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News for members of Coahoma Electric Power Association

Billups nostalgia

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

drives diner concept

Guy Billups III

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MFWC cookbook supports heart health

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Historic school to be preserved


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Today in Mississippi

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September 2018

COU UNTRY LIVING MADE EASIER R WITH MUELLER STEEL BUILDINGS


September 2018

Cooperation is key to restoring power quickly in an emergency ooperation is the best way to get things done. That’s especially true when it comes to restoring electric service in the wake of a hurricane, tornado, ice storm or other disaster. Electric cooperatives have a long history of joining forces to rebuild storm-damaged electric distribution systems, thus restoring their members’ service faster without sacrificing the safety of their crews and the public. We’re good at this work, yet we never stop looking for ways to improve our emergency preparedness and response efforts. For this reason, Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM) each year hosts an emergency work plan meeting. Electric cooperative power-restoration and safety professionals My Opinion from a dozen states converged at Michael Callahan Executive Vice President/CEO this year’s meeting, held in Electric Cooperatives August. of Mississippi After Hurricane Andrew in 1992, ECM and its counterparts in Louisiana and Alabama began to meet annually to discuss and plan for mutual assistance in emergencies. We knew there would be much to be gained by sharing experiences—good and bad—among our cooperative network, and by working together to find solutions to challenges confronting all electric utilities in an emergency. A unique challenge electric cooperatives face, however, stems from the rural nature of our service territories. (Indeed, the very reason not-for-profit electric cooperatives exist is to serve rural areas that for-profit electric utilities had chosen not to serve, due to their questionable profit potential.) It takes more than 94,000 of miles of power lines to serve all electric cooperative members in Mississippi, and therein lies the challenge: How do you restore

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On the cover Inspired by the history of his family’s Billups Petroleum service stations, Guy Billups III named his 1950s-themed diners after the company’s slogan, Fill-Up with Billups. The diners are located in Oxford and Biloxi, with a third set to open this month in Madison.

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

power quickly to the folks at the far end of the line when that line snakes through miles of woods and swamps? In a major storm there are likely to be huge numbers of utility poles broken and power lines down— not to mention roads blocked by fallen trees. In Greenwood-based Delta Electric Power Association’s service territory alone, for example, the 1994 ice storm destroyed some 10,000 utility poles. In only a few hours, ice destroyed what took years to build. Hurricane Katrina did much worse, but you get the idea. After each disaster, electric cooperatives emerge more knowledgeable and even better prepared. The annual emergency work plan meetings provide the forum we need to share what we’ve learned. The goal is to hone our disaster response and mutual-assistance efforts in coordination with electric cooperatives in other states. Mutual assistance is invaluable in recovering from widespread power outage emergencies. Our emergency work plan allows us to call in extra line crews and equipment in order to rebuild power lines faster—and to return the favor when cooperatives in other states need our help. Because the national network of transmission and distribution infrastructure owned by electric cooperatives has been built to federal standards, line crews from any electric cooperative in the country can arrive at an emergency scene in Mississippi (or any other state) and go to work on a familiar electrical system. Not every disaster will require us to ask for assistance from outside the state. Most of the time, Mississippi’s 26 electric cooperatives can handle emergency repairs by working together. Should a major storm cripple our electrical system, knocking out your power for an extended period of time, take comfort in knowing Mississippi’s electric cooperatives have an effective, efficient plan of action for getting you back “on” fast.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith - First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

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EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING • 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. • National advertising representative: American MainStreet Publications 800-626-1181 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300 Circulation of this issue: 438,424

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Today in Mississippi

OUR HOMEPLACE

One way to survive a hot day is to find a relatively cool spot and sit a spell. This shady retreat at Onward Store overlooks a cotton field off US 61, in Sharkey County.

Mississippi is The South is in her heart The Trace – her backbone. Ole Man River is her soul, She’s the mockingbird’s home. She holds her head high But doesn’t snub her nose. She’s got Delta on her fingers And Gulf on her toes. She likes azaleas in the spring And pecans in the fall. She grows beautiful live oaks But loves magnolias most of all. She loves river cats And fried green tomatoes. She can make a slap-yo-mama pie Just from sweet potatoes. Her summers are hot and humid, She cools down with iced tea. She’s my home state, Her name is Mississippi.

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi is brought to you by your member-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative and its various services, including wise energy use. If you are not a member of a subscribing cooperative, you can purchase a subscription for $9.50 per year. Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office.

— Lynda O’Quinn, Church Hill

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Fill-Up with Billups By Elissa Fulton

There was a time when the “Fill-Up with Billups” slogan adorned highways throughout the southern states. With over 600 Billups Petroleum service stations spanning across eight states from Florida to Texas, the Billups family made quite a name for themselves during a time when two world wars and the Great Depression hit hard most of the people living in the United States. The company that began in 1927 and grew over the next 36 years, until it was sold to other proprietors in 1963, was founded by Rowell Billups when he built a full-service gas station in Carrolton, Miss. The station had two pumps, premium and ethyl. As the company expanded, Billups’ brothers, Guy Billups Sr. and Buddy Billups, became involved with the enterprise and the Fill-Up with Billups name grew exponentially. The headquarters office was moved to Greenwood and Buddy Billups moved to Hammond, La., launching Billups Eastern. Guy Sr. went to Louisiana with his brother and worked with him there. Eventually, as the story goes, they became the No. 1 independent oil company in the nation and were the first successful oil company from the south. In 1963, the brothers sold the company to Exxon, Citco and Charter Marketing. Guy Billups III remembers a time as a young boy when the service stations were still operated by his family. When they sold the company, they gave each

effective marketing approach. They found it “At a time when people found it hard important to check cusmanager the opportutomers’ air in their tires, to find jobs, the Billups had quite a nity to buy their check fluids in the engine, success story. When you stop to ponstore. Many of these offer specialty items inside managers, mostly in the stores and send cusder it, the company that they grew Mississippi and tomers on their way with a during that time began right here in Louisiana, took the full tank of gas. It was full family up on the service, certainly a thing of Mississippi.” offer, so Billups stathe past. tions actually contin“They decided to put mirrors in the back of the ued to operate as indestations, and they put all kinds of stuff in the stations, pendently owned stores well so you could sit inside your car and see everything into the 1980s. inside. And it also made it look bigger, but you could Guy Billups III has never forliterally sit in your car and the kids could see teddy gotten the legacy that his family left behind. “At a bears, bows and arrows and coon skin caps,” said time when people found it hard to find jobs, the Guy. “I was told by someone who knew my grandfaBillups had quite a success story,” he said. “When ther, that he didn’t make his first million off selling you stop to ponder it, the company that they grew gas, but that he made it off selling coon skin caps.” during that time began right here in Mississippi. That After working in the automotive sales industry was quite a feat.” and banking for most of his career, Guy knew he The Billups family was known for their service and would one day honor the legacy of his family.


