a lady had hung out a heavy Snow flurrries ffa all in Steam Alley as the histo oric Soulé Steam Wo orks transffo orms into Santa’s Christmas Factory. Thiss family-friendly, holiday event features decorations, music, lights, sno ow-covered play area (sso realistic you y think it’s real snow) and a Chriistmas mini-train ride for the kids. Adm mission: $5/ /p person Children n Underr age g off 2 F Frree.

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load of wash, she also used a center board to hold the clothes line higher so the clothes would not touch the ground. When we left the Army and moved to an apartment in Mobile, Ala., I had an almost identical Clothesline City. While the morning visits were fun, some of the luster of hanging out clothes had faded. I believe this was because ads on TV showed electric or gas clothes dryers. Finally, five years later our second daughter arrived, and Mr. Roy bought me an electric dryer. By that time we had purchased our first house, complete with a clothesline in the back yard. After a few years of not being used he took it down. A short time after Mr. Roy first mentioned how fresh sheets would smell when dried on a clothesline, he said, “Have you thought anymore about me setting up a clothesline and you drying our sheets on it?” “Yes, I have,” I answered. “If you will hang them out, bring the sheets in before it rains, iron and fold them, go for it.” Would you believe that’s the last I have heard about clotheslines in this house? Merry Christmas, everyone! Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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November / December 2017

Strawberry Butter 1 cup butter, softened 1 (16-oz.) pkg. frozen strawberries, thawed

3 Tbsp. confectioner’s sugar

Place butter in mixer bowl and beat until creamy. Stir in strawberries and sugar, and beat on highest speed until mixed.

White Beans and Shrimp 2 lbs. dried great northern beans 4 to 6 cups chopped onion 2 to 4 cups chopped celery 2 cups chopped parsley 4 to 6 cloves garlic, chopped 1 Tbsp. thyme Black pepper to taste

RECIPES FROM Coast Electric’s new employee cookbook Employees of Kiln-based Coast Electric Power Association are busy folks devoted to providing top-notch service to more than 80,000 electric meters and 68,000 co-op members in Hancock, Harrison and Pearl River counties. They also serve their communities through ongoing support and volunteerism for a variety of local charitable efforts, including Relay For Life, food drives and the Salvation Army’s Angel Tree Christmas program. To further benefit local charitable organizations, Coast Electric’s Harrison County Community Service Committee members have collected recipes for a new cookbook, “Coast Electric Favorite Recipes.” These are the recipes that busy Coast Electric cooks rely upon for their ease of preparation, good flavor and family appeal. Set for release in November, the comb-bound cookbook will be available for purchase at all Coast Electric offices, located in Kiln, Gulfport, Biloxi, Bay St. Louis, Picayune and Poplarville. For ordering information, contact Coast Electric at cookbooks@coastepa.com.

2 tsp. vanilla extract 1 cup pecans, chopped 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese 1 stick butter or margarine 1 lb. powdered sugar Flaked coconut

Mix eggs, sugar, oil and mashed potatoes. Mix in flour, cinnamon and vanilla; stir in pecans. Bake in 2 layers at 350 F for 30 to 35 minutes. To make icing, bring cheese and butter to room temperature. Cream together cheese, butter and powdered sugar. Ice the cake layers. Sprinkle top with coconut.

No-flour Peanut Butter Cookies 1 cup peanut butter 1 cup white sugar

Cover beans with water and soak overnight, or use quick-soak method.* Drain beans. In a large pot, combine beans, veggies, seasonings and stock. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer, covered, until beans are tender (usually 2 to 3 hours). Add shrimp and cream; simmer until shrimp are pink, about 4 to 5 minutes. Serve over rice. *Quick-soak method: Rinse beans. In a saucepan, cover beans with 1 inch of water and bring to a boil. Boil for a few minutes, remove from heat and let stand 1 hour. Drain.

