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News for members of Coahoma Electric Power Association

Fair fun Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

PICTURE THIS:

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Fossil collector preserves prehistory

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Cane syrup cookies an autumn delight

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Vardaman is state’s sweet potato capital


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OUR HOMEPLACE

Mississippi’s electric co-op crews stood ready to aid hurricane victims urricane Florence was still hundreds of miles from the North Carolina coast when Mississippi’s electric cooperatives began preparations to help in the recovery from the massive power outages the storm was expected to inflict. Not only did the hurricane bring down power lines in coastal North and South Carolina, but long-term heavy flooding made access difficult if not impossible for utility crews trying to rebuild the lines. Crews were forced to wait until the winds and floodwaters subsided due to safety concerns, and they faced additional dangers from falling trees and windblown debris. Mississippi’s electric cooperatives marshalled a hurricane emergency force of 275 co-op line workers, who stood ready to help our friends in the Carolinas. But as it turned out, their own electric cooperative crews were able to My Opinion handle power restoration that was Michael Callahan impeded by flooding, so nearly all Executive Vice President/CEO Electric Cooperatives our cooperative crews returned or of Mississippi stayed home. It’s important to note that electric cooperatives in North Carolina and South Carolina (and 19 other states) rushed to our aid after Hurricane Katrina ripped through Mississippi in 2005. Their emergency crews and equipment hastened our progress in rebuilding thousands of miles of power lines without sacrificing safety. These out-of-state assisting crews proved invaluable in the fast, efficient and safe recovery from one of the largest power outage emergencies ever faced by Mississippi’s electric cooperatives. We will never forget the help these electric cooperative crews gave us. And when disaster strikes any member of the nation’s electric cooperative network, we stand ready to help—just in case they need us. ••• If you or someone you know is looking for a mean-

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On the cover Sadie Stringer will be going home with a new buddy after her big day at the fair. See more fair fun in “Picture This,” our reader photo feature on page 20. Photo by Melissa Stringer, a member of Pearl River Valley Electric.

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

ingful, rewarding career in Mississippi, consider working at an electric cooperative. Careers in Energy Week is Oct. 15-19, an observance that raises awareness for career opportunities in the state. Energy utilities, construction companies and manufacturers all need skilled workers to fill jobs as electric linemen, welders, plant operators, electronic technicians, machinery technicians and other middle-skill jobs. Find out more about job opportunities and training schools at GetOnTheGrid.com. Mississippi’s electric cooperatives strongly support the development of a homegrown workforce, including lineman training programs at community colleges. Many of our new hires for line crews come directly from this 16-week program, which equips them with the basic knowledge they need to kickstart their co-op career. I might be biased, but in my opinion, Mississippi electric cooperatives are fine places to work. They offer competitive salaries and benefits, and a stable work environment. Many employees stay at the electric cooperative throughout their career. We offer a wide range of job opportunities, so you don’t have to be a lineman to work at an electric cooperative. A typical electric cooperative staff includes people employed in accounting and finance, member services, billing, information technology, warehouse operations, staking and engineering, safety and communications. ••• October is National Co-op Month, a time to consider the value of consumer- and producer-owned cooperatives of all kinds in this county. Why is your electric utility a consumer-owned cooperative? Because local people created it to obtain electric service when no other utility would serve them. Electric cooperatives are all about service. We are responsive to your needs because we are owned by the people we serve.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Randy Smith - President Keith Hayward - First Vice President Kevin Bonds - Second Vice President Eddie Howard - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 71 No. 10

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING • 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. • National advertising representative: American MainStreet Publications 800-626-1181 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300 Circulation of this issue: 472,027

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi is brought to you by your member-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative and its various services, including wise energy use. If you are not a member of a subscribing cooperative, you can purchase a subscription for $9.50 per year. Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office.

Sadie Dennis, 18 months, cools off with a cup of lemonade almost as big as she is. Her big sip was captured at the Neshoba County Fair by Jessica Dennis, of Conehatta, a Central Electric member.

Mississippi is Over half a century in the North And never did I see The brilliant summer flowers Of the crepe myrtle tree. I had never tasted crawfish or grits Or heard a mockingbird sing, Had never seen ambitious kudzu Climbing on everything. I had felt cotton in shirts and sheets But not upon a plant, Had never seen a red-faced duck Or fearsome fire ant. I had never sniffed the heavenly scent Of magnolia along the walk, And never heard a person say, “Hope y’all can stay and talk.” — Marie Dauson, Olive Branch

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Digging up the

By Debbie Stringer One of Jeff McCraw’s hobbies is collecting seashells— but not at the seashore. Instead, McCraw finds plenty in Mississippi’s rivers, creeks and streams. “Right down the road here,” the Smith County resident said, “if you drive over a bridge, you can look down at the bottom of the creek and just see seashells by the thousands.” Seashells in an inland creek? Not only that, but McCraw sometimes finds shark teeth or other ancient marine fossils amongst the shells. These are all that remain of the creatures that inhabited the shallow prehistoric sea that once covered most of Mississippi and the midwestern US. When the saltwaters receded millions of years ago, huge mammals—mastodons, giant bisons and the like—came to dominate the Mississippi landscape. McCraw collects their fossils too. McCraw is equally passionate when it comes to hunting and researching prehistoric Native American artifacts, from points to pottery. He is a scrupulous hunter who avoids Native American mound sites, which remain sacred to the

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Jeff McCraw searches Mississippi’s rivers and creeks for insight into our state’s prehistoric life. descendants of the builders and protected by federal law. “I am pretty much an out-of-context artifact hunter,” he said. “I do hunt a field or site occasionally but I leave digging to the archaeologists. Just picking up an arrowhead is one thing, but if you go and start digging and messing with [a site], then you’re taking away valuable information to the scientific community.” Nor does he sell artifacts or fossils, trespass on private land or hunt for them on public lands, where removing such items is restricted by law. McCraw, a member of Southern Pine Electric, has no formal education in paleontology or archaeology; his knowledge stems from some 12 years of hunting and researching fossils and artifacts. Experience has taught him where to look for them, how to recognize them and where to get help in identifying them. (McCraw will tell you that finding artifacts is the easy part; figuring out what they were used for is more difficult, if not impossible.) McCraw’s most fertile hunting grounds are river, creek and stream beds, where collecting is legal in Mississippi. There the combined forces of erosion and time wash away ancient sediments,

eventually exposing long-buried fossils and artifacts. Often they settle into holes in hard surfaces beneath the water, McCraw has found. “I spent two or three years, maybe four, digging

McCraw has carefully crafted stories of prehistoric Mississippi through the tangible evidence he has spent so many enjoyable hours collecting. out every hole on about a mile-long strip of Tallahala Creek, and in just about every hole there was an arrowhead or shark teeth,” he said. “I’ve found things that were 2 feet deep with a machete, just by the sound of the metal hitting something different in that creek or river.” One day while paddling down a creek, McCraw came upon a mound of clay protruding from the water. His hunch turned out to be correct: Ancient whale bones embedded in the mound had saved it from eroding into oblivion. In 2007 McCraw made the first significant find of


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The projectile points pictured here were made by Native Americans of the Woodland Period, some 1,200 to 2,500 years ago. McCraw found them in Tallahala Creek, in Smith County.

