Page 1

News for members of Coahoma Electric Power Association

Kids being kids

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

pages 14-15

4

Yazoo carver thinks big

9

Old-time Thanksgiving

12 ‘Simply Delicious’ dishes


2

I

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

THE PERFECT FIT A CUSTOM BUILDING SOLUTION JUST FOR YOU

Mueller steel buildings can be tailored to suit your needs. From small, backyard designs to custom, engineered structures, we have the perfect building to accommodate your lifestyle.

www.muellerinc.com | 877-2-MUELLER (877-268-3553)


October 2017

Mississippi co-op crews help in Irma recovery operations ississippians stepped up to serve on the front lines of emergency operations in Florida after Hurricane Irma raked the state Sept. 10. The Mississippi Emergency Management Agency immediately sent teams of emergency response specialists to help with search, rescue and recovery efforts. Florida was the first state to arrive on the Mississippi Gulf Coast after Hurricane Katrina, according to MEMA director Lee Smithson, so this was our chance to offer them the same aid. Once we determined the storm would not seriously impact electric service here, Mississippi’s electric cooperatives deployed 303 workers and equipment to help Florida electric cooperatives rebuild their electrical grid. These same electric cooperatives came to help us after Katrina, and we were glad to return the favor. Electric cooperatives in 25 states sent some 5,000 workers to speed the unprecendented power restoration in the region affected by Irma. Millions of people lost power in Florida, South Carolina and Georgia as the hurricane uprooted trees and smashed utility poles. This likely will become the largest hurricane-related power outage in U.S. history. Electric power restoration leads the way to recovery from a natural disaster. Safety tops the lists of reasons why we act quickly and decisively in such emergencies; downed power lines must be cleared to allow safe passage through affected areas. Thousands of miles of power lines must be rebuilt as soon as weather conditions allow. Electricity is crucial for all phases of disaster relief work, including security and law enforcement, sanitation and water supply, communications, shelter operations, traffic control, and so on. Obviously, the more crews we have rebuilding the power grid, the sooner it can become functional again. Toward this end, the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM), based in Ridgeland, coordinates emergency operations among the 25 electric distribution cooperatives and one generation-and-transmission cooperative in the state. Each distribution cooperative is a locally owned

M

On the cover Evangeline Rose loves to feed her grandparents’ chickens. Before heading to the coop, she dons her special hat, apron and boots. Ann Ellington of Ackerman, a member of 4-County Electric Power Association, made the photo of her granddaughter for this month’s “Picture This” reader photo feature. See more on pages 14-15.

utility. But all 26 cooperatives work together to achieve mutual goals—emergency power restoration being one of the most important. What’s more, ECM is part of a multi-state network of electric cooperatives that meet each year to discuss ways to improve their emergency response plans and coordination. This mutual-aid network provides the contacts and means for a fast, coordinated team response uniting electric cooperatives throughout the region after major disasters. We in Mississippi have often been on the receiving My Opinion end of this aid. Time and Michael Callahan again out-of-state cooperaExecutive Vice President/CEO tive crews have helped us Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi rebuild lines destroyed by hurricanes, tornadoes, ice storms and floods. In fact, we are very good at disaster recovery because we’ve had so much experience doing it! Mississippi’s recent aid to other states is not limited to electric utility work—or to the Irma recovery. In August, the Mississippi Forestry Commission sent a crew of wildland firefighters to Montana to help contain some of the wildfires that have plagued the Northwest this summer. And after Hurricane Harvey left a trail of destruction in Texas and Louisiana, countless individuals, organizations and businesses in Mississippi donated truck loads of food and supplies (and sent money) to help jumpstart the long recovery process. Mississippians’ first reaction upon seeing any community suffer is to reach out with donations of goods, money and services. It’s not because we may get something in return. It’s simply because helping others is the right thing to do.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith- First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Scott Cooper- Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 10 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 463,749 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

I

Today in Mississippi

Our Homeplace

Natalie Newman enjoys a visit to a Leflore County sunflower patch with her grandmother Sommer Makamson, of Greenwood. See more photos of kids being kids in “Picture This” on pages 14-15.

Mississippi is What I treasure most about my Mississippi: • the slow pace of life • cool breezes • visits with family and friends any time of day • swinging on the porch • farmers market • Sunday services and family dinner afterwards • meeting strangers in the checkout lines • a friendly wave while driving by • extra eyes to look out for my kiddos • small towns, everyone knows • walks in the park • hugs, hugs and slow southern speech • manners and gentlemen • SEC football • high school football on Friday nights • pink sky sunsets • star-filled nights on a campout • family game night • loving life – Helen Facella

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

I

3


4

I

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

for sculptor

Alex Brown Alex Brown refines the contours of a life-size horse head he is carving from a single block of wood. Photo: Alex Brown His fine hand-finishing work is evident in a similar completed sculpture, below. Photo: Dennis McFee

Alexander “Alex” Brown has led what he calls a “weird life.” He has worked as a professional photographer, a breeder of tropical fish, an oyster hatchery employee and a licensed contractor, all while living in Bay St. Louis. He is now a wood sculptor, living near Bentonia, whose work is exhibited at fine art festivals from Florida to Colorado. Brown’s interest in freehand wood sculpture was sparked in Bay St. Louis while hand sanding wood for an artist friend on weekends. After buying his own set of basic woodworking tools, Brown discovered the path of life he seems born to follow. Then, a few years after Hurricane Katrina destroyed his coastal home, Brown closed his contracting business to become a fulltime wood sculptor. “I said, you know, I’m just going to do art.” Brown now focuses solely on designing, producing and marketing wood sculpture, bowls and other functional items. He uses only native woods collected near his rural workshop, which is served by Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association. Animals are a favorite subject for his figurative sculptures, their curvy contours and features altered by his own imaginative styling. Some are realistic,


October 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

5

“I just grab a huge block of wood and start whittling.” others more fanciful. All reflect the strong connection to nature this artist has treasured since his youth on Louisiana’s Bayou Pierre. His sculptures’ impact comes not only from their beauty but also scale. Horse heads are life size, fluted clamshell bowls fill both arms and cats serve as benches. An eagle, its wings extended in flight, measures 11 feet from the sculpture’s base to its wing tips. Brown carves every sculpture, regardless of size, from only one piece of wood. “I just grab a huge block of wood and start whittling,” he said. His favorite woods are persimmon, southern magnolia and old “sinker” cypress (logs recovered from lake or river bottoms). “I only work in local wood that I find here. And I try to find very unique pieces, and that tends to be really old trees, rare trees,” he said. He employs some unusual helpers to create distinctive looks in the persimmon he uses. By allowing a piece of dead persimmon to decay through the action of fungi and bacteria, Brown is rewarded with a discoloration called spalting.

