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News for members of East Mississippi Electric Power Association

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

Mississippi by the Book

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Mississippi tops our summer reading list

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Historic school began in founders’ log cabin

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Coastal cookbook blends art with food


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June 2017

Puzzled about your energy use? Don’t ask the neighbors o you and your neighbor compare the amounts you spend on gasoline each month? Probably not, since your driving habits are likely to be very different. It’s equally pointless to compare your power bill with your neighbor’s. As members of an electric cooperative, you and your neighbor pay the same residential rate for each kilowatt-hour of electricity you use. So, if your power bills are higher than your neighbor’s, it simply means your household uses more electricity than his. There are many reasons why two neighboring houses may differ drastically in their electricity use. The personal habits of the occupants, the quality of home construction and the efficiency of appliances are all reflected in monthly utility bills. Some examples: • Insulation. Sufficient roof and wall insulation is crucial for efficient heating and air conditioning. Adding insulation, if necessary, will make a big difference in both energy costs and comfort. • Roofing. Reflective roof colors and energy-efficient materials help keep the attic cooler in summer. Attic vents should be open. If you have a power ventilator, make sure it works. • Windows. Double-pane windows are very effective in reducing the amount of heat entering the home— and keeping conditioned air inside. In addition, shade trees and wide eaves help block direct sunlight, as do closed blinds and draperies. • Ductwork. Air lost through leaking ductwork wastes money by making the air conditioner run longer. You don’t want to pay to cool your attic! • Air infiltration. Caulking, weatherstripping and foam sealants help reduce the amount of humidity and heat (and cold winter winds) entering the home through cracks and openings. The fireplace flue damper should be tightly closed. • Thermostat setting. One of the easiest no-cost ways to control a home’s energy use in summer is to raise the air conditioner’s thermostat to at least 78 F. Ceiling or portable fans will make you feel cooler. • Water heating. Water heating accounts for about

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On the cover Pour a glass of iced tea, settle into a comfy chair and dive into a book about Mississippi history, people or places. We have several suggestions to get you started. Our reviews of new and not-sonew titles begin on page 4.

18 percent of your home’s energy use. To reduce hot water use, fix leaky faucets, wash and rinse clothes in cold water, and run the dishwasher only when full. A shower head with a flow rate of less than 2.5 gallons per minute will help too. • Appliances. Refrigerators, dishwashers, clothes washers and dryers, water heaters and air conditioners are big-time users of energy. But newer models are far more energy efficient and many have special energysaving features. When shopping for a major appliance, look for the yellow Energy Guide label to estiMy Opinion mate the model’s energy Michael Callahan consumption and cost to Executive Vice President/CEO operate. Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi • Lighting. Traditional incandescent bulbs are huge energy wasters; 90 percent of the electricity they consume is given off as heat. By replacing your home’s five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with ENERGY STAR-labeled CFL or LED models, you can save $75 per year, according to the Department of Energy. • Cooking. Using a full-size oven daily will consume far more energy than cooking in a toaster oven, microwave, slow cooker or grill. Plus, the heat an oven adds to the home day after day makes the air conditioner work harder—and use more electricity. • The rest. Also contributing to your energy use may be that freezer running 24/7 in the hot garage, the pool pump, workshop equipment, outdoor lighting and so on. All these things add up to make a real difference in a home’s energy use. So instead of comparing your power bill with the neighbor’s, stop to think just what all electricity did for you the past month. I think you’ll realize electricity is still a bargain.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 6 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 438,244 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

If Mississippi had an official state color, it would have to be green. This shady walking path winds through woods bordering the Natchez Trace Parkway, in Ridgeland.

