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News for members of Electric Cooperatives in Mississippi

Community

Cookbooks Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

as history

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USM historian studies cookbooks

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Youth leaders converge in D.C.

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Outdoors Today: Surviving summer


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Mueller custom buildings make beautiful living spacess. Our manufactured & e engineered exteriors pro id provid de flexibility ibilit for you o to d design a completely completel perrsonalized interior, while e supporting large spans and open floor plans. G Give us a call or drop by tod day, and find out more a about custom metal buildings from M Mueller.* www.muellerincc.com 877-2-MUELLER (877-268-3553)

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August 2018

Camp for special-needs children moving forward in Copiah County he 10-year effort to create a yearround camp facility for special-needs children in Mississippi has taken a giant leap forward. Mississippi’s Toughest Kids Foundation staged the groundbreaking ceremony in May, and work is underway to prepare the 326-acre site near Crystal Springs for construction of Camp Kamassa. Members of the US Air Force Reserve Innovative Readiness Training program are working on the first phase of construction this summer as a training exercise. Camp Kamassa will serve children dealing with physical and mental challenges, life-threatening illnesses and other serious issues. Every building with be handicap accessible, and qualified specialists will be on hand to help campers My Opinion with some of the activities, like Michael Callahan archery. Executive Vice President/CEO These children stand to reap Electric Cooperatives huge benefits from the fun, of Mississippi adventures, fellowship and medical care Camp Kamassa will provide. They’ll build friendships with others coping with the same life challenges while enjoying the same activities offered at conventional youth camps. Just as important, a volunteer medical staff will attend camp with their existing special-needs groups. The camp will also offer campers’ parents, family members and caretakers much-needed time to relax and recharge, knowing their youngsters are in good hands and having fun. Mississippi has nothing like Camp Kamassa. Several organizations around the state conduct summer camps for children suffering from serious illness, but they have to meet at facilities designed for use by the general public—state parks, church campgrounds and the like. What these groups sorely need is a facility designed specially for youngsters with extraordinary needs in

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On the cover What role does cooking play in Mississippi history? What can old recipes tell us about our female forebears? The Mississippi Community Cookbook Project, at the University of Southern Mississippi, seeks answers through its growing culinary collection. Learn more on page 4.

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

daily medical care and accessability. Camp Kamassa has been carefully planned to serve those needs in every way possible. The groups will pay a minimal fee for each camper and volunteer attending, but no camper will ever pay to attend. Crystal Springs resident Mary Kitchens has been the driving force behind the camp’s creation since she first envisioned the facility. Inspiration came from her own life-altering experience as the mother of a toddler with cancer (who’s now all grown up and working himself to help create Camp Kamassa). In 2008 she created the MTK Foundation, a public non-profit organization, to get the ball rolling. Kitchens, a board of equally enthusiastic Mississippians—including educators and medical professionals— and volunteers have worked hard to promote the Camp Kamassa concept and raise funding for its construction and operation. Individuals, businesses, corporations, foundations and others make up a growing list of sponsors and donors helping to make the camp become a reality. Southwest Mississippi Electric Power Association will build electric service to the camp and serve its electricity needs. The Mississippi Legislature approved a special vehicle license tag bearing the camp logo as a way Mississippians can show their support for the project. MTK receives $24 of the tag’s $31 fee. Camp Kamassa is taking shape, but more help from the public is needed. MTK estimates some $17 million will be spent to build the camp. There are several ways Mississippians can help support the project, including donations of money, volunteer service, fundraiser sponsorships and participation in Friends of MTK activities. Even a portion of your purchases from Amazon.com and Kroger can be earmarked for MTK. You can get full details on these opportunities and view the master plan for this impressive camp at MTKfound.com.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith - First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

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EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING • 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. • National advertising representative: American MainStreet Publications 800-626-1181 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300 Circulation of this issue: 438,185

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi is brought to you by your member-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperative to inform you about your cooperative and its various services, including wise energy use. If you are not a member of a subscribing cooperative, you can purchase a subscription for $9.50 per year. Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office.

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OUR HOMEPLACE

A mural on a Howard Street building in downtown Greenwood pays tribute to one of Mississippi’s most loved birds, the Great Blue Heron. Vermont artist Mary Lacy painted the mural as part of her goal to paint 10 public murals in 10 different US cities. You can see her at work on the heron in a video at MaryLacyArt.com.

Mississippi is I live down here where the gentle wind is blowing. I can see these cotton fields where I belong. I can hear my old milk cow out there a-lowing, in Mississippi, my home sweet home. Mississippi is heaven in the spring time; I love the hazy days of summer time. And I can still recall my mother softly saying, “get up, you lazy boy, it’s breakfast time.” And that time of year when leaves start to falling, you know that summertime has gone and fall is here. Picking cotton, pulling corn and parching peanuts; in Mississippi, it’s the best time of the year. When you see those grapes and ‘simmons start to falling and the air gets colder in the evening time. In Mississippi we start calling up our hound dogs; we’re getting ready ‘cause it’s possum hunting time. When we gather around the fireplace in the evening, that old oak fire feels so good these winter nights. Playing guitars, telling jokes and popping corn, just having fun by our old lamp light. At sundown when the neighbors start calling, with the circle growing larger around our room. In this peaceful, happy setting, you will find me in Mississippi, my home sweet home. —Edward “Billy Boy” Stephens, New Hebron

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Cooking behind the

At USM, Andrew Haley mines community cookbooks for insight into the lives of 20th century women in Mississippi.