These microorganisms eat their way along the tiny veins that once transported nutrients through the tree, leaving behind patterns of dark, meandering lines. The effect is prized by woodworkers. “It’s almost like you took a marker and marked it, but it’s a natural occurrence,” Brown said. The key is keeping the wood from drying out as the microorganisms do their job. Brown paints the cut ends of the wood with a sealer wax, forcing the moisture to escape slowly through the bark rather than quickly through the ends. “It will be a very, very slow process,” he said. The results are unpredictable. “When you open it up, you never know what you are going to get. I’ve seen it look so many different ways.” Brown carves some woods while still green. He brushes a green wood sealer over the finished carving to prevent the exterior of the wood from drying faster than the interior, thus preventing cracking. Finished pieces may get a mineral oil and whitewash pickling finish; others are left their natural wood color. Every piece gets the final beauty treatment of hand sanding. “When you really want to refine the finish of a piece, you hand sand it. Nothing is better than the human hand, because it will form to the piece much better than any [tool].” Brown, a member of the Craftsmen’s

At art festivals, Brown exhibits this half-carved clamshell bowl, top left, to demonstrate how he works from a single block of wood. Photo: Dennis McFee Brown’s commissioned works include an 11-foot eagle, above, he created for Hinds Community College. He carved the project from a tree trunk, above left. Photos: Alex Brown A muscular cat, below left, will serve as a bench. Brown’s benches weigh up to 350 pounds. Photo: Dennis McFee

Guild of Mississippi, will have exhibited at 16 juried art shows by year’s end, including the guild’s 41st annual Chimneyville Crafts Festival, Nov. 30 - Dec. 2 in Jackson. He plans to attend fewer festivals next year, however, and make works of a more manageable size. “I’m getting ready to probably drop down to exact half-size horse heads. I’m just getting too old to haul everything around,” Brown said. The life-size horse heads he currently makes weigh from 150 to 200 pounds and the benches up to 350 pounds. Brown’s smaller works include wine bottle balancers; bowls for holding cell

phones, food or to hang as wall art; and sculptures of college football mascots. He accepts commissions for any size work. The move nine years ago to rural Yazoo County turned out well for this artist. His neighbors even help support his work by offering wood from their property. “Everyone is so great.... I mean, I don’t buy wood. Everybody gives me all this wood,” Brown said. For more information, contact Alexander Brown at 228-209-9663 or 662-7558009. View more of his work at AlexanderSculptures.com.


6

I

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

These spiders aren’t spooky he spider lilies slipped up on me this year. They don’t usually do that. I normally start watching for them at least a week before they pop up. But this year I hadn’t even thought about them until all of a sudden I saw one blooming at the edge of the driveway a few weeks ago. The spider lily is refreshing to me because they are sort of a punctuation mark toward the end of summer, blooming just before cooler weather and the state fair. Followed quickly by Halloween and then the holidays. About this time last year I drove over to Merrihope in Meridian and did a story with Alan Brown. Alan has collected about 30 books’ worth of ghost stories including some good ones about Merrihope. I am of the opinion that the reason we have so many good storytellers here in the South is because we heard the old folks tell ghost stories at family reunions. Reunions don’t happen as often as

T

they used to. Too much else to do nowadays, I guess. Our “annual” family reunion became sporadic at best after the last aunt in my parent’s generation died. That’s too bad because our children haven’t heard the tales we heard when we were kids. Not only spooky ghost stories but also those about family history as well. And sadly, they don’t know their cousins like we knew ours, either. I think my love for stories in general and ghost stories in particular came from family gatherings and tales the old folks told after supper at reunions. And since most of those gatherings happened in association with Thanksgiving or Christmas, I tend to like this time of year even if we don’t get together like we used to. And the blooming of the spider lily reminds me that this time of year is here. The ghosts we have in Mississippi seem to me to be more of the type that go bump in the night than the kind that harm people like those featured in the movies. By the way, that’s one of the main reasons I don’t mind having a cat.

OUR WORKERS... Power that arises above the storm More than 330 work crew members, representing Mississippi’s electric power associations, joined forces with electric cooperatives from 25 states to restore electric service in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma. At the peak of the storm, our sister electric cooperatives in Florida, Georgia and South Carolina reported more than 1 million meters without electric service. In the cooperative spirit, we are part of a nationwide network that provides emergency assistance including personnel, equipment and material for restoration efforts after disasters. It was in this same spirit these states assisted us after Hurricane Katrina. Working tirelessly, these dedicated employees completed the restoration faster than predicted. Many of our workers were on the job for two weeks, working 16- to 18-hour days in adverse conditions. Their efforts have been recognized through thousands of personal thank-you notes received from the affected areas. Today in Mississippi salutes our dedicated workers who rose to the ocassion and helped restore power after the historic storm. We convey our thoughts and prayers for the people of the disaster area as they continue their recovery efforts.

When Miz Jo wakes me up in the middle of the night and asks me, “What was that?” I tell her, “It was the cat.” And Mississippi roll over and Seen go back to by Walt Grayson sleep. Nothing’s ever gotten us. Maybe it was the cat! I have run across so many ghost tales here that I am almost ready to pronounce Mississippi as the Most Haunted State in the Nation. Vicksburg and Natchez have had night-time ghost walking tours in the past. Port Gibson came up with one this year. I’m sure other towns have had similar events as well as night-time cemetery tours, like the first one I heard of at Friendship Cemetery in Columbus put on by students from the Math and Science School. “Tales from the Crypt” started back in the 1990s by a teacher at the school, Carl Butler. The home where Carl lived in Columbus is haunted too, by the way. Natchez has their “Angels on the Bluff” tour in November. I was cutting across the cemetery at the ruins of St. John’s church in Glen

Medicare Supplement Insurance Low Rates for Plan F Male (Non Tobacco)

Female (Non Tobacco)

Age

Mo.Prem.

Age

Mo.Prem.

65 70 75 80

$126.00 $128.00 $147.00 $183.00

65 70 75 80

$108.00 $111.00 $128.00 $160.00

Rates vary slightly by zip code. Not affiliated with any government agency. Rates include household discount.

HAMILTON INSURANCE AGENCY Call

800-336-9861

6045 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211

I always called them spider lilies. Some call them popup lilies or surprise lilies. Or even “nekkid ladies” because they have no leaves on their stem. Whichever, they bloom on the eve of fall. Which is now. Photo: Walt Grayson

Allan during a cemetery tour one night and ran up on a bunch of Confederate soldiers, all dimly lit pale blue by a street light about 50 yards away. My first question to them was, “Y’all are really people, aren’t you?” They assured me they were. And then asked me, “Are you?” And I looked down to see a patch of spider lilies blooming around my feet. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


October 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

7

Gracefully GROWING OLD

have mentioned previously that Mr. Roy and I find ourselves going to more doctor appointments than to the grocery. Well, not quite, but you get the point. I have an idea what causes this dilemma, but I hate to say the word “age.” As we were returning home last week from an appointment in Mobile, our discussion delved Grin ‘n’ into the fact that Bare It almost every by Kay Grafe physician we visit talks about the value of exercise, and especially as we grow older. I was sure he was speaking about my partner since he is so much older than me. But when I broached that subject, the physician told me he was speaking to both of us. However, I know he didn’t want to hurt Mr. Roy’s feelings. The last doctor also gave us a report