Lasagna Soup 8 oz. lasagna noodles, broken into pieces (10 noodles) Cooking oil 1 onion, chopped ½ lb. hot or sweet Italian sausage, casings removed 3 cloves garlic, chopped

1 tsp. dried oregano 2 tsp. tomato paste 4 cups chicken broth 1 (15-oz.) can crushed tomatoes ½ cup chopped fresh basil 1⁄3 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1⁄3 cup heavy cream

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add noodles and cook as label directs. Drain, drizzle with oil and toss. Heat 1 teaspoon of oil in a large pan over medium heat. Add onion and cook, stirring often until softened. Add sausage, garlic and oregano, and cook, stirring and breaking up the sausage until it is browned. Add tomato paste and cook, stirring until darkened, about 2 minutes. Add chicken broth, tomatoes and 1 cup of water. Cover and bring to a simmer. Uncover and cook until slightly reduced, about 10 minutes. Stir in noodles, basil, Parmesan cheese and heavy cream; simmer 2 minutes. Serve topped with fresh basil.

Cheesy Squash Casserole

Sweet Tater Cake 4 eggs, beaten 2 cups sugar 1 ½ cups vegetable oil 2 cups mashed sweet potatoes 2 cups self-rising flour 1 tsp. cinnamon

Dash of cayenne pepper Dash of white pepper Salt to taste Chicken stock, enough to cover beans 2 lbs. shrimp, peeled and deveined 4 to 5 cups heavy cream Hot white rice (not instant)

1 egg

Preheat oven to 350 F. Line baking sheets with parchment paper. Combine peanut butter, sugar and egg in a mixing bowl, and mix until smooth. Drop spoonfuls of dough onto prepared baking sheet. Bake for 6 to 8 minutes. Do not overbake. Cookies should be somewhat soft and just barely brown on the bottom. Let cool on cookie sheet before removing.

1 Tbsp. vegetable oil 6 medium yellow summer squash, sliced thin 1 large Vidalia onion, sliced thin 1 Tbsp. butter

½ cup grated Parmesan cheese 1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese ½ cup sour cream Salt, freshly ground pepper 1 sleeve Ritz crackers, crushed

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease a 2-quart casserole dish. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add squash, onion and butter and saute until soft. Transfer to a bowl and stir in cheeses and sour cream. Add salt and pepper to taste. Pour into casserole dish and sprinkle cracker crumbs evenly over top. Bake for 20 minutes or until top is golden brown.

The Best Slow Cooker BBQ Chicken Sea salt 2 lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 cup barbecue sauce

¼ cup Italian dressing 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce ¼ cup brown sugar

Season chicken breasts lightly with sea salt and place into slow cooker. In a mixing bowl, combine barbecue sauce, Italian dressing, brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce. Stir until well mixed. Pour over chicken, cover and cook on high for 3 to 4 hours. Serve breasts whole, or shred with 2 forks and let cook in the sauce for 10 minutes to soak up more flavor.


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November / December 2017

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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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Next ‘Picture This’: Hit us with your best shot Of all the photos you made in 2017, which one(s) are you most proud of? Send it to Today in Mississippi and it could become part of our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Selected photos will appear in the January 2018 issue of Today in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 4.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES • Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If

emailing a phone photo, select “actual size” before sending.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope.

We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

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Call: Willie Strickland, Southeastern Red Deer Farms, 601-736-5057.

Don’t forget to unplug

Extension Cords Extension cords are meant to be used temporarily, not as permanent plugs. They’re not sturdy enough for prolonged use.

A safety message from your local Electric Power Association

HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2018. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or news@ecm.coop.