Mississippi is You frequently call and I come back home to you who shaped me, equipped me and sent me forth to face the challenges of life. You are the place where church and summer revivals with dinner on the ground featured fried chicken, butterbeans and egg custard pies, and kin folks returned for a week of preaching. You are the place where our teachers knew our parents and cared about our “learning” and our “conduct.” Everyone was “kin folks,” sharing fresh fruits and vegetables and fresh pork on hog-killing days, and cups of cane juice on syrup-making days. You were smoke houses and storm pits and neighbors “sitting up” at night with the critically ill. You were school plays, glee club, ball games, music lessons, FFA, 4-H Club and a week every summer at Mississippi State for Club Congress, along with 1,200 other 4-Hers. You were patriotism at its finest. You demanded respect for property, the Bible, our elders and our flag, and we thank you. You taught us gratitude for our freedom every time we heard taps played at our military funerals for our fallen heroes. Our ancestors homesteaded you and are buried there. They call us back and we remember. Oh, Mississippi, you will always be home. —Georgia Phillips Crawley, Grand Bay, Ala. I lived across the river and the pelican was my bird. Now I live in Mississippi and I got the mockingbird. I lived across the river and it was real flat. Now high upon the river bluff is where I’m at. I lived across the bridge and Louisiana was my state. Now I live in Mississippi and I think it’s just great. —Christian Joiner, age 11, Natchez

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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The history of each of the state’s 82 counties is included, along with biographies of notable Mississippians. The Mississippi Encyclopedia is not only an exhaustive resource for students and scholars but a fascinating, comprehensive (and readable) book for anyone wanting to learn more about Mississippi.

I Leontyne Price:

Voice of a Century

“Leontyne Price: Voice of a Century”

Read all about it

MISSISSIPPI by the book

By Debbie Stringer As Mississippi’s 200th anniversary of statehood approaches, this summer is a fine time to bone up on all things Mississippi. Here are a few of the newer book releases to get you started:

I The Mississippi Encyclopedia

Edited by Ted Ownby, Charles Reagan Wilson, Ann J. Abadie, Odie Lindsey and James G. Thomas Jr. $70, hardcover; University Press of Mississippi This hefty 1,600-page volume aims to a be a “scholarly work about life in the state past and present,” the editors write. Inside are nearly 1,500 A-Z entries from more than 600 authors on virtually every aspect of Mississippi. The book’s stories reflect an inclusive variety of experiences, issues and perspectives. Topics encompass Mississippi politics, history, law, economy, business, agriculture, religion, arts, education, sports, environment, geography, natural disasters and more. The “C” entries alone hit many of the high

points of Mississippi history, from Choctaws and Civil War to Constitutions, Civil Rights and Camille (plus Catfish Farming, Jerry Clower, Club Ebony, Comeback Sauce, Cotton Gins, Community Colleges...).

By Carole Boston Weatherford Illustrated by Raul Colon $17.95 hardcover; Alfred A. Knopf Born in 1927, Laurel native Leontyne Price rose to world fame as a soprano for the Metropolitan Opera. How she made such an incredible journey, despite the racial barriers she faced, is the subject of this children’s storybook. The tale opens with Price as a girl “finding her voice” while singing along to her father’s records and listening to the Metropolitan Opera on the radio: “She soaked up the sopranos, if not the foreign words. Art songs and arias, shaping a brown girl’s dreams.” By the end of the book, Price’s own performance at the opera is rewarded with a 42-minute standing ovation. Weatherford’s easy-to-read prose and Colon’s gorgeous illustrations combine to tell a story of hope, determination and achievement.

I The Mississippi Book of Quotations

By David Crews $24.95 hardcover; Nautilus Publishing Co. When Nobel Prize-winning author William Faulkner was invited to dine with President Kennedy in the White House, he replied, “I’m too old at my age to travel that far to eat with strangers.” Faulkner’s quips on a range of subjects pop up often in this treasury of quotations by notables—most of them Mississippi natives—from Jefferson Davis and Medgar Evers to Tammy Wynette and Eli Manning. Each is represented by hilarious, thought-provoking or haunting observations (or advice) on topics such as baseball, dogs, mules, religion, war, civil rights, music, economic depression and prison, to name a few.


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Crews, who lives in Oxford, has compiled a book of down-home wisdom that manages to be as entertaining—and quotable—as it is inspiring.

I Biloxi Memories

By Barbara Sillery $22.95 softcover; Pelican Publishing Co. A producer and writer with a penchant for visual history, Sillery based her book on her acclaimed documentary “Biloxi Memories and the Broadwater Beach Hotel.” From nearly 30 interviews of those who lived or visited Biloxi, Sillery compiled stories of longgone attractions, hotels and eateries, historic events and sites, the beach, sailboat races, the seafood industry, natural disasters and military training, among others. There are stories of notable residents and visitors: Jefferson Davis, Barq’s root beer founder Edward C. Barq’s, “Mad Potter” George Ohr, and Jean Guilhot, the Hermit of Deer Island—plus the story of film star Jayne Mansfield’s fatal car crash on the coast in 1967. Illustrations include historical color photographs, vintage postcards and memorabilia. This look at preKatrina Biloxi offers an informative and nostalgic view of one of Mississippi’s best-loved playgrounds.