By Debbie Stringer Community cookbooks have not only inspired Mississippi home cooks for more than 100 years but also helped fund the good works of churches, clubs and organizations throughout the state. For food historian Dr. Andrew Haley, these local cookbooks serve as an unconventional source of Mississippi history—specifically, women’s history. Haley, associate professor of American cultural history at the University of Southern Mississippi, directs the Mississippi Community Cookbook Project at the university’s McCain Library and Archives. Working with Jennifer Brannock, curator of Rare Books and Mississippiana for USM University Libraries Special Collections, Haley collects, preserves and researches cookbooks reflecting the culinary and community history of Mississippi. McCain Library and Archives houses some 3,000 regional, national and international cookbooks and cooking-related books. More than 1,100 are Mississippi community cookbooks, what Haley calls the “pride and joy” of the collection; 200 of these were published from 1899 to 1970, and some are very rare. Among the recipes for congealed salads and ads from local merchants with four-digit phone numbers are revealing tidbits of history. Haley gleans details about the women who contributed and compiled the recipes, the ingredients they chose, the organizations they served and the communities in which they lived. “These cookbooks are opening up a new way to tell stories of these communities,” Haley said. “They focus on a very different group of people often ignored in history, women,” Brannock said. “You’ll hear historians remark about how most history focuses on the history of men. I love it that the cookbooks provide a glimpse into the kitchens and lives of women around the state. These are the kinds of topics that really interest me.”

As an example, Haley cites a 1961 cookbook created by the parents of the senior class at Calhoun City high school. He wondered why casserole “Straight from the Galley,” 1952, dishes seemed to be so Woman’s Auxiliary, Bay-Waveland popular in the commu- Yacht Club, Bay St. Louis nity at that time. Where were the traditional Southern recipes? “When you look at the story of Calhoun City in the 10 years prior to this cookbook coming out, it becomes really obvious,” he said. Beginning in the 1950s, the area’s economy shifted from furniture manufacturing to the garment industry, thus redefining the local labor force. “So suddenly you had a community that went from lots of men working all the time to a community where women are now working for the first time. And of course that changes the way you have to cook,” Haley said. After a long day at the garment factory, these busy women often relied on casseroles using canned ingredients to get supper on the table quickly.

“These cookbooks are opening up a new way to tell stories of these communities.” – Andrew Haley “The cool thing is, you can pick up almost at random any one of these cookbooks and there’s a story like that attached to it. And that’s what really has excited me about these community cookbooks,” Haley said. Among his favorites is “Recipes for the Bride.” The

From Flower Art Garden Club cookbook, 1951, Poplarville

undated, one-of-a-kind cookbook consists of some 40 handwritten and signed recipes from members of the bridal party, or maybe someone close to the bridal couple. Haley’s students were able to trace its origin to the 1950s in Lucedale. “Tried and True Cook Book,” published in 1906 by the Presbyterian Ladies Aid Society in Gulfport, is one of the oldest in the collection. With no oven temperatures and few times listed— “bake in a quick oven until done”— one can assume the homemakers of the time needed little cooking instruction. “Coahoma Cooking Every Day and Sunday Too,” the cookbook first published in 1949 by the Coahoma Woman’s Club, whose members were plantation wives, gave credit where credit was due: “It’s an extraordinarily rare cookbook in terms of not just Mississippi history but in terms of Southern history, because they published and acknowledged the fact that many of the recipes came from black servants,” Haley said. Community cookbooks authored by African Americans have so far eluded Haley’s collecting efforts. “Prior to 1970 I have found no evidence of a single community cookbook published by African Americans


August 2018

impact of rural electrification on home cooking, beginning in the 1930s. As electric cooperatives began electrifying farm homes across Mississippi, wood stoves gave way to electric appliances and refrigeration. Some electric cooperatives employed home econ– Jennifer Brannock omists to instruct rural women on the safe and effi[in Mississippi],” he said. “That’s one of the things cient use of electric appliances. County extension I’d really love to have in our collection. It’s part of offices offered programs in safe food preparation, the state’s legacy that’s really missing.” storage and preservation. Community cookbooks offer clear evidence of “Not only was it transformative in the way peoethnic influences on Mississippi cooking, Haley ple cooked, it transformed what people cooked. pointed out. Most are peppered with ethnicAnd that was intentional, because home economists inspired recipes like chow mein, chicken fricassee, had been trained to think about people’s courtbouillon and Italian spaghetnutrition. The traditional diets in Misti—proof that Mississippians sissippi were not particularly nutriembraced the food diversity trend tious,” Haley said. sweeping the nation in the midCommunity cookbooks reflect the 20th century. outcomes of these educational efforts The influence of immigrant cookand the subsequent evolution in ing further diversified food in the recipes. “They tell us what people state. “In the Delta, Chinese grocery actually ended up cooking as a stores were essential in spreading ideas result of those interactions, and as about food, and Italian immigrants a result of having those [electric] opened restaurants,” Haley said. stoves,” Haley said. Creole and The idea for the Communi“Coahoma Cooking Every Day Cajun cuisine ty Cookbook Project started and Sunday Too,” 1952 edition, became strong several years ago when Haley Coahoma Woman’s Club influences in was asked to deliver a talk on food in Mississipsouth Mississippi and in the port cities located pi. While researching the topic in libraries around along the Mississippi River. the state, he found only small “accidental” collecAlso evident in community cookbooks is the tions of local cookbooks that had come bundled with donations of personal papers. Packed with Gov. Paul B. Johnson Jr.’s papers, for example, were his wife Dorothy’s cookbooks. “It was his stuff they were collecting and her stuff came along with it,” Haley said. “Women’s history was often treated that way. It was kind of a subset of men’s history.” When he looked through USM’s own 15 community cookbooks at the time, “I was so excited about what they could possibly tell us about how Mississippians lived,” Haley said. “Over the next couple of years I kept coming back to this collection, and finally I approached Jennifer and asked if we could make this a serious part of what the library does.” Brannock agreed. “A part of my mission [as curator] is to collect items that document the history and culture of Mississippi. I’m always looking for different ways to do that as seen in our collection of books by Mississippi authors, local histories and even Dr. Andrew Haley, pictured at McCain Library and Archives at the University of material on the infamous Pascagoula Southern Mississippi’s Hattiesburg campus, peruses old community cookboks with alien abduction. When a historian’s eye for clues about the lives of the women behind the recipes. Com-

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“I love it that the cookbooks provide a glimpse into the kitchens and lives of women around the state.”

bined with other research, the cookbooks help reveal how family life in Mississippi changed with the times—a subject that has been mostly ignored.