Mississippi is rich in marine fossils, like these scallops McCraw found in Smith County. Below, he holds a femur from an ice age horse, excavated in Warren County. At left, he holds a partial mastodon rib, and, inset photo, an ancient shark tooth.

premodern whale in the state while canoeing the Chickasawhay River, in east Mississippi. He and nephew Kalab Deese excavated the bones from a bluff in Clarke County and donated them to the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science (MMNS), in Jackson. McCraw has also made several discoveries of Basilosaurus, the 65-foot fossil whale commonly found in Mississippi. “It would have been the largest animal alive on earth about 40 million years ago,” McCraw said. Another special find is the 32-inch beak-like rostrum, from an extinct sawfish, that McCraw excavated in Yazoo County. Identifying some fossils can be tricky, so McCraw relies on help from George Phillips, curator of paleontology at MMNS. “It’s a good partnership,” McCraw said. “They help me with identifications and I help them with a lot of donations of things important to Mississippi, and really to the fossil community as a whole.” When his wife suggested the growing collection was becoming a bit much for the house, McCraw decided to convert an old, leaky storage shed into a mini museum in order to display it. Using salvaged lumber, he built a covered porch, reinforced the siding and added a bathroom. He spiffed up the interior, built display cases, installed track lighting and air conditioning, and dubbed his creation The Artifact Shack. The Shack, as he calls it, is open free of charge to visitors and school groups. Inside, McCraw has carefully crafted stories of prehistoric Mississippi through the tangible evidence he has spent so many enjoyable

McCraw created The Artifact Shack to display and share his massive collection of fossils and artifacts. The front walkway is flanked by thousands of pieces of petrified wood, organized according to origin.

hours collecting. Most of his finds are from the Oligocene and Eocene epochs, or roughly 23 million to 60 million years ago, when all but the northeastern corner of Mississippi was submerged in a shallow sea. Nothing in the museum is for sale. The Artifact Shack is purely educational—and fun. McCraw enthusiastically shares with visitors not only what he has learned through years of collecting but also anecdotes about the curiosities on display. On one shelf rests a single whale vertebrae nearly 10 inches in diameter. To the untrained eye, it looks more like a petrified stump. “Early settlers would find those things and use them to block up their houses. They’re fairly plentiful in certain areas where that geological formation is exposed. A lot of those bones and remains are found in Jasper County,” he said. Visitors start their tour with a look at McCraw’s oldest fossils, including trilobites, sea biscuits, giant shark and crocodile teeth, shellfish and the imprint of an ancient redbud leaf in a rock. Next come fossilized remains from ice age mammals including a bison, mastodon, ground sloth, tapir, bear and horse. “These were the animals walking around Mississippi that some humans actually came in contact with and hunted. A few of these Native American artifacts were actually used to harvest, or to kill, some of these ice age animals,” McCraw said. To drive home the point, his displays are designed to lead visitors from ice age fossils directly into

Native American artifacts. Glass cases hold projectile points, grinding and nutting stones, cultivation tools, drill bits, awls and game balls—all made of stone. One particular drill bit speaks to McCraw. “I used to be a machinist and I’ve broken many a drill bit, and that Native American drill, made of stone, broke exactly the way a steel drill bit would break if it’s under tension or in a bind. You can tell which way it was turning because of the way it broke,” he said. Pieces of broken clay pots are decorated with designs incised or stamped by their makers’ hands. McCraw has yet to uncover an intact pot, so he purchased a few to complete his pottery display. The most common question McCraw gets from kids who visit his museum concerns the shark teeth: How did sharks get to Smith County? Before explaining about Mississippi’s ancient sea, McCraw may joke about sharks swimming up rivers from the Gulf, or impress them with his fossilized shark poop—scientists call it coprolite. McCraw believes all Mississippians should learn about their state’s geology and natural history. He hopes his museum can help make that fun. “Everybody, in my opinion, should know a little bit about their world around them,” he said. The Artifact Shack, located at 6270 SCR 99, Bay Springs, is open by appointment only. Admission is free and groups are welcome. Owner Jeff McCraw also stages an annual fossil/artifact hunt for children at the site. For more information, contact him at 601-896-2429.


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Fall is in the air, conjuring memories of family ur spider lilies were late blooming this year. Typically they’re up around the first week of September, sometimes as early as the middle of August. But it was late September before they sprouted this year. One of the other names for the spider lily is surprise lily because one day they just surprise you when they’ve popped up and bloomed. But I watched for them so long this year they weren’t so much a surprise as they were a relief when I finally saw them. Just as the dogwood is a forerunner of spring, the spider lily is a marker that autumn is on its way. Now, don’t get me wrong. I am not trying to rush the seasons. From my experience, seasons don’t need rushing. They’re quick enough on their own. But when summer drags on so long, and the heat just won’t let go, you (or at least I) start looking for any sign that things are about to change. Besides, I enjoy fall. Our annual family reunion for Mama’s side of the family was always the last week of September. Migrating yellow butterflies would drift past us flying southeastward as we drove north up HighMississippi way 25 to the Seen Ratliff community in Itawamba by Walt Grayson County, just the other side of Mantachie. Mantachie used to be about as obscure as Ratliff back then. Now they manufacture Toyota parts there. And it has an interstate highway running past it. Times change. We tried to keep the reunion going for a year or two after the last of the old folks passed away, but couldn’t do it. People are too busy nowadays to drive way off like that just to visit for a couple of hours and eat and turn around and drive back home. Besides, most of the people we’d really like to see are in the graveyard down the road. So now when I see yellow butterflies while I’m driving along doing stories for “Mississippi Roads” or for WLBT it reminds me of family reunion and how nice it would be if only time had slowed