I

describing the results of a recent study that shows exercise can reduce the chances of dementia in older adults. Whether this is true or not, I do know it makes you feel better. In fact, these doctors who have been extolling the benefits of exercise to Mr. Roy and me are preaching to the choir. My partner was an athlete in high school and college and has always stayed active. In the late 1970s both of us got interested in running and stayed active runners until a few years ago. And when I say “interested,” we actually became involved big time. Soon our weekends were spent driving to different towns in our area to race. I asked Mr. Roy, “How many races do you think we ran during those 30 years?” He thought a few minutes and answered, “I know we ran over one hundred 10K races (6.2 miles), and several 5K races (3.1 miles), one half marathon (13.1 miles) and two marathons (26.2 miles). I’ll never forget the marathons, especially those long, cold training runs after work. “While we ran during 12 months of

the year, our race season was primarily January through May. Although one Fourth of July we did run a 10K race in Atlanta. Believe me, that was a hot one!” By the way, in Atlanta we ran by Margaret Mitchell’s house. Do you know who she is? Close your eyes before you look at the answer: She wrote “Gone with the Wind.” Back to exercise. Today we fast-walk five days each week and also work out with weights two of those days. I know that some people have health conditions preventing them from participating in heavy exercise. I sincerely believe, however, that some type of exercise is extremely

important for people of all ages, especially as we grow older. I can still run, but Mr. Roy has a bad knee and I don’t want to hurt his feelings, so I fast-walk with him. While I am in the “giving advice” mode, I will pass on another tidbit that Mr. Roy and I recently read and liked. A study was conducted that revealed results I could have predicted. It said that what pleases a person over a longer period of time are not material things, but experiences. For example, we may spend $10,000 to trade for a new car we want, or we may spend that same amount to take a trip. Chances are we will remember the trip and cherish its memory long after the new car is completely forgotten. We are a product of our experiences and memories, and the older I get the more I realize this is so true. You have reached the end of this month’s column, but remember this: You received some good Grin ‘n’ Bare It advice, and it didn’t cost you a penny. Of course, you may say, “Well, it’s worth exactly what it cost.” Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


8 I Today in Mississippi I October 2017



Clip this offer and please call today!

Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company and Companion Life Insurance Company...

Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 85*? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! NO medical exam!

NO health questions!

>> Choose from 4 benefit levels - up to $25,000! >> Rates “lock-in” at the age you enroll - never go up again!

Plus... Proceeds paid directly to your beneficiary

>> Call for your FREE all-by-mail enrollment packet! >> Call TOLL-FREE

1-800-729-3026

Builds cash value and is renewable up to age 100!**... Then automatically pays YOU full benefit amount!

Or enroll online at

www.DirectLifeInsure.com

Policy cannot be canceled – EVER – because of changes in health!

Why this policy? Why now? Our graded death benefit whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, final medical expenses...or other monthly bills. You know how important it can be to help protect your family from unnecessary burdens after you pass away. Maybe your own parents or loved one did the same for you. OR, maybe they DIDN’T and you sure wish they would have! The important thing is that, right now, you can make a decision that could help make a difficult time a little easier for your loved ones. It’s a responsible, caring and affordable decision. And, right now, it’s something you can do with one simple phone call. You may have been putting off purchasing life insurance, but you don’t have to wait another day. This offer is a great opportunity to help start protecting your family today.

Your affordable monthly rate will “lock-in” at your enrollment age* ...

Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85

$3,000.00

$5,000.00

Benefit

Benefit

Male $10.45 $11.50 $14.20 $17.20 $20.50 $27.40 $37.00 $50.50

Female $8.80 $9.70 $11.95 $13.30 $16.00 $21.40 $30.10 $42.55

Male $16.75 $18.50 $23.00 $28.00 $33.50 $45.00 $61.00 $83.50

Female $14.00 $15.50 $19.25 $21.50 $26.00 $35.00 $49.50 $70.25

$10,000.00 $25,000.00 Benefit

Benefit

Male Female Male Female $32.50 $27.00 $79.75 $66.00 $36.00 $30.00 $88.50 $73.50 $45.00 $37.50 $111.00 $92.25 $55.00 $42.00 $136.00 $103.50 $66.00 $51.00 $163.50 $126.00 $89.00 $69.00 $221.00 $171.00 $121.00 $98.00 $301.00 $243.50 $166.00 $139.50 $413.50 $347.25

The rates above include a $12 annual policy fee.

This is a solicitation of insurance, an agent (In OR & WA: producer) may contact you. These policies contain benefits,

reductions, limitations, and exclusions to include a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership. Policy Form ICC11L057P or state equivalent (in FL: 7722L-0505; in NY: 827Y-0505). Not available in all states. In NY, during the first two years, 110% of premiums will be paid. Website unavailable for NY residents. EASY WAY Whole Life Insurance is underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, Omaha, NE 68175, which is licensed nationwide except NY. Life insurance policies issued in NY are underwritten by Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788. Each company is responsible for its own financial and contractual obligations. *Age eligibility and benefits may vary by state. **In FL policy is renewable until age 121.

AFN44167_0113


October 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

9

Thanksgiving feast the old way Thanksgiving is not far away. A grand time of feasting and celebration will be the norm. Soft recliners and sofas await guests for the afternoon game—that game on the TV of course! Imagining a time and place and setting much different than what was just described is difficult. But it was different at one time in history. Feasting and celebrating were common throughout the history of this by Tony Kinton day, as they now are, but menus and after-meal entertainment not so much. Settings, too, were different. Outside for the most part back then. In an effort to recreate the spirit of early Thanksgivings and to replicate the goings on of such times, the Grappin family of Leake County began a new tradition a few years back. They elected to live the week of this holiday in canvas tents, cook over open fires and in Dutch ovens and collect foods for the big day’s feast that would have been common to those early times, say the 1700s. Amy Grappin did a great deal of research to determine the appropriate foods, and her table from last year was wonderfully colorful and bountifully supplied. The Grappins—Michael, Amy, Deaven, Destin, Alayna and Flint—are intriguing. They are a close family that spends the bulk of their time together,

Outdoors Today

At home in their camp are Destin, Deaven, Flint and Alayna Grappin. A bountiful and colorful table of traditional foods, right, cover the table. Note the Dutch oven, upper left, filled with roasted peanuts. Also on the menu were venison, quail, clams and muscles. Photos: Tony Kinton

and though modern in most aspects of life, they frequently abandon the new and gravitate toward antiquity. The bulk of their food supply comes from the woods and streams or from their garden, and each family member contributes in some form to this acquisition. Professionally, Michael owns Grappin Construction. Amy, trained as a nurse, is a stay-at-home mom and teacher for the children. With their interest in learning about and practicing trades of days past,

CD or IRA Coming Due?

13%

First YYe ear Guaranteed!

Fixixxeed indeexx annuittyy iinncluddees firrsst year bonus Fi

L.D. O'Mire Financial Services

Sounds Too Good to Be True? IT IS TRUE! Check Us Out And You Will See! We have been In Business For Over 50 Years!

# Call 1-601-957-384 411 # Or Call Me Personally at 601-209-3131 Better Business Bureau A+ Rating

Guarantees subject to the claims-paying ability of the Insurance Company. Surrender of the Contract may be subject to surrender charge or market value addjjustment. Product not available in all states. This is a single premium deferred annuity. Interest rates are subject to change. Withdrawals prior to age 59 ½ may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.