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Published in 1906 by the Presbyterian Ladies Aid Society in Gulfport, “Tried and True Cook Book” is one of the oldest in USM’s cookbook collection.

Don’t toss out those old community cookbooks!

Donating them to McCain Library and Archives at the University of Southern Mississippi helps preserve and share Mississippi’s culinary heritage. Andrew Haley, USM associate professor of American cultural history, has these four titles on his “wish list” of yet-to-find community cookbooks:

• The Twentieth Century Cook Book 1902, Young Woman’s Guild of St. James’ Episcopal Church, Greenville • Newton Cook Book 1903, Presbyterian Church Ladies Aid Society, Newton • Power School Cook Book 1950?, Power School, Jackson • Kosciusko Cooking for Everyday and Sunday Too 1950s?, Kosciusko Garden Club, Koscuisko To donate cookbooks, contact Jennifer Brannock, USM’s curator of Rare Books and Mississippiana, at 601-266-4347.

From “The Dinah: McComb City Recipes,” published 1946 by the Junior Auxiliary of McComb

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Seventy-five of Mississippi’s finest high school juniors spent a week in June exploring the nation’s capital and making new friends, courtesy of their local electric cooperative. As participants in the 32nd annual Mississippi Electric Cooperative Youth Tour, the students visited many of Washington’s most significant historical and cultural sites during the tour. They also took part in special events with more than 1,800 participants from 42 other states as a part of the national electric cooperative program. A highlight was a visit to the U.S. Capitol, where Rep. Gregg Harper took the Mississippi students to the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives. Rep. Harper also personally took the students onto the House Speaker’s balcony, with stunning views overlooking the National Mall. After the Capitol tour, each student had the opportunity to visit the office of his or her congressman. For 10 years Congressman Harper has graciously invited our students to the Capitol as his personal guests. While the Congressman is not seeking reelection as a House member in the next term, we cannot thank him enough for his dedication to our students and our Youth Tour program over the last decade. He will be missed by the electric cooperatives. The workshop in Jackson, held in February, and Youth Tour are components of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM) Youth Leadership Program. Participants are chosen through a competitive process sponsored by their electric cooperative. “Our program, designed for youth, prepares them for the next chapter in their life and challenges them to be better students

Mississippi’s participants in the 32nd annual Electric Cooperative Youth Tour meet with Rep. Gregg Harper on the steps of the U.S. Capitol building.

Rep. Harper gives the Youth Tour students a tour of Capitol, beginning in the National Statuary Hall, which is devoted to sculptures of prominent Americans throughout history.

and leaders in their school and community,” said Ron Stewart, ECM senior vice president. “It also encourages them to find ways to make a difference in the lives of others. This is done through leadership conferences and interaction with elected officials, business and government leaders. We offer students an opportunity to enhance their leadership skills and stress the importance of giving back as they move forward in life. Our 2018 class will make a positive impact as they lead others.” 2018 Mississippi Youth Tour delegates and their sponsoring

electric cooperatives are Alcorn County EPA: Rachel Carpenter, Lindsey Dunn; Central EPA: Wallace Bass, Sarah Burns, Gabrielle Caldwell, Allyson Crocker, Courtney Gill, Brian Pace, Alana Patterson, Arrow Scott; Coast Electric: Stephen Azar, Gage McClinton, Marion Pohl, Conner Thurtell; Dixie Electric: Garrett Crowder, Aubrey Gaudet; East Mississippi EPA: Michaiah Bolar, Maya Clay, Lydia Palmer, Sierah Roberts, Shon Willis; Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi: Landes Purnell; 4-County EPA: Haley Fye, Lake Little, Clay Walters; Magnolia Electric Power: Molly Lawson, Cruz Maxwell; Natchez Trace EPA: Weston Warren; North East Mississippi EPA: Siena Cizdziel, Jackson Dear, Marissa Harrison, John Reece McClure, Alexis McLarty; Northcentral EPA: Max Allen, Kyana Conway, Faith Cox, Camille Howell, Meredith Lee, Erin Lomenick, Daisha Matthews, Emily Merz, Jeffery Rhea, Kelli Rhea, Bryce Smith, Marcy Vanderburg, Landon Wardlaw, Cambell Webb; Pearl River Valley EPA: Thomas Hahn, Katie Norris; Singing River Electric: Zikeya Byrd, Micah Pickering, Eli Ramirez, Cari Sims; Southern Pine Electric: Mary Crane, R.J. Holifield; Southwest Electric: Nicholas Lambert, Noah Lambert, Mallory Hinson, Damira McGruder; Tallahatchie Valley EPA: Devin Booker, Camryn Gaines, Ainsley Grace Gordon, Hannah Gowen, Willaudre Harris; Tombigbee EPA: Skyler Dale, Kellen Harrison, Anderson Martin, Ashley McCrory, Madi Raper, Shelby Simmons, Rob Winters; Twin County EPA: Jonovan Tyler, Anna Claire Willard; and Yazoo Valley EPA: Colbie Merritt, Cameron Shaffer. Cooperative Energy sponsored a student representing Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association.

 MISSISSIPPI YOUTH LEADERS 


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MISSISSIPPI STUDENT WINS NATIONAL HONOR

The meeting house at Granly has been restored to its mid-1930s look and feel. It is often used nowadays for weddings as well as the annual day-after-Christmas gathering for the descendants. The original Danish community settled here about the time of the Great Depression and built this building in 1936. Photo: Walt Grayson

Wallace Bass, Mississippi’s representative on the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) Youth Leadership Council (YLC), took top honors at a conference featuring outstanding students from across the nation. During the 2018 Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi (ECM) Youth Leadership Workshop in Jackson, Wallace, representing Central Electric Power Association in Carthage, was selected among 79 students to represent our state at the national level. Each state participating in the NRECA Washington, D.C., Youth Tour selects a representative to serve on the YLC. Wallace attended the YLC conference in Washington July 14-18, where he competed against 42 representatives to represent electric cooperatives nationwide. The students were required to prepare speeches about their Youth Tour experience and/or electric cooperatives. They delivered their speeches in front of their peers and a panel of judges. On July 17, Wallace was named as the NRECA 2019 spokesperson. Wallace will deliver his speech at the ECM Annual Meeting in September 2018, and again at the NRECA Annual Meeting in Orlando, Fla., in March 2019, before an estimated group of 9,000. Central Electric Power Association and ECM congratulate Wallace on this distinguished honor.