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Roosevelt State Park in Scott County is the closest to us in central Mississippi with the old CCC cabins. The cabins are very popular. The weekend waiting list is already into 2020. Weekdays you may be able to catch one open, especially in winter when you can build a fire in the fire place and cook bacon on the stove. That's my favorite time to go. Photo: Walt Grayson

down a bit through the years and everybody was still here. Mama’s family was from “pioneer stock,” as she liked to put it. There’re five generations of us buried in the family plot in Itawamba County. Well, six generations now, with our sister passing away this summer. It’s all passing it seems. Things I thought had been here forever when I was a child are pretty much either gone or unrecognizable now. The house Granddaddy built is still here, but it started changing the week Grandmother died. The uncle who inherited it proudly hauled the huge coal heater from the living room that we cousins played hide-and-seek behind,

along with the small wood-burning heater in the dining room and Grandmother’s wood stove, and as he put it, “dumped ‘um in a hollow in Alabama.” Later occupants have added their touches and removed our childhoods to the point where if I want to pretend to go back to Grandma’s, I just head to one of the CCC cabins in a state park. The old cabins smell of wood smoke and cooked bacon like Grandma’s kitchen did. And they are rustic like my imagination remembers her house. I tell folks that Miz Jo taught me to cuss at Tishomingo State Park. Monday night was blissful. No cell phones, no television. Just the crickets. Same Tuesday, no phones or TV, just crickets.

Wednesday night Jo said, “If I hear one more damn cricket I’m going to lose my mind.” Evidently, Miz Jo isn’t from pioneer stock. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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The way it was and still can be ctober is the month of romance! That bold statement may be quickly challenged, for some conclude that June claims top billing for this designation. After all, weddings are often scheduled for June. Still, I hold firm, prejudiced by recall from my early days, that October reigns supreme in the arena of romance. Please allow here some definition and explanation. Romance in the usage just mentioned is not restricted to human relationships. It moves past that to include awe, sentiment and wonder, these focused on the natural world around us. It is more a mindset than it is an event. And October rises to the surface if this form of romance is contemplated. October is then the very essence, the embodiment of romance. Outdoors Consider an October sky at sunrise. The expanse overhead Today appears especially vast, more disby Tony Kinton tant than that of summer past. Wispy clouds seem drawn to that rising sun, suspended and haunting in an azure globe of mystique. The observer is compelled to stop and stare and absorb. A new day is being forged on an anvil of pink and orange and mist and fog—and yes, romance. Moments later, when darkness has been fully displaced by light, trees that were mere apparitions lost in the shadows earlier become grand spectacles of gold and red and gentle brown. Romance has once again blossomed. For one who is in proximity to agriculture, additions to such grandeur can be handily found. Ripe pump-

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kins; curled corn stalks performing their ballet in quiet breezes; raspy songs of insects; the rustle of leaves, perhaps soon followed by their pirouette downward as they prepare to nurture the soil. One activity that I recall from childhood is particularly enchanting to me, and that is the processing of cane stalks into rich juice that was and is for the most part transformed into syrup, a substance of rare and substantial value. While not as common as in days past, it is still done. There are several mills in easy driving distance of me, and I tend to visit the closest among them annually. The aroma is reason enough to make the trip to a cane mill. Just as in those old days, mules turn the long pole that turns the press at this mill. These animals are rotated regularly throughout the day to provide rest breaks. And unless memory has failed me, and it could possibly have done so, this romantic and alluring endeavor of making syrup takes place in October—or close to that month anyway. I usually leave there with a can or two of that syrup, all destined for breakfast biscuits or more likely cane-syrup cookies. These things are too good to be legal. Here are instructions for making the Kinton version of these delights:

Top: Doing it the old way! Above: Syrup making is a community affair. Left: John Michael Donovan prepares to fill a can with freshly made cane syrup. Photos: Tony Kinton

Cane-Syrup Cookies Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Cream 1 stick of margarine and ¼ cup of canola oil. Then add and mix 1 egg, 1½ cups of cane syrup and 1 teaspoon of vanilla. In another bowl, mix 4 cups of plain flour, 1½ teaspoons of baking soda and ½ teaspoon of salt. Whisk or sift these and blend into the syrup mixture. Then hand stir in 1½ cups of sugar. Roll this mixture into teaspoon balls. These can be left in balls or pressed slightly for a crispier cookie. Bake for 6 to 7 minutes or until brown. Oh my! So, go to a cane mill or watch a sunrise or absorb autumn colors or listen to the insects or view the dance of cornstalks. Better still, do all these things and more. It is October after all, and October is overflowing with romance. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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He keeps on giving back ome people give back, while most of us are primarily takers. I enjoy writing about people who make a difference in their communities and the lives of people around them. Stories about people like this make us feel good and hopefully inspire us to do similar good deeds. A couple years ago, I told you about Mr. Roy and our friend Dayton Whites writing a book about Lucedale during the 1940s, entitled “The Best Little Town.” Dayton has always loved Lucedale and George County, and he started giving back to the people in this area early in life. After completing medical school and an internship at Greenville, S.C., Dayton practiced medicine in George County for 40 years before retiring in 1999. Our friend has always described himself as a “country doctor,” and if that describes a caring physician who has a sincere concern for his patients, then I agree with this title. After he retired from medical practice, he served two terms as mayor of Lucedale. Dayton said that he had always looked at a wetlands area on the east side of town and felt that it should be preserved for future generations. And when an old friend encouraged him to do something so that future kids would have a place nearby to fish, he got busy. He asked the Luce family, who owned the property, to donate it to the Mississippi Coastal Plains Land Trust, and the city received a grant to build a ¾mile raised wooden walkway, including fishing and observation areas. This 62-acre wetlands is now named the Lucedale Depot Greenway and protected for generations to come. Another area that Dayton began looking at in 2007 was a 40-acre woodland area just north of town that would make a good nature trail and tie into the Greenway and the City Park. He applied for a Katrina grant that was available, and this provided funds to purchase the land and begin work on the trail. Today a 1 ¼-mile nature trail is available for hiking. Prior to his becoming mayor, Dr. Whites was told that the city was going to remove an old dilapidated building it owned, called “The Business Girls Clubhouse.” He looked at it and said, “I

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can’t let that old building be destroyed. Let’s renovate it.” And that’s what he did. With mostly volunteers and inmate labor, the building was restored to its original design. It has been used for almost 20 years as the Chamber of Commerce Building. Just north of the Business Girl’s Club house, in the next block, is a building that was known as the Legion Hut. It was built in the late 1940s by the American Legion as a place to hold their meetings and other functions. In 2005 the building was in bad condition, and the VFW who owned it was faced with Grin ‘n’ having to sell the Bare It property. by Kay Grafe Again, Dr. Whites did not want to see this landmark demolished. So, he went to the leaders of the local VFW and made them a deal. If they would donate the building and land to the city, the city would renovate the building, and the VFW could use it for their meetings as long as they needed to. A deal was made and the building was

completely renovated. Again, with city and inmate labor as well as volunteers and his own labor, another landmark was saved. Today the building is the Lucedale Fine Arts Center and is regularly used for art shows, recitals and other public gatherings. Early this year Mayor Nelson and the city board were told by Buddy Horn and his wife, Patsy, that they wanted to donate a piece of property they had inherited to the city. This property, on Main Street, is commonly known as the old Paul Kinch Service Station, built in 1923. The building was vacant and not used. The mayor said, “Well there’s only one person to contact. Let’s talk to Dr. Whites.” And as we all knew he would, Dayton said, “Yes, I’ll be glad to head up the project.” Work was completed in August, and now we have a new Chamber of Commerce Building on Main Street.