I Once in a Lifetime: Reflections of a Mississippi First Lady

By Elise Varner Winter Edited by JoAnne Prichard Morris $28 hardcover; University Press of Mississippi Drawn from her personal journal, this is a revealing firsthand account of Winter’s activities as first lady of Mississippi during the term of her husband, Gov. William F. Winter, from 1980 to 1984. “Who even knows what a first lady does?” Mrs. Winter writes. “There’s no job description.” Her “duties” included hobnobbing with the likes of Eudora Welty and Leontyne Price at elegant dinner parties and a visit to the Reagan White House. But as

first lady, Winter was also intensely interested in public education and in the state penitentiary. The book is made up of dated journal entries such as “A Visit from Nancy Reagan,” “Breakfast with Jesse Jackson,” “William Makes a Controversial Call” and “Parchman Prepares for the Execution.” Other entries reflect the Winters’ family life, including the death of Winter’s mother and welcoming the first grandchild. Winter also recorded her impressions while traveling throughout Mississippi with entries like “Secrets of Southwest Mississippi,” “A Mississippi Fourth of July” and “The Amazing Neshoba County Fair.” “Once in a Lifetime” is an absorbing look at the role of a first lady as well as a personal view of the political and cultural landscape during the Winter years in the Governor’s Mansion.

I A Year in Mississippi

Edited by Charline R. McCord and Judy H. Tucker Foreword by Malcolm White $28 hardcover; University Press of Mississippi Mississippi is a state rich in long-standing traditions, and the proof lies in this collection of 40 essays about seasonal events and traditions in the Capital, the Delta, the Hill Country, the Piney Woods and on the Coast. The essay writers explore the background, history or emotions of events and traditions with special meaning and cultural significance. Among the well-known contributors and essays in the collection are Willie Morris’ “The Glory of the Game,” Sid Salter’s “The Neshoba County Fair: Porches, Politicians and Pie” and Lawrence Wells’ “Always on My Mind: A Blues and Civil Rights Tour of the Mississippi Delta.” Other essay topics, organized by season, include the Blessing of the Fleet, the International Ballet Competition, Tougaloo Art Colony, the Mississippi Blueberry Storytelling Festival, the Egg Bowl, Juke Joint Festival, camp meetings, revivals, deer hunting, hurricane season, spring pilgrimages and many more activities that have evolved into time-honored traditions. McCord and Tucker have coedited other books including “Christmas Stories from Mississippi” and “Growing Up in Mississippi.”

I Mojo Triangle Travel Guide

By Mardi Allen $8.95 softcover or eBook; Sartoris Literary Group This guide will help music lovers navigate their way through the geographical source of America’s original

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music, the Mojo Triangle. Author and former musician James L. Dickerson coined the term Mojo Triangle to describe a cultural land area within an imaginary triangle connecting New Orleans, Nashville and Memphis. The Mojo Triangle is the birthplace of country, blues, jazz and rock ‘n’ roll—the roots of America’s popular music. The bulk of the Mojo Triangle lies in Mississippi, encompassing Tupelo, Oxford, Meridian, the Mississippi Delta, Jackson and Natchez. The book’s seven chapters are organized by destination, with brief profiles of local music legends and feature stories. Readers can use the book to find music venues, places to eat and spend the night, and interesting side trips such as festivals, museums and historic sites. Allen is a psychologist who grew up in the Mojo Triangle. “Writing this book is my attempt to assist travelers through the Mojo Triangle by helping them fully grasp the influences from the soil, the rivers, the poverty, the current and past suffering that have culminated in some of the most enduring melodies within the last 200 years. Many of the stories included in the book are told for the first time and add a unique appreciation for Mojo artistry,” Allen writes.