Deaven and Destin, the two oldest of the children, have learned blacksmithing and bow building. A portion of the entertainment during the afternoon of last year’s Thanksgiving was watching these two young men fire up the forge and begin hammering out a variety of

handmade items. Much unlike watching football, it was. Alayna sang an old hymn; her rich and powerful voice, always perfectly on pitch, belied her age. Plans for this year’s Grappin Family Thanksgiving are solid; they intend to continue—in 18th century form—celebrating this way. Always gracious and eager to share, they welcome visitors to this micro version of the earliest Thanksgivings. It is a peek into living history. Give Michael a call for additional information at 601-559-7352. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


10



Today in Mississippi



October 2017

Providing affordable, reliable electricity to our members since 1936.

Manager’s Message

Coahoma Electric to return capital credits The Board of Directors of Coahoma Electric Power Association recently annonced the issuing of $456,444.38 in capital credit retirements. These capital credit retirements are for the members who received a bill in the years of 1986-1987. An application process will be in place for those members from 1986-1987 to receive their capital credit refund. Application forms for capital credit returns are available at our main office or on our website at www.coahomaepa.com. See application process W. Keith Hurt below. All applications must be returned to our General Manager main office. All current member refunds will be processed, and will be issued in November. If you are a current active member, and were also a member during 1986-1987, you do not need to fill out an application for capital credits. If you were a member during 1986-1987, and have already completed paperwork to receive prior capital credits, you do not need to fill out the application again. All other refunds will be verified through the application process in the months of October with the disbursement of funds in November. The deadline for all applications to be processed this year is November 1. Any application received after this date will be held over until next year.

How do I apply for capital credits? You may go to our website at www.coahomaepa.com and click on the Member Services Tab (at the top), then click on Capital Credits. There you will find the instructions and forms to fill out to apply. You must have been a member in 19861987 to be eligible.

Don’t have the Internet?

Please contact us at 662-624-8321 or stop by our office to pick up forms.


October 2017



Today in Mississippi  11

Committed to all things big and small Mississippi’s electric cooperatives believe in neighbors helping neighbors. That’s just another way of saying we’re committed to our communities, and it’s central to everything we do. October is National Co-op Month, which is a perfect time to highlight our commitment to the local communities we serve. Your electric cooperative keeps the power flowing, providing lights, running stoves, heaters, air conditioners and energizing the images we see in the game of the week or our favorite television series. Sure, that’s our main mission, but when you look around your neighborhood, there’s a good chance the folks at your electric co-op have played some small role in helping to make things better. Because we’re your neighbors, our kids attend the same schools. Members of our co-op staffs are right there with you at parent-teacher organization fundraisers. You can bet you’ll hear their voices among the bidders at 4-H/FFA project auctions, and some of those energy efficiency projects at the science fair might just be co-op inspired. We see the same challenges and depend on the same services you do. At the fire hall or emergency medical services garage, you’ll see some of our lineworkers, field representatives and member services staffers listed on the roster of volunteers. We work with members to solve the problems in our communities that members see. But none of this is new.

In fact, it’s why your electric co-op is not just some we find out how we’re doing and that lets us know when company. Since the beginning, the people behind the co- we get it right, or need to make changes to keep from op have regularly gone through their comgetting it wrong. munities looking for ways to meet We care about the things you care needs. about, because we live here too. VOLUNTARY CONCERN FOR AND OPEN Reliable, affordable We get involved early on the COMMUNITY MEMBERSHIP power is still one of big economic developthose needs, but lisment issues. Our engitening to members neers, lawyers and still helps us to see accountants work COOPERATION DEMOCRATIC and learn about with other comAMONG MEMBER new ones. munity leaders to COOPERATIVES CONTROL These days, find solutions we do that creating new jobs through conand launching versations new industries. member services But our representatives commitment to MEMBERS’ EDUCATION, have with memcommunity means ECONOMIC TRAINING AND PARTICIPATION bers on the telewe should be there INFORMATION phone or at our servto help with the small ice center counters. things too. Staffers are also listening At the neighborhood AUTONOMY AND for your concerns at churchlevel, it’s the little things that INDEPENDENCE es, fast food restaurants and on really make a difference. That’s the sidelines at the local ballfields. always been the co-op way. Each and With us, whether you grew up on our lines or every one of us connected to the co-op is every bit as just moved into our service territory weeks or months committed to being here and staying involved each and ago, you’ll always have a voice. When we listen to you, every day.

7 COOPERATIVE PRINCIPLES

ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES

of Mississippi

ELECTRIC CO-OP STATS

 There are 26 electric co-ops in Mississippi and over 900 electric co-ops located in 47 states.

 Electric co-ops serve approximately 1.8 million Mississippians.

 Electric co-ops serve 85 percent of the landmass in Mississippi.

ELECTRIC CO-OPS

COMMIT Co-op Month 2017 #coopmonth

SHOW YOUR SUPPORT FOR CO-OPS DURING THE MONTH OF OCTOBER


12

I

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

Slow Cooker Ranch Pork Chops 4 boneless thick pork chops 1 can cream of chicken soup 1 pkg. dry ranch dressing mix

Layer pork chops in slow cooker. Pour soup over chops. Sprinkle ranch dressing mix on top. Cook 4 hours on high or 6 hours on low. Serve with mashed potatoes.

Mexican Chicken Penne 1 (16-oz.) pkg. penne pasta 2 cups cooked and cubed chicken 1 ¼ cups salsa con queso dip ½ cup 2% milk ¼ tsp. salt

RECIPES FROM

‘Simply Delicious’ Members and friends of Calvary United Pentecostal Church, in Jayess, present more than 400 recipes in the cookbook “Simply Delicious.” Most of its down-toearth, everyday recipes are simple enough for even beginning cooks to serve with success. Convenience items help speed preparation, and many of the recipes are prepared in a slow cooker. Recipes run the gamut from appetizers and game-day snacks to entrees and sides, plus a wide variety of desserts and sweet treats. Proceeds from cookbook sales will help the church remodel and commercialize its kitchen. To order, mail $15 plus $2.25 S&H per copy to Calvary UPC, P.O. Box 10, Jayess, MS 39641. For more information, call 601-748-5469.

1 (15-oz.) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 large tomato, chopped 3 green onions, sliced ¼ cup shredded Cheddar cheese

Cook pasta according to package directions; drain. In a large bowl, combine chicken, dip, milk and salt. Stir chicken mixture into pasta; toss to coat. Top with beans, tomato, onions and cheese. Heat through.

Sopaipilla Cheesecake 2 pkgs. crescent rolls 2 (8-oz.) pkgs. cream cheese, softened 1 ½ cups sugar, divided

1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 stick margarine, melted ½ tsp. cinnamon

Preheat oven to 350 F. Place 1 package of crescent rolls into bottom of a 9-by-13inch glass baking dish coated with cooking spray. Press seams together to form crust. Beat cream cheese, 1 cup of the sugar and vanilla until smooth. Pour over crust and smooth. Lay remaining package of crescent rolls on top, and press seams together. Mix margarine, remaining sugar and cinnamon; spread over crust. Bake 35 to 45 minutes. Cool before slicing.