Dr. Dayton Whites

Thank you, Dayton. Every small town needs a Dr. Whites. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 437,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Send to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“Da Vinci’s Machines,” through Nov. 11, Laurel. More than 75 inventions reconstructed from Leonardo Da Vinci’s illlustrations and writings. Free. Lauren Rogers Museum of Art. Details: 601-649-6374; Lrma.org. Fall Native Plant Sale, Oct. 5-6, Picayune. Hard-to-find native plants; focus on shrubs and trees for fall planting; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu. Cedar Hill’s Haunted Farm, Oct. 5-27, Hernando. Flashlight Corn Maize, hayride, haunted hayride, Trail of Terror, haunted barn, more. Admission. Cedar Hill Farm. Details: 662-429-2540; Halloween.GoCedarHillFarm.com. Bailey Haunted Firehouse, Oct. 5, 6, 12, 13, 19, 20, 26, 27, 31, Bailey community (Lauderdale County). Admission; 7 p.m. - 12 a.m.; on Halloween 7-10 p.m. Bailey Volunteer Fire Department. Details: baileyhauntedfh@comcast.net; Facebook. Octoberfest Celebration, Oct. 6, Hattiesburg. German food, music, silent auction, quilt raffle; 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. St. John’s Lutheran Church. Details: 601-583-4898. Dinner Dances, Oct. 6, 13, 20, 27; Nov. 3, 10, 17, 24, Gulfport. Dinner, 7 p.m., dance 8-10 p.m.; casual dress. Admission. Amour Danzar School of Ballroom Dance. Details: 228-3243730; AmourDanzar.com. Mississippi Community Symphonic Band and Mississippi Swing in Concert, Oct. 7, Pearl. Pearl High School; 3 p.m. Details: mcsb.us. Fourth Annual Holiday Extravaganza Gift Show, Oct. 13, Meridian. Christmas shopping, vendors; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tommy Dulaney Center, Hwy. 19 N. Details: 601-480-1776. Oktoc Country Store, Oct. 13, Oktoc community (Oktibbeha County). Baked goods, silent auction, quilt raffle, Brunswick stew, kids’ games; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Oktoc Community Center. Details: 662-341-1001. St. Clare Oyster Festival, Oct. 13, Waveland. Music, food, seafood; 10 a.m. - 10

p.m. St. Clare Catholic Church. Details: 228467-9275. Water Tower 10K Road Race, Oct. 13, Hernando. Begins at Town Square; after-race party with live music, door prizes, food. Details: 662-429-9092. Lower Delta Talks: “The Accidental Salvation of Gracie Lee,” Oct. 16, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Talya Tate Boerner; 6:30 p.m. Free. Bring lawn chairs. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Kids Market Children’s Consignment Sale, Oct. 18-20, Hattiesburg. Free admission. Cloverleaf Mall. Details: 601-467-5429; KidsMarketMS.com. Hannibal Buress Comedy Tour, Oct. 19, Hattiesburg. Admission; 8 p.m. Saenger Theater. Details: 601-545-4576; HattiesburgSaenger.com. Barn Sale, Oct. 19-20, Purvis (Oak Grove). More than 50 collectors with antiques, collectibles; 7 a.m. - 5 p.m. Parking fee; 4799 Old Hwy. 11. Details: 601-818-5886, 601-7947462.

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Great Mississippi River Balloon Race, Oct. 19, Natchez. Music, ballooning, carnival, arts/crafts market, more. Admission. Rosalie Mansion. Details: NatchezBalloonRace.com. Bluegrass Gospel Singing on the River/Cornhole Tournament, Oct. 20, Chunky. Featuring Leipers Fork Bluegrass, Pilgrim Family Bluegrass Band, Jason Archie Family; singing begins 11 a.m., tournament 3:30 p.m. Chunky River Recreation. Details: 601-480-3045. Lumberton Olde Tyme Festival, Oct. 20, Lumberton. Arts, crafts, entertainment, food, children’s activities; 8 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Details: 601-796-4212; info.ledc.ms@gmail.com. Sixth Annual Historic Griffin Cemetery Tour, Oct. 20, Moss Point. Hour-long tours with guides in period attire, starting at 9 a.m. Local authors, crafters. Free admission. Sponsored by Jackson County Historical and Genealogical Society. Details: Facebook: Historic Griffin Cemetery Tours. Gulf Coast Writers’ Association Writers Conference, Oct. 20, Long Beach. Guest speakers Jackie Warren Tatum, Mary Beth Magee, Richell Putman, others; 9 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Registration required. University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Park Campus. Details: GulfCoastWriters.org. Fall Festival, Oct. 20, Walls. Vendors, inflatables and games for kids, live music, silent auc-

tion, exhibits, Country Cafe, more. Free admission. Minor Memorial United Methodist Church. Details: 662-781-1333; MinorMemorial.org/fall-festival. John Prine in Concert, Oct. 26, Meridian. Admission; 7:30 p.m. MSU Riley Center. Details: 601-696-2200; MSURileyCenter.com. Rhythm on the River Festival, Oct. 26-27, Leflore County. Live music, food trucks, more. Admission. Tallahatchie Flats. Details: 662453-1854; TallahatchieFlats.com. Homochitto River Festival, Oct. 27, Meadville. Music, art show, arts/crafts, cookoff, trunk-a-treat, car show, children’s games, Touch-a-Truck, more; 10 a.m. - 6 p.m. Town Square. Details: 601-384-5206; HomochittoRiverFest@gmail.com. Great Delta Bear Affair, Oct. 27, Rolling Fork. Music, arts and crafts, children’s activities, costume run, fun dog show, live snakes, prehistoric mound tour, chainsaw woodcarving demos, more. Downtown. Details: 662873-6261; GreatDeltaBearAffair.org. Family PAWZ Day, Oct. 27, Picayune. Dogfriendly public garden; activities for families and their dogs; doggie fashion show; 10 a.m. 2 p.m. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-7992311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu. 11th Annual Black and Blue Civil War Living History, Oct. 27, Natchez. Reenactment of 3rd U.S. Colored Calvary, U.S.

