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Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

News for members of Coast Electric Power Association

4 Sawing logs the old way 14 Cookbook benefits historical museum

16 LaPointe-Krebs:

Mississippi’s oldest house


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Today in Mississippi

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September 2017

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Island emergency a reminder of the danger underground hen 10,000 tourists were forced to leave two popular North Carolina islands in July, they weren’t fleeing from a hurricane but a power outage, of all things. The outage occurred when a workers building a bridge drove a steel casing through an underground transmission line. Officials ordered the tourists to evacuate, and some 9,000 homes lost power. The governor declared a state of emergency in part to help speed the repairs. Coming during the islands’ peak tourist season, the outage’s impact on the local economy was described as “huge.” The incident is a sobering illustration of what can happen when people excavate, drill or bore without knowing where local underground utilities lie. Whether digging to erect fence posts, build a swimming pool or prepare a foundation, everyone should keep electrical safety foremost in mind. Mississippi 811 Inc. (MS811) is a non-profit organization designed to keep people safe and protect underground utilities when excavations take place. MS811 maintains an information center in Jackson that serves as a communications link between those who dig (excavator, builders, property owners, etc.) and the utilities that operate underground facilities, including your electric power association. When you call 811, utilities will be notified to send a representative to your dig site to mark the locations of their underground facilities. It’s a convenient, efficient system; 811 saves you from having to call multiple utilities. Mississippi law requires excavators, contractors, building and private citizens who are going to drill, blast, dig and/or bore to notify MS811 before they start the work. You can read the law at www.ms1call.org. We encourage you to get more information at www.ms1call.org or 811 while your excavation work is still in the planning stage. ••• Kids are back in school and the daylight hours are slowly diminishing. Soon school buses will be cruis-

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On the cover Aaron Rodgers, executive director of the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum, in Jackson, sees the museum’s vintage sawmill as a way to demonstrate to visitors just how difficult life could be for past generations of rural Mississippians. See story on page 4.

ing in the dark on weekday mornings, until Daylight Saving Time ends on Nov. 5. Please drive with extra caution to help keep our students safe. Impatience, distracting driving and simple carelessness can result in tragedy on the road. Also keep in mind that electric cooperative line crews may be out working on roadside lines at any time of day or night, in any kind of weather. Their extensive safety training and protective gear help keep them safe, but nothing can shield them from the inattentive, speeding driver. Please help keep our My Opinion employees safe by considerMichael Callahan ably reducing your speed Executive Vice President/CEO when approaching their Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi work site. ••• This has been an unbelievably wet summer for much (if not all) of Mississippi. We’re seeing a number of trees collapse, evidently due to saturated soils in many cases. Electric power associations work hard to prevent trees and limbs from falling into power lines by diligently clearing power line rights-of-way. But we can’t cut everything everywhere. If you see a tree (or anything else) in contact with a power line, please call your electric power association or 911 immediately to report it. Never, ever attempt to remove the debris yourself; a power line can appear to be “dead” but still carry enough current to cause serious injury or death. Your electric power association will respond quickly to dispatch personnel to repair the line. Until they arrive, keep others far away from the site. If you have any questions regarding electrical safety, your electric power association will be more than happy to help. They are, after all, your electrical safety experts.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 9 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 440,908 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

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Today in Mississippi

Our Homeplace

One of Mississippi’s architectural gems is the Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art, designed by architect Frank Gehry and dedicated to the ceramics of George H. Ohr (1857-1918). The museum includes metal pods whose shapes bring to mind the curving, twisting contours of Ohr’s pottery.

Mississippi is What’s Mississippi to me? It’s sitting on the front porch swing with family shelling buckets of peas. Shady seats in front of a row of peach trees. A water oak with great big roots and a board swing. A bench under the wisteria where Grandpa sits with all the bumblebees. A square flower bed with a catawba worm tree. A horse named Dolly, so lonely and old. It’s Grandma’s lilies and the plum trees lining the dirt road. Clothes stretched out to dry on a line. The corner wood pile stacked so high. Tin-wrapped leaf beds surrounding the fig trees. Water straight out of the hose, never mind the mud holes. The smokehouse in the back where grandkids are never to go. It’s Grandpa and Grandma’s house. It was home to me. –Brandy J. Gardner, Waynesboro Eighteen years ago, my husband and I chose to retire in Pontotoc. One of our children, who remained in Denver, called today. As we were talking, he asked if we had canaries now. I answered no. I had gone out on the front porch to talk. There I was watching two male cardinals chase each other while the female sat on a nearby limb, cheering them on. A blue jay and a robin perched side by side, fussing at one another while eating leftover food from our dog’s bowl, and a couple of squirrels chattered gleefully as they played tag around the base of an old oak tree in one corner of our yard. I explained to him, “It’s just springtime in Mississippi.” –Carolyn E. Oakes, Houlka

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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The

Little Sawmill That Could

By Debbie Stringer Turning logs into lumber takes place in massive automated mills that produce tens of thousands of board feet per hour. There was a time, however, when trees were felled with hand saws, hauled in mule-drawn wagons to a small rural sawmill and cut into boards, one at a time—as long as the saw didn’t overheat. These mills played a vital role in the growth of towns along the new railroads being built throughout Mississippi in the 19th century. “You couldn’t build anything until a sawmill was set up, unless you wanted to hew logs,” said Aaron Rodgers, director of the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum, in Jackson. Cutting lumber with hand tools was a difficult,

extremely slow process. “You might be able to get two sides of a floor joist done in eight hours,” Rodgers said. Village building demanded a more efficient means of lumber production, hence the rise of the small rural sawmill with its engine-driven reciprocating (and later, circular) saw. The advent of the circular saw in the mid-1800s, along with later innovations, led to the rise of large commercial sawmills capable of producing and shipping great numbers of board feet per day. Yet rural sawmills continued to supply local needs into the early 20th century as their power sources advanced from steam to gasoline and diesel engines. Tucked behind the cotton gin at the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum is one such rural sawmill, moved to the site from Jefferson Davis County. During special events at the museum, the sawmill’s

Rural sawmills gave rise to Mississippi’s earliest towns while helping farm families to survive

Barry McLemore is one of the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum employees who demonstrate the vintage sawmill during special events. Small sawmills once served as the “heartbeat” of early communities in the state, he said. The mill, moved from Jefferson Davis County, is powered by a 1947 diesel engine, which drives a series of flat belts and pulleys. The carbide circular saw blade is a recent replacement.

1947 diesel engine is fired up to demonstrate its operation for visitors. Through a series of flat belts and pulleys, the engine powers a circular saw and a rail-mounted carriage that moves logs into the spinning saw blade. Next, the lumber goes through a vintage edger to neaten rough edges and create a four-sided board. This type of small-scale mill was called a peckerwood sawmill in its day. The saw would cut just about any wood, hard or soft, for making everything from fence posts to framing materials to siding. Little skill was required to operate the mill and it could be disassem-


September 2017

McLemore, at top, shows a piece of lumber with marks left by the mill’s circular saw. Aaron Rodgers, above, the museum’s executive director, holds a cant hook used for gripping and moving logs.

bled, packed into wagons and moved to the next logging site. Working in a rural sawmill was not a full-time job back then, Rodgers said. Most rural Mississippians were subsistence farmers, producing enough to feed their family and maybe some extra to sell. But when the harvest was done or the crops failed, farmers could find work in the local sawmill to earn income until the next planting season. “That was really, really dangerous work, so the guys who worked in them did it because they had to, to supplement their [farm] income,” Rodgers said. “It was like you were putting your life in your hands to do that kind of thing.” Hazards surrounded the

workers. Sawdust spewing from the logs threatened their eyes and lungs, and nothing shielded them from the exposed high-speed saw blade and belt-driven machinery. “All it would take is just one stumble and that’s it for you,” Rodgers said. Visitors to the Mississippi Ag Museum get that message. “Once you see that blade spinning and the carriage moving across it, most people realize that it was an incredibly dangerous job. I think it makes people appreciate how far we’ve come in making sure that families aren’t torn apart because of work accidents,” Rodgers said. “And then I think a lot of people react to the sheer power of it. All you have to do is thump a log to realize how much material is there. This old equipment could just power right through it—hundreds of logs a day, if they wanted to.” Recent upgrades to the museum’s sawmill, funded in part by the Mississippi Forestry Association, include the construction of a viewing deck for visitors, safety enhancements, repairs, a donated carbide saw blade and additional informational signage. Termites, rust and weathering are constant threats to the old mill’s survival, but Rodgers believes this piece of Mississippi history is worth every effort to preserve and interpret for future generations. The exhibit represents a piece of family history for museum visitors whose relatives once worked in a sawmill. “I think it’s important for us to teach how complicated life was then, and how hard it was, so you can appreciate how easy it is now,” Rodgers said. “We like to think of ourselves as having these big, complicated lives now, but in these rural communities they may not have been formally educated but they had to know so much about how to live

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on their own. This sawmill is a perfect example of that. And there was so much hard work involved in it.” Museum visitors can see the sawmill in action during the annual Harvest Festival, Nov. 7-11 from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. daily. The museum’s Small Town Mississippi will come to life with demonstrations in the sawmill, cotton gin, cane mill, print shop and blacksmith shop. Each is equipped with authentic equipment, machinery and tools. “The experience you’re going to get is the really unique noise of a 20-year-old tree being cut into lumber, or the thump of the giant diesel engine running the cotton gin, or the clang of the blacksmith’s hammer. It’s an experience you can’t get from a video. And when it’s all running, it’s magical out here,” Rodgers said. For visitor information, contact the Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum at 601-432-4500 or visit msagmuseum.org.