Mississippi still holds surprises t happens every once in a while. After years running around Mississippi doing articles, writing a few books and producing a few thousand television stories, I run across something totally surprising. Probably the most striking example of that happened several years ago. Jo and I were staying overnight at The Burn Bed and Breakfast in Natchez. Bridget Green and her husband own The Burn. Bridget said she knew of a little country church south of town that I might like to see. St. Mary’s Episcopal Chapel at Laurel Hill Plantation. Her daughter was to be married there soon. I didn’t think too much of it until Bridget told us her daughter wanted an exotic wedding and had even toyed with the idea of going to Tibet for the ceremony. Bridget said she told her if that’s what she wanted, then do it. But first, she should see this church. And after she saw it she forgot Tibet. St. Mary’s Chapel was much more intriguing. Now, I figured we weren’t going to a one-room, wood-framed country church with two doors on the front, four windows down each wall and another door behind the pulpit area. My expectation bar was set high. And the imposing 160-ishyear-old stone and iron Gothic building protruding from the

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woods, with its high spires and burials under the floor, completely surpassed anything I imagined I might be going to the country to see. Well, the same sort of thing happened again the other day. I am working with a friend on a tourism project for the Mississippi Gulf Coast Seen counties docuby Walt Grayson menting some of the ethnic and cultural groups who have migrated here over time. We hit the obvious, the French who landed in 1699 and the Native Americans who helped them off the boat. The Croatians have a surprisingly deeply rooted legacy in shipbuilding on the coast. The Vietnamese community is strongly entrenched in fishing. There’s a bunch more groups. But my big surprise came when we went to the Hurley area in Jackson County to Granly to visit the once-thriving Danish community there. Else Martin is the daughter of one of the original Danish settlers. They came during the Dust Bowl from the upper Midwest in answer to advertisements for cut-over forestlands, excellent for farming. One of the first buildings constructed in the mid-1930s was their Forsamlingshus, or meeting house. It served as sort

of a community center as well as Bethany Lutheran Church. The building has been restored to its original look complete with the original hand-made pews, pulpit and altar area. The communion set is still there, as well as a hand-me-down figure of Jesus from another church that was enlarging its sanctuary and needed a bigger version. The meeting house is not nearly as ornate at St. Mary’s Chapel, across the state in the woods at Natchez. But this building at Granly is still the center of the Danish community, although there is no such visible community anymore. Descendents of the original Borgesens and Christensens and Knudsens have long since assimilated into other South Mississippi families. But the kids and grandkids still come back to this place and this building, especially on Dec. 26 for a Christmas celebration highlighted by a circle dance around the Christmas tree. The building at Granly is interesting in and of itself. But the fact that the Danish community still gravitates back to it and thinks of it as “home” is even more fascinating. Especially in a society where many people have drifted away from their roots altogether. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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Hot weather and outdoor activities

Some small streams are hardly big enough for a canoe or kayak, yet can produce impressive catches of fish. Neal Brown casts into a pool in an effort to collect a Kentucky bass. Photo: Tony Kinton

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t is August! Anyone possessing more than a year of experience with Mississippi weather knows that this month can be reliably defined with quite a few adjectives: hot, miserable, suffocating, stifling, disagreeable. The list is far longer, but there is no need to belabor the issue. Sufficient it is to simply say that August is generally not prime for outdoor activities. Still, an outdoor propensity remains pronounced in a great many individuals. The lure of being outside, while diminished, is present and powerful, even in the face of unpleasant conditions. And it seems that the more time we spend sequestered near the AC or with various and obnoxious devices blaring what is often a poor substitute for substantive entertainment or viable enhancement serves only to prod that urge to be outside in the natural world. The situation can become near maddening. Is there hope other than waiting until October before emerging from a numbing cocoon unknown to countless generations that preceded this world of modernity? Yes. Is hopeless resignation the only path? No. There are options for the outdoors types suffering from this heat-induced form of incarceration. But, these options come with a few caveats. Know that heat will be present and conditions will perhaps be less than desirable. And since there will be heat, precautions are in order. Don’t push the limits and have to terminate an otherwise enjoyable outdoor adventure because of a heat-related disorder. Be sensibly careful.

This care includes such elements as wearing the proper clothing and a hat. Always a hat! Apply sunscreen. Drink adequate amounts of water. Don’t overexert. These and other prerequisites to hot-weather activities are well known, so practice them with vigor. But warnings not specifically related to heat are also important. Things such as knowing where you are going, how to get back from there and letting someone else know where you are going and when to expect you back certainly apply. And be highly aware of the nasties that lie in wait. Ticks are paramount. They are insidious little beings that are more than capable of dealing serious grief. Always use some form of spray or lotion, and always do a strip search immediately upon returning from any sojourn outside. A shower is advisable after the search. A viable suggestion regarding tick prevention is to do research—articles, books, websites. Here can be found a list of products that may help prevent tick attacks, as well as advice for proper removal and treatment if a bite does occur. Don’t take this tick issue flippantly. It is extremely important. So what should you do when you go outside seeking relief from confinement? That is purely a matter of choice. Some may head to the lake, ski boat in tow. Others may simply opt for pool side. And there are the more sedate, such as I, who gingerly stroll around the back yard in early morning. All good, these doings. Don’t overlook fishing. Bass boats are buzzing during August, and these fish can be found. But a far more pedestrian