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Colored Troops; 10 a.m. Historic Jefferson College. Details: 601-442-4719. Whitehall United Methodist Church Bazaar, Oct. 27, Louisville. Breakfast, lunch, crafts, recycled furniture, baked goods, more; 8 a.m. Details: Facebook: Whitehall UMC Bazaar. 43rd Annual Magee Crazy Day Fall Festival, Oct. 27, Magee. Arts/crafts vendors, 5K run/fun run, children’s activities, food, music stage; 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Details: 601-8492517. Heritage Day, Oct. 27, DeKalb. Free museum tour, outdoor music, BBQ, bake sale; 11 a.m. 1 p.m. Kemper County Historical Museum. Details: 601-934-2649. Jake Moeller Memorial Shallow Creek Homecoming, Oct. 27, Picayune. Bluegrass gospel singing; 6 p.m. Free; donations. Shallow Creek Farm. Details: 601-590-3577, aletamoeller@gmail.com. 13th Annual Christmas Handworks Bazaar, Nov. 2, Starkville. Some 30 vendors with hand-crafted wares; baked and frozen foods; 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. Benefits Habitat for Humanity. Starkville First United Methodist Church. Details: 662-323-5722. Missions Marketplace, Nov. 3, Puckett. Yard sale, soup cafe, holiday casseroles, desserts; 8 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Benefits Center Ridge Outpost Camp and Friends in Need Mission. Puckett United Methodist Church. Details: 601-591-5570. Harvest/Christmas Celebration, Nov. 3, Porterville. Blacksmithing, branding, chuckwagon, kids’ games, more begin 2 p.m. At 6

p.m., bluegrass gospel, country gospel featuring Cross Mountain Praise Band. Cross Mountain Ministries. Details: 601-743-5676. 16th Soulé Live Steam Festival, Nov. 2-3, Meridian. Steam engine demos, industrial/craftsman demos, historic factory tours, Carousel Organ Association of America’s Fall Rally, antique car show; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum. Details: 601-693-9905; SouleLiveSteam.com. Fourth Annual Car, Truck, Rat Rod Show/Antique Tractor Display, Nov. 3, Moselle. Spectators free; competition entry fee; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Moselle Memorial Baptist Church. Details: 601-580-5550. Laurel Gun Show, Nov. 3-4, Laurel. Admission. South Mississippi Fairgrounds. Details: 601-319-5248; BigPopGunShows.com. Bluegrass, Country & Gospel Music Festival, Nov. 5-10, Polkville. Featuring Catahoula Drive, The Wilsons, Davis County, more. Campsites available. Music Barn. Details: 601-946-0280, 601-955-9182. Fiber Art Exhibit: “Things I’ve Seen, Places I’ve Been,” Nov. 5-30, Pass Christian. Works by Dyed-in-the-Wool Weavers and Spinners Guild. Reception Nov. 8 with demos, 10:30 - 1 p.m. Pass Christian Library. Details: 228-669-2898. Harvest Fest, Nov. 6-10, Jackson. Demos of cotton gin, sawmill, cane mill, print shop, blacksmith shop operations; wagon and carousel rides; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Admission. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-432-4500; MSAgMuseum.org. The Talleys in Concert, Nov. 9, Petal. First

Baptist Church of Runnelstown; 7 p.m. Love offering. Details: 601-583-3733. Piney Woods Heritage Festival, Nov. 9-10, Picayune. Living history program on Fannye Cook, Mississippi’s pioneering conservationist and scientist; music, demos/displays of traditional skills and crafts. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311; CrosbyArboretum.msstate.edu. Pass Christian Yacht Club 22nd Holiday Boutique, Nov. 9-10, Pass Christian. More than 21 shops and artists, door prizes, homemade foods. Admission. Market Street. Details: 228-452-2571. Jingle Bell Jubilee Christmas Open House, Nov. 9-10, Louisville. Main Street merchants offer specials; $500 Louisville Dollars prize drawing. Downtown. Details: 662-773-3921; amy@winstoncounty.com. “A Christmas Story – The Musical,” Nov. 911, 16-18, Laurel. Stage musical for all ages based on the hit holiday movie. Admission. Laurel Little Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. Sean M. Cooley Memorial 5K Fun Run/Walk, Nov. 10, Ocean Springs. Fundraiser for nursing scholarships; registration starts 7:30 a.m., run 9:30 a.m. Front beach walk, Fort Maurepas. Details: SeanCooleyScholarship@gmail.com. Turkey Shoot, Nov. 10, Vestry community (Jackson County). Daisy Masonic Lodge #421, 25700 School House Road; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Details: 228-697-5980. Holiday Gift Bazaar, Nov. 10, Meridian. Thirty-five vendors, gumbo lunches; 9 a.m. - 3

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Today in Mississippi I 11

p.m. Free admission. Trinity Presbyterian Church. Details: 601-485-4105. Celtic Music Festival and Scottish Highland Games, Nov. 10-11, Gulfport. Seven Nations and other musicians, jousting, vendors, children’s activities, Irish dancing, bagpiping, sheep herding, artisans, authentic food, more. Admission. Harrison County Fairgrounds. Details: MSHighlandsAndIslands.org. Capital City Gun Show, Nov. 10-11, Jackson. Admission. Wahabi Shriners Temple. Details: 601-319-5248; BigPopGunShows.com. Magnolia State Gem, Mineral and Jewelry Show, Nov. 9-11, Pascagoula. Exhibits, demos, educational resources, vendors. Admission. Jackson County Fairgrounds Civic Center. Details: MGCGMS.org. Veterans Parade, Nov. 12, Hernando. Veterans, veterans groups, high school bands, first responders, more; 10 a.m. Hernando Courthouse Square. Details: 901-634-1548; HernandoVeteransParade.com. “James and the Giant Peach Jr. – The Musical,” Nov. 12, 13, 15, Pearl. Admission; 7 p.m. Pearl High School Performing Arts Center. Details: 601-664-9725; pearljrthespians@gmail.com. Lower Delta Talks: “The Importance and Art of Telling Our Stories,” Nov. 13, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Willy Bearden; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Stringer Alpaca Festival, Nov. 17, Stringer. Pet and feed alpacas, learn how their hair is made into yarn, arts and crafts, food, bounce houses, entertainment; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free admission; 383 County Road 155. Details: 716863-4366; AStrokAGeneUsAlpacas.com. 35th Annual Christmas at Landrum’s Homestead, Nov. 24-25, Laurel. Working homestead with over 80 buildings, Civil War reenactment, entertainment, dulcimers, Santa, wagon rides, gem mining, blacksmith, crafts, candlelight tours, more. Admission. Details: 601-649-2546; Landrums.com. Gingham Tree Arts and Crafts Festival, Nov. 10, Lucedale. More than 300 vendors; 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free admission and parking. George County Fairgrounds. Details: GinghamTree.com.


