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News for members of Coahoma Electric Power Association

The Ultimate Float Trip

Delta canoeists paddle 2,400 miles down the Mississippi River

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

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Port Gibson landmark vanishes—for now

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Mississippi Cooks: Easy low-carb recipes

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Picture This: Mississippi mornings


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Nation’s birthday a reminder of the ongoing cost of freedom arbecues, cold watermelon, fireworks and flag waving are staples of America’s birthday party, Independence Day. It’s one of our most fun holidays in Mississippi: School’s out, the sunshine’s plentiful and the heat makes a cool swim a wonderful thing. Folks flock to the beautiful Mississippi Coast and patriotic celebrations crank up in communities across the state. Independence Day marks the adoption of the Declaration of Independence by the Continental Congress on July 4, 1776. This bold move by the 13 American colonies cut their political ties to Great Britain and opened the door for the new nation to be officially recognized by foreign governments. A war would be fought, though, and many lives lost before America would finally emerge as a free and independent nation after the British surrender in 1781. Political and civil liberties are glorious (and rare) things, and worthy of our sacrifices and protection. Too many people throughout our nation’s 241-year history have given their lives to secure and safeguard our freedom for us to take it for granted. I suspect Independence Day will mean more in the future to a special group of Mississippi high school students. These 70 students recently toured Washington, D.C., courtesy of their local electric cooperative. The annual Electric Cooperative Youth Tour took them to war and veterans’ memorials, monuments honoring great leaders, world-class museums, Arlington National Cemetery, Washington National Cathedral and the U.S. Capitol. All these sites share a common theme: Freedom is not free. I’m sure our Youth Tour students—always a bright bunch—picked up on that. The students also learned how electric cooperatives work with elected leaders to relay the concerns of rural Mississippians. That’s why we urge our members to vote and why we focus on advancing the interests of rural communities in our nation’s capital. The Youth Tour is part of the Electric Coopera-

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On the cover Mission accomplished: Delta residents John Keen, left, and Park Neff pose by their decked canoes in August 2016 upon reaching the mouth of the Mississippi River at the Gulf of Mexico. Two months earlier, the men had begun their float trip at the river’s origin in Minnesota. Learn more about their expedition on pages 4-5.

tives of Mississippi Youth Leadership program. We’ll tell you more about it in our August issue. ••• If your electric service was interrupted during Tropical Storm Cindy’s sweep through our region last month, the most likely cause was a tree (or limbs) falling onto a power line that serves you. Rainfall deluged Mississippi’s already saturated soils for days, causing some trees to lose their grip and topple over—and, in many instances, take power lines down with them. Electric cooperative crews respondMy Opinion ed immediately. They Michael Callahan began rebuilding lines and Executive Vice President/CEO restoring service as soon as Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi conditions allowed them to work safely. Power outages caused by storms cannot be prevented, but they can be reduced through aggressive right-of-way clearing practices. Each of Mississippi’s 25 electric distribution cooperatives places a priority on maintaining a clear path for delivering electricity to members. Keeping thousands of miles of power lines free of underbrush, trees, vines and nearby limbs is a huge job in this state, where nature runs wild in the summer months. It’s also a huge expense. Yet the payoff is real. Routine right-of-way maintenance drastically reduces the chances of a limb or tree damaging a power line. There are other causes of power outages, of course, including wildlife, traffic accidents, lightning, equipment failure and countless others. Rest assured that regardless of why (or when) your electric service is interrupted, electric cooperatives have the ability and the will to restore it quickly and safely.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 7 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 456,582 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Today in Mississippi

Our Homeplace

Magnolia Electric Power member Charlene Point, of Kokomo, captures a foggy morning in a Walthall County hay field. See more beautiful Mississippi mornings in “Picture This,” pages 14-15.

Mississippi is I love a Mississippi morning On a summer’s day; Everything’s so glorious, In the most delightful way. The sun is peaking upward, The earth begins to warm; Magnificent works of nature, Are simply just the norm. There is a sense of wonderment At how all things look so new; The flowers glow with freshness From the past night’s dew. The beauty all around you, Would take away your breath; You feel you’d like to soak it in Until there’s nothing left; There’s nothing like a Mississippi morning, On a summer’s day; It’s such a grand production, It seems we all should pay. —Patricia Neely-Dorsey, Tupelo from her book “Reflections of a Mississippi Magnolia: A Life In Poems” I live in Mississippi, the state that I love. There’re so many things to do and see; This is what Mississippi means to me. Helping Grandmaw in the garden, Riding four-wheelers too. Oh my! There’s so much to do! Dancing in the rain, Watching firecrackers go off with a bang. Eating watermelon and drinking sweet tea; this is what Mississippi means to me. I live in Mississippi, the state that I love. To me it’s a gift from God above! —Anna Grace Ellis, age 13, Collins

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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THE PASTOR & THE PHOTOGRAPHER’S

Great River Adventure Park Neff paddles past marsh grasses lining the extreme upper reaches of the Mississippi River. The small wheeled cart strapped to the stern of his 17-foot decked canoe is for portaging the boat around dams on the upper river. Photos courtesy of John Keen.

By Debbie Stringer Neff, a pastor living in Arcola, and Keen, a profesAvid canoeists Park Neff and John Keen have sional photographer in Greenville, have long enjoyed floated the entire length of the Mississippi River sevcanoeing and kayaking local waterways, including the eral times. Or so it seems. Mississippi River. Paddling the river’s entire length For years Neff and Keen followed other paddlers’ seemed to be the next logical step for these experisource-to-sea Mississippi River trips through social enced paddlers. media. And they’ve met many “The Mississippi River is the of them by volunteering as ultimate place to go canoeing,” “river angels,” the name for Neff said. people who offer meals, lodgSo four years ago, he started ing or other assistance to padplanning his own source-to-sea dling passersby. Mississippi River adventure. Last summer, Neff, then Hoping for a paddling partner, 62, and Keen, 68, finally Neff pitched the idea to Keen. slipped their own boats into “Like Park, I had been thinkthe river’s headwaters in Mining about that for a long time,” nesota. From June 1 until Keen said. He signed on only Aug. 2, 2016, the two friends after assurance from wife Sharon paddled from Lake Itasca to that she wouldn’t mind managthe Gulf of Mexico, a journey ing their photography business of some 2,400 miles powered alone for two months. by millions of paddle strokes Neff’s wife, also named and river currents. Sharon, was equally supportive, With only five days off for so the men began choosing gear rest, the men achieved their for the trip, starting with canoes. goal in 58 days by paddling 10 They each purchased a 17-foot to 12 hours a day, on average. Sea Wind, a sleek, 63-pound “The longest day we had canoe hand crafted by Kruger was paddling 82 miles, when John Keen, left, and Park Neff pose for a photo on June Canoes in Irons, Mich. The 1, 2016, before launching their canoes in the headwawe were coming in to boat’s foot-controlled, flip-up ters of the Mississippi River at Lake Itasca in Minnesota. Greenville,” Neff said. rudder would prove invaluable River length measurements vary, but Neff estimates “We paddled in after dark in maneuvering through the they paddled nearly 2,400 miles to the Gulf of Mexico. with headlamps on,” Keen said. river’s strong currents, eddies That night, both men slept in their own beds at and churning waters. home, instead of a tent on a sandbar. Two days later “They’re specialty canoes, made with 10 layers of they were back on the river, continuing southward. Kevlar,” Neff said. “They have the lines of a kayak