“I think it’s important for us to teach how complicated life was then, and how hard it was, so you can appreciate how easy it is now.” – Aaron Rodgers


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The town that time forgot, almost A town that time forgot? Or a town ahead of its time with GPS-guided tours? By the way, the Carrollton Pilgrimage is Oct. 6-7 this year. Photo: Walt Grayson

ighway 82 didn’t run through the town but instead chose a route just to the south of it. The railroad bypassed it too, taking the more level ground the other side of Big Sand Creek, just to the north. And when the railroad was built, a new town grew up along the tracks as happened quite a bit back then. But in the case of this town, it didn’t fade away as many did when bypassed. To this day it is still nestled there snug between the railroad town to the north and the highway to the south. Carrollton is the town I’m talking about. It was created as the county seat of Carroll County, sharing that honor with Vaiden today as one of our counties with two county seats. Carrollton was about as progressive as any town in Mississippi. It was the center of commerce for the area. It was also a popular place where some Delta planters built their fine homes, up in the hills away from the heat and bugs of the swampland where their cotton acreage was. Carrollton was the home of notable folks too, such as Sen. J.Z. George, who chiefly authored Mississippi’s 1890 Constitution, under which the state operates

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today, much of it written at his home, Cotesworth. Cotesworth, with his unusual Hexagonal library, is a cultural center today just north of North Carrollton. I can just see it in my mind the busy little village of old with its dusty dirt streets full of people and horse-drawn wagons back in its heyday. ‘Course, it’s not too hard to imagine Carrollton like that if you ever saw the 1960s era movie “The Reivers,” based on the William Faulkner novel. Steve McQueen starred in it along with Will Geer. Much of it was shot in Carrollton. Mississippi For the Seen movie, the by Walt Grayson paved streets were covered with dirt and horse-drawn wagons were all over the place. That’s why it doesn’t take a great deal of imagination to see the town looking like that. Just pull up the movie and watch it. Some of the signs painted on the sides of buildings as set-dressing for the movie are still there. One advertising “furniture

and coffins” comes to mind. It’s on the side of what is the town’s museum, today. At one time it housed a business that really did sell furniture and coffins, among other things. When the new railroad to the north created the town of North Carrollton, trackside, there was very little need for Carrollton to do any further progressing. So it seemed to slow down in time. There was no real need to tear it down, either. So Carrollton still sits sort of as it was in the 1920s. Businesses have come and gone, obviously. Some of them you may be familiar with. The famous Carroll County Picture Show of “Ode to Billy Joe” fame was right there on the square, across from the courthouse. The picture show is gone but the building is still there. A lot of the old buildings and homes still stand in Carrollton, making it a popular pilgrimage destination for nostalgia and history buffs. But Carrollton has brought its past into the future with the launching of a GPS-triggered downtown walking tour. Load the app and follow the town’s stories with your smartphone. And I appreciate the folks in Carrollton inviting me to be the voice for the tour. I learned a lot about the town in the process of recording the narration. And

learned there are no places time forgot. Not in the internet age. And I never imagined I’d be an app! Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Life’s changes and the coming of

autumn

My life changed in 1962. News headlines flickered across black-and-white TV screens, announcing high-profile events such as the Cuban Missile Crisis, the death of Marilyn Monroe. And as it turned out, Robert Frost wrote his last poem that year, “In the Clearing.” He died in ’63. There were a great many other episodes of tremendous importance demanding discussion. And though I was aware of these, few fully grabbed the attention of a 14-year-old country boy whose sheltered world consisted of a ragged farm, a rural school, a small church and an incalculable list of dreams that were seldom appreciated or entertained by anyone other than me. The overriding cause for consternation and core of unwelcome change, I now know, was that my aging bird dog, Lady, pointed her last by Tony Kinton covey of quail in 1962 on the back side of that farm, which was home. That word last is sobering. It was the last for Lady because her health quickly declined after that December morning. It was the last for me because other pursuits took control and led me eventually to college and graduate school and a form of living specified by life as I had never known it. And last seems to have predicted the soon-to-be last coveys of this grand bird for not only that one farm but for the entire area. Even before I left, the corn field that once held birds was a clean pasture with cattle scattered about. One garden, a separate pea patch and a long, grown-up fence row gave way to chicken houses and assorted sheds. The broom sedge growth just over the hill was rapidly becoming a pine plantation. Quail habitat pretty much went missing in the next two or three years following 1962. Unless the reader of this piece is at least 60, it is unlikely that he or she can

Outdoors Today

recall those days in the countryside when quail were abundant, their cheery, gentle yet haunting calls echoing across fallow fields. Their thunderous flushes, whether occurring in front of a staunch pointer or caused by a chance encounter with someone walking past, were capable of increasing the heart rate of even the most composed. They were a symbol of wildness, a link to a world that was slipping away. For one who knew and loved these things and who was convinced that life didn’t get any more fulfilling than walking out the back door with a worn-out shotgun and a hard-headed dog to collect four quail for supper, this passing was difficult to process. It appeared tragic. Time has verified that it was and is tragic. And that conviction held then is yet as firm as once thought. It is no secret that quail fell on hard times and have practically vanished from the landscape in far too many areas of the Southeast. Why this happened has not been solidly determined, but much study has already gone into finding an answer; that study continues. Will there be simple and conclusive solutions? That is still unknown. But we can hope and work toward the return of this glorious species. In the meantime, for those of us who long for the ballet of a bird dog and the boisterous clatter of a covey rise, there is one alternative other than driving great distances to other regions that still hold good supplies of these birds. That alternative is the shooting preserve. I have hunted on and written about these establishments scattered about the state many times. Most afford a realistic outing that is professionally executed and provides the rare opportunity to have this magic of quail hunting unfold in a fashion similar to how it was done in the past. One early morning this past March, I met my friend Mike Davis in Magee. We were headed out of town to Bouie Creek Quail Farm and Hunting Preserve to catch up with Wayne Hill and enjoy a

Tony Kinton, right, with Wayne Hill of Bouie Creek Quail Farm. Photo: Mike Davis

hunt. Wayne is a dedicated dog owner and quail hunter who laments the past and makes the best possible of the present. Shortly after introductions and some hot coffee, we were off, Wayne’s poised and polished English Setters, German Shorthairs and Brittany Spaniels busy about locating quail. The birds were scattered everywhere throughout a property that was quail perfect. I took note of and found great pleasure in the fact that Wayne and I used the same persuasion shotgun. The Browning Citori over/under in 20 gauge. No call for the bigger 12s in this endeavor. Even the 28, for the keen shooter who is proficient with ¾-ounce loads, is an ideal choice. Such rigs as outlined above are not demanded; a solid pump or semi auto is fine. But there is just something particularly stylish about an O/U or side-by-side in the crook of the arm or toted over the shoulder action open. These are classic bird guns. For the remainder of that morning

action was consistent. Dog work was spectacular. Sorry to admit that I didn’t play the shotgun to perfection, but I collected birds and, for a few hours, relived those days that put me in mind of adolescence on that old farm. With the coming of autumn, thoughts of many turn to the hunting fields. Shooting preserves offer a viable setting to rekindle the spirit of an activity that was once common or to see for the first time how it was back then. Such doings are sure to capture the fancy of any participant. Bouie Creek Quail Farm is one such preserve that deserves a visit. For information about the family-friendly hunts there, call Wayne Hill at 601-849-4415 or 601-506-1790.

Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Gomphrena beauties defy summer weather t was extremely hot in the trial gardens recently at the South Mississippi Branch Station in Poplarville while we were shooting new TV segments of “Southern Gardening.” While my crew and I were literally wilting in the heat and humidity, there was one group of plants that seemed to be taunting Mother Nature to bring it on. That plant was gomphrena, and I’d hate to meet it in a dark alley. Gomphrena is a tough plant that tolerates the combination of summer heat and humidity and keeps right on blooming. Sometimes called globe amaranth, the gomphrena likes it hot—really hot, like it is in our Mississippi gardens and landscapes. I love to share the story that says gomphrena is the only plant that will grow around the Gates of Hades. Now to continue that story, I like to tell fellow gardeners that gomphrenas certainly grow like heck! What makes the gomphrena one of my favorite hot weather, flowering annuals is that it blooms from late spring to the last hard frost in the fall. In south Mississippi, that frost may not show up until January, so I may get to enjoy gomphrena blooms for eight

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The hot-pink flowers of Fireworks gomphrenas have little yellow tips that capture the essence of a celebratory explosion. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

months or more. The fact that they have few serious garden pests is another plus. The flowers are clover-like, everlasting and similar to straw in texture. The flower heads are actually bracts, which

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are leaves resembling petals. The small flowers are inconspicuous, only noticeable when the yellow stamens poke out. Flower colors Southern range from Gardening white to purple by Dr. Gary Bachman and red. Gomphrena’s strong garden performance is exemplified by its having been chosen as a Mississippi Medallion winner twice in the past nine years. The first selection was All Around Purple in 2008, followed by Fireworks in 2010. And true to its name, this selection is as beautiful as any fireworks display I’ve ever seen. The hot-pink flowers almost seem iridescent, and the little yellow tips seem to capture the essence of a celebratory explosion. Fireworks is a big plant, growing up to 4 feet tall and wide, so plan your landscape bed accordingly. Another selection always welcome in my garden is Strawberry Fields, the very first red-flowered selection of gomphre-

na. The flower heads resemble blazing fireballs, and they are displayed on sturdy stems that bob around in a gentle breeze. Other garden-worthy series are the Gnome and Ping Pong. Smaller in stature than other gomphrenas, these selections are perfect for smaller planting areas in the garden. Be sure to plant in the full sun. Gomphrenas tolerate partial shade, but the best flowering show requires higher light levels. As long as the planting bed is well drained, your plants will thrive. In fact, once established in the spring, gomphrenas actually become somewhat drought tolerant, but remember to water them during extended dry periods. Gomphrena also makes a good dried flower and is classified as an everlasting. Tie flower stems in bunches and hang them upside down to dry in an airy room out of direct light. The flowers retain their color and are great additions to craft projects and dried flower arrangements. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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September 2017

Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

Where our members have the power CEO’s message

We can do great things together Coast Electric is a member-owned, member-governed cooperative. When the co-op was founded in 1937, members of the community knew that we are a locally-owned Ron Barnes President and CEO business – likely because it played a part in founding our co-op. Over time as the novelty of receiving electricity waned, the founders passed on and new people moved into the community, many began to view the electric co-op like any other energy provider. But we are different and the key to that difference is you, the member-owner of our cooperative. Without your support and commitment, we would not exist. Research proves that when people own something they treat it differently, which is why we encourage Coast Electric members to act as an owner rather than a customer. As an owner, you play a critical role in our success. Each year, if our revenue exceeds our expenses (which is always our

goal), a certain percentage is allocated back to you – because you are a member of the co-op. With that ownership come certain rights like the opportunity to seek election to serve on the board of directors. We hope you will join us at our Annual Meeting in November so you can vote and see what your co-op is all about. We welcome your advice and counsel as we continually look for innovative ways to help you use energy efficiently and in a more costeffective manner. We use member feedback when developing programs like our Time of Use rate plan and our Cooperative Solar program. While electric power is the commodity that your co-op sells, the real power is that together, we empower this local community. When people feel empowered they accomplish great things. True, the world is different today than it was in 1937 when Coast Electric was founded but our mission of serving you and our community is constant. Working together with your active, inspired engagement, we can continue to accomplish great things.

Coast Electric’s

business offices will be closed

Monday, Sept. 4 in observance of Labor Day.

Crews will remain on call and dispatchers will remain on duty throughout the holiday weekend. Call 877-769-2372 or use our free CE on the Go mobile app to report outages. Have a safe and happy weekend!

This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

Watt’s up this month

12b PAGE

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I Meet your board representatives I Annual Meeting is Nov. 2 – join us!

I Did you know about our environmental efforts? I Household Hazardous Waste Day is Sept. 30 in Kiln I Missisisppi hunting seasons Wear Orange


September 2017

Efficient kitchen lighting Kitchen sizes, styles and configurations have changed dramatically through the years. As consumer lifestyles and tastes have changed, kitchen lighting has evolved to reflect these shifts. In the past, a simple florescent ring placed in the center of the ceiling operated by a single switch was the norm for a typical American kitchen. Now, the proliferation of TV networks and shows devoted to every aspect of home decorating, remodeling, building and sales reflect current consumers’ higher standards and expectations for a home’s appearance. Lighting, once considered an afterthought, is now an integral part of home décor and function – particularly in a focal area such as the kitchen.

 Layering effect

The effect of a single overhead light source can be too much light in one area and not enough in others. Layering different types of light from different sources is not only a smart plan, but it makes good sense from an efficiency perspective. Task lighting, such as under-counter lighting illuminates a particular work surface without a shadow-

TIP of the

Month

ing effect. Energy efficient options typically feature LED-powered puck lights that can be placed precisely where they are most needed under the cabinets. Another option is the thin-diameter fluorescent tube that use about 25 percent of the electricity of halogen or incandescent bulbs and have a much greater life span. Regardless of the type of light selected, when installing the lights, place them toward the front of the cabinet so they illuminate the whole countertop rather than the wall. Most types of under-counter lights can be plugged into a standard outlet. Overhead lights, whether from a central fixture, track lights or recessed, can offer indirect illumination and complement the task lights. Where possible, utilize ENERGY STAR and LED options.



Today in Mississippi



12a

Coast Electric donates to local community colleges and food pantry

 Shining a light on flexibility

Efficient lighting in the kitchen does not necessarily mean more lights, but rather more versatile lighting. Dimmer switches create more flexible lighting options for existing lights. There are times when maximum illumination is required for tasks such as food preparation or clean-up. At other times, it makes more sense to turn down the lights to create a cozier ambiance. By placing different sets of lights on dimmer switches, you increase your options, minimize the energy used for lighting and thereby allow for greater energy efficiency. However, when installing dimmer switches, make sure they are compatible with LED lights. Lighting accounts for up to 15 percent of a home’s energy budget, and since the kitchen still remains the heart of the home and is a high traffic hub, it makes good sense to focus here. For basic energy efficiency in the kitchen and elsewhere, sometimes small adjustments can make a big impact. The simplest area to focus is on the light itself. LED lights use a small fraction of the energy of CFL, halogen or traditional incandescent bulbs and they are known for their longevity and efficiency. ENERGY STAR-rated LED bulbs typically are the most energy efficient. At its best, a good kitchen lighting plan is functional, attractive and energy efficient. Whether your kitchen is large or small, old or new, one reliable recipe for energy savings is utilizing more efficient lighting in the heart of the home.

Coast Electric representatives Devin Swanier, Merilee Sands, Melissa Russo and April Lollar present a check to Jim Collins (center) of the Hancock County Food Pantry. The donation was made possible with donations from Coast Electric and CoBank.

One of Coast Electric’s operating principles is showing concern for the communities the cooperative serves. In partnership with CoBank, a national cooperative bank that serves utilities in rural America, Coast Electric was able to make donations to local organizations in the amount of $10,000. CoBank’s Sharing Success program allows their members like Coast Electric to apply for grants and receive matching funds from the bank. This year, CoBank agreed to award matching funds grants for three entities in the Coast Electric territory including Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College, Pearl River Community College and the Hancock County Food Pantry. The community colleges received a total of $4,000 and the food pantry was awarded a $2,000 grant. Each entity is able to spend the funds in any way they see fit to best serve the needs of those they serve. “We are grateful to partner with entities like CoBank who allow us to make a greater impact on our local communities,” said Coast Electric President and CEO Ron Barnes. “It is part of our company mission to serve our communities and improve the quality of life in the areas we serve. These funds are a great example of what we can do to fulfill that mission and have an impact for people in southern Mississippi.”

Cooler temps will be here soon!