approach is both available and Outdoors enticing. In fact, this tactic is just Today getting started by Tony Kinton toward its peak season and can run through late fall. The fishing referred to here is that found on small creeks and rivers, some maybe even too small to accommodate a canoe or kayak minus a great deal of portaging over tangles. August quite often finds stream waters low and slow. This translates into tiny shoals, deeper and pronounced pools, exposed logs and shallows flowing over sandbars. And despite the appearance of these diminutive waterways, fishing can be spectacular. Bream, catfish and Kentucky and/or largemouth bass are common in most of these streams. How do you fish them? Wading is productive. So is fishing from a canoe or kayak. Seldom will the streams highlighted afford adequate water for bigger boats. The canoe or kayak will float in shallow water and is easily portaged. And if you are using a boat of any type, don’t hesitate leaving it on a sandbar and wading a

bit. Sneakers will dry in time, and wading can regularly put you in a profitable position for good casting. For bass, throw a spinnerbait so that it runs the length of logs that feature a dark pocket. The same applies to a steep bank that enters the flow. Where sandbars end and give way to deeper water, cast so that the lure runs parallel to that drop. Kentucky or largemouth bass should be there. And the occasional bream in the same locales will move out of his league among predators and tackle a bait intended for bass. If you want to target bream, tie on a Beetle Spin. Catfish? Use worms and fish the deeper isolated pockets. August may not be the ideal time to be outside, but some activity can be had in relative comfort. Even if this is limited to early mornings, any amount of time outside can be beneficial in warding off the delirium of detention. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Farewell to Moonshine and Fuzzy pproximately a year ago I wrote a column about the lives of my two very old outside cats, Fuzzy and Moonshine. Fuzzy gave birth to her one and only litter of kittens when she was only eight months old. We gave them all away except Moonshine. I described the special relationship this mother and daughter had and their love for each other. I also included a photo in the column of Fuzzy washing her baby when they were 19 years old. Fuzzy and Moonshine were inseparable. Some of you wrote me long letters describing experiences with your cats. I’m glad I wrote about Moonshine and Fuzzy, because within six months Moonshine disappeared. We looked for her endlessly but decided that she knew her death was near and left, to bear it alone. Especially since she never wondered away from Fuzzy. Some species do that. We worried what Fuzzy’s reaction would be. For several weeks she sat and looked out toward the west woods. But finally she seemed to accept the fact that

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Moonshine was gone. Fuzzy had also begun to show the effects of old age, and possibly the loss of her child. She made it very obvious she wanted more attention from me, and almost demanded it by following me every place I went. I put her in my lap often and talked to her constantly when I was outside. She had lost most of her Grin ‘n’ hearing, and we Bare It were very careful by Kay Grafe driving into the carport for fear of hitting her. Yesterday, she did not want to get out of her bed, so we put her food next to her. This morning when I went outside and looked in her bed it was empty. I looked all around the yard and and began to think that she had gone into the woods and died. But when I walked outside our bedroom door, I saw her lying next to the screen door where I occasionally let her

in. That was as close as she could get to me last night, before she died. Fuzzy’s name is now listed along with my other pet friends that have been an important part of my life. As you, my readers, know, Mr. Roy and I are animal lovers. We are not radical in our views, but we love our animals and feel that they do have certain rights. We both grew up in the 1940s and ‘50s when most people who owned dogs and cats loved their pets and cared for them, but would never consider allowing them in their house, even during bad weather. During the first years of our married life we had several dogs and cats and they all lived outside. During the fall of 1972 I had emergency surgery and was off my feet for several weeks. During this time, Mr. Roy asked me what he could do to make me feel better. Was there something that I wanted? I said, “What I really want is my own little dog that I can keep in the house.” I could tell he did not particularly like this idea, but he said, “Okay.” I won’t go into detail about my first

little inside dog, but she was a mixed breed and exactly what I needed. Pansy was the first, followed by Dixie Belle and our current child, Sugar Baby. Also during this time we have had three outside dogs, Shannon our collie and two blue heelers, Big Mack and Little Mack. Each one of our inside dogs taught us so much. First, when they live so close, they know us in many ways, better than we know ourselves. Sugar understands what we say ... wish I had space to explain. Second, our dogs have all taught me so much about unconditional, faithful love. While cats have different personalities from dogs, I can say the same about them. Especially Oaklee, our latest baby. I thank you Fuzzy and Moonshine for being my faithful little cats for over 19 years. Rest in peace. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.

the Cooks Behind the Cooking Continued from page 5

Andrew approached me, I felt that collecting more cookbooks was a great way to explore and preserve the state’s culinary history and traditions,” she said. Initially, Haley focused the collection on community cookbooks published in Mississippi before 1970, when he believed them to be “somewhat rare.” “I was entirely wrong about that. It turns out that a hundred was a ludicrously small estimate. Right now, we have about 200 community cookbooks from prior to the 1970s,” and at least 50 more identified, he said. Historic community cookbooks can turn up in flea markets, auctions or estate sales. Some are deteriorating in attics. Too many end up in the trash when the owner moves or dies. “We’re trying to acquire these books before they’re lost,” Haley said. Most of the cookbooks in USM’s collection came through donations. Carthage native Anderson Orr, of Norfolk, Va., last year gave his collection of more than 2,500 cookbooks to the university. The Orr donation expanded USM’s holdings to include regional, national and international cookbooks, many of which influenced home cooking in Mississippi. Haley sees the collection as a valuable resource not only for historians but also culinary professionals,

sociologists, nutritionists—and everyone else. “If you want to know how to cook bread, we have all the major and recent works on cooking bread,” Haley said. “We have classic works on French and American cooking. It’s a resource for anyone who cares about food.

“The cookbook collection and its popularity have surpassed our expectations.” – Jennifer Brannock

“Even if all you want is to find your grandmother’s recipe you remember her making, you should come here, look at all the cookbooks we have from [her] community and see if it shows up.” The collection may be viewed by the public any day but Sunday at McCain Library and Archives on the USM campus. Dozens of the copyright-free community cookbooks can also be viewed online and downloaded free from the University Libraries website. Work is ongoing to digitize more cookbooks for the site.