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Cooperatives see the future Dramatic changes are transforming all aspects of the energy industry. Interest in renewable energy is at an all-time high, and ultimately consumers want greater control over their energy use and payment methods. The prevalence of smartphone apps and “smart” technology for the home is increasing, and consumers and businesses are showing greater interest in electric vehicles. There’s no denying it: Electric utilities will have to make changes to the way they provide energy to accommodate these trends. Luckily, Coahoma Electric Power Association is uniquely positioned to meet these changing energy needs because we are a cooperative.

Co-ops are community-led October is National Co-op Month, which is the perfect time to highlight the

many ways electric cooperatives are unique. Cooperatives are locally governed, looking out for the long-term needs of their consumer-members. Keith Hurt, general manager of Coahoma Electric, explains: “Electric cooperatives belong to the communities they serve. This heightened community

focus allows us to quickly adapt to evolving consumer expectations. Our closeness to the community ensures a better response to these needs because we are led by the people that we serve.”

Co-ops are a catalyst for good Electric co-ops, like Coahoma Electric, are a catalyst for good in their

communities, beginning over 80 years ago when electric co-ops brought power to rural America by way of the Rural Electrification Act (REA). The cooperative model has been very effective in enhancing the quality of life for rural Americans, and they are ever striving to anticipate and plan for the future needs of their consumer-members. The co-op business model is unique. It is pragmatic, mission-oriented and puts people first. Co-ops strive to be a trusted voice in their communities. Co-ops have earned that trust because, while not perfect, they always have their members’ best interest at heart and are determined to enrich the lives of those living and working in the communities they serve––now and in the future.

SAFE, RELIABLE, AFFORDABLE ENERGY. THEN. NOW. ALWAYS. We are proud to power your life.

OCTOBER IS NATIONAL CO-OP MONTH


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Cybersecurity is everyone’s responsibility Technology breaches––think customer credit card data being stolen from Target, or consumer data being stolen from Experian––have become more commonplace, ushering in a new reality of increased security measures and constant monitoring of organizational and personal data to ensure our identities, credit card numbers or bank accounts have not been compromised. This new reality has made many realize that keeping systems secure is not solely the responsibility of information technology employees. Rather, it is incumbent on every individual to help keep critical personal data safe from potential breaches. It can seem a little overwhelming at times, and the idea that the next threat is always lurking around the corner can be stressful. But there are things you can do to protect your personal data, along with Coahoma Electric’s data.

Keep your defenses up! • Make sure all your computer software–– including your web browser––is updated with the latest software. Keeping software up to date ensures security patches being deployed by our security team can succeed in blocking security threats. • Create a strong password and keep it private. It could take up to two centuries to crack a password consisting of 12 characters

It’s time for an HVAC check-up Every fall before it gets too chilly outside, call a qualified heating and air conditioning technician to give your central heating system a once-over. In fact, it’s important to have your heating system professionally maintained every fall. Regularly maintaining your heating will help prevent a breakdown on a cold night during the dead of winter. Between annual check-ups, you can head off trouble by paying attention to your heating system. Here’s how: • Replace your system’s air filters once every three months. Dirty filters can get clogged and prevent air from flowing through them. That will make your system work harder, which is energy inefficient. • When you turn the heat on for the first time this fall, listen for banging, rattling or other unusual sounds. They could be a symptom of a malfunction-in-the-making. Call your tech back to check it. • If your windows are steaming up or you see rust or a lot of dirt on your heating vents, something is wrong. A professional can diagnose the problem. • And if some rooms in your home feel cold while others are comfortable, that’s a sign that something’s not quite right. Call for help.

or more! • Treat all Wi-Fi networks as a potential security risk. Encrypt sensitive data when using a public Wi-Fi network. And never check financial or other sensitive accounts when using public Wi-Fi. Don’t fall for a phish! • Be on the lookout for emails, phone calls and other messages that try to get to secure data. If it sounds too good to be true, it

OCTOBER IS NATIONAL CYBERSECURITY AWARENESS MONTH We all share responsibility for our organization’s online safety and security, and YOU are our first line of defense.

Think Before You Click • Always hover over a link first to be sure it is safe. • Report suspicious emails or emails from an unknown sender to your spam filter and delete them from your inbox.

Lockdown Your Log-in • Create long and unique passwords. Use familiar phrases or song lyrics you’ll remember. • When possible, use 2-factor authentication as a second layer of defense.

Cooler temps are just around the corner! Is your home’s heating system ready? Remember to replace furnace filters once a month or as recommended. If you heat your home with warm-air registers, baseboard heaters or radiators, remember to clean them regularly to increase efficiency. Source: energy.gov

• Change passwords regularly, and do not share them.

TIP of the

Month

probably is. If something seems off, trust your instinct and convey your concerns to a manager or member of the security team. • Don’t click on links or attached files in emails or text messages from senders you don’t know. Even if you do know the sender, hover over the link before you click as they may have been hacked or someone could be spoofing them! There are many ways to spot a phish, and you can visit www.staysafeonline.org to see them all. Keeping your data safe Electric co-ops take every precaution to protect your data. Coahoma Electric keeps up with current trends in the industry to better protect our members from security threats. Whether keeping your data safe at home, at the workplace or on the go, remember: You are the first line of defense against cybersecurity threats!

Watch for Red Flags to Identify Potential Phish Attacks • Phishing attempts seek to steal or compromise data and will often mimic a known sender. Look for red flags: 1. the email is unexpected; 2. there is a sense of urgency conveyed; 3. there is an offer that seems too good to be true; and/or 4. there are typos and misspellings.

Defend Your Computer • The best defense against viruses, malware and other online threats is keeping your equipment up to date. • Work with our IT staff (or provider) to keep your software, including your web browser, and operating systems current.

Protect Sensitive Information • Use encryption to protect sensitive data. • Limit the spread of any attack by only accessing files and folders you need. • Do not put confidential information in emails, or instant and text messages.

Practice Good Cyber Hygiene On the Go • Treat all public Wi-Fi networks as a security risk, and don’t make financial or other sensitive transactions over public networks.

Want more tips to improve your cyber hygiene? Want more tips to improve your cyber hygiene?