Cranberry-Pecan Cheese Ball 1 (16-oz.) pkg. cream cheese 1 tsp. seasoned salt 1 cup shredded Cheddar cheese 1 cup chopped dates

1 cup golden raisins 1 cup dried cranberries 1 cup chopped pecans, divided

Combine cream cheese and salt; mix well. Add cheese, dates, raisins, cranberries and ½ cup of the pecans. Mix well. Shape into a ball and roll in remaining pecans. Refrigerate. Serve with graham crackers.

Corn Bread Confetti Salad Lemon Snowflakes 1 (18 ¼-oz.) pkg. lemon cake mix 2 ¼ cups frozen whipped topping, thawed

1 egg Confectioners’ sugar

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a large bowl, combine cake mix, whipped topping and egg until well blended. Batter will be sticky. Drop by teaspoonfuls into confectioners’ sugar, and roll lightly to coat. Place on ungreased baking sheets. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until lightly browned. Remove to wire rack to cool.

Texas Trash Warm Bean Dip 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 cup sour cream 2 (16-oz.) cans refried beans 1 pkg. taco seasoning mix

2 cups Cheddar cheese 2 cups Monterey Jack cheese Tortilla chips

Preheat oven to 350 F. Mix cream cheese and sour cream. Stir in beans and seasoning mix. Coat a 9-by-13-inch baking pan with cooking spray. Spread mixture evenly in pan. Sprinkle with cheeses. Bake 30 minutes. Serve with chips.

1 pkg. corn bread mix 2 cans whole kernel corn, drained 2 cans pinto beans, rinsed and drained 1 can black beans, rinsed and drained 3 small tomatoes, chopped 1 medium green pepper, chopped 1 medium sweet red pepper, chopped ½ cup chopped green onions 10 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled 2 cups shredded Cheddar cheese

Prepare corn bread according to package directions. Cool completely and crumble. In a large bowl, combine corn, beans, tomatoes, peppers, onions, bacon, cheese and crumbled corn bread. In a separate bowl, combine dressing ingredients. Just before serving, pour over salad and toss.

Dressing: 1 (8-oz.) carton sour cream 1 cup mayonnaise 1 pkg. ranch dressing mix


Medicare Supplements Low Rates!

E.Insurance F. Hutton Agency

(Female age 65, “Plan F� = $111.19 )

FINANCIAL FREEDOM

October 2017

10% Interest Bonus on all Deposits!

P. O. Box 5277, Brandon, MS 39047

Today in Mississippi

I

13

Mississippi Industrial Heritage Heritage a Museum at Historic Soule’ oule Steam Workks

Featuring up to

I

I

1-844-AGENT4U

I FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION (IRA, ROTH, CD, NQ, 401K and Pension Rollovers)

MORE GAIN • NO LOSS • SAFETY

Culotta Insurance & Investments

A+

1-800-463-4348

#1 SAFE MONEY MAN in MISS - LOU since 1992!

E. F. Hutton nor its agents are affiliated with the Federal Medicare Program.

Richie Culotta

FRIDAY & SATURRDAY

NOV. 3& &4 D OWNTOW WN MERIDIAN, MS 9AM to 4PM // $5 Admission // $225 Famil a y

Food • Rides • Games • Entertainment October 4 -15

All on a One Mile Midway and 105 Acres of Fun

FEATTURING MORE THHAN 16 WORKING STEAM ENNGINES

H i F T t ys Op DEMONSTRATIONS

Machine Shop • Blacksmiithing LLetterpress Print Shhop Spinning • Weavvingg Spinn Broom Making M

7:30

OCT 4 Brothers Osborne

7:30

OCT 5 William Michael Morgan

7

OCT 8 SKillet

7:30

OCT 9 Temptations

MS Coliseum Tickets $19.75 - $49.75 Ticketmaster.com

SStreet Organ O FALL RAALLY

7:30

OCT 10 The Oak Ridge

7:30

OCT 11 Plain White T’s

7:30

OCT 12 Brian McKnight

Celebration Tour

Special Features Free With Your Price of Admission! A A A

    

  

A A A

   

Advance Tickets at Select Trustmark Locations Download Free App

Like us on Facebook

Visit MsFair.net for more information

ME ER ERIDIA RID RIDI IDIA DIA AN RAILR LR ROAD DM MUSE SEUM RAILFEST AILFE AIL L LFE Full--size & Model Railroad Exhibits

visitmeridian.com m 888.868.7720 soulelivesteam.com


14

I

1

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

PICTURE THIS

Kids

being kids 1. Jace Brauer and his sister, Madison, enjoy a soaking romp in the mud. Stephanie Brauer, Lumberton; Pearl River Valley Electric member. 2. No luck fishing, so Tyler Powell leaps in for a swim. Shane Kesler, Water Valley; North East Mississippi Electric member. 3. Charles James “Cass” Turner’s first birthday cake is a smash. Cecilia Stover, Moselle; Dixie Electric member. 4. John Michael Morgan digs into a juicy melon; Christy McDaniel, Madison, Ala. 5. Ryann and Raylen Pickett prove a box can be as much fun as the trampoline that came in it. Angela Pickett, Petal; Dixie Electric member. 6. A toy puppy delights Lilly. Robbie Roberson, Hattiesburg; Pearl River Valley Electric member. 7. Abigail Wilson hangs around. Desireé Wilson, Steens; 4-County Electric member. 8. Smith Williams needs a smaller cone or a bigger mouth. Heather Williams, Greenwood. 9. Orion explores a puddle after a summer rain. Cassandra Harris, Steens; Monroe County Electric member. 10. “Dog,” a rescued pet, enjoys Madi’s attention despite the soaking. Beth Smith, Toomsuba; East Mississippi Electric member. 11. A pooped toddler snoozes with a friend. Lorie Roberts.

2


October 2017

3

I

Today in Mississippi

4

6 5

9

7

8

10

11

Our next photo theme:

My Best Photo of 2017 What’s the best photo you made this year? We’d love to see it! Selected photos will appear in our January 2018 “Picture This” feature. Deadline for submissions is Dec. 4. Get details at www.TodayinMississippi.com.

I

15


16

I

Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

Mississippi

VACATION RENTALS

LOG CABIN in PIGEON FORGE, TN, 2 BR, sleeps 6, great location. 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049, www.hideawayprop.com. SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch, charcoal grill. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures E-mail: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com. GULF SHORES BEACH HOUSE. Nice 2 BR, Fall Special $900/week. 251-666-5476.

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

ENERGY SAVING TIP Clean or change filters regularly. A dirty heater or A/C filter will slow down air flow and make the system work harder to keep you warm or cool.

FOR SALE GOOD QUALITY USED PEWS for churches upgrading or restoring seating due to devastation. Go to web site cheapusedpews.com for inventory or call or text 910-590-4364 for info.

MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music� - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon Church and Government uniting, will supress “Religious Liberty� enforcing a “National Sunday Law,� leading to the “Mark of the Beast.� Be informed/Be forewarned! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 the biblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715.

Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

Mobile Home Super Insulated Roof Over Systems. 40 Year Warranty. Factory Direct from

ROOF KING 1-800-276-0176 www.roofking.net

PORCHES

For Mobile Homes

FOR SALE OR RENT TO OWN # No Credit Check # Low down payment # Low monthly payment # Free delivery & setup

334-507-4745

SINCE 1982

Brooksville, Ms

EASTERN

DIVISION

Painted Enclosed $9,995 - 30 0x50x10 Built Price (Not Shown) STORAGE BUILDINGS HAY BARNS HORSE BARNS GARAGES

!#"# "$# ! " !"!