but are considered a decked canoe. It’s made for a trip like this—made for comfort, speed and safety.” Next, they chose bent-shaft paddles made of carbon fiber and weighing only 7.5 ounces. “They are unbelievably light, which makes a big difference when you’re paddling a million-and-a-half strokes,” Neff said. Three years after Neff began planning the trip, the paddlers and their wives loaded up the boats and gear and drove north to a cabin near Lake Itasca in Minnesota. The next day, Neff and Keen’s grand adventure began with the launch of their canoes, each loaded with 160 pounds of gear and supplies. They put in near a line of rocks marking the outflow of the Mississippi River from Lake Itasca. “We backed our canoes up and touched the rocks, and then we started off,” Neff said. At this point, the great river looks more like a shallow creek, with crystal-clear waters and shores lined with evergreens. At times the paddlers negotiated boulders and rocks in rapids so swift Neff compared it to a ride at Disney World. In calmer waters, the men draped their legs over the sides of their boats while drifting and enjoying the scenery. “The first part of the trip, I think I almost dozed off paddling a few times,” Keen said. “The beauty of the upper river, it was spectacular,” Neff said. “We saw eagles, swans, ducks and deer. That first week or two the scenery was unbelievable.” Using two cameras and a cell phone, Keen photographed riverscapes, sunrises, sunsets and the people they met along the way. Neff kept a daily trip journal, often scribbling in the dark by the light of his headlamp. Both men posted progress reports, videos and photos on their Facebook page, Mission Mississippi River.


July 2017

Neff and Keen pitched their tents on a river bank or sandbar most of the time. They started out with 160 pounds of gear and supplies in each canoe but later shipped some items home. The men usually set out at sunrise and paddled 10 to 12 hours a day, on average.

Neff handled navigation. Having downloaded maps to his GPS beforehand, he could pinpoint their location on the river in real time. That ability proved especially useful early in the trip when the paddlers found themselves drifting through disorienting mazes of marsh grass. They intended to follow a time schedule in order to achieve their goal of reaching the gulf in 60 days. But there were delays. On 13 occasions the paddlers had to pull their boats and gear from the water, mount them on small carts and drag them around dams in the upper reaches of the river. The longest of these portages was

and Keen paddled more than 8 miles in sudden stormy conditions. They lost sight of each other amid winddriven waves of up to 3 feet. “That was one of the few times I felt a little bit uneasy,” Keen said. “The bows of the canoes were going underwater. We were a long, long way out from shore, and we could barely see the dam in the distance.” Both men always wore life jackets while paddling, knowing that storms, rough water, whirlpools or other river hazards could rise up at any time. Yet they never capsized, or even came close. “We paddled through water like a washing machine, but in all of that we never took on any water or got swamped,” Keen said. One morning, Neff suffered an “attack” from Asian carp. “I still have this image in my mind. Park looked like a Kung Fu fighter.... I bet 15 fish jumped over his boat,” Keen said, laughing at the memory. “I mean at the same time! And none of them hit the boat,” Neff added. Having built up “paddling muscles” from years of float trips, the men never felt sore after a day on the river, just fatiqued—too tired to prepare dinner on a small camp stove. “I was so tired after paddling all day John Keen’s boat is dwarfed by an ocean vessel docked at a port on the lower Mississippi River. long and setting up camp that if I The bimini top helps protect him from the hot July sun. couldn’t just boil water, pour it in a pouch [of instant food], stir it up and 1.5 miles, due to a lock closure at Minneapolis. eat it, I wouldn’t eat,” Neff said. Neff and Keen passed through 27 locks before reach“We built one fire the entire trip,” Keen said. ing St. Louis, Mo. Canoes are allowed to enter the Snacks and stops for meals at riverside eateries kept locks alone and with other small craft, but not with the paddlers fueled. “It got to where we would stop at a barges. Sometimes the men waited hours for barges to marina or restaurant and eat cheeseburgers and french exit a lock before they could enter. fries or pizza—or anything just to get calories in,” Neff The weather didn’t always cooperate either. Dense said. fog and thunderstorms forced the paddlers off course or Even so, the pounds fell off both men as their expeto the shore. In one of the lakes formed by a dam, Neff dition unfolded. Neff lost 15 pounds and Keen 25 in

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the first month. “River angels,” following the men’s progress on Facebook, offered meals, showers, lodging, re-supply runs and even laundry service. Neff and Keen gratefully accepted their hospitality and stayed overnight with more than a dozen kind strangers. Throughout the trip the men stayed in contact with their wives, “the two Sharons.” In early July, they all enjoyed a weekend reunion in Hannibal, Mo. The women found their husbands to be bearded, tanned and trim—and happy. During a stop in Memphis, Keen visited Dale Sanders, who in 2015, at age 80, became the oldest known person to canoe the entire length of the Mississippi River. Neff was able to surprise his father at his 90th birthday celebration. Neff himself was surprised later by a visit from daughter Jennifer at Vicksburg. The July heat cranked up as the paddlers continued southward, but their main concern was the increase in river traffic. Throughout their journey they had encountered towboats, barges and high-powered pleasure boats without a major incident. They used a VHF marine radio to communicate with towboat captains and found most to be polite and professional. A few offered the paddlers cold drinks and good wishes. But from Baton Rouge to New Orleans and beyond, they traveled through one of the largest port systems in the world. Huge freighters, tankers and cruise ships towered over their canoes, making passage unnerving in some areas. “The thing is they were so fast and quiet,” Neff said. He used an app to identify commercial craft in the areas they paddled. The paddlers finally escaped the busy shipping channel near the river’s mouth, where it branches into three separate waterways before emptying into the Gulf of Mexico. “Surprisingly, when we got to the end of the river, it was like paddling in molasses,” Neff said. “You really had to paddle hard to get in 40 miles. And we were pretty well able to paddle hard by the end of the trip.” The paddlers’ Facebook page lit up with hundreds of congratulatory messages after they posted a “mission accomplished” photo on Aug. 2: Standing beside their boats on a shore south of Port Eads, La., Keen grins while Neff raises both arms in jubilation. The men’s long journey ended well due to their extensive preparation, paddling experience and vigilance in remaining alert to their surroundings and river traffic. They returned home to the Delta with thousands of photographs, good memories and muddy boats. Neff, who is also an artist, has since based several paintings on their river photos. Both men have shared their river experiences in presentations to civic and church groups and by exhibiting their art and photography. The 58 days they spent together paddling the river were physically draining, and the nights hot and humid. Comforts like showers were few and far between. Still, their friendship survived the journey intact. “We were friends before and we’re friends after,” Neff said. “It was a good experience.”