Mississippi Book Festival

a celebration for book lovers

Readers, authors and booksellers will come together Aug. 19 at the third annual Mississippi Book Festival, in Jackson. Known as Mississippi’s “literary lawn party,” the festival turns the grounds of the Mississippi State Capitol into a gathering spot for book lovers and authors. The festival will include book signings, Authors Alley for self-published writers, a booksellers marketplace, panel discussions with notable authors, Capitol tours and exhibits, live music, a Kids Corner tent focusing on children’s books, a family storytelling room, food trucks and much more. C-SPAN will broadcast live interviews with authors during the festival. Admission and parking are free, and the event is handicap accessible. Get details at MSBookFestival.com.


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Why do you live where you live? he television station where I work on a dayto-day basis, WLBT in Jackson, has been doing some community profiles in our viewing area away from the Jackson Metro. I have been assigned to do a brief history of the areas we’ve visited. Probably one of the fascinating things I have discovered in all of this is why we live where we live. And it all pretty much goes back to getting the basics of life and easy transportation. You probably knew this already. But some pretty significant changes in the layout of our state came from improvements and inventions in those areas. Going way back in time, several years ago a friend of mine invited me to do a story about prehistoric Native Americans in the Delta. We went to the obvious places, the mound sites. But he told me something interesting about where he had had his best success in finding undiscovered sites. He said to look near where any creek or river flowed out of the hills into the Delta. Let me put Mississippi this in bold type: DON’T Seen DO THIS by Walt Grayson ON YOUR OWN! Most of that land is private property or national forests or something. And people don’t take kindly to folks poking around on their land. Neither does the state Department of Archives and History. There are laws protecting ancient Native American sites. But I bring that up to make the point that in ancient days people didn’t choose a village site for the view. It was situated where they could get the basics of life. In this case, water. And where they could either hunt, fish or raise food. Transportation plays into the picture too. An archaeologist once told me that Deer Creek in the Delta was like an ancient superhighway. All the rivers and streams all over the state were. And not just in prehistoric times.

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The original Pike County Courthouse at Holmesville is under restoration. It and a few old houses and the cemetery are about all that's left of what was once the principal town in the area. The siting of the railroad west of town robbed Holmesville of its people and importance. It is an interesting place to visit, however. Photo: Walt Grayson

When settlers of European descent arrived in the state, they tended to locate along or pretty near a stream or river. Going back to the basics, people have to have water to live and for transportation. Many of our rivers were navigable back then. Steamboats once came up the Pearl River to Jackson, for instance. Then came the inventions. Not only did steam power the boats, but also locomotives. It’s too bad children today don’t get to see steam trains so they would understand why locomotives are called “choo choos.” Most recently WLBT traveled to Pike County, down in the “chin” of Mississippi. Holmesville was its first county seat. The town was built on the banks of the Amite River because rivers were the prin-

cipal transportation routes. But then came the railroad. The railroad laid a course west of Holmesville, and the population shifted to the new railroad. Holmesville dried up and Magnolia became the county seat. McComb is actually the biggest town in the county. It grew around the railroad repair yard relocated in McComb to get it away from New Orleans. Skipping forward to our day, the reason we don’t have to live on a river (except for the view) or near a rail station is because we all have a road out front, a driveway connecting to it and a car in the driveway or garage. And we have our electric power association to light our houses and run our water association’s pumps.

So I guess we can thank folks like Thomas Edison and Henry Ford and many more for inventing ways to move us away from having to live where streams flow out of the hills to just about anywhere we want to. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Late afternoon at Bay Springs Lake adjacent to Piney Grove Campground in northeast Mississippi. Photos: Tony Kinton

Father’s Day and other celebrations une is the month for Father’s Day. This specific day has become a custom in our society and is set aside for honoring and celebrating fathers, both those still living and those who have passed away. Such is an admirable event. But let’s move from a specific day and the focus it brings. Let’s expand this concept to encompass the entire family structure and the participation in more than a single, predetermined day. Let’s explore some avenues of celebration that may include but go beyond a fine meal and perhaps a card and gift. Let’s move outside these, both literally and figuratively. by Tony Kinton Outdoors activities are abundant in June. While temperatures may border on unpleasant from time to time, this condition is seldom a deterrent from being outside. A simple look around any lake or park or pool or tennis court will confirm. So, outside it is. June sunshine will greet with gusto.