 #$ !# &"& #!"%!& "   " #!!!&! "$" ! www.nationalbarrn.com 1-888-427 7-BARN (2276)


October 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

17

Color fall gardens with ornamental peppers ate summer and early fall when the word “ornamental” is used to are among my favorite describe a garden plant. Many folks times of the year because automatically assume the fruit of an the ornamenornamental plant is not to be tal peppers are eaten, which is generally true. starting to really color up. Ornamental peppers have More and more fellow been selectively bred for gardeners are jumping on color, but they also could be the bandwagon and planting used to spice up a dish. In these beauties in their landfact, most are very, very hot. scapes. These plants are hot If you’re worried about —in landscape character and young children possibly eataccent—and they carry the ing the colorful pods but still Southern garden through the fall seawant to grow these fine garGardening son and maybe beyond. den plants, I have the selecby Dr. Gary Bachman Most ornamental peppers tion for you. Chilly Chili is a begin setting fruit as the colorful pod producer but temperatures rise, so the best show is without the heat. It is about as hot as a always saved for late summer and conbell pepper. tinues through the fall as they keep proEvery year, there are new introducducing. This means you need to set tions available in a dizzying array of these plants out in the late spring. options for the home garden and landI find there is sometimes confusion scape. From big to small, with multicol-

L

FARM BARNS

Hattiesburg, MS • 1-601-296-0550 Our Prices Include Labor & Metal Sides Also Available in Wood Sides

Garage with hardy siding and concrete slab, any size.

www.farmbarnsinc.com

We will build any size barn.

If you’re worried about young children eating the colorful pods, try growing Chilly Chili, a colorful pod producer without the heat. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

ored fruit, and with green, purple and variegated foliage, this is a fun way to add interest to your garden. Check out the black, purple and red pods of Black Hawk. The plants themselves seem to be proud of their fruit, as many pods are held high above the foliage for our viewing enjoyment. Purple Flash was chosen as a Mississippi Medallion winner for 2010. With its purple and white variegated leaves, it is one of the showiest peppers available on the market. Ornamental peppers love our hot and humid summers, and this helps the plants produce loads of pretty fruit.

When the pepper plants are producing, it is very common to have peppers in various stages of coloration. Once fruit has set, it is common for it to remain on the plant for a few months. Only when the peppers begin to dry will their color start to fade. Ornamental peppers prefer growing in consistently moist soil, but don’t be overly generous, as the plants do not tolerate waterlogged soil. I like growing these landscape standouts in containers or raised beds. Fertilize with a good, slow-release fertilizer early in the season. Some gardeners stop fertilizing once fruit starts to set, but I like to feed mine with a water-soluble fertilizer through the summer and fall to maintain nutrition at optimum levels. I realize I’ve told you about a plant that it’s too late to grow this year. If you are interested in some of these varieties for next year, start preparing now. The seeds are available at many online seed houses. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


18

I

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 418,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze, weekends through Nov. 5, Collins. Farm wagon tours, train rides, hay mountain, jumping pillows, free pumpkin, food, general store, more. Admission. Mitchell Farms. Details: 601-7658609; MitchellFarms-MS.com. Oktoberfest 2017, Oct. 7, Carthage. Arts and crafts festival with kids’ activities, food, music and more. Carthage Coliseum. Details: 601267-9231; Facebook: Carthage Main Street. “Town and Country” Art Show and Sale, Oct. 7, Bruce. Paintings of Bruce and local countryside by North Miss. Plein Air Painters and other artists; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Bruce Museum. Details: 662-418-3092; SusanPattonArt.wordpress.com. Community-wide Yard Sale, Oct. 7, Black Hawk. Black Hawk Old School; 7 a.m. - 1 p.m. Mississippi Peanut Festival, Oct. 7-8, Collins. Arts/crafts, collectibles, boutique clothing, live entertainment, food, pumpkin patch. Admission. Mitchell Farms. Details: 601-765-8609; MitchellFarms-MS.com. Bike MS: Mississippi 150, Oct. 7-8, Ridgeland. National Multiple Sclerosis Society bike ride with route options for all levels of cyclists. Details: 855-372-1331; BikeMS.org. Bailey Haunted Firehouse, Oct. 13, 14, 20, 21, 27, 28, 30, 31; Nov. 3, 4, Meridian. Opens 7 p.m. nightly. Details: Facebook: Bailey Haunted Firehouse. Mississippi’s Craft Heritage, Oct. 14, Ridgeland. Mississippi Bicentennial event with living history portrayals, craft demos, games, hands-on craft activities; 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Free admission. Mississippi Craft Center. Details: CraftsmensGuildofMS.org. Fall Festival, Oct. 14, Diamondhead. Food, chili cook-off, cake walk, cookie decorating, pumpkin carving, games, kids bounce, more; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Diamondhead Community Church. Details: 228-255-5556; DHCommunityChurch.org. Magnolia State Bluegrass Association Fall Show, Oct. 14, Florence. Featuring Bluegrass Cartel, Flatland Bluegrass, Wood & Wire; 1 p.m. Florence Volunteer Fire

Department. Details: 601-954-2565. Big Pop Gun Show, Oct. 14-15, Natchez. Buy, sell, trade, appraisals. Natchez Convention Center. Also, Nov. 4-5 in Jackson, Wahabi Shrine Building. Details: 601-4984235; BigPopGunShows.com. Hickory Hill Camp and Jam, Oct. 15-21, Foxworth. Music, camping. Details: 601-4411544. Lower Delta Talks: “Pursuing a Dream,” Oct. 17, Rolling Fork. Cathy Shropshire presents portrayal of Fannye A. Cooke, Mississippi’s first wildlife conservation leader; 6:30 p.m. Free admission. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Mississippi’s 200th Birthday Celebration, Oct. 19, Moorhead. Bicentennial celebration and tribute to troops who perished in plane crash nearby; 10 a.m. Guest speaker: Gov. Phil Bryant. Calhoun Park. Details: 662-207-3010. Women’s Day Expo, Oct. 19, Byhalia. Details: 662-838-8127, 662-291-0505. Barn Sale, Oct. 20-21, Purvis. More than 50 vendors with antiques, collectibles, coins, handmade items, more; 7 a.m. - 5 p.m.; 4799 Old Hwy. 11. Details: 601-818-5886; 601-7947462. Old Tyme Festival, Oct. 21, Lumberton. Live music, food, homebaked goods, kids’ Halloween contest, chili contest, 5K run/walk, petting zoo, arts/crafts, pony rides, more; 7 a.m. - 4 p.m. Details: 601-796-4212. Warren County School Reunion, Oct. 21, Vicksburg. For all who attended any Warren County school prior to consolidation in 1966; 10 a.m. Bring potluck dish. Sheffield Warehouse. Details: AnnieWarnock622@gmail.com. Fifth Annual Historic Griffin Cemetery Tour, Oct. 21, Moss Point. Guided tours at 9, 10 and 11 a.m.; 1 and 2 p.m. Free admission. Dantlzer Street, west end. Details: 228-2185239. Turkey Shoot, Oct. 21, Perkinston. Daisy Masonic Lodge No. 421, 25700 Schoolhouse Road; 9 a.m. til. Details: 228-383-2669.