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Port Gibson’s Golden Hand ne of Mississippi's most hand pointing toward heaven. I have it. The church supposedly adopted the state that had the finger pointing famous icons, the Golden heaven-pointing hand to point to a better done a lot of stories about cemeteries. I DOWNWARD! They figured that perHand pointing heaventell people I like any cemetery I can walk son must have been particularly bad, and place. ‘Course, no bigger than Port Gibward atop the Port Gibson is, I figure everybody knew where the out of. My fondness for cemeteries comes his unfortunate eternal destination was son Presbyterian Church house was as well as from my childengraved as a warning for all steeple, has come hood. During passersby to see. down. Temporarily. family reunions I actually found that stone It’s going back up in at Grandmothbut decided it was just a variaa few months. er’s, at some tion on the “upward” theme. The problem is, all point we Sort of like God pointing that’s gold doesn’t would all pile down in the same spirit of the glitter. Well, it into however old “Uncle Sam Wants You!” doesn’t after a quarter many cars it recruiting posters. century since its last took to get all As far as the hand, what Mississippi cleaning. Neither the of us there, comes down must go back Seen elements nor the birds and we’d carup. Give them a few months by Walt Grayson have been kind to it. avan out to and you can get your golden So the Golden Hand the family directions to heaven once has been brought down burial grounds. again in Port Gibson, atop the steeple at for repair, cleaning and The trip there was fun the Presbyterian Church. a new application of for me. Every uncle I Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi gold leaf. would ride with had difRoads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting The present heavenferent stories about adven- television, and the author of two “Looking pointing hand is not the tures of growing up there. Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That original hand that (They all had different Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown topped the steeple. That stories, but each of them Stories.” Contact Grayson at first hand was wooden, would tell their same sto- walt@waltgrayson.com. carved by a young artist ries every time we went.) named Daniel Foley When we got to the 39th Annual around 1860. I have been cemetery my cousins I told he is the same teenagand would try to find er who carved the altar rail the oldest grave. And I in St. Joseph Catholic particularly noticed difChurch in Port Gibson ferent headstone decoabout that same time. rations. One of the Woodpeckers rendered recurring headstone the original hand too “holy” The heaven-pointing hand atop the Port Gibson Presbyterian Church steeple themes was the index (877) 790-9722 is down at ground level for a few months for a cleaning and re-gold leafing. to use, so it was replaced by a more finger pointing heavenwww.mswatermelonfestival.com The steeple is one of Mississippi's most unusual icons. Photo: Walt Grayson durable metal hand around 1901. The ward. Ticket Prices: last cleaning and gold leafing was done in A few years ago someFRIDAY SATURDAY Adult: $5.00 Adult: $10.00 1989. The steeple was reinforced at the they knew where the church was. one wanted me to check out a headstone Child under 6: $3.00 Child under 6: $5.00 same time. Now, it needs another going There may be other reasons for using a in a cemetery in the eastern part of the Gates open to the public on: over. • Friday at 3:30 pm • Saturday 8:30 am The inspiration for the clenched fist with the finger pointing toward heaven as Concert: Saturday night in concert at 8 p.m. an ornament for the top of the steeple may have come from the first pastor, the JOHN CONLEE Rev. Zebulon Butler. They say he gesFireworks show sponsored tured upward with his index finger during by BigPopFireworks intense moments in his sermons, attemptALL the FREE ing (literally) to make a point. watermelon you can eat! That may be true. But I have also • Arts, Crafts, & Food Vendors • Talent Contest heard other theories why the church • The Mississippi Watermelon Festival 5K Run chose the heaven-hand as their steeple • Live Music • Watermelon Eating, Seed Spitting, topper. Supposedly there was a house of & Biggest Watermelon Contest less-than-good reputation in Port Gibson All Proceeds go to the back in that day, and pointy-hand placMize Volunteer Fire Department ards were nailed all over town leading to

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Snakes Truth and Consequences

“That snake bit me!” My excited cry echoed across the pond and garnered the full attention of all there. The episode took place when I was 15 or so, and began with a Sunday afternoon swim in a clear, sandy-bottomed pond tucked quietly into the woods a few miles from my home. It was a common gathering place after church every Sunday of summer. There were five or six of us there that particular day. The problem began with a couple of comrades throwing broken limbs and pine cones at a snake that was swimming just outside the area we inhabited. “A water moccasin,” one shouted. Despite outcries from some of us that they leave the snake undisturbed, they persisted. The reptile, actually a brown water snake, eventually moved away—or so we thought. We commenced with the splashing and diving and general frivolity. A short time later I opted to move over close to the edge and rest. I sat on that sandy bottom in water just deep enough to cover outstretched legs and began to lean back on my elbows. The snake struck; he made contact with the triceps of my right arm. I scrambled and grabbed and shrieked, all the while grasping the snake with my left hand and giving him a toss. Then time seemed to stop; at least the pace slowed adequately for some measure of composure to return.

This was a brown water snake, not some venomous monster that had just filled me with poison. Medical facilities were not immediately available, and the truth of this situation, apart from a severe case of nerves, was that I was likely in no real danger. Yes, there was the possibility of infection, as is true with any compromise of the skin, but I would care for that with a thorough cleaning and application of antibiotby Tony Kinton ic ointment as quickly as I got home. Perhaps not the most effective treatment, but a common approach in country life during the 1960s in rural Leake County. That frightening afternoon is now more than 50 years in the past, and to the best of my recall there were no negative results other than the pain similar to a wasp sting. Oh, my head is practically bald, my beard gray, one knee doesn’t function well and I am now the proud owner of my very own heart attack. Thinking back, however, I have concluded that the bald and gray are closely

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The eastern garter snake is one of the many nonpoisonous snakes important to the ecosystem in Mississippi. If you see one in your neck of the woods, leave it be.