No matter what kind of heating system you have in your home, you can save money and increase your comfort by properly maintaining and upgrading your equipment. Contact a licensed professional to inspect your system before the winter chill arrives. Source: U.S. Department of Energy


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Today in Mississippi I September 2017

Coast Electric values its Board of Directors Gil Arceneaux

Elected to board in 2003 Trades Superintendent o Grumman; Member of U (Hancock County Positio

Douglas Mooney Position 3

Frank McClinton Position 2

James Baldree

Elected to board in 1998 of Gulf Oaks Hospital; Me Jesus Christ of Latter Day (Hancock County Positio

Teri Eaton Position 2

Pearl River County

Charles Lopez Position 1

Richard Dossett

Elected to board in 1980 Member of Nicholson Ol Church (Pearl River County Posit

Gil Arceneaux Position 2

James Ginn

Elected to board in 2002 vice-president of Hancoc Central Bible Church, Ba (Hancock County Positio

Harrison County

Teri Eaton

Hancock County

Richard Dossett Position 1

Appointed to board in 20 term of retired board me Insurance Agent; Memb Baptist Church. (Harrison County Positio

James Ginn Position 3 James Baldree Position 1

Gordon Redd Position 3

Elected to board in 2002 battalion chief; Member Memorial Baptist Church (Harrison County Positio

Annual Meeting Notice The annual meeting of the members of Coast Electric Power Association will be held on Nov. 2, 2017. The following information is provided in accordance with association bylaws. Committee on Nominations; Credentials and Elections It shall be the duty of the board to appoint no less than 40 days nor more than 90 days before the date of the meeting of the members at which directors are to be elected, a committee on nominations consisting of not less than five nor more than 11 members who shall be selected from different selections so as to insure equitable geographic representation. The committee shall receive and consider any suggestions as to

nominees submitted by members of the association. The committee shall prepare and post at the principle office of the association at least 30 days before the meeting a list of nominations for board members. The secretary must mail with the notice of the meeting or separately a statement of the number of board members to be elected and the names and addresses of the candidates nominated by the Committee of Nominations. Any 25 members acting together may make other nominations by petition and the secretary shall post such nominations at the same place where the list of nominations by the committee is posted provided same is filed with and approved by the Committee on Nominations at least 40 days prior to the

Charles Lopez

Annual Meeting. Any petition for nominations shall be submitted on a form designated and provided by the association. Each member signing such petition shall place thereon the date of signing, address, account number and service location of the member. No nomination by petition will be accepted by the Committee on Nominations which are not filed with such committee at least 24 hours prior to the meeting date and time, if such a petition is timely filed, such person shall be a write-in candidate. A complete copy of the association bylaws is available upon request at all offices of Coast Electric Power Association.

Frank McClinton

Elected to board in 2005 manager of M&M Indust Serenity Baptist Church (Pearl River County Posit

Douglas Mooney

Elected to board in 1986 Sun Coast Business and I Member of Salem Baptis (Pearl River County Posit

Gordon Redd

Elected to board in 2002 president of Redd Pest S Orange Grove Church of (Harrison County Positio


3; Retired Paint of Northrop Union Baptist Church on 2)

8; Education Director ember of Church of y Saints on 1)

0; Cattle Farmer; d Palestine Baptist

tion 1)

2; Retired executive ck Bank; Member of y St. Louis on 3)

015 to fill unexpired ember; State Farm er of Campground

on 2)

2; Retired fire service r of Michael h on 1)

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5; Former owner and tries; Member of

tion 2)

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6; Retired partner in Industrial Supplies; st Church tion 3)

2; Co-owner and Solutions; Member of Christ on 3)

September 2017

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Today in Mississippi

Your coop future Democratic member control is one of the seven cooperative principles that companies like Coast Electric use to guide our operations. As a member of an electric cooperative, you are an owner of Coast Electric and you have voting privileges. That means you can vote on the men and women who will represent you on the board of directors. As you may know, this is a time of transition for Coast Electric. Ron Barnes took over as President and CEO of the cooperative last April and one of his first major projects is working with his staff and board members to create a new strategic plan. The strategic plan is meant to ensure

Coast Electric employees are always working on new ways to serve its members and to carry out the cooperative’s vision of safely providing member-owners with superior service and dependable electricity at the lowest possible price and to improve the economy and quality of life in our community. Members will see the results of the strategic plan in various areas in the months and years to come. We would like for you to get to know the people who represent you on Coast Electric’s board and see what they have to say about Coast Electric’s bright future.

Gil Arceneaux: When Coast Electric employees work to create a strategic plan, they start by researching what our members’ needs are. Whether it is from our member satisfaction surveys or simply taking note of what members say when they call or visit our offices, Coast Electric employees use what they hear from members as the basis for new plans and projects. That is why it is imperative that our members are active and give us feedback. As board members, we are here to listen and we want your feedback. It makes your cooperative stronger.

you to look at each decision with those goals in mind. As a board member, it helps us guide this cooperative. We are able to examine if the things we do are helping us realize the vision of the company. A strategic plan is what lights our path and ensures our decisions are always member-focused.

James Baldree: Our Coast Electric Employees are awesome! They are dedicated, hardworking and forward thinking. They are not content to be one of the best electric cooperatives in the country; they are always seeking new ways to improve. It may be new technology to make the electrical system more reliable or a new program that gives members more options. Whatever the endeavor is, employees here always work to be progressive and provide the best for the people we serve. Richard Dossett: Creating a new strategic plan every few years makes all of us focus on what is important. Are the things we are doing helping us achieve this cooperative’s vision and mission for the people of our community? Are we all singing from the same sheet music? A strategic plan isn’t just paper, it’s a living document that gives employees guidance and focus. It will benefit the people who live and work in Coast Electric’s service area. Teri Eaton: At my business, I work on behalf of my customers every day and as a board member at Coast Electric, it is my job to work on behalf of this cooperative’s member-owners. I like building relationships with the people I serve and think it strengthens the cooperative when I understand the needs and wants of fellow members. During my time on the board here, it has been evident to me that Coast Electric employees are always looking out for the people they serve. It is my sincere hope that more members play active roles in their co-op and let us know how we can build a better future together. James Ginn: Having a strategic direction is important for any successful company. It impacts everything you do, every project you might want to implement. It allows

Charles Lopez: Strategic directions are born out of strategic planning sessions. Every aspect of the entire company is viewed through the lens of what is happening now? What will happen tomorrow? And more importantly, what will tomorrow look like five to 10 years down the road? The necessity of strategic planning can be found in another question, what was going on within the industry just five years ago? Where we are today as a company is a product of the forward thinking and actions born out of past strategic directions. Success is always proactive. Frank McClinton: The cooperative business model relies on its members to function properly. Members vote for other members to represent their needs and cooperative employees work to benefit the people they serve. It is a model that makes sure the people using the product are always the focus of the cooperative’s plans and actions. I encourage members who may not be involved to learn more about their co-op and how it works to benefit the homes and businesses in our communities. Doug Mooney: We welcome comments from our members because they are our owners. Their comments are a valuable help as we work on our strategic three- and five-year plan for the future. We want to be on the offensive rather than on the defensive on our plans. Gordon Redd: There are many descriptions to define the word ‘member’ – relationship, inclusion, partner, supporter. The parts of the body such as the arms, legs, hands and feet require every ‘member’ doing its part to function properly. In the same way, Coast Electric, as the provider of electrical power, depends on each and every ‘member/owner’ to be involved in voting on important matters, to help provide better communities and to strengthen the company to be the best provider of electrical power to the public. Members of Coast Electric are important in every area of the company.

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Today in Mississippi



September 2017

Did you know that at last year’s Household Hazardous Waste Day hosted by Coast Electric at their Kiln Headquarters saw more than 560 cars drop off 35,384 pounds of old electronics, 20 tons of scrap metal, 997 gallons of waste oil and much, much more? This five-hour event does so much to ensure that waste materials are safely disposed of and aren’t a hazard to our environment. We hope to see you on Sept. 30!

Each year, Coast Electric participates in various projects to sustain and improve the environment of south Mississippi. Being good environmental stewards is an important part of acting out Coast Electric’s mission to improve the quality of life in the communities it serves. From cleanups of our waterways and highways to hosting events such as Household Hazardous Waste Day, Coast Electric employees are working to sustain and protect the beauty of our land.