Visit Visit www.staysafeonline.org. www.staysafeonline.org.


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Sweet Potato Holiday Salad 1 (8-oz.) can crushed pineapple, undrained 1 cup apricot nectar 1 (3-oz.) pkg. apricot-flavored gelatin 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, cubed and softened

1 cup shredded raw sweet potatoes 1 cup chopped pecans 1 cup frozen whipped topping, thawed

Combine pineapple and apricot nectar in a saucepan; bring to a boil. Add gelatin, stirring until gelatin dissolves. Add cream cheese and stir until melted. Chill until the consistency of unbeaten egg white. Fold in sweet potatoes, pecans and whipped topping. Pour into 5-cup mold or 9-inch square dishes. Chill until firm. Wonderful side dish for turkey or ham. Yields 9 to 12 servings.

Sweet potato roots run deep

in Vardaman

Mississippians love sweet potatoes as a tasty, nutritious and inexpensive addition to any meal. Sweet potatoes are a big deal for Mississippi farmers too. Mississippi ranks second in the nation in sweet potato acreage and third in production. “This year the Mississippi acreage was down somewhat and is about 25,000 acres as opposed to 2017, when we grew over 28,000 acres,” said Sylvia Clark, of the Mississippi Sweet Potato Council. Mississippi’s sweet potato industry contributes more than $130 million in total value each year to the state’s economy and creates more than 1,000 jobs, according to the Mississippi State University Extension Service. Calhoun, Chickasaw and Webster counties are the state’s primary sweet potato-producing counties. This is the home of the famous Vardaman sweet potato, named after the sweet potatogrowing town in Calhoun County. What makes the Vardaman sweet potato special? “We think it’s the soil and the climate and the expertise of the farmers, because they’ve been doing it so long. They just know what to do,” Clark said. “There’s just something about the flavor of the Vardaman sweet potato that we think is exceptional,” she said. Vardaman’s sweet potato production dates to 1915 when a few families from Martin, Tenn., established small

farms in the area. Fourth- and fifthgeneration growers from those original families continue the tradition. “They’re all still family farms, even the largest one that grows 3,000 acres,” Clark said. Natchez Trace Electric Power Association serves the farms’ electric power needs. Vardaman has celebrated its sweet potato heritage for more than 40 years with the annual Sweet Potato Festival, this year set for Nov. 3. Special related events continue through Nov. 10. (Get details at VardamanSweetPotato Festival.com.) Sweet potatoes and potatoes are both root vegetables, but they come from different plant families. The sweet potato is an excellent source of beta-carotene, vitamins A and C, dietary fiber and many other nutrients. The Center for Science in the Public Interest ranks sweet potatoes above all other vegetables for nutritional content. And they’re suitable for people who are trying to reduce their consumption of carbohydrates. Sweet potatoes can be baked, boiled, steamed, roasted, grilled, microwaved and even eaten raw. They are enjoyed year-round in casseroles, dips, salads, or simply served alone as a side dish. The Mississippi Sweet Potato Council offers recipes—included those reprinted here—and nutritional information at MSSweetPotato.org.

Sweet Potato Caramel Pie ¼ cup butter or margarine 1 (7-oz.) can flaked coconut ½ cup chopped pecans 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 ½ cups cooked sweet potato puree

1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed milk 2 (8-oz.) containers frozen whipped topping, thawed 2 vanilla wafer pie shells 1 (12-oz.) jar caramel ice cream topping

Melt butter in a large skillet. Add coconut and pecans. Cook until golden brown, stirring frequently. Set mixture aside. Combine cream cheese, sweet potatoes and condensed milk. Beat until smooth. Fold in whipped topping. Spread ½ of the cream cheese mixture in each pie shell. Drizzle ¼ of the caramel topping over each pie. Sprinkle ¼ of the coconut mixture over each pie. Repeat layers with remaining ingredients. Cover and freeze until firm. Let stand at room temperature 5 minutes before serving. Yields 2 large pies. If purchased graham cracker crusts are used, it makes 3 pies.

Sweet Potato Casserole 3 cups mashed sweet potatoes 1 cup sugar ½ cup margarine 2 eggs, slightly beaten 1 tsp. vanilla extract ½ cup raisins (optional)

Topping: 1 cup light-brown sugar 1 cup chopped pecans ¼ cup margarine ½ cup flour

Mix potatoes, sugar, margarine, eggs, vanilla and raisins, and pour into a casserole dish. Mix topping ingredients well and spread over potatoes. Bake at 350 F for 40 to 60 minutes (to your desired doneness). This recipe may be doubled. This recipe was a grand prize winner at the first Vardaman Sweet Potato Festival, held more than 40 years ago.

Sweet Potato Chewy Bars 4 eggs ¾ cup cooking oil 1 cup coconut 1 tsp. vanilla extract

1 box dark-brown sugar 2 cups Bisquick 1 cup chopped pecans 1 cup finely shredded sweet potatoes

Combine all ingredients and pour into an oblong pan (9 x 13 inches). Bake 45 minutes at 350 F.

Sweet Potato Cheese Ball 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened ½ cup cooked, mashed sweet potatoes 1 (2.5-oz.) pkg. smoked beef, chopped 2 cups (8 oz.) shredded sharp Cheddar cheese

¼ cup crushed pineapple, well drained 1 Tbsp. chopped onion

Combine cream cheese and potato, mixing well. Stir in beef, Cheddar cheese, pineapple and onion; mix well. Form into a ball and chill. Serve with crackers.


October 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

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Today in Mississippi I October 2018