linked to a sufficient collection of years, the bum knee is likely the product of too many mountains while in search of mule deer and elk, and the heart issue is most probably a result of high stress and my fondness for fried chicken and fish. That snake bite, it is logical to determine, caused none of these maladies. Snakes are interesting creatures and are certainly more than available during July in the outdoors of this state. While I am no herpetologist and don’t keep snakes as pets, I do stop along the way to admire these often misunderstood creatures. And while some are poisonous and all snakes should be left to go about their way, most are entirely harmless. Of the 40 or so species of snakes found in Mississippi, only four are truly dangerous. The four that are venomous and can threaten real harm are the cottonmouth, copperhead, rattlesnake and coral snake. Most of these are easily recognizable and best avoided. Regarding the coral snake, there is some confusion when determining if the snake in question is truly venomous, for there are two snakes here that have that coral configuration. One is the real deal, the other not. A common rhyme that aids in identification is this: Red on yellow kill a fellow; red on black, venom lack. If you encounter either, this rhyme will make perfect sense. The most common reaction to dealing with a snake of any sort is to grab the .22 and blast away or pick up a hoe and give the snake a whack. Neither is

required. Unless the snake is venomous and posing a direct threat, such as a cottonmouth in the swimming pool or a rattlesnake in the woodpile, most will go their way to more favorable turf if left alone. True, there are occasions where the snake must be dispatched, but these are, in the greater scheme of things, somewhat uncommon. All others apart from the venomous invaders afford no real concern. And what is the advantage of leaving snakes as you found them? The danger factor is one—if that snake is dangerous. If you avoid the snake, you likely decrease significantly the possibility of a bite. If not venomous, the snake you leave can be a bona fide mouse and rat machine. They can help keep sheds and flowerbeds free from other pests that are far less desirable than the snake, and some even eat those other snakes that are harmful. They are simply a part of nature’s design and will coexist quite well if simply ignored. Snakes are out there and they require vigilance. But they should not paralyze us with unmerited fear. Not all of them are set on biting someone. They are just going about their business of being a snake. If you react to a snake, do so with thought. In every circumstance that thought will be advantageous. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Sun coleus offers summer beauty without much work With summer officially here and hot and humid weather firmly in place, many gardeners—myself included—like to look at a pretty landscape, but don’t really want to get out and do much work in that same landscape. So selecting plants that look good without much work pique my interest. One plant that doesn’t disappoint me is Sun coleus. This is a group of ornamental plants that have moved out of the shadows to take their Southern rightful place in Gardening the full sun. by Dr. Gary Bachman They thrive in our Mississippi summers. Sun coleus colors are rich and diverse, and the plants come in highly variegated variations. They offer a kaleidoscope of combinations and are foolproof land-

scape plants. Coleus have a growing season that lasts from planting in the spring to frost in the fall. I think they belong in every garden and landscape. You need to take a close look at Electric Lime coleus, a Mississippi Medallion winner from 2010. At 24 inches tall, the beautiful lime-green foliage makes this an outstanding garden performer. Electric Lime coleus is a durable plant that can be paired with spring flowers, as well as mums in the fall. The Kong coleus has massive foliage and thrives in shady areas of the landscape. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman One selection that has impressed many gardeners across the above with a deep burgundy undergood in these settings, and that is where Deep South is Henna, a coleus that has neath. the shade-loving coleus takes its rightful stunningly beautiful, serrated foliage. But what about that shady corner or place. The leaves are chartreuse and copper patio you have? Coleus would also look Many of these varieties have gone by


the wayside as home gardeners prefer the sun-loving varieties, but one shade-loving coleus every gardener with a shady spot should consider is the Kong coleus series. Kong coleus was named a Mississippi Medallion award winner in 2006, and it is still a winner in the landscape today. Kong coleus have huge leaves large enough to cover a human face, living up to their namesake. Their foliage is the main focus, with bright colors featuring many shades of red and purple. Coleus plants are easy-to-grow, lowmaintenance plants. They are almost foolproof when grown in well-drained landscape beds or containers and consistently watered through dry periods. They also are excellent in baskets as filler plants, especially when grown in combination with a vining or cascading plant. Since we grow coleus for its boldly colored foliage, there is no point in letting them use energy to develop flowers. Pinch these off to help develop a bushy plant. New varieties are bred to resist flowering until late in the season, if they bloom at all. One key to success with coleus planted in landscape beds is to improve the soil with organic matter. In heavy clay soil, organic matter improves drainage and aeration, allowing better root development. In sandy areas, liberal amounts of organic matter help soil hold water and nutrients. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

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et’s talk about reunions and 4o years ago. (That’s a whisper.) If you get distressed over your rising age, stop and think about the future, fun, fulfillment, maturity and the “best years of your life are yet to be.” Sooo, I’ve been to high school reunions, college reunions, family reunions, special friend reunions, but on June 10, I was the only teacher invited to attend the high school reunion for the Class of 1977. Tommy Polk was the courier of the invitation. These students I remember as kids are now almost 60 years old. Their chatter wasn’t about their children, but their grandchildren. After I got over the initial shock and a wide array of conversations that brought back memories, I could close my eyes and picture those kids so full of life, mischief and dreams of the future … as it was in 1977. I didn’t go to college until Dawn and Babette were in school. I wanted the best of both worlds: stay-at-home mom and working mom. I graduated from the University of South Alabama in the spring of 1972 with a major in secondary education, specializing in history. At this point I had never had a paying job. Mr. Roberts, the high school principal, offered me a job teaching history. He had been Mr. Roy’s high school football coach, so I thought I would get special treatment and privileges. Boy, was I wrong. The first week on the job Mr.

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Reunion

Roberts called me on the intercom to report to his office at once. He measured my skirt length. The rule was it could be no more than 4 inches above your knees. He said in a harsh tone to go home and change my skirt. I felt like a student who was disciplined. Another rule was that girls who wore pants must wear a pants suit to cover their hips. So, on another morning when I walked into the office to sign in, he immediately called me back to his office. “Mrs. Grafe, I can see your crotch; your jacket isn’t long enough.” I wanted to say, why are you looking at my crotch? But I didn’t have the Grin ‘n’ nerve. Bare It Another trip by Kay Grafe home. The first thing I asked permission to do was to paint my classroom. Mr. Roberts said, just don’t paint it a bright color like red. So, I chose the next best color— orange. All other rooms were that sick pale green. I had read that orange would entice your brain to absorb information better. I wanted my students to have fun in class, so we had debates about the hot news of the week. Sometimes I read them a few chapters of a best-seller

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Guarantees subject to the claims-paying ability of the Insurance Company. Surrender of the Contract may be subject to surrender charge or market value adjustment. Product not available in all states. This is a single premium deferred annuity. Interest rates are subject to change. Withdrawals prior to age 59 ½ may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.