Household Hazardous Waste Day is back in Hancock County

SEPT. 30 Coast Electric, the Hancock County Board of Supervisors, the Mississippi Department of Environmental Quality and Mississippi Power are once again sponsoring a Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day. When: Saturday, Sept. 30 from 8 a.m.- 1 p.m. Where: Coast Electric’s Kiln Headquarters Facility at 18020 Highway 603. For more information call the Hancock County Road Maintenance Department at 228-255-3367 Collection stations include:

 Scrap Metal and Car Batteries • Refrigerators, grills, lawn mowers, washers, dryers, metal fence material, bicycle parts, stoves, ranges

• Metal construction material, pipes, AC parts, etc. • Car batteries

 Waste Oil

Cooking oil, motor oil, antifreeze, transmission fluid

 Household Hazardous Waste • Paint, paint thinner, wood finish, varnish, turpentine, tub and tile cleaners, upholstery cleaners, oven cleaners, bleach, detergents, ammonia, drain openers, silver polish, etc. • Gasoline, lighter fluid, butane, propane • Insecticides, pesticides, rodent poisons, snail/slug killers • Fluorescent bulbs and household batteries



Waste Tires (25 tire limit)

 Old Electronics • Computers, monitors, TVs, microwaves, computer mice, keyboards, etc.

 Safe Transportation

• Leave products in their original containers and make sure the containers are properly sealed. • Transport the containers in the trunk or in the back of the vehicle away from passengers. • Do not transport more than five gallons or 50 pounds at one time. It is dangerous – and illegal – to discard household hazardous materials in the trash or down the drain. We encourage you to bring your products to this event on Sept. 30 in Kiln.


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2017-18

For a complete listing of hunting seasons, bag limits and other legal restrictions, go to www.mdwfp.com.

NEW DEER ZONES

White-tailed Deer DELTA, NORTHEAST, EAST CENTRAL, AND SOUTHWEST ZONES METHOD

SEASON DATES

LEGAL DEER

Archery

Sept. 30 - Nov. 17

Either-Sex on private and open public land.

Nov. 4 - Nov. 17

Either-Sex on private and authorized state and federal lands. Youth 15 and under.

Nov. 18 - Jan. 31

Either-Sex on private lands. Legal bucks only on authorized state and federal lands.

Youth Gun (15 and under) Early Primitive Weapons

Nov. 6 - 17

Antlerless Deer Only on private lands.

Gun (with dogs)

Nov. 18 - Dec. 1

Primitive Weapon

Dec. 2 - 15

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license. Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

Gun (without dogs)

Dec. 16 - 23

Gun (with dogs)

Dec. 24 - Jan. 17

Archery/Primitive Weapon

Jan. 18 - 31

METHOD

SEASON DATES

LEGAL DEER

Archery

Oct. 14 - Nov. 17

Either-Sex on private and open public land.

Nov. 4 - Nov. 17

Either-Sex on private and authorized state and federal lands. Youth 15 and under.

Nov. 18 - Feb. 15

Either-Sex on private lands. Legal bucks only on authorized state and federal lands.

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

SOUTHEAST ZONE

Youth Gun (15 and under) Gun (with dogs)

Nov. 18 - Dec. 1

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

Primitive Weapon

Dec. 2 - 15

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

Gun (without dogs)

Dec. 16 - 23

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land.

Gun (with dogs)

Dec. 24 - Jan. 17 Jan. 18 - 31

Archery/Primitive Weapon Feb. 1 - 15

Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Either-Sex on private land. Legal Bucks only on open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license. Legal Bucks only on private and open public land. Weapon of choice may be used on private land with appropriate license.

Small Game

In all zones: For youth fifteen (15) years of age and younger hunting on private lands and authorized state and federal lands, all three (3) of their three (3) buck bag limit may be any antlered deer regardless of number of points, inside spread or beam length.

SEASON

SEASON DATES

DAILY BAG LIMIT

Youth Squirrel*

Sept. 23 - 30

8

BAG LIMITS:

Squirrel - Fall Season

Sept. 30 - Feb. 28

8

Antlered Buck Deer: The bag limit on antlered buck deer is one (1) buck per day, not to exceed three (3) per license year. Legal bucks must meet the antler criteria within the appropriate deer management zone. For youth fifteen (15) years of age and younger hunting on private lands and authorized state and federal lands, all three (3) of their three (3) buck bag limit may be any antlered deer regardless of number of points, inside spread or beam length.

Squirrel - Spring Season

May 15 - June 1

4

SPECIES

SEASON DATES

DAILY BAG LIMIT

Rabbit

Oct. 14 - Feb. 28

8

Bobwhite Quail

Nov. 23 - Mar. 3

8

Frog

Mar. 31 - Sept. 30

25/NIght

Raccoon

July 1 - Sept. 29

1 per Party/Night

Opossum, Raccoon, and Bobcat

Sept. 30 - Oct. 31 (Food and sport) Nov. 1 - Feb. 28 (Food, sport, and pelt)

5/Day; 8/Party No Limit

Trapping

Nov. 1 - Mar. 15

No Limit

*On private lands and authorized state and federal lands only in those areas open for squirrel hunting.

Dove Wear Orange

• White-winged & Mourning Dove (North Zone) ** Sept. 2-Oct. 8; Oct. 21 Nov. 4; Dec. 9 - Jan. 15 (South Zone)*** Sept. 2-10; Oct. 7-Nov. 11; Dec. 2-Jan. 15 **(Dove North Zone) Areas north of U.S. Hwy 84 plus areas south of U.S. Hwy 84 and west of MS Hwy 35 ***(Dove South Zone) Areas south of U.S. Hwy 84 and east of MS Hwy 35.

Fall Turkey

Oct. 14 - Nov. 15 For legal restrictions and a list of areas open for fall turkey hunting, go to www.mdwfp.com.

Antlerless Deer: Private lands: The bag limit on Delta and Hill Zones antlerless deer is five (5) per annual season. The bag limit on Southeast Zone antlerless deer is one (1) per day, three (3) per annual season. U.S. Forest Service National Forests: The bag limit is one (1) per day, not to exceed three (3) per annual season.


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Delta Chicken 3 cups cooked, chopped chicken 3 cups cooked rice 2 cans cream of chicken soup ½ can pimiento pepper, drained and chopped 1 ½ cups mayonnaise 1 cup marinated artichoke hearts, drained and chopped ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. black pepper

¼ tsp. garlic salt ¼ cup chopped onion ¼ cup soy sauce 1⁄3 cup chopped pecans Topping: 1 stick margarine 1 pkg. Stove Top stuffing mix 1⁄3 cup slivered almonds

Mix all ingredients, except for topping, and pour into a buttered 9-by-12-inch dish. Bake at 350 F for 30 minutes. Topping: Melt margarine and combine with stuffing mix. Spread onto casserole. Sprinkle with almonds and bake at 350 F for 15 to 20 minutes. Note: Casserole freezes well unbaked; add almonds at baking time.

Peanut Butter Bars with Frosting

Recipes from ‘Pontotoc County Historical Society Cookbook’ Town Square Post Office and Museum, in downtown Pontotoc, is the only working historical post office in the nation. Founded in 1998 and operated by the Pontotoc County Historical Society, the museum houses exhibits on local Chickasaw history, early explorers and pioneers, railroading, veterans, education, early homemaking and more. There’s a general store and a blacksmithing shop, and a gift shop. Society members have created a 126-page cookbook to help support the museum. The book serves up recipes from appetizers to desserts, including canning and old recipes, and recipes contributed by famous Mississippians. Order the cookbook from Pontotoc County Historical Society, P.O. Box 141, 59 South Main St., Pontotoc, MS 38863. Price is $10 plus $5 S&H, payable to Pontotoc County Historical Society. For more information, call Town Square Museum at 662-488-0388. Downtown Pontotoc will host a Mississippi Bicentennial Celebration on Saturday, Sept. 30. The event will include exhibits, reenactors, carriage rides, historic tours and more from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.

Banana Griddle Cakes with Praline Butter 1 cup flour 2 tsp. baking powder ½ tsp salt 2 Tbsp. sugar 1⁄8 tsp. nutmeg 1 egg 1 cup milk 3 Tbsp. margarine, melted

1 cup mashed banana 2 tsp. lemon juice Praline Butter: ½ cup butter or margarine ½ cup light-brown sugar ¼ cup chopped pecans

In a medium bowl, sift flour, baking powder, salt, sugar and nutmeg. In a separate medium bowl, beat egg with rotary beater. Beat in milk, margarine, banana and lemon juice. Pour into flour mixture all at once; beat just until combined. Batter will be lumpy. Using about 3 tablespoons of batter per cake, cook as usual. Makes 4 to 6 pancakes. Praline Butter: In a small bowl of mixer, beat butter until fluffy. Gradually add sugar, beating until light and fluffy. Fold in pecans. Let stand, covered, at room temperature until serving. Makes 1 cup.