“I think that the cookbook collection and its popularity have surpassed our expectations,” Brannock said. “At first, I thought that it would be a great collecting area that would support the research of Andrew and his students. Once we got deep into collecting the cookbooks, I realized that we were the largest cookbook collection in the state. “The interest from community groups like DAR chapters, historical societies and other groups reflected the interest in cookbooks in the state and how many people wanted to make sure that these cookbooks were preserved,” Brannock “Chew Chew,” 1952, said. Columbus Junior Auxiliary. “We’re doing this to help Recipes are handwritten. Mississippians hang on to something that’s precious,” Haley said. To view complete digital versions of more than 90 community cookbooks, go to lib.usm.edu/spcol. Click on Digital Collections and Mississippiana Digital Collection. Search for “community cookbooks.” See page 14 for reprints of a few recipes from the collection.


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August 2018

ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OF MISSISSIPPI

Downed power lines:

Always a risk You teach your children not to mix water and electricity in the bathroom, kitchen and laundry room. But when a late summer rain storm knocks power lines down outdoors, do they know to stay far away from them? HERE’S WHAT YOUR FAMILY NEEDS TO KNOW: • If someone nearby comes into contact with electricity, do not touch that person or anything the person is touching. Instead, call 911. If the source of electricity is an appliance, grab the plug—not the cord—and pull it out of the outlet. If you cannot safely remove the plug, turn off the power at the fuse or circuit breaker. • If an electric wire falls on your car, do not get out of the car. You are safe inside your vehicle because your tires are conductors of electricity. They can keep you safe in your car because electricity seeks the quickest path to the ground—through the outside of the car, through the tires and into the ground. • Not all power lines are insulated, so they are never safe to touch. When a wire falls to the ground, it may

still be live, even if you don’t see sparks. Call 911 and your electric cooperative if you see a downed wire. Warn others to keep their distance. • Wood is a poor conductor of electricity, but it is still a conductor, especially when wet. Do not use a wooden ladder near a power line. If a ladder begins to fall into a power line, don’t grab it. Let it fall and call your electric cooperative. • Only pure rubber is an insulator, and most household products aren’t pure rubber. Don’t try to handle electric emergencies at home, even when you’re wearing rubber gloves or shoes.

LABOR DAY Celebrate safely Monday, Sept. 3


August 2018

Don’t let water heater guzzle energy You know how to save water by taking shorter showers. But your electric water heater doesn’t just guzzle water; it guzzles electricity. You can stop wasting electricity by replacing an old water heater with a newer, more energy-efficient model. Also: • Drain a bucket of water out of the bottom of the heater twice a year. The bottom can fill with sediment, which separates water from the heating element. • Invest in an inexpensive water heater blanket or insulation kit, especially for older heaters. Do not insulate over doors or vents. • Before buying a new water heater, estimate your family’s needs. A family of up to four should buy a 30- to 50-gallon tank, while up to seven people might require 50 to 80 gallons. Consider appliances such as hot tubs when calculating how much hot water you use, and consult a plumber for help.

Tip of the

Month • If your house is more than two levels or if the bathrooms, kitchen and laundry room are spaced far apart, it might be more efficient to invest in a smaller water heater for each level. • Set the water heater’s temperature at 120 degrees or lower. This prevents scalding and standby heat loss, and can lower your water heating bill by 10 percent. • Insulate hot water supply pipes to reduce heat loss.

We’re back in school Students are out and about. Please watch out for school buses and children at crosswalks. And observe school zones when school is in session.

THINK SAFETY!

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Today in Mississippi

Look for LED products and fixtures for outdoor use, such as pathway, step and porch lights. Many include features like automatic daylight shut-off and motion sensors. You can also find solar-powered lighting for outdoor spaces. Source: energy.gov

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Zinnias

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Today in Mississippi I August 2018

make terrific cut flowers

B

ecause of the oppressive heat and humidity in my coastal landscape and garden, I spent the weekend in the air conditioning, of course. While getting ready to speak at the Cut Flower Growing Workshop in Ocean Springs, I realized that I don’t think there’s a nicer activity than growing your own flowers for indoor use. I wish I had planned better and grown more flowering plants in my garden instead of all those darn tomatoes and peppers taking up the growing space. The good thing about planning a garden is there’s always next year to change things up. So, as I thought about the flowers that can be used indoors and also are pretty easy to grow, the best match I came up with is the zinnia. The classic cutting garden zinnia is Zinnia elegans, and boy, do these live up to that name in a vase. These are the oldtimey, pom-pom zinnias that I’m sure nearly everyone’s grandmother grew. They come in lots of colors and attractive flower shapes. I’m really fond of the cactus-flowered zinnia after seeing them growing in trial gardens at the Mississippi State University Truck Crops Branch Southern Station in Gardening Crystal Springs. by Dr. Gary Bachman Two varieties that I heartily recommend are the Benary Giants and Magellan selections. Benary Giant zinnia is a must for any home gardener who wants long-lasting cut flowers that bloom all summer. These plants are perfect as the background in summer flowerbeds, as they grow to 30 inches tall. The tall and sturdy stems support an abundant yield of beautiful flowers. The huge double flowers routinely reach 3-4 inches in diameter.

These gorgeous flowers are available as single colors or in a stunning mixture of pink, coral, white, salmon rose, golden yellow, golden orange, dark red and dark lavender. Benary Giants tolerate the high temperatures and humidity of Mississippi summers. As a bonus, they have a lower vulnerability to powdery mildew, which can be a problem with other Zinnia elegans. Magellan zinnias, shorter and stockier than some of the Benary’s Giant zinnias, have a mature height of about 18 inches. Because of the shorter, thicker stems, these plants don’t require staking even though the flowers are enormous. The flowers resemble pompoms and are available in single and mixed colors. I like mass planting the mixtures, as they look like a colorful carnival in the landscape. Zinnia elegans such as Magellan and Benary’s Giant benefit from deadheading the fading flowers. But since these are great cut flowers, you won’t have to deadhead because the flowers will never get to that point in the garden. All Zinnia elegans actually require very little ongoing maintenance during the season. Proper fertilization is critical to maintaining the gorgeous flowers. Keep constant levels of nutrition with monthly applications of a slow-release fertilizer, or use a water-soluble fertilizer biweekly. Maintain a 2- to 3-inch layer of mulch to hold moisture and cool the soil. Zinnias tolerate droughty weather, but the flower production is reduced, so supply supplemental irrigation during these times. Soaker hoses or other forms of drip irrigation are useful during the