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Above: Customers dine at the Fill-Up with Billups location on the courthouse square in Oxford. The small restaurant boasts a 1950s retro diner theme, and large photographs of the old Billups stations decorate the walls in both the Oxford and Biloxi locations. Below: Grillmaster Jamie Carter displays the Monte Cristo breakfast sandwich, one of the many delicious items served at the Fill-Ups with Billups restaurants. Owner Guy Billups III is a member of both North East Electric Power Association and Delta Electric Power Association.

“I didn’t particularly want to do the same thing that they did, but I always knew Fill-Up with Billups would work again in some fashion,” he said. When he began the process of acquiring the trademark, he had to prove to himself that he could sell a product first. That’s when Guy and his wife, Hattie, began a small coffee company in Oxford named FillUp with Billups in 2014. In a surprising discovery, the Fill-Up with Billups name was never trademarked, and Guy hit the jackpot when he realized the name was not sold along with his family’s service stations. After procuring the trademark, he was free to resume the Fill-Up with Billups legacy. In October 2017, Guy and Hattie partnered with longtime friends from south Mississippi—brothers Jordan, Field and Lloyd Nicaud and their parents, Kent and Jenny Nicaud—to start a restaurant project on the courthouse square in Oxford. The Nicauds are well aware of the dedication it takes to run a restaurant; they are the owners of the Bacchus restaurants statewide. When Bacchus moved into the old Rowdy Rebs location on the square, it seemed a perfect time to launch the Fill-Up with

Billups diner project. “I had never been in the restaurant business,” Guy said. “I’ve known them for a long time and we’ve talked about it, but when the space became available, Jordan approached me with the breakfast diner idea. The Nicauds are the restauranteurs and they are the ones that designed the menu, although I did request the grillades. The whole idea was to be an upscale ‘50s retro diner and it’s working pretty well for us.” In March 2018, Fill-Up with Billups opened in Biloxi with the same ‘50s diner theme. Guy dreams of expanding it as far as it will go, with possible future locations in Hammond, La., and Jackson. The idea is to recreate the Billups name. The restaurant was not designed for Guy to be present daily. He charges Susan Coley with that responsibility. Coley has worked for the Nicaud’s for many years and as the general manager, she manages the day-to-day operations. Guy does like to visit often, however, and enjoys visiting the customers. He has a genuine interest in those who visit the restaurants. “What’s really been interesting is that the elder people remember the Billups service stations and the college students question it. They want to know where

Top photo: The Billups station in Meridian looked much like the other stations across the southeast, with colorful flags and banners noticeable to any driver approching the stations. Middle photo: This 1953 Ford Courier was used to travel from the Greenwood headquarters to the stations across the southeast. Bottom photo: The Star location looked much like the other Billups stations. These photographs line the walls of the Fill-Up with Billups restaurants to showcase the history of the trademark familiy business.

the service stations are, so then I get to talk to them about the story. So there’s a whole new generation now that is learning about history right here from Mississippi. It was a huge success story and it was always important for me to push that narrative,” Guy said. In opening his restaurant, Guy wanted to recreate the name and the memories of the Billups family. “Those are the stories that mean a lot to me,” he said. “Those are the things that really drew me to all of this.” Fill-Up with Billups restaurants are located at 1107 Jackson Ave. E. in Oxford and 100 Caillavet St. in Biloxi. The third location opens this month in Madison. Learn more at FillupwithBillups.com.


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Icon of history: the county courthouse ama grew up in Fulton, about halfway between Tupelo and the Alabama state line, in Itawamba County. Although an interstate highway runs through Fulton today, as does the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, and Toyota parts are manufactured in Itawamba County, that part of Mississippi at one time was very isolated. So it was kind of ironic back during the Cold War when two Itawamba County farmers were discussing whether or not Mississippi to build a fallout Seen shelter. One said by Walt Grayson he saw no need for it where they lived. The other was shocked! “Don’t need one! Why, don’t you know Fulton is one of the first places they’ll hit?” “Why on earth would anybody want to bomb Fulton?” “It’s the county seat, ain’t it?” Well, that conversation may or may not have happened. I like it because I think it’s funny. But it also illustrates the lofty esteem our forefathers had for the stability and order government represented. The first public building in a new area, besides a church, was the county courthouse. After I had been going around the state doing feature stories for a number of years, I began to notice that I had never been to Ashland, the seat of Benton County government. After a while I sort of made it a game to see how long it would be before my work actually took me there. Long story short, I was amazed when I finally did make it because of the old courthouse in the middle of downtown Ashland. It reminds me somewhat of the Carroll County Courthouse at Carrollton and the old courthouse at Jacinto—and for that matter, the Itawamba County Courthouse at Fulton before it was encased in a renovation. Carroll County still uses their courthouse after adding more office space. The old courthouse at Jacinto was no longer needed when they divided the original Tishomingo County into three smaller

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Benton County was established in 1870. Its courthouse in Ashland was built in 1871. The county has outgrown it as a functional courthouse but has not outgrown the need to keep it as a reminder of history and the orderly society such places ideally represent. Photo: Walt Grayson

counties. Matter of fact, it was sold for scrap and only saved when people realized it was a treasure and a doctor put up $2,000 to keep it from demolition. Actually, the folks in Benton County moved their functional courthouse years ago to larger quarters. But within the past year the old courthouse at Ashland has come back to life once again—not as an official county governmental building but as a museum. The Benton County Historical Society recently started repurposing the downstairs of the old courthouse as a place to

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display the history and memorabilia of the county. There is also a gift shop that is beginning to blossom with more and more merchandise. The plan is to eventually refurbish the entire building. The upstairs courtroom was fairly well cleaned up when someone donated a sizable model train display. It’s being stored up there right now. The train set itself will be a great addition to the museum’s collection once it’s put back together. The old Benton County Courthouse at Ashland is open two mornings a week, Wednesdays and Saturdays, from 9 until noon, with the bonus of a farmers market on the grounds on Wednesdays. But of all the artifacts at the museum, the building itself is probably the most

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important. The county courthouse was always in the center of town, and ideally the community was a community because of the social stability it stood for. So with the courthouse representing that aspect of our values, it isn’t so far fetched to think if an enemy really wanted to disrupt our way of life, they would bomb the county seat first, no matter the size or the location.