Bars: ½ cup crunchy peanut butter 1⁄3 cup butter or margarine, softened ¾ cup sugar ¾ cup packed brown sugar 3 eggs 1 tsp. vanilla 2 cups all-purpose flour

2 tsp. baking powder ¼ tsp. salt Frosting: 1⁄3 cup creamy peanut butter 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1⁄3 cup milk 2 ½ cups confectioners’ sugar

In a large bowl, stir together crunchy peanut butter and butter until creamy. Gradually beat in sugars. Add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition. Beat in vanilla. Combine flour, baking powder and salt. Stir into peanut butter mixture. Spread into a greased 9-by-13-inch baking pan. Bake in preheated 350 F oven for 20 to 25 minutes. Cool in pan. Frosting: Beat together creamy peanut butter and vanilla. Beat in 2 tablespoons milk and 1 cup sugar until smooth. Gradually beat in remaining sugar and milk until smooth and a good spreading consistency. Frost cooled peanut butter bars. Makes 24 bars.

Black-eyed Pea Soup 1 lb. lean ground beef 1 cup finely chopped onion 1 lb. Polish sausage, cut into bite-size pieces 1 can black-eyed peas with jalapeños, undrained 1 can reduced-sodium beef broth 1 can diced tomatoes, undrained

1 can mild diced tomatoes and green chilies, undrained 1 small can chopped mild green chilies 1 or 2 medium jalapeño chilies, seeded and chopped (optional) 1⁄8 tsp. salt 2 to 3 cups water

In a Dutch oven over medium-high heat, brown beef with onion. Drain excess fat. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and cover tightly. Simmer 45 minutes. Refrigerate overnight to allow flavors to blend. Reheat before serving.

Mexican Lasagna 1 (10-oz.) pkg. frozen chopped spinach, thawed, drained and squeezed dry 1 cup part-skim ricotta cheese 1 can pinto beans, rinsed and drained 1 can black beans, rinsed and drained

6 small corn tortillas 2 cups refrigerated fresh salsa 1 (8-oz.) block 50% reduced-fat Cheddar cheese with jalapeño peppers, such as Cabot Jalapeño Light, shredded

Preheat oven to 425 F. Combine spinach and ricotta cheese in a small bowl. In a separate bowl combine beans. Cut 3 corn tortillas into pieces and arrange in a solid layer to cover bottom of an 8-inch square baking dish coated with cooking spray. Top with half the bean mixture, salsa, spinach mixture and cheese. Repeat layers with remaining ingredients. Cover and bake for 25 minutes; uncover and bake an additional 15 minutes, or until bubbly and lightly browned. Let stand for 10 minutes before serving. Makes 6 servings.


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Elevators have been around since the mid 19th century, and you can find them in almost every multi-story structure around… except homes. That’s because installing an elevator in a home has always been a complicated and expensive home renovation project… until now. Innovative designers have created a home elevator that can be easily installed almost anywhere in your home by our professional team without

No more climbing up stairs No more falling down stairs Plenty of room for groceries or laundry Perfect for people with older pets Ideal for Ranch houses with basements


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LaPointe-Krebs House and Museum offer local history lesson By Nancy Jo Maples When it comes to being Mississippi’s oldest home, the LaPointe-Krebs house in Pascagoula captures the prize. Dating to 1757, it is the oldest scientifically-confirmed standing structure not only in Mississippi, but in the Mississippi River Valley, which spans from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico and from the Rocky Mountains to the Appalachian Mountains. The “scientifically-confirmed” term qualifies the significance because some historians claim a structure in New Orleans is slightly older. According to Marks Sokolosky-Wixon, executive director of the LaPointe-Krebs Foundation, old writings dated the one-story house to 1718, but those accountings have been determined historically inaccurate. “The date of this house’s origin had been debated for years until we got the dendrochronology report,” he said. Dendrochronology is the study of a timber’s rings to determine the year the tree was cut based on environmental events. Built on a bluff overlooking Lake Catahoula (Krebs Lake), the house was erected by Hugo Krebs, who married the daughter of Joseph Simon de la Pointe. LaPointe had traveled with French Canadian explorer Jean-Baptiste de Bienville to the area in 1699, and had bought land rights from France. Krebs, a German, came here in about 1730 to manage LaPointe’s indigo and cotton plantation. He later married LaPointe’s daughter. Descendants of the Krebs family lived in the house until 1930. It has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1971. The museum next to the house was built in 1984, but closed after Hurricane Katrina dumped three-and-a-half feet of water into the building. It reopened last year with exhibits offering written explanations of the various time periods of the area’s inhabitants, as well as

Mississippi’s oldest home, the LaPointe-Krebs house in Pascagoula, above, is temporarily closed for an extensive restoration, but visitors can learn about the historic property at a museum on the site. Marks Sokolosky-Wixon, right, serves as executive director of the LaPointe-Krebs Foundation.

hands-on activities for kinetic learning. One of the museum exhibits displays a replica of a cotton gin. Krebs is credited with inventing the cotton gin 20 years prior to Eli Whitney, but he did not have his idea patented. Other exhibits show how the house was built with tabby, a concrete substance made from oyster shells, and with bousillage, chinking made of dried moss and clay. Located on Fort Street just a few blocks north of U.S. Highway 90, the house was known for many years as the Old Spanish Fort. Research revealed that the structure is French Colonial and was a residence rather than a fort. According to Wixon, the 18-inch walls caused people to assume the structure was fortified. He said Spanish artifacts found on the property led to the belief that Spaniards had built it. In addition to Spanish artifacts, French, British and Native American relics have been found onsite. “Archeology here is breathtaking,” Wixon said. “This land has remained virtually unchanged since Native Americans inhabited it. It is interesting what we have found in the ground, as well as amazing to think what’s in the ground that we haven’t found yet.” A few feet from the house lies the Krebs Family Cemetery, the oldest active private family cemetery in the United States. Original tombstones date to 1820 with the marker of a 15-year-old girl written in French; however, burials are recorded for the ceme-

tery as far back as the 1700s. The three-and-a-half-acre grounds offer shaded tables for picnicking and plenty of room to roam among trees and War of 1812 cannons. The house is closed to the public for safety reasons while renovation continues. The museum is open Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. and Saturday 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Admission cost is $5 for adults, $4 for military and ages 65 and older, $3 for ages 5 to 15 years. The physical address is 4602 Fort St., Pascagoula. More information can be found online at www.lapointekrebs.org or by calling 228-471-5126. Award winning journalist Nancy Jo Maples lives in Lucedale and is the author of “Staying Power: The Story of South Mississippi Electric Power Association.” She can be reached at nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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Next ‘Picture This’: Kids being kids Who knows what kids will do next—but you can show us! Submit your photo of kids being kids for our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Selected photos will appear in the October issue of Today in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is Sept. 11.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES • Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date appearing on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to add any other details you like.

• Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or news@ecm.coop.

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Mississippi

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Before buying a TV, consider operating cost If you find the giant TV of your dreams on sale, check how much electricity it uses before you rush to buy it. It used to be that a huge television screen would use as much energy in a year as your refrigerator. But manufacturers now make models that consume much less electricity and have a minimal effect on your electric bill. The exception is the plasma TV: That one is still something of an energy hog. A few tips if you’re buying a TV during the next big electronics sale: • Buy a screen with LED technology. Like the LED light fixtures in your home, this technology uses less energy and the lights burn for longer. • Study the yellow-and-black EnergyGuide label that the U.S. government requires on every new TV. It will tell you approximately how much running that set will cost you in utility costs so you can compare products. • Another label to look for when you shop for a new TV: The Energy Star label. This one’s not required, but TVs that qualify to display it use about 27 percent less energy than others. • If you’re also buying a set-top box, Blu-Ray player and soundbar, look for Energy Star-qualified models. The U.S. Department of Energy estimates that you can save nearly $140 over the life of the products.

Five more ways to save 1. You could save $100 a year on your energy bill by replacing an older model refrigerator with an Energy Star-qualified appliance. 2. Insulating your attic and the walls, and floors next to an unheated garage, can lower your heating and cooling bills. 3. Unplug the TV. Electronics like TVs, speakers, gaming consoles, computers and even phone chargers continue to use energy, even when they’re turned off. 4. Dim the lights. Dimmer switches control how much light you use. A switch with a timer can turn lights on and off at set times. A light fixture with a motion sensor will turn itself off when a room is empty. All that adds up to energy savings. 5. Switch to LED lights. They use 90 percent less energy than incandescent light bulbs.


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Missing those Sunday family dinners am always delighted when my readers write, or meet me on the street, and say, “You won’t believe how your columns relate to me.” Thank you for your kind comments. My goal is to write about experiences that most of you can relate to. I have told you, my readers, about my two old cats that live outside. A friend gave me Fuzzy approximately 18 years ago, Grin ‘n’ when she was a Bare It kitten. A few by Kay Grafe months later a traveling tom came by, used his charms, and Fuzzy became a teenage mom.