Container-grown herbs are a great fall option lthough we’re finally into the fall season, it’s still 90 degrees outside across Mississippi. Nevertheless, we all need to start thinking about what we’re going to plant and grow for the eventual cool weather. Besides the usual cool-season color, which I’ll write about later, herbs are plants that many gardeners forget about. I think there’s nothing like growing and enjoying fresh herbs. Fall is a great time to grow herbs. If you don’t already have an herb garden, likely overwaterers. fall is the perfect time to start one. I Herbs, with few exceptions, like to be never want to make gardening a difficult grown on the dry side, which seems to task, so what better way to grow and concentrate the essential oils and flavors. enjoy herbs than growing them in conBe sure to water well when first planttainers? ing, and allow the containers to feel dry The herbs I’m growing this fall to the touch before watering again. include sage, dill, parsley As the temperatures drop and basil. Sage has longish, later this fall, you can reduce coarse, gray-green leaves the watering frequency, but that feel soft and velvety never let your herb containers and release a warm, fradry out completely. grant aroma when rubbed One benefit of growing fall between your fingers. We herbs in containers is that they use a lot of dill to pickle are more manageable. Also, vegetables and season fresh you will have less weeding to Southern Gulf fish. do. Gardening Parsley is a great addiYou will be surprised at how by Dr. Gary Bachman tion to many recipes, espemany more herbs fit in a tight cially those using homespace when grown in containgrown tomatoes. And I ers. Even if you have only a love using fresh basil for everything from small patio, balcony or a sunny kitchen homemade pesto to refreshing mojitos. window, you can still enjoy fresh herbs The purple varieties add a gorgeous pur- all fall and winter. And they are easier to ple-red-pink tint to recipes. bring inside on cold nights. There are lots of herbs ready to plant Be sure to choose attractive herb at your local garden center, making this plants so you can enjoy the visual aesis an easy way to get started growing thetics as well as the culinary delights. them this fall. Many of the basic herb species are availRemember to use a good-quality, able in green, variegated and multicolpeat-based potting mix. Some herb afiored foliage. Remember, we eat with our cionados don’t fertilize their herb plants, eyes as well as our mouths. The multibut I like to fertilize at planting with a colored herbs work well in recipes, but controlled-release fertilizer using one-half their best use may be as flavorful garto 1 tablespoon per plant blended into nishes. the soil or top-dressed on the mix. This No one likes to make that long walk is enough for basic plant growth, but it across the yard to harvest herbs for a keeps the nutrition lean to help limit recipe, so be sure to place your containgrowth. ers where they will be easily accessible. Watering can be a tricky proposition. When you do this, you can enjoy the Most unsuccessful herb gardeners are goodness of fresh herb whenever needed.

A

Herbs are excellent choices for container gardening. This mixed herb container was made by the Pine Belt Master Gardeners. Dill, at left, is an easy herb to grow and is a great addition to seafood and pickled vegetables. Photos: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

Next in “Picture This”

Kittens Kittens may be the best photo subject of all. They’re funny, cute, beautiful, mischievous, playful, cuddly and curious. Send us your photo(s) of one or more kittens, and be sure to include their name. Selected photos will appear in the January 2019 issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Dec. 3.

I Submission guidelines

• Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If emailing a phone photo, select “actual size” before sending. We cannot use compressed photo files.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places

in the picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

I How to submit photos

Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Or, mail prints or a CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 391583300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2019. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601605-8600 or news@ecm.coop.


October 2018

I

Today in Mississippi

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I

19


20

I

Fair fun

Today in Mississippi

I

October 2018

PICTURE THIS:

2

1 1. Kellyn Lyon races past at the South Mississippi Fair, Laurel. Allen Hill, Laurel; Dixie Electric member. 2. James Perry experiences centrifugal force at the Delta Fair. Angela L. Perry, Olive Branch; Northcentral Electric member. 3. Feeding time fun at the Mississippi State Fair petting zoo, Jackson. Kim Edwards, Brandon; Central Electric member. 4. Who doesn’t love the Tilt-A-Whirl. Michelle Cuevas, Kiln; Coast Electric member. 5. Merry-go-round magic at the Mississippi State Fair, Jackson. Eva Harris, Brandon; Southern Pine Electric member 6. Madeline Ertle enjoys her first county fair. Sharon Ertle, Bentonia; Yazoo Valley Electric member. 7. Emma Lea rides the ferris wheel with her granddad so he won’t be scared. Tim Lea, Wanilla community, Lawrence County; Southern Pine Electric members. 8. Lori and son Walker have a blast on the Scrambler. Lori Griffin, Yazoo City; Yazoo Valley Electric member.

3

4


October 2018

I

Today in Mississippi

I

21

5

6

7

8

9 9. Viviann Smith and her family travel to the Natchez Balloon Festival every year. Jody Smith, Hammond, La.; Southwest Electric member. 10. Cousins James and Biven Patterson ride at the Yazoo County Fair. Jason Patterson, Yazoo City; Yazoo Valley Electric member.

Our next “Picture This� theme:

Kittens Submissions are due Dec. 3. Find details on page 18.

10


22

I

Today in Mississippi

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October 2018

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CALL L NOW 1-888-34 45-1838 VISIT INFINITYDISH.COM FO OR MORE WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS AYS A WEEK; 8 AM – MIDNIGHT EST, SUNDAY AY 9 AM – MIDNIGHT EST • OFFER ONLY GOOD D FOR NEW DISH SUBSCRIBERS. S. • SE HABLA ESP PA AÑOL All calls with InfinityDISH are monitored and recorded for quality assurance and training purposes. Offer for new and qualifying former customers only. Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfronnt activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. Offer ends 11/14/18. 2-Year Commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $59.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 programming package, local channels, HD service fees, and Hopper Duo for 1 TV. Includeed in 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($69.99 for AT120+, $79.99 for AT200, $89.99 for AT250), monthly fees for upgraded or additional receivers ($5-$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15). NOOTT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Ta Taxes & surcharges, s add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Protect, and transactional fees. Premium Channels: 3 Mos. Free: After 3 mos., you will be billed $30/mo. for Showtime, Starz and DISH Movie Pack unless you call to cancel. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality and all prices and fees not included in price lock are subject to chhange without notice. After 6 mos., if selected you will be billed $8.99/mo. for DISH Protect Silver unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. Free standard professional installation only. SHOWTIME is a registered trademark of Showtime Networks Inc., a CBS Comppany. STA TARZ and related channels and service marks are property of Starz Entertainment, LLC. Amazon Alexa: Requires internet-connected Hopper, Joey, Wally, and any Amazon Alexa-enabled device. Amazon, Alexa, and all related logos and motion marks are trademarks of Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. Google: Requires internet-connected Hopper, Joey, Wally, andd any Google Assistant-enabled device. Google Home and Google Home Mini are trademarks of Google L.L.C. Alexa Integration: Requires internet-connected Hopper, Joey, Wally, and any Amazon Alexa-enabled device. Internet: Internet speeds, prices, and providers vary by customer address. Call for details. Internet not provided by DISH and will be billed separately. Mastercard® gift card must be requested through your DISH Representative at time of purchase. $100 Mastercard® gift card requires activation. Yoou will receive a claim voucher within 3-4 weeks and the voucher must be returned within 60 days. Yoour Mastercard® gift card will arrive in approximately 6-8 weeks. InfinityDISH charges a one-time $49.99 non-refundable pprocessing fee which is subject to change at any time without notice. Indiana C.PP.D. Reg. No. T.S. R1903.

Today in Mississippi October 2018 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi October 2018 Coahoma

Today in Mississippi October 2018 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi October 2018 Coahoma