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September 2018

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Try the old for shooting success

ne essential to precise rifle shooting is the sighting system. In recent years this element has slowly but certainly become the arena of scopes and/or dot sights in their various and extensive forms. Rare it is in this age of modern gear to see a rifle minus some type optic sitting atop the action. And there is good reason for this. Optics are now more reliable than ever, and a vast array of options accompany scopes and dots. Plus, these mitigate many of the issues associated with being able to place a shot into a specific spot. But don’t determine that scopes and dots are the only option. Sights in some form have been employed on rifles since the rifle was developed. History reveals that sights, primitive by today’s standards, were used on rifled firearms as early as Outdoors 1450, plus or Today minus a few years. by Tony Kinton These sights were required to gain the accuracy advantage a rifled barrel afforded over the smoothbore, and their progression moved along steadily as did the rifle itself. In their initial makeup, these sights were and are referred to as open sights, a front and back. The primary purpose of a back sight was a solid station in which to line up the front sight. They work. But, there are drawbacks. Primary among those shortcomings is the fact that the human eye can’t completely focus simultaneously on three objects along a plane that is ever extending from that eye. While this can be done more reliably with young eyes, as we age it becomes a near impossibility. Back sight, front sight, target. Something will go lacking in the focus department. Still, open sights are reliable and rugged and are common on a great many new rifles even today.

An aperture sight is simple. Just look through the hole and line up the front sight on the target. Apertures such as this one are sleek and unobtrusive. They don’t change the balance or feel of the rifle. Photos: Tony Kinton

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However, somewhere along the way a modification of the open sight idea was put into use. This approach used a small circle as the rear sight and is generally known as the peep. More accurately perhaps is the term aperture. This aperture plays on the human eye’s ability to seek out and immediately find the point of greatest light. That, in the case of the aperture sight, is the center. Once settled on that point, all that remains is for the front sight to be held on the target at the spot the shooter wishes the projectile to arrive. Thus, that complex near impossibility of focusing on three objects is diminished. The rear sight is basically disregarded because the eye will be centered in the peep without conscious effort. That leaves only the front sight and target. Smooth and quick this procedure is. Some may question this process and conclude that looking through a hole and not intentionally placing the front sight in a specific locale within that hole won’t produce desired results. That question has been answered! Military and police personnel have been using the aperture system for decades, and most weapons built

for such use come equipped with these sights. Hunters and target shooters as well employ aperture sights with great success. Interesting it is that a relatively old system is still going strong; in fact, it may be gaining new converts every year. At perhaps one tenth the cost of scopes, the aperture sight is a bargain and fully functional, even for aging eyes. I began using aperture sights three decades back, these on a variety of rifles that passed through my hands. Still use that system on a few units I have. One in particular is a Marlin 39A. This is a nifty little lever rig in .22, and it goes to the squirrel woods with me regularly. It also sees duty at punching holes in cans and paper. The 39A has always worn an aperture sight. The first one was a side-mounted block that matched factory-drilled holes, with the sight resting in that block. That was a fine setup, but I recently discovered one that is more compact and unobtrusive. The one I discovered is a Skinner (skinnersights.com). It is all steel, sleek, rugged, mounts in the holes on top of the action and is truly becoming on the

Marlin .22. It is fully adjustable and absolutely perfect. Most of the apertures I use now are set on lever-action rigs, and the peeps don’t ruffle my sensitivities like a scope on a lever action would. Apertures fit the setting. And of equal or even more importance is that these sights allow me to keep shooting the levers despite the fact that my eyes are definitely not what they once were. So, the old is still bringing success. Too good to miss—the aperture sight. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.

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Hot and sweet peppers produce best in fall everal weeks ago, I wrote about looking forward to the time of year when ornamental peppers start strutting their gorgeous fruit colors. What I didn’t mention is that late summer is not just for ornamental peppers; I always get my best home-grown culinary peppers from August until frost in the fall. My tastes for culinary peppers range from the mild and colorful bell peppers all the way to the superhot selections like Ghost, Scorpion and Carolina Reaper. “Heat” is measured in units called Scovilles, named after Wilber Scoville, the scientist who developed the rating system. Fruits of Capsicum, the botanical genus of all peppers, contain the compound capsaicin in varying concentrations. Capsaicin is the chemical com-

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pound that stimulates the nerve endings on our tongues to feel that “hot” sensation. Capsaicin is concentrated in the inner white pith of the peppers. Contrary to popular belief, the seeds do not carry any heat, but since they are produced on those inner pith layers, they can be coated with the capsaicin. Here’s a list of peppers and their heat content in Scovilles: Bell: 0 Jalapeno: 2,500 to 5,000 Serrano: 5,000 to 23,000 Tabasco: 30,000 to 50,000 Cayenne: 30,000 to 125,000 Habanero: 100,000 to 350,000 Ghost: 1 million Carolina Reaper: up to 2.2 million (what I call weapons grade) Whether you like to eat them or not, I think peppers are interesting in their

ECM Foundation announces winners

The four winners of the 2018 engineering scholarships sponsored by the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM) Foundation were announced recently at a luncheon held in their honor. Michael Callahan, ECM CEO, praised the students for their commitment to a career in electrical engineering. “This is a very distinguished group, and based on their academic achievements, outstanding attitude and work ethic, they will be an asset to our industry,” Callahan said. The winners are: • Jose Luis Dominguez (top photo), of Meridian, sponsored by Magnolia Electric Power, pictured with Michael Callahan, left, and Darrell Smith, right, general manager of Magnolia Electric Power. • Haley Hutcherson (left photo), of Meridian, sponsored by East Mississippi EPA, pictured with Randy Carroll, CEO of East Mississippi EPA. • Joshua Matthews (right photo), of Perkinston, sponsored by Cooperative Energy, pictured with Jim Compton, president/CEO of Cooperative Energy. • Richard Tran (not pictured), of Fort Smith, Ark., sponsored by Cooperative Energy.

color development. All the fruit start off green as they begin to grow. I get questions every year from people saying the tags with the pepper transplants they bought from the garden center say they’re supposed to be yellow or red, but the fruit is green. As they mature, the peppers develop the various colors they were bred to display. One of my favorite ways to prepare and consume the peppers I grow is to fire roast them. Simply put your fresh peppers on a really hot grill until they develop a hard char. If you don’t want to use a grill, it works almost as well to place them under the broiler. After the peppers are blackened, put them in a bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Their Southern heat, in terms of temperature, Gardening releases steam. by Dr. Gary Bachman When cool, the blackened skin peels right off, and your peppers retain that smoky taste. I love eating these right off the grill.