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Her first and only litter consisted of four pretty little kittens. I kept two of them and adopted out the other two. One of the two I kept was killed during Hurricane Katrina, but the other one, Moonshine, still lives here with her mother. Mr. Roy and I have often watched these two cats, mother and daughter, and remarked about what an idyllic life they have enjoyed. They have spent every day together since Moonshine was born. Several times each day Fuzzy still washes and cleans her baby. Sure, they have had squabbles over the years, and in fact there have been weeks when they would have nothing to do with each other. But what mother and daughter don’t occasionally have disagreements. And as they have grown older their disagreements rarely occur. As I sat on the patio this morning drinking my second cup of coffee and watching Fuzzy and Moonshine sitting side by side, I thought about my family

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when I was growing up. Especially my grandparents, parents, uncles, aunts and cousins. I remember Sunday dinners when Big Mama and Daddy Tom

Fuzzy and Moonshine

and all their children and grandchildren sat at the dining room table and ate, talked and laughed. The young ones had to prove they were old enough to move out of the kitchen into the dining room. Everyone lived within a 50-mile radius, so these family visits occurred regularly. Roy grew up in a similar situation where the children and grandchildren gathered every few weeks at his grandparents’ house. There are still families where the members live close to each other and have Sunday dinners together, and if this is your family, be thankful; you are truly blessed. Roy never wanted to live far from his parents, and many of our decisions regarding where we were going to work and live reflected that. Today with high-speed transportation, the internet and all sorts of communication devices, it is easy for families to stay in daily contact even though the distance of separation may be hundreds or thousands of miles. In our own little family, one daughter lives in Salt Lake City, Utah, and the other in Saltillo, Miss. Our grandson lives in Nashville and our granddaughter in Ireland. We communicate almost daily. As I watched these two cats lying side by side in the sun, thoughts of my family

glowed in my mind. I still yearn for the “good old times” when everyone sat down to eat Sunday dinner together. When letters were regularly written among family members. And I wish for Sunday dinners with Roy and our daughters and their families. I dreamed of this when I first married, but cultural change and so-called progress did not allow it to happen. After we married I wrote letters weekly to my mother and grandmother. When Roy was in college and the army we wrote each other daily. Isn’t it fun to pull out some of those old letters and read them today? Fuzzy and Moonshine will never know how lucky they were to live all their lives together in the same location. And that’s great for animals and some humans. In fact, I had already written the ending to this column and expounded on what young people today are missing by not living close to their parents. But before I finished, my granddaughter called. We talked for awhile and I told her about the column I was writing about families. Lealand reminded me that she and her friends grew up in a mobile society, where the world seemed small and communication was changing at an amazing pace. Then she said, “ Kay-Kay, I can be at your house in just 10 hours, and I call you at least once a week. I love my work, friends and living in Ireland.” I still believe that families are very important, but I also realize that young people today are growing up in a completely different culture and time period. I’m not sure it’s better, but it surely is different. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 418,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

The Wisecarvers in Concert, Sept. 2, Newton. Love offering; 7 p.m. Ebenezer Baptist Church. Details: 601-896-2249. Comedian Sebastian Maniscalco: “Why Would You Do That?” Tour, Sept. 8, Biloxi. Admission; 8 p.m. Beau Rivage Theatre. Details: 888-566-7469; SebastianLive.com. “A Cast of Blues,” Sept. 8 - Oct. 7, Hernando. Interactive exhibit of life-cast masks of blues musicians, sculpted by Sharon McConnellDickerson. DeSoto Arts Council. Details: 662404-3361. Lower Delta Talks: “Dispatches from Pluto,” Sept. 19, Rolling Fork. Presenter: author Richard Grant; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Wilkinson County Homemaker Volunteers Bazaar and Quilt Show, Sept. 14, Woodville. Exhibit of vintage and contemporary quilts, local vendors with handmade items; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Pulled-pork lunches available. Free admission. Wilkinson County Park. Details: 601-888-3211. 27th Annual Rice Tasting Luncheon, Sept. 15, Cleveland. More than 300 rice dishes to sample; 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Admission. Delta State University Walter Sillers Coliseum. Details: 662-843-8371. Mississippi Gourd Festival, Sept. 15-16, Raleigh. Indoor festival with handcrafted gourds, ready-to-craft gourds, gourdcrafting classes, demos, tools, supplies, more; 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Admission. Smith County Ag Complex. Details: 601-782-9444; MississippiGourdSociety.org. Reveille: Mississippi’s Bicentennial Bash, Sept. 15-16, Natchez. Chickasaw dancers demo, BBQ dinner, old-time music by The Canegrinders, tours, more. Historic Jefferson College. Details: 601-442-2901; HistoricJeffersonCollege.com. Lake Eddins VFD Big Bass Tournament, Sept. 16, Pachuta. Entry fee. Details: 601-7273535, 601-928-8702. Shape Note Singing Workshop, Sept. 21, Jackson. Learn to sing Early American hymns

in four-part harmony; 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Free. Mississippi Ag and Forestry Museum. Details: 601-953-1094. Fall Pilgrimage, Sept. 22 - Oct. 9, Natchez. Tours of 17 antebellum homes, music, more. Admission. Details: 800-647-6742; NatchezPilgrimage.com. Indian Bayou Arts Festival, Sept. 23, Indianola. Handmade art, live music, children’s art activities, food; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Across from B.B. King Museum. Details: 662-887-4454. Mississippi Science Fest, Sept. 23, Jackson. Hands-on STEM activities for all ages at four museums: Miss. Museum of Natural Science, Miss. Agriculture and Forestry Museum, Miss. Children’s Museum, Miss. Sports Hall of Fame and Museum. Admission. Details: MSScienceFest.org. Cedar Hill Farm Pumpkin Patch and Corn Maze, Sept. 23 - Oct. 31, Hernando. Hay ride to pumpkins, hay fort, pony rides, animals, Country Kitchen, General Store. Admission. Details: 662-429-2540; GoCedarHillFarm.com. Mighty Mississippi Music Festival, Sept. 28 - Oct. 1, Greenville. Multi-genre concert with St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Turnpike Troubadours, others. Camping, food, vendors. Admission. Warfield Point. Details: MightyMississippiMusicFestival.com. Gulf Coast Military Collectors and Antique Arms Show, Sept. 29-30, Biloxi. Military memorabilia, war souvenirs. Joppa Shriner’s Center. Details: 228-224-1120. 30th Annual Mississippi Pecan Festival, Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, Richton. Art/crafts, antiques, bluegrass/gospel music, mule pull, traditional craft demos, living history farmstead, draft horse farming demos, more. Admission. Details: 601-964-8222, MSPecanFestival.com. Cedar Hill Farm Civil War Reenactment, Sept. 29 - Oct. 1, Hernando. Union/Confederate encampments, skirmishes, main battle Saturday/Sunday, grand ball. Admission. Details: 662-429-2540; GoCedarHillFarm.com. 14th Annual Wing Dang Doodle Festival, Sept. 30, Forest. Chicken wing team cooking contest, entertainment, 5K run/walk, antique