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Outdoors Today

And what is the family to do outside? The possibilities are too numerous to highlight in detail within the space given here. But a quick overview can unveil a great many pursuits that occur outside. Obviously, when mention is made of June in an outdoor column such as this, fishing floats high toward the top of familiar pastimes. And that is a proper conclusion. Fishing, in its various disciplines, is extremely popular in the Magnolia State, and there is a vast array of locales where it can be practiced. So that is a viable choice for an activity. I often say that everything I truly needed to know for living a full life was learned in a family setting on a bream lake or in the squirrel woods, and this learning took place minus any trappings other than a cane pole or single-barrel shotgun. Parents taught life; my sister and I absorbed the lessons of living. But not everyone is interested in fishing—or squirrel hunting for that matter. If this is the case, there are other options afforded on a June day. Maybe a simple picnic. A hike can be attractive. So can bicycling, field sports, canoeing, kayaking. Go visit a state park. Being outside together is the key ingredient. The specific activity likely takes second place. I enjoy music. So enamored of it was I that straight from high school I earned bachelor’s and master’s degrees in music.

The written word eventually won my heart, drawing me into additional graduate work in literature and English. These have held me captive and enhanced my livelihood for more than 40 years now. But I still love music. Beethoven to bluegrass. Debussy to “Desperado.” Oh, that harmony of the Eagles! An outdoor concert may be in order. Again, being outside and absorbing the nuances of nature can smooth the rough edges of life.

I was most privileged to be part of a family camping trip recently. The setting was Piney Grove Campground along Bay Springs Lake in northeast Mississippi. A spectacular venue. Three generations were represented, and I was the second oldest in the gathering. The true youngsters, three boys, were 6, 7 and 8. These were the center of interest, and I was more observer than participant. It was intriguing. They ran and walked and biked and fished and watched the squirrels. They even experienced a monstrous nighttime thunderstorm from the confines of a tent. But most of all, they fully enjoyed family and being outside. The impact of that trip was not completely discerned until camp was broken and everyone headed home. On that drive, the youngest of the trio made a proclamation that exhibited his fascination with what he had done. From the backseat of the car, he directed this statement to his parents: “When I’m grown, I’m going to live in a campground.” Happy Father’s Day! Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


8 I Today in Mississippi I June 2017

The Prentiss Institute was founded in 1907 to provide educational opportunities for African-Americans. The school closed in 1989 but its renovated Rosenwald Building, designated a Mississippi Landmark, hosts community events and the school’s biannual reunion. A school photo, below, dated 1950-51, shows students posing in front of the building. Photos courtesy of Prentiss Institute Alumni Board of Trustees

Historic Prentiss Institute to host reunion By Nancy Jo Maples Alumni from the Prentiss Institute in Jefferson Davis County are gearing up for this year’s reunion with a weekend of festivities that include a parade, ceremony and plenty of food. The reunion, set every two years on the school campus, will be June 16-17. Former students and their families attend. The reunion was begun 20 years ago and draws about 150 people each occurrence. “The school had an atmosphere where everybody knew everybody and knew their names, not just their faces,” alumnus Janice Armstrong said. Armstrong met her husband there while attending college 1972-1974, and their son met his wife during one of the school’s reunions. The reunion weekend will begin Friday night with a meet-and-greet on the school campus. The next morning reunion-goers will gather for breakfast at Williams’ Good Old Days Buffet restaurant in Prentiss and afterward will parade through the town, ending at the campus’ memorial site where the institute’s founders are buried. Wreaths will be placed ceremoniously on the graves.

Other activities include a business meeting, brunch and an evening banquet in the school’s Rosenwald Building. Prentiss Normal and Industrial Institute, as it was once known, is among the state’s

oldest educational facilities for African-Americans. Established in 1907, the school evolved from log cabin quarters and 40 acres to 24 buildings and 500 acres before closing.