Empty Bowls, Oct. 21, Hattiesburg. Select a handcrafted pottery bowl with lunch from local restaurants; 10:30 a.m. - 1 p.m. Benefits Edwards Street Fellowship Center food pantry. Admission. Main Street Books. Details: 601584-6960. Bluegrass Gospel Singing on the River, Oct. 21, Chunky. Featuring Tyler Carroll and Pineridge Bluegrass, Jason Archie Family, Pilgrim Family Bluegrass Band; 11 a.m. Chunky River Recreation. Details: 601-4803045. Fall Native Plant Sale, Oct. 21-22, Picayune. Native trees, shrubs and perennials; 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Free admission. Crosby Arboretum (use Service Road entrance). Details: 601-7992311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu. Great Delta Bear Affair, Oct. 28, Rolling Fork. Chainsaw carving, music, vendors, children’s activities, 5K run/walk, Indian mound tour, live animals/snakes, fireworks, more. Downtown. Details: 662-873-6261; GreatDeltaBearAffair.org. 42nd Annual Crazy Day Arts and Crafts Festival, Oct. 28, Magee. Kid zone, classic car show, food, shopping. Details: 601-849-2517. Fifth Annual Gator Fest, Oct. 28, Columbia. Arts, crafts, baby alligators, canoe/kayak races, food, more; 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Columbia Water Park. Details: 601-736-6385. Homochitto River Festival, Oct. 28, Meadville. Music, art show, arts/craft vendors, wild game cook-off, trunk-a-treat, 5K run, pet parade, kids game area, more. Town square. Details: 601-384-5206; HomochittoRiverFest@gmail.com. Heritage Day, Oct. 28, DeKalb. Outdoor music, barbecue, bake sale; 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Kemper County Historical Museum. Details: 601-934-2649. Whitehall UMC Bazaar, Oct. 28, Louisville. Breakfast, lunch, baked goods, recycled furniture, pottery, silent auction, more; 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Whitehall United Methodist Church. Details: 662-803-8222. Jake Moeller Memorial Shallow Creek Homecoming, Oct. 28, Picayune. Bluegrass gospel singing, antique tractor exhibit; 6 p.m. Shallow Creek Farm. Details: 601-590-3577; AletaMoeller@gmail.com. “Brighton Beach Memoirs,” Nov. 2-5, Laurel. Comedy by Neil Simon. Admission. Laurel Little Theatre’s Arabian Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. Soulé Live Steam Festival, Nov. 3-4, Meridian. Steam engines, tours of historic Soulé Steam Feed Works, traditional craft demos; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Also, Carousel Association of America Fall Rally. Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum. Details: 601-6939905; SouleLiveSteam.com.

Puckett UMW Mission Marketplace, Nov. 4, Puckett. Arts/crafts, woodwork, yard art, jewelry, gifts, homemade soup cafe, more. Benefits Center Ridge Outpost and Friends in Need campaign. Puckett United Methodist Church. Details: 601-591-5570, 601-214-7834. Antiques, Arts and Crafts Fair, Nov. 4, Purvis. Vendors, raffles, food, safety presentations, more; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. VFW Post 3955. Details: 601-864-3431; casa-pam@live.com. Old Time Day, Nov. 4, Leaksville. Demos, cane syrup making, grist mill, quilting, wagon train, music, food. Details: 601-394-2385. 33rd Annual Homemakers Arts and Crafts Show and Sale, Nov. 4-5, Meridian. All items are handmade. Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sunday 12 -5 p.m. Admission. Tommy Dulaney Center. Details: 601-482-9764. Tim Lovelace, Nov. 5, Petal. Appearance by comedian, musician and motivational speaker Tim Lovelace; 6 p.m. Love offering. First Baptist Church of Runnelstown. Details: 601583-3733. Festival at the Barn, Nov. 6-11, Polkville. Featuring Sowell Family Pickers, Kody Norris Show, Polkville City Limits, more. RV hookups. Music Barn. Details: 601-955-9182, 601-9460280. 21st Holiday Boutique, Nov. 10-11, More than 20 stores and artists with unique items, door prizes. Admission. Pass Christian Yacht Club. Details: 228-452-2571. Holiday Gift Bazaar, Nov. 11, Meridian. Thirty-five vendors, gumbo lunches; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Trinity Presbyterian Church. Details: 601-485-4105. 45th Annual Gingham Tree Arts and Crafts Festival, Nov. 11, Lucedale. More than 300 vendors; 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free admission. George County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-9474542; GinghamTree.org. Moscow Ballet’s “Great Russian Nutcracker,” Nov. 14, Hattiesburg. Featuring world-class artists, elaborate costumes; 7-9 p.m. Admission. Saenger Theatre. Details: Nutcracker.com, HattiesburgSaenger.com. Lower Delta Talks: The Mississippi Delta is the Center of the Universe, Nov. 14, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Willy Bearden; 6:30 p.m. Free admission. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Shape Note Singing Workshop, Nov. 16, Jackson. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Free. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-953-1094. 15th Annual Piney Woods Heritage Festival, Nov. 18, Picayune. Music, exhibitors, traditional skills/crafts demos, more; 10 a.m. 3 p.m. Admission. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu.


October 2017

BEATS

FREE 20%

Customer Rating • 8100 cu. in. of storage • 704 lb. capacity • Weighs 120 lbs.

99

$179

$15 999

SAVE $79

$ ITEM 61427/63308/69397/95272 shown

ITEM 63381

SUPER COUPON

TRIPLE BALL TRAILER HITCH Customer Rating

6 GALLON, 1.5 HP, 150 PSI PROFESSIONAL AIR COMPRESSOR • Air delivery: 2.5 CFM @ 90 PSI, SAVE 3.4 CFM @ 40 PSI $47

SAVE 53%

Customer Rating

$1 999

ITEM 69030/69031 shown LIMIT 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Hercules, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, StormCat, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/18.

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/18. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 61914

Compare

$42.98 $

3199

$9999 $

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

HEAVY DUTY FOLDABLE ALUMINUM SPORTS CHAIR

12 VOLT, 2/10/50 AMP 12" SLIDING COMPOUND BATTERY CHARGER/ DOUBLE-BEVEL ENGINE STARTER MITER SAW

Customer Rating

SAVE 50%

$

29

SAVE 57%

99

$1 9

99 Compare

Compare $69.99 $

$39.99

ITEM 62314/63066/66383 shown

ITEM 60581/60653 shown

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

49

99

$29

99

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED COMBINATION SAVE WRENCH SETS 59%

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

YOUR CHOICE

99

Compare $ 99 $14 .97

7

Compare

SAE METRIC

ITEM 69043/63282/42304 shown ITEM 42305/69044/63171

$236.89 $

ITEM 63297

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

15999

ITEM 67514

$ $39.99

29

$9 ITEM 62281/61637 shown Compare

$

$60

1799

Compare $ 99 $13.67

Compare

$229.99

ITEM 69265/62344/93897 shown LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

$

8999

$

7999

ITEM 62835

• 1.3 GPM • Adjustable spray nozzle

SAVE $100 $

99

Compare $249.99 $

$79

Compare

$179.33

$

9999 9

ITEM 63255/63254 shown LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

• 5400 lb. capacity

Customer Rating

MAX. STARTING/ 3/8" x 14 FT., GRADE 43 4000 3200 RUNNING WATTS TOWING CHAIN 6.5 HP (212 CC) GAS GENERATOR

SAVE 67%

• GFCI outlets

SAVE 1709

$

SUPER QUIET

$28999

99

$179.99 Compare

$60.95

$

$1 999

33999

ITEM 60658/97711 shown

$

Wheel kit sold separately.