But we also can them for use in the winter or to be ready for the zombie apocalypse, whichever comes first. One of the best peppers I have grown in recent years is Giant Marconi. This is an elongated, Italian sweet pepper selection that tastes great and has no heat. The fruit is up to 8 inches long and has a smoky flavor without the need for the grill. I think they taste best when fully bright red. Giant Marconi is an All-America Selection winner that produces strongly through the heat and humidity of our south Mississippi summer. I’m currently conducting a production trial with about 100 plants. Since mid-June, we’ve harvested five full 15-gallon containers of ripe and delicious fruit from these plants growing in Biloxi at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center. I realize it’s too late to start peppers this season, but I hope you’ll consider growing peppers next year. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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The Power in Preparation Preparation is the key to success in many things we do in life. Planning, practice and thoughtful assessment provide opportunities to work out potential problems in advance. September is National Preparedness Month, and the Department of Homeland Security’s Federal Emergency Management Agency is encouraging all of us to prepare for emergencies. But most of us do better when we prepare for the routine, the extraordinary and the unexpected. For electric cooperatives in Mississippi, preparation plays a huge role in ensuring that our members have the electricity they need as soon as they flip a light switch or start an appliance. When a co-op crew pulls a truck into a loading bay, warehouse workers have already pulled the parts and equipment needed for that crew’s scheduled day’s work. When a member services representative discusses balanced billing by telephone, they’re helping a member with preparations to ease the impact of seasonal high bills. When meteorologists call for exceptionally hot or cold weather, electric co-ops work closely with their generation and transmission cooperatives (G&Ts) to ensure adequate supplies of electricity are reserved to meet anticipated demand. Mississippi’s electric co-ops are constantly

TIP of the

Month

preparing for the future. Engineers and construction crews design, build and upgrade the electric system to move electricity from power plants and substations to farms, homes and businesses. All of these actions prepare electric co-ops to deal with the daily challenges of meeting the electricity needs of their members. But working together, we put in just as much effort preparing for the uncertainties posed by flooding, tornadoes, wildfires, hurricanes, high winds, blizzards and ice storms. Electric co-ops maintain and constantly update emergency response plans. Employees train for major events and know in advance what their primary and secondary roles would be. Electric co-ops also subscribe to mutual aid agreements. That’s why you see trucks and crews from co-ops in other states in your communities when major power outages occur. We also work with state and national officials to help ensure that crews can get to your communities when they are needed and have the lodging, food and support necessary to work effectively far from home. September may be National Preparedness Month, but Mississippi’s electric cooperatives are committed to preparedness every day––for the routine, the extraordinary and the unexpected.

Turn off kitchen, bath and other exhaust fans within 20 minutes after you’re done cooking or bathing. When replacing exhaust fans, consider installing high-efficiency, low-noise models. Source: energy.gov


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DEER ZONES For a complete listing of hunting seasons, bag limits and other legal restrictions, go to www.mdwfp.com.

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Gun (with dogs)

Dec. 24 - Jan. 16

Archery/Primitive Weapon

Jan. 17 - 31

METHOD

SEASON DATES

LEGAL DEER

Archery

Oct. 15 - Nov. 16

Either-Sex on private and open public land.

Youth Gun (15 and under)

Nov. 3 - Feb. 15

Either-Sex on private and authorized state and federal lands. Legal bucks only after Nov. 17 on authorized state and federal lands.

Gun (with dogs)

Nov. 17 - Dec. 1

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

Dec. 2 - 15

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

SOUTHEAST ZONE

In all zones: For youth fifteen (15) years of age and younger hunting on private lands and authorized state and federal lands, all three (3) of their three (3) buck bag limit may be any antlered deer.

Primitive Weapon Gun (without dogs)

Dec. 16 - 23

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

Gun (with dogs)

Dec. 24 - Jan. 16

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

BAG LIMITS: Antlered Buck Deer: The bag limit on antlered buck deer is one (1) buck per day, not to exceed three (3) per annual season. Legal bucks must meet the antler criteria within the appropriate deer management zone.

Antlerless Deer: Private lands: The bag limit on Northeast, Delta and East Central, and Southwest Zones antlerless deer is three (3) per annual season. The bag limit on Southeast Zone antlerless deer is one (1) per day, two (2) per annual season.

Jan. 17 - 31 Archery/Primitive Weapon Feb. 1 - 15

Small Game SEASON

SEASON DATES

DAILY BAG LIMIT

Youth Squirrel*

Sept. 24 - 30

8

Squirrel - Fall Season

Oct. 1 - Feb. 28

8

Squirrel - Spring Season

May 15 - June 1

4

SEASON

SEASON DATES

DAILY BAG LIMIT

Rabbit

Oct. 13 - Feb. 28

8

Bobwhite Quail

Nov. 22 - Mar. 2

8

Frog

April 1 - Sept. 30

25/NIght

Raccoon

July 1 - Sept. 30

1 per Party/Night

Opossum, Raccoon, and Bobcat

Oct. 1 - Oct. 31 (Food and sport) Nov. 1 - Feb. 28 (Food, sport, and pelt)

5/Day; 8/Party No Limit

Trapping

Nov. 1 - Mar. 15

No Limit

U.S. Forest Service National Forests: The bag limit is one (1) per day, not to exceed three (3) per annual season except in the Southeast Zone which is two (2) per annual season.

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license. Legal Bucks only on private and open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

*On private lands and authorized state and federal lands only in those areas open for squirrel hunting.

Dove • White-winged & Mourning Dove (North Zone) ** Sept. 1-Oct. 7; Oct. 27 Nov. 7; Dec. 22 - Jan. 31 (South Zone)*** Sept. 1-9; Oct. 6-Nov. 7; Dec. 15-Jan. 31 **(Dove North Zone) Areas north of U.S. Hwy 84 plus areas south of U.S. Hwy 84 and west of MS Hwy 35 ***(Dove South Zone) Areas south of U.S. Hwy 84 and east of MS Hwy 35.