tractor show, arts/crafts, children’s rides, more. Free admission. Gaddis Park. Details: 601-469-4332; WingDangDoodleFestival.com. Picayune Writers Group Free Writers Symposium, Sept. 30, Picayune. Theme: “So Many Genres: Where Does My Writing Fit?” Breakfast 8:30 a.m.; sessions begin 9 a.m. Margaret Reed Crosby Memorial Library. Details: 708-431-9668; MaryBethMageeWrites@gmail.com. Natchez Biscuit Festival, Sept. 30, Natchez. Biscuit demos, cook-offs, crowing of Biscuit Queen, biscuit eating; begins 8 a.m. Biscuit Alley, Main Street. Details: NatchezBiscuitFest.com. Indoor Flea Market, Sept. 30, Biloxi. VFW Post and Auxiliary 2434 fundraiser; 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.; 289 Veterans Ave. Details: 228-6691313. Rock the Park!, Sept. 30, Crystal Springs. Crowder, Finding Favour, Rapture Ruckus, P.Lo Jetson; 6 p.m. Admission. Chautauqua Park. Details: 601-718-7940; iTickets.com. Front Porch Jubilee, Sept. 30, Hernando. Live Americana, blues, R&B music; open mic; food trucks. Admission. Clifton Cotton Gin, downtown. Details: 901-569-5482; FrontPorchJubilee.ms. Mississippi Bicentennial Celebration, Sept. 30, Pontotoc. Exhibits, reenactors, carriage rides, historic home and downtown tours, music, parade, style show, more. Downtown. Details: 662-488-0388. Home Instead Golf Tournament, Oct. 2, Hattiesburg. Benefits PINK Ribbon Fund. Shotgun start at noon. Canebrake Country Club. Details: 601-261-2114; anna.edenfield@homeinstead.com. 158th Mississippi State Fair, Oct. 4-15, Jackson. Rides, games, food, exhibits. Entertainers include The Temptations, Oak Ridge Boys, more. Admission. Fairgrounds. Details: 601-961-4000; Facebook: Mississippi State Fairgrounds. Big Pink Volleyball Tournament, Oct. 5, Hattiesburg. Benefits PINK Ribbon Fund. USM Payne Center; 5 p.m. Details: 601-266-5641; sabina.miller@usm.edu. 15th Annual Hernando Water Tower Festival, Oct. 6-7, Hernando. Barbeque contest, arts/crafts, muscle car show, Kidz Zone, 10K run, music, more. Free. Courthouse Square. Details: 662-429-9055; HernandoMS.org. “Fight for the Girls” Pink Fun Run/Walk, Oct. 7, Osyka. 1.5 and 2 miles; check-in 8:30 a.m. Registration fee. Details: 601-810-3953; Facebook: Osyka Civic Club. Taste & Talent, Oct. 7, Diamondhead. Homemade foods, artist/author talks, silent auction; 5-8 p.m. Admission; advance tickets only. Diamondhead Community Center. Details: 228255-0337, 201-403-3847.

40th Annual Zonta Club Arts and Craft Festival, Oct. 7, Pascagoula. More than 250 exhibitors, entertainment, children’s activities, food, library book sale, antique cars, free shuttle. Free admission. Downtown. Details: 228762-8011; ZontaofPascagoula.com. Pine Lake Camp Sale, Oct. 7, Gulfport. Crafts, homemade baked goods, gumbo, jambalaya, children’s activities. Begins 8 a.m.; quilt/craft auction 1 p.m. Gulfhaven Mennonite Church. Details: 601-483-2264, 228-8320003. 40th Annual Olive Branch Octoberfest, Oct. 7, Olive Branch. Crafts, games, food, more. City Park. Details: 662-893-5219; obms.us. 39th Annual Oktoberfest, Oct. 7, Hattiesburg. Authentic German food and music, deli, quilt raffle, silent auction, vintage rooms; 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. St. John Lutheran Church. Details: 601-583-4898; stjohnlutheranchurch@gmail.com. Osyka 37th Annual Fall Fest, Oct. 7-8, Osyka. Going Pink for Breast Cancer Awareness Month with lighted Pink Forest in Town Park, survivor medals, children’s activities, crafts, more. Downtown. Details: 601-341-5901; Facebook: Osyka Civic Club. Big Pop Gun Show, Oct. 7-8, Pascagoula. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. 91st Annual Sacred Heart Bazaar, Oct. 7-8, D’Iberville. Food, children’s games, live music, bingo, silent auction. Sacred Heart Catholic Church. Details: 228-392-4527. Hill Fire: “Knee Deep,” Oct. 7, 8, 12, 14, Winona. Original folk life play based on stories of Mississippi author Arnold Dyre. Admission. Performing Arts Center. Details: 662-3100199; HillFire.org. 39th Annual Fall Flower & Garden Fest, Oct. 13-14, Crystal Springs. Plant sales, garden seminars, garden tours, wagon ride tours, live animals, plant swap, scarecrows, more; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free admission. Truck Crops Branch Experiment Station. Details: 601-892-3731; Extension.msstate.edu/FallFest. Third Annual Holiday Extravaganza Gift Show, Oct. 14, Meridian. Many new vendors. Tommy Dulaney Center; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Details: 601-480-1776.

Coming up: Third Annual Artists Watercolor Workshop, Oct. 17-20, McComb. Featuring artist instructor Judi Betts, AWS, of Baton Rouge. Registration. Details: 601-684-9995; bonniewimberly@bellsouth.net. Creative Sewing Workshop with Londa Rohlfing, Oct. 26-28, Brandon. Trunk show, hands-on sewing. Registration deadline Sept. 15. Rankin County Extension office. Details: 601-825-1462; Londas-Sewing.com.


September 2017

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Today in Mississippi I 23

SUPER COUPON

8750 MAX. STARTING/7000 RUNNING WATTS 13 HP (420 CC) GAS GENERATOR

1750 PSI Customer Rating PRESSURE WASHER

SUPER COUPON

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Wheel kit and battery sold separately.

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20 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS 1/2" COMPACT DRILL/DRIVER KIT • 450 in./lbs. torque • 1.5 amp hour battery • Weighs 3.4 lbs.

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44", 13 DRAWER $2200 INDUSTRIAL QUALITY 10 TON HYDRAULIC ROLLER CABINET LOG SPLITTER

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ITEM 69387/62744 63271/68784 shown

3999

99

9 Compare $2550 99

• Accepts logs up to 18" long and 6-1/2" diameter

$

Customer Rating

$999 ITEM 62291 67090 shown

6

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ft.

to

8

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7 79

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ft.

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21 GALLON, 2.5 HP, 125 PSI SAVE VERTICAL OIL-LUBE $49 AIR COMPRESSOR • Air delivery: Customer Rating 5.8 CFM @ 40 PSI, 4.7 CFM @ 90 PSI 99

179 $1 49 99

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ITEM 69091/61454 62803/63635/67847 shown

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$699.99

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ITEM 68496/61363 68497/61360 68498/61359

7

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Item 68498 shown

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$229.99

ITEM 69265/62344/93897 shown LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

$

89

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• Safe + secure + stable • Super strong - holds 300 lbs. • Weighs 35 lbs.

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10" SLIDING COMPOUND MITER SAW • Powerful 15 amp motor

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8

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ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

$

Blade sold separately.

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111499 $179

ITEM 61971/61972/98199 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

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29 PIECE TITANIUM TRIPLE BALL TRAILER HITCH Customer Rating DRILL SAVE 83% BIT SET

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72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET

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$

3/8" x 50 FT. RETRACTABLE 12 VOLT MAGNETIC TOWING LIGHT KIT AIR HOSE REEL Customer Rating

10 FT. x 17 FT. PORTABLE GARAGE

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SIZE MED LG X-LG

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LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

Customer Rating

$

POWDER-FREE SAVE 12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH NITRILE GLOVES $410 WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE PACK OF 100 • Weighs 83.5 lbs. SAVE Voted Best Winches Customer Rating

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• Boom extends from Customer Rating 36-1/4" to 50-1/4" • Crane height adjusts from 82" to 94"

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Item 239 shown

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1 TON CAPACITY 17 FT. TYPE IA SAVE FOLDABLE MULTI-TASK LADDER $189 SAVE SHOP CRANE • Versatile - 23 configurations $169

2696/61277/63881 807/61276/63880 62431/239/63882

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LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

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99

$377.56

1/4" 3/8" 1/2"

ITEM 69645 60625 shown

ITEM 68862/63190/62896 shown

18999 $1 49

ITEM 63585 Compare

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER

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10 "

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accent lighting $ • Pair of arbor • Super bright light plates included Customer Rating

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11999

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100 WATT SOLAR PANEL KIT

Customer Rating SAVE

• 14,200 cu. in. of storage • 2633 lb. capacity • Weighs 245 lbs.

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6 99 69

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# 1 SELLING

• Weighs 73 lbs.

$5 999

Limit 1 - Coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Hercules, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, StormCat, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/18.

59999

ITEM 68530/63086/69671/63085 shown ITEM 68525/63087/63088, CALIFORNIA ONLY

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

ITEM 69030/69031 shown LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 1/5/18. Limit one FREE GIFT coupon per customer per day.

$

ITEM 63255/63254 shown

ANY SINGLE ITEM

$ 2999 $5

SAVE 2170 $ Compare $2700

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$179.33

$

OFF

6

VALUE

Customer Rating SUPER QUIET

SAVE $99

$7999

WITH ANY PURCHASE

$ 99

• Includes GFCI outlets

• 1.3 GPM • Adjustable spray nozzle

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1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

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ITEM 63100

LIMIT 8 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

800+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com *Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 1/5/18.

ITEM 62281/61637 shown

99 17$60

Compare

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

$1 999 ITEM 61914

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$42.98

$

3199

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 1/5/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare” or “comp at” price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare” or “comp at” price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare” or "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Today in Mississippi September 2017 Coast  
Today in Mississippi September 2017 Coast  

Today in Mississippi September 2017 Coast