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These Benary Giant zinnias are excellent as the background in summer flowerbeds, as well as cut and brought indoors for long-lasting blooms. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

summer and help keep the water bill down. These zinnia selections have great vase life and can still look good seven days after cutting. When collecting these flowers for vase use, always cut early in the morning and select flowers that are not quite fully open. They will continue to open once in the vase. Always have a small bucket of water with you when collecting these flowers. As soon as you cut the stem with sharp scissors or a knife, place the stem

in the water. Add a product that extends cut flowers’ life to the collection bucket to help keep the flowers fresh. Cutting zinnias from your garden is one way to enjoy the outdoors while staying cool indoors during the oppressive summer. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


August 2018

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Today in Mississippi I 13

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Wonderful French Dressing 2 cloves garlic 1 cup mayonnaise ½ cup chili sauce ½ cup catsup 1 tsp. prepared mustard ½ cup vegetable oil 1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce

1 tsp. black pepper Dash of Tabasco sauce Dash of paprika Juice of 1 lemon 1 onion, grated 2 Tbsp. water

Mix all ingredients well. Place in a quart jar in refrigerator for several hours before using. — “Chew Chew,” 1952, Columbus Junior Auxiliary

Tuna Fish Casserole 6 Tbsp. evaporated milk ¼ cup water ½ cup cheese (Velveeta type) 2 tsp. butter ½ cup bread crumbs 1 ½ tsp. [grated] onion

1⁄3 cup tunafish 1⁄3 tsp. salt 1 egg Pepper 1 cup cooked macaroni

Combine milk, water, cheese and butter in a saucepan and let melt slowly. Combine sauce and other ingredients, and pour into a greased casserole dish. Bake at 350 F for 40 minutes. — “Taste It Supper,” 1961, Forrest County Home Economics Alumnae of Mississippi Southern College [now University of Southern Mississippi]

What did past generations of Mississippi women feed their families at mealtime? What did they serve with pride for special occasions? What inspired them to experiment in the kitchen? The Mississippi Community Cookbook Project at the University of Southern Mississippi seeks to answer these questions while revealing the lives of these homemakers. While history tends to overlook their contributions to their families and community, the cookbook project is helping to bring them to light. The recipes reprinted here come from Mississippi community cookbooks published in the mid-20th century by women’s clubs and organizations. We have slightly edited some of the content for the sake of clarity. The Mississippi Community Cookbook Project welcomes donations of old cookbooks, recipe cards and other culinary ephemera. For more information, contact Jennifer Brannock at Jennifer.Brannock@usm.edu or 601-266-4347.

Bertha’s Cake ¾ cup butter 1 ¾ cups sugar 4 eggs 2 cups cake flour (sifted before measuring)

2 Tbsp. cocoa 1 ½ tsp. ground cinnamon ¾ tsp. ground cloves 1 tsp. vanilla ¾ cup milk

Potatoes O’Brien 2 Tbsp. minced onion 3 cups diced cooked potatoes 2 Tbsp. pimento

2 Tbsp. chopped green pepper 3 Tbsp. melted butter or margarine Salt and pepper

Mix all together and sauté until delicately browned, stirring occasionally. Serves 6. — “Album of Favorite Recipes,” 1959, Young Women’s Christian Association of Laurel

Orange Rice 3 Tbsp. butter or margarine 2⁄3 cup diced celery and leaves 2 Tbsp. chopped onion 1 ½ cups water 1 cup orange juice

2 Tbsp. grated orange rind 1 ½ tsp. salt 1⁄8 tsp. thyme 1 cup uncooked rice

Melt butter in heavy saucepan. Add celery and onion; cook on low heat until tender (do not brown). Add water, orange juice, rind, salt and thyme. Bring to a boil and add rice slowly. Cover, reduce heat and simmer about 25 minutes or until rice is tender. Makes a serving for 6. — “Album of Favorite Recipes,” 1959, Young Women’s Christian Association of Laurel

Bemie’s Buttermilk Caramel Candy

2 ½ tsp. baking powder

Cream butter and add sugar. Beat until like whipped cream. Add whole eggs, beating well after each addition. Sift flour, baking powder, cocoa, cinnamon and cloves together. Add vanilla to milk. Add, alternately, the flour and the milk mixtures. Beat until smooth and well mixed. Pour into two 9-inch layer cake pans that have been greased and dusted with flour. Bake at 375 F for 25 to 35 minutes. Use your favorite filling. Caramel is recommended. — “Coahoma Cooking Every Day and Sunday Too,” 1952 edition, Coahoma Woman’s Club

2 cups sugar 3 Tbsp. white Karo syrup 1 cup buttermilk 1 scant tsp. soda

1 cup pecans 1 tsp. vanilla 1 Tbsp. butter

Mix all together and put on stove and stir until it begins to boil. Cook until it makes a medium-hard ball in cold water, then take off and add butter, pecans and vanilla flavoring. Beat until slightly cool, then drop in desired shapes and sizes. — “Coahoma Cooking Every Day and Sunday Too,” 1952 edition, Coahoma Woman’s Club


August 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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August 2018

Mississippi

VACATION RENTALS SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures Email: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com. GULF SHORES BEACH HOUSE. Nice 2 BR, $900/week. Summer, $1095/week. 1-251-666-5476.

MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE MATERIALS: Soon Church/Government Uniting, Suppressing "Religious Liberty" Enforcing "National Sunday Law." Be Informed! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715. CHURCH FURNITURE: New pews, pulpit furniture, cushions for hard pews. Big sale 1-800-231-8360. E-mail: www.pews1.com

This issue will Advertise in the reach over 438,0000 homes and businesses. MARKETPLACE

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

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August 2018

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17

Next in “Picture This”

Fair Fun PORCHES

For Mobile Homes We are looking for lively scenes that best convey the fun to be had at a local fair, including midway rides, games, exhibits, food, night lights, etc. Please include the name of the fair with your submission(s). Selected photos will appear in the October issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by Sept. 17.