Fall Turkey SEASON

DATES

BAG LIMIT

FALL (SEE OPEN AREAS)

OCT. 15 - NOV. 15

TWO (2) TURKEYS, EITHER SEX

Open Areas: In the following counties or portion of counties, on private lands where the landowner/lease holder completes a fall turkey hunting application and provides a copy of the property deed or lease agreement at a MDWFP Regional Office or the Jackson Office. Delta Zone: Bolivar County - west of the main Mississippi River levee and those lands east of the main Mississippi River levee known as 27 Break Hunting Club; Coahoma, Desoto, Issaquena, Tunica, and Washington counties - west of the main Mississippi River levee. North-Central Zone: Benton, Lafayette, Marshall, Panola, Tippah, and Union counties.

Southwest Zone: Adams, Amite, Claiborne, Copiah, Hinds, Franklin, Jefferson, Lincoln, Madison, Warren, Wilkinson, and Yazoo counties.


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September 2018

Where has the summer gone?

A

either take me and several friends out to bout this time last year Mr. “Inland Beach,” or one of my friends’ Roy walked into the kitchen as I was placing my last batch mother would take her turn. of sweet pickles into jars, and Those preteen and later teenage sumsaid, “Well, summer is finally over and mers were wonderful and lasted longer football season is right around the corner. since a school year was only eight months I’ve been looking forward to this since last long in Lucedale. January.” A few years after Mr. Roy and I were This was about the cruelest thing he married, I started back to college and could have said. It was right up there with again looked forward to my summers. “The stock market just crashed” or “I hate After graduation I was offered a job at the to tell you, but I wrecked your new car.” I high school teaching my major, history. You guessed it, again I was in a situation have always treasured my summers and where I couldn’t wait for summer to arrive hated to see them end. and hated to see it end—though I enjoyed “Why did you make a statement like teaching and loved my students. Don’t we that?” I asked, knowing what his answer all like vacations? would be. Soon we had a pool installed in our He cleared his throat. “I passed by the elementary school this morning and school backyard and this made summers even better for our daughters and me. Later we was in session. built a summer home on Dauphin Island, “Why do you always hate to see every Ala., and I spent most of my summer end?” he asked. summers at the beach. I answered and tightened Today I have been retired my shoulders. “Look, we have from my teaching job about 15 this same discussion every year years, and I still look forward to and you know my answer: It my summers. But I have to goes back to when I taught admit it’s not the same feeling it school and my vacation had used to be. come to an end. I’m beginning Grin ‘n’ A couple weeks ago when I to believe you are trying to It Bare noticed all of the cars at the elestart an argument. There’s no mentary school three miles from new comeback; you’ve backed by Kay Grafe our house, I knew a new school me in a corner, again. One year had begun. I also knew my partner day, I will have something in my reperwould soon make his yearly statement, toire that will knock you off your feet.” “Well, summer is finally over.” He raised his eyebrows, picked up the Sure enough, later that afternoon he daily paper and turned to the sports page. walked into our office area where I was I have told you before, my dear my writing on my computer and said those readers, that I grew up an only child. My exact words. I didn’t even look up from mother worked and most of the time my daddy was not home. During the summers my work, and replied, “Good, I’m ready for football season.” I stayed with my grandparents, Mother’s After he regained his senses, he said, parents. I called her Big Mama and him “What did you say? I think I misunderDaddy Tom. stood you.” There were always cousins coming to I grinned and said, “I have decided that visit, and my summers were fun filled, I love all the seasons, months, weeks and especially with a swimming pool next days. Every day is a gift from God, and I door. intend to enjoy every one of them. I also Later, when my mother remarried and suggest that you quit wishing for time to we moved to Lucedale, there was a large swimming pool a couple of miles from our pass so that football season is here, and house. The pool/lake wasn't like the con- enjoy every day.” In fact, that’s good advice for my readcrete pool in Forest next to my grandparers and everyone. I’ll let you know next ents house. Actually, it was a swimming month if Mr. Roy has recovered from the area that was created by damming up a shock. creek. The beautiful lake was huge compared Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, to the pool next to my Big Mama and Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone Daddy Tom’s house. It had a pier in the number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay center and a tall diving board on the west Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS bank. My mother worked, so she would 39452.

October 3 - 14

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Budweiiser Stage

OCT 9 7::3 30

OCT 8 7:30

The Marshall Tucker Band

En Vogue Budweiser Staage OCT 10 30 7::3

Budweiser Staage

Colt Ford Budweiser Staage

OCT 4 7:30

Mercy Me, Inside Coliseum.

OCT 11 7:00

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SPECIAL FEAATTURES FREE WITH YOUR PRICE OF ADMISSION! • MS Beef Celebrity Cook-off • Farm Bureau Petting Zoo and Pig Races • Joseph D Bauer ’s Great American Thrill Show

• Fetch and Fish • 4-H exhibits • Arts & Crafts Competition • Antique Car Show • Floral Exhibits

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Download our FREE Fair App to your smartphone: Like us on Facebook for more updates on ride specials, fair news and your opportunity to win tickets to the fair or visit www.MSStateFair.com.


September 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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September 2018

Quinoa and Bean Salad 2 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil 2 Tbsp. white wine vinegar ½ cup lime juice 2 tsp. Dijon mustard ½ tsp. each salt and black pepper 1 (16-oz.) can black beans, drained 1 (16-oz.) can garbanzo beans, drained

Recipes from

‘Dixie Dining III’

Becky Wright’s mother suffered a heart attack as Wright stood holding her hand in 2004. Her mother survived, but watching her suffer left a lasting impact on Wright. Today, Wright has made promoting heart health her special project as president of Mississippi Federation of Women’s Clubs Inc., a member of the international General Federation of Women’s Clubs. Her goals are to raise awareness about heart disease, encourage others to make healthy lifestyle choices and raise funds for the American Heart Association. Heart disease and stroke are the first and fifth highest causes of death in the U.S., according to the American Heart Association. The lifetime risk for developing cardiovascular disease in those free of known disease at age 45 is nearly 2 in 3 for men and greater than 1 in 2 for women. (Learn more at Heart.org.) Wright’s efforts include the recent publication of “Dixie Dining III,” a cookbook featuring 777 recipes contributed by MFWC members throughout the state. Many of the recipes are noted as being heart healthy, including Baked Chicken Fajitas, Slow Cooker “Refried” Beans, and Quinoa and Bean Salad. “Dixie Dining III” is available throughout Mississippi from GFWC-MFWC members for $20. For information on ordering, contact Becky Wright at 662-9838836 or Frances Brown at frannabrown@hotmail.com. Wright is a member of Pontotoc Electric Power Association.