book at the end of class, if we had time. Also, every few weeks we had an unofficial class party at the end of class and before the bell. Students would bring some goodies and I brought Cokes in a cooler. We also wrote stories about famous characters in history, and I gave out parts for them to read. However, this got me in trouble. A student made a remark that started an argument, and her mother came to the office to have a “word” with me. After that Mr. Roberts took me to his office again and said, “Mrs. Grafe, when you get to the Civil War chapter, just skip it.” I said, “Mr. Roberts, I can’t do that. You can’t change history.” He frowned and said, “Yes, you can. I’m your boss.” One reason I believe the students enjoyed my classroom is because I was the only teacher who had air conditioning, thanks to Mr. Roy. He installed a used window air conditioner that actually worked until I left the high school. Back to the reunion. All the people there treated me like a queen and told funny stories about things that happened in class. While the stories were being told, Tim Rogers and Ronnie Davis, the class musicians, played 70’s music. The reunion was held at Ralph and Kacoos Restaurant, and we had the entire bottom floor reserved. On the way back home after the reunion was over, I began thinking about the significance of the event. The years of college, the sacrifices that my husband and children made, the long nights of study and the long daily drives to Mobile were all worth it. These wonderful kids matured into outstanding, successful adults. Maybe I played some little part in that. They told me that I did and that’s good enough for me. But I still had a nagging question. Did they pick me as their favorite teacher because of my superb ability to teach history or because they had so much fun in my class? Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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Today in Mississippi



July 2017

Beat Beat the Extreme Extreme Heat Heat a During periods of extreme heat, hot weather mixed ed with tuations. Accord outdoor activities can lead to dangerous situations. rdelated illness when ing to the CDC, people ple can suf suffer ffer heat-r heat-related operly cool themselves. During their bodies aree unable to pr properly otect yourself extreme eme heat, follow these guidelines to pr protect and your loved ones.

HEAT ALERT

S Stay tay inf informed: ormed: Check local ne news ws for for extreme extreme heat heat alerts. ou do not have have access access S Stay tay c cool: ool: If yyou onditioned space, space, visit a shop to an air-c to air-conditioned shop-ping mall or public libr ary for for a few few hours. library o your local health department tto Call your heat-relief shelt ers in y our ar ea. locate heat-relief locate shelters your area.

(nonalcoholic) S Stay tay h hydrated: ydrated: Drink (nonalcoholic) fluids rregularly, egardless of your your activity egularly y, rregardless olored, le vel. Wear Wear lightw eight, light-c level. lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing.

ve an yone in a closed, Don’t lea leave anyone

5

SUMMER energy savers

Take control of your summer energy bills in five easy steps: • Sun block. Half of all the heat that enters your home comes in through the windows. Invest in a thick shade or window film to block out the summer sun. Save up to 15 percent on your cooling bill by shading westfacing windows, which absorb the most afternoon sun. For the hottest parts of your house, consider installing an awning or planting trees in front of the window to shade the house. • Quick change. A filter for your air conditioning system costs little (about $5 for a high-quality, pleated model), but can save you much more if you change it every month during the summer. Dirty air conditioning filters prevent air flow and make the air conditioning system work harder. That means a higher power bill. • One degree. For every degree you turn your thermostat up during air conditioning season, you’ll save up to 2 percent on your

cooling costs. Try setting your thermostat at 78 degrees, and turn on a ceiling fan to help circulate the air. • Wind chill. Fans don’t cool the air, but they make the air feel cooler by moving it around the room and against your skin, which creates a sort of “wind chill” effect. When the fan is running, you can move your thermostat three to four degrees higher without noticing a difference in your comfort level. • Cool touch. Replace every incandescent light bulb in your house with a compact fluorescent light (CFL) bulb or an LED fixture. The replacements cost more at first than incandescents, but CFLs use 75 percent less energy and LEDs use less than one-tenth. Both of these energy-efficient versions pay for themselves and then some over their lifetimes. Plus, they emit far less heat than incandescent bulbs, so they don’t add heat to your home’s air or make the air conditioner work harder.

park ed vehicle vehicle parked

Do check on elderly friends and neighbors.

Tip of the

Heatt S Stress: Hea tress: W ho’s At At Risk? Who’s Adults over the age of 65, children childr under the age of four chronic medical four, r,, individuals with chr conditions such as heart disease, and those without access to air conditioning. Source: e: Cent C ers for Disease C Control ol and Pr Prevention

Month

Let the sun work for you! Consider solar lights for outdoor lighting. Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity that can be stored in a battery and tapped at night to make light. Check manufacturers’ instructions to make sure your solar lights are situated to receive sufficient sunlight to recharge during the day. Source: U.S Department of Energy


July 2017



Today in Mississippi  11

Be efficient in the kitchen with no-bake recipes Cooking in the summer can be unbearable, and the last thing you want to do on the hottest, most humid days is turn on the oven to make dinner. Your air conditioner works extra hard during summer months to keep your home cool, so why not give it a break with easy, efficient, no-bake recipes. The recipes below are meant to help you make a delicious meal for your family, without breaking a sweat!

 Tzatziki

This refreshing dip can be eaten with pita chips or veggies. You can also add it to some grilled chicken or veggies as a sauce, or even add it to a salad to make a creamy dressing! Here’s the recipe: 2 cups (plus 1 tablespoon) 2 percent Greek yogurt 1 cup cucumber, grated 1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice 1 tablespoon olive oil 3 cloves garlic, minced 3 tablespoons dill leaves (plus extra for garnish) Salt and pepper to taste Add all the ingredients to a bowl, then stir gently to mix.

 Pita with Spiced Chickpea Salad and Whipped Feta Spread the whipped feta into your pita, add the chickpea salad and you have a delicious sandwich. Add grilled chicken or even a couple slices of smoked turkey or chicken breast for a heartier meal. Here’s the recipe: For the Spiced Chickpea Salad: 2 cans chickpeas, drained 2 tablespoons olive oil 3 tablespoons lemon juice 2 teaspoons cumin 2 teaspoons dill 2 teaspoons sumac 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1/2 teaspoon red chili flakes 3 cloves garlic, minced 4 oz. cherry tomatoes 1/2 cup chopped cucumber 1 small red onion, finely diced 1 tablespoon fresh dill 1 tablespoon chopped fresh cilantro Add chickpeas, olive oil, lemon juice and spices to a bowl; stir to combine. Allow the mixture to sit for 15 minutes to 1 hour to let the flavors meld. Add tomatoes, cucumber and onion. Add dill and cilantro, and stir to combine. For the Whipped Feta: 6 oz. feta cheese 2 oz. cream cheese 1/4 cup olive oil Add feta and cream cheese to a blender. Slowly drizzle the olive oil into the blender top until the mixture is creamy and smooth.