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

2 TON CAPACITY FOLDABLE FULL-MOTION SAVE $ SAVE SHOP CRANE TV WALL MOUNT 160

120

$

$17999 $

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

800+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com *Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 2/5/18.

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

• Boom extends from 41" to 61-3/4" • Crane height adjusts from 73-5/8" to 89"

ITEM 60388 69514 shown

Compare

332999 $1999

ITEM 69676/69729/63080/63079 shown ITEM 69675/69728/63090/63089, CALIFORNIA ONLY

LIMIT 7- Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

11999

SAVE $99

99

Compare

Customer Rating

$8999 SAVE $160

1750 PSI Customer Rating PRESSURE WASHER

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$5 999 SAVE $170

SAVE $50

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 56%

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

Customer Rating

$329.99

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

1/2" HEAVY DUTY 3/8" x 50 FT. RETRACTABLE COMPOSITE PRO 950 TORQUE AIR HOSE REEL AIR IMPACT WRENCH FT. LBS. BOLT BREAKAWAY

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

ITEM 68053/62160 62496/62516/60569 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

32 PIECE SCREWDRIVER SET

$5 99

7799

ATV/LAWN MOWER LIFT

11999

Compare

$109.99

ITEM 61523 shown 60395/62325/62493

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

7

$

Compare

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

ITEM 61259/90764 shown

$5 9

$119.99

$7999

$

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

• 3-1/2 Pumps Lifts Most Vehicles • Lifts from 3-1/2" to 14-1/8" • Lightweight 34 lbs.

SUPER COUPON • 300 lb. capacity

$99

ITEM 63100

RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON ALUMINUM RACING JACK

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

99

99

1899

$34.95

SUPER COUPON

99

Customer Rating

$1 999 Compare

Compare

SAVE $70

ITEM 61840/61297/63476/61258 shown

29 PIECE TITANIUM DRILL SAVE 83% BIT SET

TWO TIER COLLAPSIBLE SAVE EASY-STORE 50% STEP LADDER

• 225 lb. capacity

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS Customer Rating REMOTE CONTROL Voted Best Winches

99 $4999 9 3 $1

Compare

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$

SUPER COUPON

Battle Tested

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

$9

Blade sold separately.

99

ITEM 61969/61970/69684 shown

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

10 FT. x 10 FT. PORTABLE SHED SAVE $96

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINE

SAVE $230 99

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 71%

99

$299

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$129 199

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

12 VOLT MAGNETIC TOWING LIGHT KIT

99

$

$147.29

SUPER COUPON

• Laser guide

SAVE $169

Customer Rating

Compare

SUPER COUPON

$5

SUPER COUPON

112499

Compare ITEM 62511/62894/62380/67696 shown

LIMIT 6 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

SUPER COUPON

19999

SUPER COUPON

ANY SINGLE ITEM

VALUE

Compare

$1150

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

OFF

6

109

Compare

WITH ANY PURCHASE

$ 99

SAVE 30", 5 DRAWER $990 TOOL CART

$9999 $

I

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

• 576 in. lbs. of torque • 2.5 amp hour battery • Weighs 3.6 lbs.

SUPER COUPON

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

Today in Mississippi

SUPER COUPON

DEWALT

20 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS 1/2" COMPACT DRILL/DRIVER

SUPER COUPON

I

22999

Compare

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

$299.99

• Fits most 37" to 80"

$3999

$

4999

ITEM 64037/63155 shown

Compare

$199.99

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 2/5/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare” or “comp at” price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare” or “comp at” price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare” or "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

19


SA AV VE A BUNDLE E

DISH TV Service + High-Speed Internett

Internet prices starting at:

114 95

$

per month

Restrictions apply. Subject to availability.

2-YEAR TV V PRICE

GUARA ANTEE

49 4 9

$

99

190 CHANNELS AMERICA A’S TOP 120 PACKAGE

PER MONTH plus taxes

All offers require credit qualification, 2-Year commitment with early termination fee and eAutoPay.

... AND MA ANY MORE!

FREE Enjoy over 45 Premium Channels

FREE

FREE

HD

NEXT DA AY

FOR LIFE FOR 3 MONTHS

Because why shouldn’t it be?

Not available with certain packages. After 3 months, you will be billed $55/mo. unless you call to cancel.

UPGRA ADE

INST TA ALLAT ATION

Integrated w with Alexa, YouTube and d Pandora. For Only $10//mo. More

(where available)

Hopper upgrade feee may apply.

All offers require credit qualification, 2-Y -Year commitment with early termination fee and eAutoPay. See back for complete terms and conditions.

SWITCH TO O DISH AND RECEIVE A

50 VISA GIFT CARD

$

50 GIFT CARD

$

MUST MENTION OFFER O CODE AT TIME OF ORDER : GIFT50 Courttesyy of InfinityDISH y with activation, certain conditions apply. pp y

C ALL NOW

1-844-523 5 -07 722

INFINITYDISH.CO M WE ARE OPE EN 7 DAY AYS A WEEK; 8 AM – MIDNIGHT EST, SUNDAY AY 9 AM – MIDNIGHT EST. OFFER R ONLY GOOD FOR NEW DIS DISH SH SUBSCRIBERS. SUBSCRIBERS • SE HAB BLA ESP PA AÑOL All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recordeed for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qqualifying former customers only. Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAuutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based b on credit qualification. Offer ends 01/16/18. 2-Y -Year Commitment: Early terminnation fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $49.99 advertised price: Americaa’s Top 120 programming package, Local channels HD service fees, and equipment for 1 TV. Included in 2-year price guarantee for addditional cost: Programming package upgrades ($59.99 for AT120+, $69.99 for ATT200, $79.99 for AT250), monthly fees for additional receivers ($5-$$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15) and monthly DVR fees ($10-$15). NOT included in 2-yeaar price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Ta Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Prootect, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: 3 Mos. Free: Afterr 3 mos., you will be billed $55/mo. for HBO, Cinemax, Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All paackages, programming, features, and funccttionality and all prices andd fees not included in price lock are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., you will be billed $8.99/mo. for DISH Protect unless you call to cancel. Affter 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business ess customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional ional installation only. All rights reserved. HBO®, Cinemax® and related chhannels and service marks are the property of Home Box Office, Inc. SHOWTTIME is a reggistered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Company. STA TARZ annd related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Internet: Internet speeds, prices, and providers vary by customerr address. Call for details. Visa® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $50 Visa® gift card requires accttivation. Yoou will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must bee returned within 60 days. Your Visa® gift card will arrive in approximateely 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable prrocessing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana diana C.PP.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

Today in Mississippi October 2017 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi October 2017 Coahoma