18

I

Today in Mississippi

I

November / December 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 418,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“do it Pike County,” through Feb. 25, 2018, McComb. Art show with activities for all ages; organized by Pike School of Art. Free admission. St. Andrew’s Activity Center, Pike County Chamber of Commerce, McComb Public Library, Jubilee Performing Arts Center, Percy Quin State Park. Details: psa-ms.org/do-it. “Atomic Alternatives: The Block Prints of Walter Anderson,” through Jan. 29, 2018, Ocean Springs. Exhibition of Anderson block prints and carved linoleum blocks. Walter Anderson Museum of Art; 228-872-3164; WalterAndersonMuseum.org. “The Wind in Your Hair: Vintage Motorcycles,” Nov. 1 - Feb. 24, 2018, Biloxi. Featuring 13 rare, vintage, unusual and landmark motorcycles made between 1900 and 1970. Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art. Details: 228-374-5547; GeorgeOhr.org. “Paul Andrew Wandless: Stories, Myths and Musings,” Nov. 7 - March 10, 2018, Biloxi. Exhibition of art works combining clay and printmaking. Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art. Details: 228-374-5547; GeorgeOhr.org. The Deciduous Trio in Concert, Nov. 14, McComb. Trio of flute, viola and harp; 7 p.m. State Theater. Details: 601-810-5030. Handworks Holiday Market, Nov. 17-18, Jackson. More than 140 vendors; food court. Admission. Mississippi Trade Mart, fairgrounds. Details: HandworksMarket.com. 65th Annual Mississippi Gulf Coast Camellia Show, Nov. 18, Gulfport. Hundreds of blooms on display; waxing of blooms and free horticultural assistance. Lyman Community Center. Details: 228-249-4115. Stringer Alpaca Festival, Nov. 18, Stringer. Animals to pet, fiber demonstrations, bounce houses, vendors, food, more; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free admission. A Stroka Gene-Us Alpacas, 383 County Road 155. Details: 716-863-4366; AStrokaGeneUsAlpacas.com. Anderson Pottery Studio Show and Sale, Nov. 18, Hernando. Featuring Jim Anderson’s wheel-thrown, functional stoneware; 9 a.m. 4 p.m. Anderson Pottery. Details: 901-8280873; JimAndersonPottery.com.

Nature Sketching Classes, Nov. 18, 25, Picayune. Robin Veerkamp teaches basics of nature sketching; 10 a.m. - noon. Admission; supplies, registration required. Crosby Arboretum. Details: text 601-337-0286. Vasti Jackson in Concert, Nov. 21, McComb. Grammy-nominated guitarist and blues legend; 7:30 p.m. State Theater. Details: 601810-5030. 19th Annual Southern Lights, Nov. 23 Dec. 31, Southaven. Driving tour through 116acre park with 500,000 lights; begins at dark. Admission. Central Park. Details: 662-2802489; Southaven.org. Christmas in the Park, Nov. 24 - Dec. 31, Collins. Driving tour; Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays only; 5-9 p.m. Free admission. Bettie D. Robertson Memorial Park. Details: 601-765-6012; CovingtonChamber.com. 34th Annual Christmas at Landrum’s Homestead, Nov. 25-26, Laurel. Working homestead with more than 80 buildings, Civil War reenactment, entertainment, Santa, wagon rides, gem mining, clogging, blacksmith, crafts, more. Admission. Landrum’s Homestead. Details: 601-649-2546; Landrums.com. 41st Annual Chimneyville Crafts Festival, Nov. 30 - Dec. 2, Jackson. More than 150 booths of handcrafted items. Preview party 69 p.m. Nov. 30; shopping Dec. 1-2. Admission. Mississippi Trade Mart, fairgrounds. Details: CraftsmensGuildofMS.org. Christmas on the Rails & Shop by Candlelight, Dec. 1, Picayune. Shopping, Santa photos, carolers, more; 5:30-8:30 p.m. Downtown. Details: 601-798-9079. Cross Mountain Candlelight Service, Dec. 1, Porterville. Singing and celebration of Jesus’ birthday; 7 p.m. Free admission. Cross Mountain Ministeries. Details: 601-513-3348, 601-743-5676. Ka Pottery Annual Open Studio and Gallery, Dec. 1, 2, 3, 8, 9, 10, Seminary. Featuring wheel-thrown pottery by Claudia Ka Cartee and weavings and paintings by Kim Whitt; 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Details: 601-722-4948;