 Frozen Lime Pie

A creamy dessert that’s a cinch to make. 1 prepared 9-inch graham cracker crust 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened 1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed milk 1 cup evaporated milk 1/2 cup (about 3 medium limes) fresh lime juice 1 tsp. grated lime peel Optional garnish: lime slices or mint leaves

sweetened condensed milk and evaporated milk, and beat until smooth. Add lime juice and peel, and beat on medium speed for 1 minute. Pour mixture into graham cracker crust. Freeze for at least 2 hours or until firm. Let stand at room temperature for 10 to 15 minutes before serving. Garnish, if desired, and serve immediately.

Beat cream cheese in a small mixer bowl until smooth. Gradually add

Keep Food Safe Before, During and After a Power Outage Unfortunately, power outages do occur from time to time. It’s important to know how to keep your food safe during an outage. Use these tips from USDA to help minimize food loss and reduce your risk of illness.

Before

power outage

During

power outage

After

power outage

Keep the refrigerator and freezer doors closed! Keep refrigerator at 40° or below. Freeze items like fresh meat and poultry that you won’t use immediately. Keep freezer set to 0° or below. Group frozen foods to help items stay colder longer.

If you anticipate an extended power outage, buy dry or block ice to keep the fridge and/or freezer cold.

If the doors stay closed during the length of the outage:

12

Check the temperature inside your refrigerator and/or freezer.

A full freezer will hold its temperature for 48 hours. If the temperatures are safe, the food should be safe to eat. A refrigerator will keep food safe for four hours.

Foods that should be thrown out after an extended power outage: Meat, poultry or seafood products Milk, yogurt and other dairy products Cooked or sliced produce

Eggs and egg products Soft and shredded cheese Opened baby formula Dough and cooked pasta Source: USDA


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Stovetop Mock Mac and Cheese 1 head cauliflower 2⁄3 cup heavy cream ¾ tsp. ground mustard ½ tsp. salt

RECIPES FROM:

‘Quick & Easy Low-Carb Cookbook’ If you or someone you cook for has adopted a low-carb approach to eating, this new cookbook is for you. Professional chef and cookbook author George Stella has redefined comfort foods by using low-carb alternatives to white flour and sugar. Stella advocates eating natural, unprocessed foods at all times. “To eat well, you have to cook well. It doesn’t have to be difficult. And it doesn’t have to take all day,” he writes. The cookbook opens with Stella’s own story of losing 265 pounds. He shares tips on grocery shopping and information on high- and low-carb ingredients, sugar substitutes and pantry items. Recipes include appetizers, everyday meals, no-sugar-added desserts and snacks. Color photographs and cooking tips accompany most every recipe. Stella explains how to use “pasta alternatives,” which substitute spaghetti squash or zucchini for flour-based pasta. And he gives cauliflower the lead role in recipes where you’d expect to find pasta, rice or potatoes. Most of Stella’s recipes save time (like TwoHour Pot Roast), use few ingredients (only three for sweet and savory Chipotle Flat Iron) and offer fresh, flavorful combinations (Avocado and Melon Salad). The cookbook is part of the “Best of the Best” series of cookbooks published by Quail Ridge Press, of Brandon, a member of Southern Pine Electric Power Association. The 224-page softcover book is available in stores. Price is $19.95. To order, contact the publisher at 800-343-1583 or visit QuailRidge.com.

Peanut Butter Cheesecake Minis 12 ounces cream cheese, softened ½ cup sugar substitute 1⁄3 cup natural smooth peanut butter

2 large eggs 2 Tbsp. half-and-half 2 tsp. vanilla extract

Place oven rack in the center position and preheat to 350 F. Spray 6 (6-ounce) ramekins or oven-safe custard cups with nonstick cooking spray. Make a water bath by pouring ¾ inch of hot water into a shallow roasting pan. Place the water bath onto the center oven rack to preheat. Place all ingredients in an electric mixer and mix on medium speed, just until combined. Spread an equal amount of filling into each of the 6 ramekins. Place the ramekins into the preheated water bath, and bake for 26 to 28 minutes, just until the tops of the cheesecakes start to crack. Cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes, then refrigerate at least 1 ½ hours before serving. Serves 6. Tip: Garnish with a sprinkling of unsweetened cocoa powder, chopped peanuts and a dollop of sugar-free whipped cream.

¼ tsp. garlic powder 1 ¼ cups sharp Cheddar cheese 4 slices deluxe American cheese

Chop cauliflower into small pieces, stem and all. Discard leaves. Boil or steam chopped cauliflower for 10 minutes, until very tender. Drain well. Transfer drained cauliflower to a sauce pot over medium heat, and add heavy cream, mustard, salt and garlic powder. Stirring frequently, bring the heavy cream in the pot to a simmer. Let simmer for 5 minutes. Remove pot from heat and stir in Cheddar and American cheeses, stirring until well combined. Let stand 1 minute to thicken before serving. Serves 4. Note: Using the American cheese helps bind the Cheddar cheese with the heavy cream, making it easier to mix without the sauce separating.

Lemon and Garlic Chicken Legs 8 chicken legs (not drumettes) 1 Tbsp. olive oil Zest of 1 lemon Juice of ½ lemon

1 Tbsp. minced garlic ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper

Preheat oven to 450 F. Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil and spray foil with nonstick cooking spray. In a large mixing bowl, toss chicken legs with all remaining ingredients. Transfer the coated legs to the prepared sheet pan. Bake for 35 minutes, flipping halfway through. Chicken legs are done when a meat thermometer inserted into the thickest part registers 175 F. Serves 4.

Fresh Ratatouille Sauté 2 Tbsp. olive oil 1 small eggplant, cut into 1-inch cubes 2 medium zucchini, chopped 1 large tomato, chopped ½ red onion, chopped large ½ yellow bell pepper, chopped

3 Tbsp. chopped fresh basil 1 Tbsp. minced garlic 1 tsp. dried thyme 1 bay leaf ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper

Heat olive oil in a large skillet or Dutch oven over medium-high heat, until nearly smoking hot. Add all remaining ingredients to the skillet and stir to combine. Sauté, stirring occasionally, for 5 minutes. Reduce heat to medium-low, cover and cook for 15 minutes, uncovering only to stir occasionally, until eggplant is soft. Season with additional salt and pepper to taste, and remove bay leaf before serving. Serves 4. Tip: If the ratatouille begins to caramelize and stick to the bottom of the pot, add a splash of water.