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• Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If emailing a phone photo, select “actual size” before sending. We cannot use compressed photo files.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the

picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a selfaddressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

I HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Or, mail prints or a CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 391583300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2018. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601605-8600 or news@ecm.coop.

I Use your generator only outdoors, away from open windows, vents and doors. Do not use it in an attached garage. I Never plug your generator directly into your home outlet. Connecting a generator to your home’s wiring requires the professional installation of a power transfer switch. A safety message from your local electric cooperative.


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Today in Mississippi I August 2018

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 437,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Send to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“Rex’s Exes,” Aug. 3-5, 10-12, Laurel. Stage production of the ditzy Southern comedy. Admission. Laurel Little Theatre, downtown Arabian Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. Dinner Dances, Aug. 4, 11, 18, 25; Sept. 1, 8, Gulfport. Dinner, 7 p.m., dance 8-10 p.m.; casual dress. Admission. Amour Danzar School of Ballroom Dance. Details: 228-3243730; AmourDanzar.com. Back to School Yazoo: Choosing Jesus Christ and a Drug-Free Lifestyle, Aug. 5, Yazoo City. Regional youth worship event with keynote speaker Darryl Strawberry; live music by Hanover Drive, TwiceBorn; workshops; more. Parkview Church. Details: 662746-4298; office@parkviewchurchyc.com. Calhoun County Sacred Harp Singing Convention, Aug. 11, Bruce. Shape note singing; 9:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Bethel Primitive

STOP!

Baptist Church. Details: 601-940-1612. Gospel Concert: Brandon Andrews with Dogwood Cross, Aug. 11, McComb. Donation; 6 p.m. South McComb Baptist Church. Details: 601-276-7475; BrandonAndrewsMusic.com. Triumphant Quartet in Concert, Aug. 17, Meridian. Meridian Temple Theater; 7 p.m. Details: 601-416-1630. Gillian Welch in Concert, Aug. 17, Hattiesburg. Special guest Dave Rawlings; 8 p.m. Admission. Saenger Theater. Details: 601-584-4888; HattiesburgSaenger.com. Hill Country Boucherie and Blues Picnic, Aug. 17-18, Como. Featuring chefs, boucherie dinner, Hill Country and blues musicians, farm tours, camping, more. Admission. Home Place Pastures. Details: HomePlacePastures.com. The Rally in Sturgis, MS, Aug. 17-19, Sturgis. All-bike motorcycle rally with rides,

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show, games, competition, vendors and entertainment including Confederate Railroad, others. Registration. Details: 662-323-1555; MSRally.com. Muscadine Grape Harvest Opening, Aug. 18, Vancleave. Tentative opening date for picking six varieties of sweet muscadines; 7:30 a.m. Also, Harvest Celebration Sept. 1 with hay ride, inflated jumpie, more. Boggy Creek Vineyard. Details: 228-283-0669; BoggyCreekVineyard.com. Mississippi Book Festival, Aug. 18, Jackson. Book lovers’ celebration featuring authors, panel discussions, book signings, Capitol tours, book vendors, kid/teen activities, more. Free admission. Mississippi State Capitol. Details: 769-717-2648; MSBookFestival.com. 16th Annual Tri-State Blues Festival, Aug. 18, Southaven. TK Soul and others; 7 p.m. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 662-4702131; Ticketmaster.com. “Denim and Diamonds,” Aug. 18, Starkville. Friends of Oktibbeha County Heritage Museum fundraiser; 6:30 - 10 p.m. Barbecue, dance music by Jimmy Bonner and Bill Davis Duo. Admission. Starkville Country Club. Details: 662-769-7671. Lower Delta Talks: “Service Dogs: What We Have Learned and What You Need to Know,” Aug. 21, Rolling Fork. Presenters: Kevin and Stacey Nelms; 6:30 p.m. Free admission. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Mid-South V.I.B. Bridal Show, Aug. 21, Olive Branch. Games, vendors, prizes, food tasting; 7-10 p.m. Whispering Woods Hotel and Conference Center. Details: 901-368-6782; MidSouthWeddingShow.com. Relay For Life Bolivar County, Aug. 25, Cleveland. Entertainment, kids activities, luminary ceremony, 5K run/1-mile walk, golf ball drop; 2-10 p.m. Delta State Fitness Trail.

Details: 662-719-2239; RelayForLife.org/BolivarMS. 47th Annual Gospel Singing Jubilee, Aug. 25, Magee. Featuring Freemans, Terry Joe Terrel, Tim Frith & Gospel Echoes, Revelations; 6:30 p.m. Magee High School Auditorium. Details: 601-906-0677. Mississippi Sacred Harp Singing Convention, Aug. 25-26, Forest. Shape note singing; 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Saturday, 9:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Sunday. Free admission. Antioch Primitive Baptist Church. Details: 601940-1612; Home.OleMiss.edu/~mudws/miss. “Little Bit of Everything” Sale, Sept. 8, Meridian. Meridian Little Theatre Guild fundraiser; 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. MLT Theatre. Details: 601-482-6371. Camp & Jam, Sept. 10-15, Polkville. Bluegrass, country and gospel music featuring Polkville City Limits and others. Open stage jam 6 p.m. nightly. Campsites available. Free admission. Music Barn. Details: 601-946-0280, 601-955-9182. Fiber Fun in the ‘Sip, Sept. 21-22, Vicksburg. Classes in fiber crafts such as knitting, spinning, weaving, dyeing, tatting, etc. Juried vendor hall, “sit and stich” area, more. Pre-registration required for classes. Vicksburg Convention Center. Details: FiberFunintheSip.com.

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19


Today in Mississippi August 2018  

Today in Mississippi August 2018

Today in Mississippi August 2018  

Today in Mississippi August 2018