KaPotteryStudio.com. City-wide Rummage Sale, Dec. 2, Laurel. Indoor sale with more than 100 families participating; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free admission. Good Samaritan Center receives unsold items. Magnolia Center, fairgrounds. Details: 601319-6086; MyRummageSales.com. Pine Belt Holiday Expo and Christmas Market, Dec. 2, Hattiesburg. Shopping, Kids’ Christmas Village, food; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Historic Train Depot. Details: 601-270-2756; PineBeltHolidayExpo.com. Live Nativity, Dec. 2-3, Brandon. Manger scene with stable animals; 6-8 p.m. Free admission. Nativity Lutheran Church. Details: 601-825-5125. Big Pop Gun Show, Dec. 2-3, Philadelphia. Neshoba County Coliseum. Admission. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. Nativity Open House, Dec. 2, 3, 9, 10, 16, 17, Cary. Exhibit of some 475 nativities from collection of Mrs. Charles Hyde Weissinger Sr.; Saturdays 10 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sundays 1-4 p.m. Group tours Dec. 1-23 by appointment. Free admission. Goodman Memorial United Methodist Church. Details: 662-873-2365. Bicentennial Cookiepalooza, Dec. 3, Oxford. Open house featuring 19th century activities/crafts for all ages, docents in period dress, period Christmas decorations, music, antebellum photo booth, Santa, homemade cookies, more; 3-6 p.m. Free admission. Cedar Oaks. Details: 662-236-4088; CedarOaks.org. Mark Bishop in Concert, Dec. 3, Osyka. Gospel music; 7 p.m. Love offering. Gillsburg Baptist Church. Details: 601-684-8943. Christmas Parade: Krazy ‘Bout Christmas, Dec. 7, Ackerman. Parade 6 p.m.; silent auction. Downtown. Details: 662-285-6251. Country Christmas, Dec. 7-8, Jackson. Story time, Santa photos, carousel, wagon rides, historic crafts, live music, more; 5-8 p.m. Free admission. Mississippi Ag Museum. Details: 601-432-4500; MSAgMuseum@mdac.ms.gov. Life of Christ Live Nativity, Dec. 8-9, Monticello. Driving tour; 6-8 p.m. Free admission. Atwood Water Park. Details: 601-5873007, 601-405-4975. Rudolph Run, Dec. 9, Pontotoc. 5K run/walk, 10K run and Relaxing Reindeer; 8 a.m. Pontotoc Community Center. Sponsored by Pontotoc Woman’s Club. Details: RacesOnline.com. A Very Merry Waynesboro Christmas Celebration, Dec. 9, Waynesboro. Shopping, parade (3:45 p.m.), kids’ activities, Santa photos, food, outdoor movie (6:30 p.m.). Downtown. Details: 601-735-3311. “The Nutcracker,” Dec. 9, 10, 16, 17, Hattiesburg, Poplarville. South Mississippi Ballet Theatre. Admission. Dec. 9, 10: USM Mannoni Performing Arts Center; 800-844-

TICK. Dec. 16, 17: PRCC Brownstone Center; 601-403-1180. Also, Sugarplum Fairy Tea, Dec. 10, 12:30 p.m., USM Thad Cochran Center. “Picturing Mississippi, 1817-2017: Land of Plenty, Pain, and Promise,” Dec. 9 - July 8, 2018, Jackson. Bicentennial exhibition of more than 175 artworks in various media. Free admission. Mississippi Museum of Art. Details: 601-960-1515; MSMuseumArt.org. A Garland of Carols, Dec. 10, Oxford. Oxford Civic Chorus presentation; 3 p.m. Admission. Nutt Auditorium, University of Mississippi Music Building. Details: 662-506-2724; OxfordCivicChorus.org. Santa’s Christmas Factory, Dec. 15-19, Meridian. Music, decorations, mini-train ride for kids, snow-covered play area; 4-8 p.m. Admission. Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum. Details: 888-868-7720; SantasChristmasFactory.com. Bienvenue Acres Holiday Camp, Dec. 2629, Gulfport. Western and English horseback riding, horsemanship instruction. Admission; registration. Bienvenue Acres. Details: 228357-0431; BienvenueAcres.com.


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Today in Mississippi Nov-Dec 2017 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi Nov-Dec 2017 Coahoma