Bacon-Wrapped Boneless BBQ Ribs 8 boneless country-style pork ribs (about 2 pounds) 8 slices raw bacon

Quick BBQ Sauce: ½ cup no-sugar-added ketchup 2 tsp. smoked paprika 1 tsp. Worcestershire sauce ½ tsp. onion powder ½ tsp. garlic powder ½ tsp. black pepper

Preheat oven to 350 F. Line a sheet pan with aluminum foil sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Place ribs into a large mixing bowl. Add all Quick BBQ Sauce ingredients, and toss to mix and fully coat the meat. Transfer the coated ribs to the prepared sheet pan. Wrap each rib with a slice of bacon, securing with toothpicks for best results. Bake for 40 minutes, or until bacon is crisp and pork mostly white throughout. Serves 4. Tip: As this cut of pork is very lean, these ribs will have the consistency of pork chops. You can, however, cook them to be fall-apart tender with a little more time. Simply bake uncovered for 20 minutes at 350 F, and then cover and reduce heat to 250 F for 1 ½ hours of cooking, or until desired tenderness.


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FREE Car Charge r

s o t N rac t

“My friends all hate their cell phones… I love mine!” Here’s why.

I

n Co

B Bu igg tt er on s

July 2017

Say good-bye to everything you hate about cell phones. Say hello to the Jitterbug Flip. “Cell phones have gotten so small, I can barely dial mine.” Not the Jitterbug® Flip. It features a large keypad for easier dialing. It even has a larger display and a powerful, hearing aid compatible speaker, so it’s easy to see and conversations are clear. “I had to get my son to program it.” Your Jitterbug Flip setup process is simple. We’ll even program it with your favorite numbers. “What if I don’t remember a number?” Friendly, helpful Personal Operators are available 24 hours a day and will even greet you by name when you call. “I’d like a cell phone to use in an emergency.” Now you can turn your phone into a personal safety device with 5Star® Service. In any uncertain or unsafe situation, simply press the 5Star button to speak immediately with a highly-trained Urgent Response Agent who will confirm your location, evaluate your situation and get you the help you need, 24/7. “My cell phone company wants to lock me in a two-year contract!” Not with the Jitterbug Flip. There are no contracts to sign and no cancellation fees. “My phone’s battery only lasts a short time.” Unlike most cell phones that need to be recharged every day, the Jitterbug Flip was designed with a long-lasting battery, so you won’t have to worry about running out of power.

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“Many phones have features that are rarely needed and hard to use!” The Jitterbug Flip contains easy-to-use features that are meaningful to you. A built-in camera makes it easy and fun for you to capture and share your favorite memories. And a flashlight with a built-in magnifier helps you see in dimly lit areas. The Jitterbug Flip has all the features you need. 5Star Enabled

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Enough talk. Isn’t it time you found out more about the cell phone that’s changing all the rules? Call now! Jitterbug product experts are standing by.

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IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc. Your invoices will come from GreatCall. 1Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Plans and services may require purchase of a Jitterbug Flip and a one-time setup fee of $35. Coverage is not available everywhere. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can only be made when cellular service is available. 5Star Service will be able to track an approximate location when your device is turned on, but we cannot guarantee an exact location. 2We will refund the full price of the Jitterbug phone and the activation fee (or setup fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes. You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S.-based customer service. However, for calls to a Personal Operator in which a service is completed, you will be charged 99 cents per call, and minutes will be deducted from your monthly rate plan balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Personal Operator. Jitterbug, GreatCall and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. Copyright ©2017 GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.


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Today in Mississippi

PICTURE THIS

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July 2017

Mississippi Morning

Reader photos capture nature’s wake-up call 1. Lake Eddins, near Pachuta. Bob Livingston, Lucedale; Singing River Electric member. 2. Montpelier sunrise. Nannette Shinn, Cedar Bluff; 4-County Electric member. 3. 4 Lakes Bass Club morning blast-off, Fulton. Charlotte Reiland, Aberdeen; Monroe County Electric member. 4. Sunrise on the Big Black River, Yazoo County. Sam King, Madison; Yazoo Valley Electric member. 5. Early morning riser. Sandy Warren, Benton; Yazoo Valley Electric member. 6. Sand, seagrass and sunrise over the Mississippi Sound. Dianne Ott, Biloxi; Singing River Electric member. 7. Lilies await the sun’s rays. Tiffany Smith, Weir; 4County Electric member.

1 2


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8. Dawn of a new day. Myrna Davis, Wiggins; Pearl River Valley Electric member. 9. Ocean Springs beach sunrise. Melinda Youngblood, Laurel; Dixie Electric member. 10. Fog drifts across the water. Jimmy Wheat, Petal; Dixie Electric member.

Our next Picture This theme:

10

Kids Being Kids Submit your photos of kids doing their thing. Deadline for submissions is Sept. 11. Find photo submission details on page 17.


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Marketplace

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July 2017

Mississippi

MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon Church and Government uniting, will supress “Religious Liberty” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark of the Beast.” Be informed/Be forewarned! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 the biblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715. FREE E-BOOK "Secrets Your Creditors Don't Want You To Know" Call 888-485-7757 NOW. Stop Letting Debt Ruin Your Life!

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

FOR SALE SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial sawmill equipment for woodlot and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. Call for a free list or to sell your equipment, 800-459-2148; www.sawmillexchange.com.

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VACATION RENTALS LOG CABIN in PIGEON FORGE, TN, 2 BR, sleeps 6, great location. 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049, www.hideawayprop.com. SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch, charcoal grill. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures E-mail: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com. GULF SHORES HOUSE. Nice 2 BR, Gulf View, Summer $1095/week. 251-666-5476.

FARM BARNS

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Who knows what kids will do next— but you can show us! Submit your photo of kids being kids for our next “Picture This� reader photo feature. Selected photos will appear in the October issue of Today in Mississippi. Deadline for submissions is Sept. 11.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES • Submit as many photos as you like, but

Mississippi’s Giant House Party since 1889 Philadelphia, Miss. (Neshoba Co.)

Arts & Crafts market, garden & field crop exhibits, home arts & crafts exhibits, needlework and quilt displays. State dairy cattle show, beef cattle & sheep shows. Petting zoo. Harper, Morgan & Smith PRCA Rodeo. Harness and Running horse races, pony pull. Antique car show. Local & statewide political speaking. Nightly variety & Nashville Entertainment. 38th Annual Heart O’ Dixie Triathlon. Thacker Mountain Radio Show. Fireworks. Midway amusement & rides by Mitchell Bros. Amusements. 8 huge days of family fun and hospitality. For more information,

EASTERN

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DIVISION

Today in Mississippi

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Next ‘Picture This’: Kids being kids

128th NESHOBA COUNTY FAIR

Fri., July 21 thru Fri., July 28

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July 2017

visit www.neshobacountyfair.org or call 601-656-8480 Enclosed $9,995 - 30x50x10 Painted Built Price (Not Shown) STORAGE BUILDINGS HAY BARNS HORSE BARNS GARAGES

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select only photos in sharp focus. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the date appearing on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their

safe return through the mail.

HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Or, mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@ecm.coop. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a $200 cash prize drawing in December.

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Today in Mississippi

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July 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“Thinking Art into Being: Ruth Miller’s Contemporary Embroidery,” through Aug. 19, Biloxi. Personal photographs, sketches and written descriptions trace development of Miller’s tapestries from concept to finished work. Admission. Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art. Details: 228-374-5547; GeorgeOhr.org. “Avalon,” through Aug. 12, Biloxi. Iron, bronze, wood sculpture exhibit by Greg Moran. Admission. Ohr-O’Keefe Museum of Art. Details: 228-374-5547; AmberglowForge.com; GeorgeOhr.org. Mississippi Opry Summer Show, July 8, Pearl. Bluegrass, bluegrass gospel, Ole Tyme and country tunes; featuring Harmony & Grits, Bill & Temperance with Jeff Perkins; 6 p.m. Admission. Pearl Community Room. Details: 601-331-6672; sa5ash@aol.com. Horsemanship Mini Camp, July 10-14, 1721, Gulfport. Admission. Bienvenue Acres LLC. Details: 228-357-0431; BienvenueAcres.com. Dizzy Dean Fastpitch World Series, July 13-18, Southaven. Ages 6-18. Greenbrook Softball Complex. Details: 662-890-7275; GreenbrookSoftball.com. 39th Annual Mississippi Watermelon Festival, July 14-15, Mize. Arts, crafts, 5K run/walk, watermelon contests, talent contest, fireworks, more. John Conlee in concert 8 p.m. Saturday. Details: 877-790-9722; MSWatermelonFestival.com. Seventh Annual Mississippi Corvette Classic, July 15, Jackson. Ride-and-drive event, car show, vendors; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Sponsored by Mississippi Corvette Club; benefits Diabetes Foundation of Miss. Jackson Convention Complex. Details: 601-668-0533, 601-862-7560; MSCorvetteClub.com. Magnolia State Bluegrass Association Summer Show, July 15, Ackerman. Featuring Tyler Carroll & Pine Ridge Bluegrass, Russell Burton Family, Eddie Pilgrim Family, Alan Sibley & Magnolia Ramblers; 1-9 p.m. Admission. Choctaw County Community Center. Details: 662-258-2334. Kids’ Day, Excel-ebration, July 19, McComb. Scooter mouse, museum tours,

miniature riding train, model trains, inflatable jumpers, book giveaways, more; 9 a.m. noon. Free admission. McComb Railroad Depot Museum. Details: trainmaster@mcrrmuseum. 128th Neshoba County Fair, July 21-28, Philadelphia. Arts/crafts, entertainment, exhibits, livestock show, rodeo, horse races, pony pull, antique car show, midway rides, political speaking, more. Admission. Neshoba County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-656-8480; NeshobaCountyFair.org. Rascal Flatts Rhythm & Roots Tour, July 22, Southaven. Admission; 7:30 p.m. BankPlus Amphitheater, Snowden Grove. Details: 662892-2660; TicketMaster.com. The Rose Hill Revue, July 22-23, Meridian. “From grave to the stage”; 7 p.m. Saturday, 2 p.m. Sunday. Meridian Little Theatre. Details: 601-681-8525, 601-482-6371. The Whisnants in Concert, July 24, Osyka. Love offering; 7 p.m. Gillsburg Baptist Church. Details: 601-542-5231, 601-684-8943. Author Event: Allen Boyer, July 24, Greenwood. “Rocky Boyer’s War” author Allen Boyer signs and speaks; 5:30 p.m. Turnrow Book Co. Details: 662-453-5995; TurnrowBooks.com. Christmas in July, July 25, Newton. MSU floral professor Dr. James DelPrince leads workshops on holiday decorating with fresh materials and bow making. Also, lunch and demos on holiday craft/food ideas. Registration fee. Mississippi State University Coastal Plain Experiment Station. Details: 601-635-7011; newton@ext.msstate.edu. Natchez Food and Wine Festival, July 2829, Natchez. Fine food by regional chefs, special events, Mississippi vendors and artists, blues music. Reservations. Various venues. Details: NatchezFoodandWineFest.com. LaurelLittleTheatre.com. City Wide Rummage Sale, Aug. 5, Laurel. Indoor sale with more than 100 vendors; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free admission. Magnolia Center Arena, fairgrounds. Details: 601-319-6086; MyRummageSales.com.

Bikes, Blues and Bayous Cycling Event, Aug. 5-6, Greenwood. State’s largest bike ride; 11-, 22-, 46- and 62-mile (metric century) rides; 70-mile competitive division. Details: 662-453-9197; BikesBluesBayous.com. Mississippi Zydeco Jamboree, Aug. 11-13, Hazlehurst. Trail ride, campout, rodeo, horse show, prizes. Copiah County Fairgrounds. Details: 769-798-9412, 601-918-2333; SouthernHorsemen.com. Sacred Harp Singing, Aug. 12, Bruce. A cappella congregational singing of early American hymns in four-part harmony; 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Free admission. Bethel Primitive Baptist Church. Details: 601-5024634. Karen Peck and New River in Concert, Aug. 13, Petal. Love offering; 6 p.m. First

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Baptist Church of Runnelstown. Details: 601583-3733. “Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat,” Aug. 3-6, 11-13, Laurel. Musical story of Joseph and his “coat of many colors.” Admission; reservations. Laurel Little Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140.

Medicare Supplements Low Rates!

E.Insurance F. Hutton Agency

(Female age 65, “Plan F” = $111.19 )

P. O. Box 5277, Brandon, MS 39047

1-800-463-4348

E. F. Hutton nor its agents are affiliated with the Federal Medicare Program.

July 21-28, 2017

Y E ARS

! !

!

!

!

!

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! Tickets ! $40 season pass; $15 day ticket

!

Children 9 & under FREE

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! !

!

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William Michael Morgan Tuesday, July 25- 8:00 pm

Frank Foster

Thursday, July 27- 8:00 pm

!

Larry Gatlin & the Gatlin Brothers Wednesday, July 26- 8:00 pm

Brothers Osborne

Friday, July 28- 8:00 pm

21, 8 miles southwest of Philadelphia 601-656-8480 Highwaywww.neshobacountyfair.org


July 2017

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Today in Mississippi

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Today in Mississippi July 2017 Coahoma  

Today in Mississippi July 2017 Coahoma

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