Slow Cooker Shrimp Boil 2 lbs. small new potatoes 4 cups chicken broth 1 lb. kielbasa sausage, cut into 1-inch pieces 2 Tbsp. Old Bay seasoning

½ tsp. cayenne pepper 4 ears corn, cut into quarters 2 lbs. large shrimp Lemon slices 4 Tbsp. butter, melted

Place potatoes, broth, sausage, seasoning and pepper into slow cook. Top with corn. Cover and cook on low for 7 hours or high for 3 to 4 hours. Add shrimp and lemon slices, and cook on high for 15 minutes, or until shrimp are pink. Spoon out of liquid into a large bowl and drizzle with butter.

Lemon Rotel Spread 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese 1 (3-oz.) pkg. lemon gelatin mix 1 can Rotel tomatoes ½ cup chopped bell pepper

½ cup chopped celery ½ cup chopped onion ½ cup chopped pecans ½ cup mayonnaise

Combine cream cheese, gelatin and tomatoes in a medium saucepan over medium heat, and stir until cream cheese is melted. Remove from heat and allow to cool. Add bell pepper, celery, onion, pecans and mayonnaise; blend well. Pour into a lightly oiled mold and chill for several hours or overnight, until set. Turn out onto a serving dish and serve with crackers.

1 can shoe-peg corn, drained 1 cup cooked quinoa Optional stir-ins: 1 cup chopped tomato, 1 cup chopped sweet peppers, chopped green onions, chopped jalapeño pepper

In a large glass or plastic bowl, whisk oil, vinegar, lime juice, mustard, salt and black pepper. Add beans and corn to vinegar mixture. Add other desired vegetables. Toss in quinoa. Cover and chill in refrigerator overnight. Gently stir before serving. Note: To make heart-healthy, drain and rinse canned vegetables or use no-sodium varieties.

Baked Chicken Fajitas 2 tsp. chili powder 2 tsp. ground cumin 1 tsp. paprika ½ tsp. dried oregano ¼ tsp. salt Freshly ground black pepper 1 ½ lbs. boneless, skinless chicken breasts, sliced into strips

1 each red, yellow and green bell peppers, cored and sliced into strips 1 med. yellow onion, sliced 2 cloves garlic, chopped 3 Tbsp. olive or canola oil Optional toppings: fresh cilantro, reduced-fat sour cream, salsa, avocado, fresh lime juice

Preheat oven to 400 F. Coat a large sheet pan with nonstick cooking spray. In a small bowl, whisk together chili powder, cumin, paprika, oregano, salt and pepper. Set aside. Spread chicken, bell peppers, onion and garlic evenly over the sheet pan. Drizzle with olive oil. Sprinkle seasoning mixture on top. Toss to coat. Spread into a single layer. Bake uncovered for 20 to 25 minutes, or until chicken is cooked through and vegetables are tender. Note: Serve with warm whole wheat or corn tortillas, over a salad or as a topping for baked potatoes. Black beans or slow-cooker refried beans are the perfect side dish.

Slow Cooker ‘Refried’ Beans 1 onion, peeled and halved 2 cups dried pinto beans, soaked according to package directions and rinsed ½ fresh jalapeño pepper, seeded and chopped

2 cloves garlic, minced ¾ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper ¼ tsp. ground cumin 2 Tbsp. olive oil 6 cups water

Combine onion, beans, jalapeño, garlic, salt, pepper, cumin, olive oil and water in the slow cooker. Cook on low 8 to 10 hours or on high 4 to 6 hours. Remove the bigger chunks of onion and drain the liquid, reserving some. Mash beans with a potato masher, adding reserved liquid to get desired consistency and texture. Optional: Top with shredded Monterrey Jack cheese.

Down South Sweet Tea Cake 1 pkg. yellow cake mix, regular size 1 (3.4-oz.) pkg. instant vanilla pudding mix 1 cup strong brewed tea, cooled, divided 4 large eggs ¾ cup canola oil

1 tsp. vanilla extract ½ tsp. lemon extract 1 cup chopped pecans, toasted 2 cups confectioners sugar 1⁄3 cup unsalted butter, melted

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grease and flour a 10-inch fluted tube pan. In a large bowl, combine yellow cake mix, vanilla pudding mix, ¾ cup brewed tea, eggs, oil, vanilla and lemon extracts. Beat on low speed 30 seconds. Beat on medium speed 2 minutes. Stir in pecans. Transfer to the prepared pan. Bake 45 to 50 minutes or until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes before removing to a wire rack to cool completely. In a small bowl, mix the confectioners sugar, butter and enough remaining tea to reach the desired consistency. Pour the glaze over the top of the cake, allowing some to flow over the sides.


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Breathing new life into old places:

Gautier Schoolhouse and Cultural Museum

Bill Bray is among those advocating the preservation of the historic Gautier Colored School. The Gautier Historic Schoolhouse Restoration Project seeks to preserve the building and eventually transform it into a cultural museum. By Nancy Jo Maples A unique nugget of black history and Jackson County heritage lies just off U.S. 90 in Gautier, and local historians hope to rejuvenate the story behind it. “The Gautier Colored School matters to the Gautier community because of its role in the community’s African-American educational history and because of the architectural significance of the building itself,” said Bill Bray, one of the leading advocates for the preservation project. Also known as the West Pascagoula Colored School, the building is tucked on a pristine corner of De La Pointe Drive and Point Bayou Road and surrounded by a cool canopy of trees and foliage. The old building is an eyesore to some, but a historical artifact to others. With concerted effort, the place will become a meeting location for the community as well as a museum to preserve the era and culture that it represents. “We want to make sure historical value remains in the building. That’s why we are being selective in the materials used for the renovation,” Bray said. Jackson County purchased the property in the 1920s and appropriated $200 to build a school. Citizens raised another $500 and supplied manpower. A local sawmill provided heart pine wood from virgin timber that was still in existence at that time. The result was a 40x30-foot West Indies-style building featuring windows with 18 panes of glass that served as an educational fort for numerous youngsters ages 6 to 16. Students in all grades learned in a one-room school setting that was warmed in the winter by a pot-belly stove.

Club. However, the structure became too rundown Earnestine Ellis Fountain is remembered as the for public use and in 2013, the Mississippi Heritage school’s educator, the children’s mentor and the Trust named it as one of the 10 Most Endangered driving force behind all the reading, writing and Historic Places in Mississippi. ‘rithmetic. Fountain (1912-2002) began teaching Recognizing the historic value of the building when she was 18 after passing the Mississippi and the significance of the stories associated with Teacher’s Examination. She spent 40 years in educathe old schoolhouse, locals created the Gautier tion. Historic Schoolhouse Restoration Project to preserve Fountain rode a Greyhound bus from Moss the place and document the past. The initial effort Point to Gautier each day to teach, and after school has been to secure the building’s she cleaned houses for extra money infrastructure with the long-range before riding the bus home again for “We want to make sure goal of using the building as a culthe night. To accommodate operating the school on a low budget, Fountain historical value remains in tural museum where exhibits and artifacts will tell the stories of the walked with the children to the railthe building. That’s why school children and other groups of road depot and picked up loose coal we are being selective in people who have gathered there that had spilled from the steam the materials used for the throughout its history. engines to feed the stove to heat the An $80,000 grant with a building. Some students brought renovation.” $20,000 required match was packed meals for lunch, and Fountain – Bill Bray secured several years ago from the cooked oatmeal to feed the children Mississippi Department of Archives who didn’t have the luxury of a meal and History for phase one of the project. Bray said brought from home. more donations are needed to complete the effort. She was the last teacher employed at the Gautier Contributions of $100 or more will be acknowlColored School when it closed in 1946. A concrete edged on permanent plaques inside the museum. block schoolhouse was erected near Fraiser Park that Checks may be made payable to Gautier Pride and served black Gautier students until integration earmarked Gautier Schoolhouse Museum Project. occurred in the 1960s. Fountain later served as the The address to mail donations is P.O. Box 598, first African-American principal in the Pascagoula Gautier, MS 39553. school system when she was the administrator at Fair Elementary School. Following its closure as a school, the building was Award winning journalist Nancy Jo Maples lives in used as a community center, senior citizens’ center, Lucedale and is the author of Staying Power: The voting poll and a meeting venue for Boy Scouts of Story of South Mississippi Electric Power Association. America, the Gautier Jaycees and the Gautier Men’s She can be reached at nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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September 2018

Mississippi

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MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95.

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-2624982. FREE MATERIALS: Soon Church/Government Uniting, Suppressing "Religious Liberty" Enforcing "National Sunday Law." Be Informed! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715. CHURCH FURNITURE: New pews, pulpit furniture, cushions for hard pews. Big sale 1-800-231-8360. E-mail: www.pews1.com

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September 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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Next in “Picture This”

Fair Fun

We are looking for lively scenes that best convey the fun to be had at a local fair, including midway rides, games, exhibits, food, night lights, etc. Please include the name of the fair with your submission(s). Selected photos will appear in the October issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Sept. 17.

I SUBMISSION GUIDELINES • Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If emailing a phone photo, select “actual size” before sending. We cannot use compressed photo files.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the

picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

I HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Or, mail prints or a CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 391583300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2018. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601605-8600 or news@ecm.coop.

PORCHES I Use your generator only outdoors, away from open windows, vents and doors. Do not use it in an attached garage. I Never plug your generator directly into your home outlet. Connecting a generator to your home’s wiring requires the professional installation of a power transfer switch. A safety message from your local electric cooperative.

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Today in Mississippi I September 2018

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 437,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Send to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“Da Vinci’s Machines,” through Nov. 11, Laurel. More than 75 inventions reconstructed from Leonardo Da Vinci’s illlustrations and writings. Free. Lauren Rogers Museum of Art. Details: 601-649-6374; Lrma.org. Share with MSers Fundraiser, Sept. 8, D’Iberville. Mississippi Gulf Coast Multiple Sclerosis Society event; 5 -8 p.m. Admission. D’Iberville Civic Center Automall Parkway. Details: 228-596-0525, 228-806-4523. Mississippi Gulf Coast Blues and Heritage Festival, Sept. 8, Pascagoula. Jackson County Fairgrounds; 1 p.m. Admission. Details: 228-366-0127. Wilkinson County MHV Fall Bazaar and Quilt Show, Sept. 13, Woodville. Free admission; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Lunches available for purchase. Wilkinson County Park. Details: 601-888-3211. 28th Annual Delta Rice Tasting Luncheon, Sept. 14, Cleveland. Delta State University Walter Sillers Coliseum; 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Admission. Details: 662-843-8371. The Gospel Showdown, Sept. 15, Cleveland. Ten gospel choirs to compete; 2 p.m. Admission. Grammy Museum Mississippi front lawn. Details: GrammyMuseumMS.org. “Because of the Brave” Quilt Show, Sept. 15, Lucedale. George County Senior Citizens Building. Details: 601-508-8663, 601-7660918. 38th Annual 300 Oaks Road Race, Sept. 15, Greenwood. 10K and 5K runs, 5K walk, 1mile fun run, 1-mile color run; post-race party. Details: 300oaks.racesonline.com. Dinner Dances, Sept. 15, 22, 29, Gulfport. Dinner, 7 p.m., dance 8-10 p.m.; casual dress. Admission. Amour Danzar School of Ballroom Dance. Details: 228-324-3730; AmourDanzar.com. Coming Home 1883-2018, Sept. 16, Hattiesburg. Rawls Springs Baptist Church celebrates 135th anniversary; Sunday school 9 a.m., worship/praise 10 a.m. Lunch follows. Details: 601-268-2801. Lower Delta Talks: “Lebanese Heritage in the Mississippi Delta,” Sept. 18, Rolling Fork. Keith Fulcher, presenter. Free admis-

sion. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. D’Iberville Historical Society Quarterly Meeting, Sept. 19, D’Iberville. Potluck dinner, guest speaker, historical displays; 6-9 p.m. Open to public. D’Iberville Town Green. Details: 228-392-1939. Art Ability Fair, Sept. 20, Biloxi. Free day of art classes for people with intellectual disabilities; lunch included; 9 a.m. - 1:30 p.m. Registration required. Biloxi Civic Center. Details: 228-604-4020; DisabilityConnection.org. Mid-South Fair, Sept. 20-30, Southaven. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 662-4702131; MidSouthFair.com. Fall Floral Workshops, Sept. 20, Oct. 8 & 25, Nov. 29, Dec. 6, Biloxi. Learn to make seasonal floral arrangements and decor. Registration required; costs vary. MSU Coastal Research and Extension Center. Details: 228-546-1011; j.delprince@msstate.edu; Coastal.msstate.edu. Mid-South Forestry Equipment Show, Sept. 21-22, Starkville. Longest-running live in-woods equipment demo in the nation. Admission. MSU John W. Starr Memorial Forest. Details: 662-325-2191; MidSouthForestry.org. Water Tower Festival, Sept. 21-22, Hernando. Live music, barbecue contest, arts/crafts, car show, community stage, Kidz Zone. Free admission. Hernando Courthouse Square. Details: 662-429-9055; HernandoMS.org. Krewe of Horse Sports Fin Show, Sept. 2123, Gulfport. Dressage, eventing, hunter, jumper. Harrison County Equestrian Center. Details: 228-669-2687; gcclassic@aol.com; BienvenueAcres.com. Natchez Fall Pilgrimage, Sept. 21 - Oct. 8, Natchez. Tours of antebellum homes and special events. Admission. Details: 601-446-6631, 800-647-6742; NatchezPilgrimage.com. Pike County Fair and Family Festival, Sept. 25-29, McComb. Pike County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-684-0894. Master Gardener Program, Sept. 27,

Ackerman.“Southern Gardening’s” Dr. Gary Bachman to speak on homemade pesticides, Dr. Wayne McLeod on growing roses; bring plant or seeds to swap; 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Admission; registration required. Choctaw County Library. Details: 662-285-6337. Chicks with Hits, Sept. 27, Meridian. Featuring Terri Clark, Pam Tillis, Suzy Bogguss; 7:30 p.m. Admission. MSU Riley Center. Details: 601-696-2200; MSURileyCenter.com. Mississippi Bluegrass Jamboree, Sept. 2729, Columbia. Bluegrass, old country and gospel music performances, plus quilting workshop, old engine/tractor display, local tours, more. Admission. Columbia Exposition Center. Details: 601-736-6204, 601-408-5965. 31st Annual Mississippi Pecan Festival, Sept. 28-30, Richton. Arts, crafts, craft demos, antique equipment show, bluegrass music, mule pull, draft horse demos, more. Details: 601-964-8201; MSPecanFestival.com. Golf Scramble Fore Veterans, Sept. 29, Olive Branch. Noon shotgun start. Medal of Honor guests, dinner, auction. Benefiting Task Force Resolute and DeSoto County Veterans Park. Cherokee Valley Golf Club. Details: 662893-4444; dmoore1776@aol.com. “Charms of Mississippi” Quilt Show, Sept. 29-30, Picayune. Quilt exhibit, vendors, demos, craft items; 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. KC Hall. Details: 601-590-0596; push19@bellsouth.net. Trash to Treasure on Kuykendall Hill, Oct. 4-6, Smithville. Artists/crafters invited to sell their work. Hwy. 25 N. Details: 662-640-9144; Facebook: Trash to Treasure on Kuykendall Hill. Gulf Coast Military Collectors and Antique Arms Show, Oct. 5-6, Biloxi. Admission; 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Saturday. Joppa Shriners Center. Details: 228-224-1120. Pine Belt Quilt and Fiber Art Show, Oct. 56, Hattiesburg. Competitive show, lectures, demos, exhibits, vendors. Admission. Lake Terrace Convention Center. Details: PineBeltQuilters.com. Craft Fair and Bake Sale, Oct. 6, Brandon. Handmade items from artists around the world, food, baked goods, door prizes; 9 a.m. 3 p.m. Free admission. Nativity Lutheran Church. Details: 601-825-5125. Choctaw County Flea Market, Oct. 6, Ackerman. Choctaw County Regional Medical Center; 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Details: 662-2856337. Craft and Quilt Sale, Auction, Oct. 6, Gulfport. Craft sale 8 a.m.; quilt and craft auction 1 p.m. Homemade baked goods, gumbo, jambalaya, organized children’s activities. Gulfhaven Church. Details: 601-483-2264, 228-832-0003. The Whisnants in Concert, Oct. 6, Newton. Southern gospel music; 7 p.m. Love offering.

Ebenezer Baptist Church. Details: 601-8962249. Pine Fest, Oct. 6, Prentiss. Art, crafts, entertainment; 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Longleaf Trace Park. Details: 601-792-5903. Pascagoula Gun Show, Oct. 6-7, Pascagoula. Jackson County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-3195248; BigPopGunShows.com. Hill Fire: “Lead Me to the Rock,” Oct. 6, 7, 11, 13, Winona. Montogomery County Arts Council production of an original folk life play. Comedy/drama/music. Admission. Performing Arts Center. Details: 662-310-0199; HillFire.org. “Material Pulses: Seven Viewpoints” Art Quilt/Mixed Media Exhibit, Oct. 6 - Jan. 13, 2019, Jackson. Seventeen works by seven fiber artists in the U.S., U.K., Canada; curated by Nancy Crow. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Art. Details: 601-960-1515; MSMuseumArt.org. Pumpkin Adventure, Oct. 10-13, 17-20, 2426, Jackson. Hayride, pumpkin patch, more. Admission. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-432-4500; MSAGMuseum@mdac.ms.gov. Olive Branch Chamber of Commerce Business Expo, Oct. 10, Olive Branch. Northcentral Electric Power Association; 9 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Details: 662-895-2600; OliveBranchMS.com. Deep Blues Festival, Oct. 11-14, Clarksdale. Blues, gospel, rock ‘n’ roll acts. Admission. Various venues. Details: DeepBluesFest.com. Fall Flower and Garden Fest, Oct. 12-13, Crystal Springs. Seminars, garden tours, food vendors, more; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free admission. Truck Crops Experiment Station. Details: 601892-3731; Extension.msstate.edu/fallfest. Lonesome Traveler in Concert, Oct. 13, Meridian. With guest Peter Yarrow; 7:30 p.m. Admission. MSU Riley Center. Details: 601696-2200; MSURileyCenter.com. Natchez Gun Show, Oct. 13-14, Natchez. Natchez Convention Center. Details: 601-3195248; BigPopGunShows.com. Mississippi Writer’s Retreat, Oct. 18-21, Starkville. Mentoring, critiques, instruction in publishing/marketing, writing time, more. Registration fee. The Homestead Education Center. Details: TheHomesteadCenter.com. “Take Me to the River New Orleans Live,” Oct. 19, Meridian. Featuring Dirty Dozen Brass Band, Ivan and Ian Neville, others; 7:30 p.m. Admission. MSU Riley Center. Details: 601696-2200; MSURileyCenter.com. Gulf Coast Messiah Chorus Young Artists Vocal Competition, Oct. 27, Gulfport. Open to vocalists ages 15-25 in Hancock, Harrison, Jackson, Pearl River, Stone or George counties. Registration deadline Oct. 12. MGCCC Jefferson Davis Campus. Details: MessiahChorus.org.


I

September 2018

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19


Today in Mississippi September 2018 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi September 2018 Coahoma

Today in Mississippi September 2018 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi September 2018 Coahoma