Jonas Edward Johnson (1873-1953) and his wife Bertha LaBranche Johnson (1882-1971) founded the school during a time when African-Americans had limited educational opportunities. The Johnsons borrowed money to purchase the property and started the school in the log cabin where they lived. Initially it served only elementary students but within two years was licensed by the state as a private high school. Students paid for tuition, room and board with homegrown commodities such as eggs, chickens, vegetables and other farm-related goods. Beginning in the 1950s, Heifer International donated cows as a source of beef and milk for the school. The Prentiss Institute is one of Heifer International’s first ventures in the United States. In 1931 the facility increased its course offerings to also serve as a private junior college. In 1959 it began to function solely as a junior college. At its peak the school had an enrollment of 700 students and 44 faculty members. However, student enrollment dropped, funding waned and the school closed in 1989. The Rosenwald Building was constructed in 1926


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with funds given by Sears, Roebuck and Company president Julius Rosenwald. The Julius Rosenwald Rural School Building Program operated under the encouragement of Booker T. Washington at Tuskegee Institute. The Prentiss campus contains one of the remaining 15 buildings out of the original 557 appropriated by Rosenwald for Mississippi; there were almost 5,000 Rosenwald school buildings constructed throughout the country, primarily in the impoverished southern states. The Rosenwald Building was renovated several years ago with a state-funded Community Heritage Preservation Grant. It is recognized as a historic landmark by the Mississippi Department of Archives and History and last year became listed on the National Register of Historic Places. Today the Rosenwald Building serves as a museum and a community banquet hall. For more information about the upcoming reunion, contact Armstrong at 601847-1984 or James Jenkins at 601-249-5643. With gleaming hardwood floors and vintage light fixtures, this space in the Rosenwald Building serves as a community banquet hall. The building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

Nancy Jo Maples has been a professional journalist for 30 years. She can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, MS 39452 or nancyjomaples@aol.com.

Old habits are hard to change r. Roy and I have a bad habit that we have tried to break over the years, but with little success. We know it’s not healthy to eat dinner late. We normally eat between 8:30 and 9:30, and then go to bed immediately after that. Looking back over the years, this habit probably started after both of the girls left home for college, and it became more entrenched after we both retired. We both enjoy our time together at the end of each day with our cups of coffee or iced tea, while solving the world’s problems. As we have grown older, one of our primary topics is “Do you remember when we went there, or saw this, or that?” Sometimes these memories bring laughs, but other times they may bring tears. We thank God for all of our mem-

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ories, both good and not so good. Many times Mr. Roy and I relive trips we took in the motorhome as well as the trips abroad. We are so fortunate that we were able to travel over most of the United States and much of Europe. Now that we have gotten (a little) older, travel is not as much fun. The desire to just stay in the comfort of our home is stronger than it used to be. Yesterday afternoon as we met for our afternoon board meeting—that’s what we call it—and Mr. Roy said, “Well it’s May 21, I’ll never forget that date.” Every year at this time he says the same thing, but this year he seemed to want to talk more about the memory. We had only been married one month when Mr. Roy had to leave for basic training and Army duty. Many young couples our age experienced the same thing, and today many are separated for long periods while one of them is

serving in harm’s way. After basic training I was able to go with Roy to his duty station, and we had our own apartment. In fact, it was in a group of old World War II barracks that had been renovated several times. So we talked about our Army life and the friends we made. And we jumped to the subject of technology and the remarkable differences from the way we live now. In the late Grin ‘n’ 1950s when Bare It Roy left for his by Kay Grafe Army duties, I didn’t hear from him for several days. That’s hard to believe. We take cell phones for granted today. They give us immediate information and updates on “what’s going on.” In the movie “American Sniper,” the actor who played Chris Kyle is actually in a battle, crawling on the ground.

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Where? Afghanistan, talking to his wife on his cell phone. A few years after Roy had served and was discharged, we drove back to that exact area to look around. We wanted to see our old apartment. The apartment building was gone and the entire area had changed. It upset me so badly that I cried. One thing that adding years to our lives teaches us is that most everything eventually changes. And big changes are inevitable. Back to our problem of eating dinner too late every night. (This is another change that I can not accept: Growing up in the late 1940s and mid-50s, we ate supper at night and dinner at noon time.) So, about our problem now of eating “supper” too late. Since it hasn’t killed us yet or caused some medical problems we are aware of, I believe I’ll just continue visiting each afternoon with my husband-handyman until the visiting is done. By the way, another change that has taken place is my lack of desire to cook. Maybe that’s the reason I put off eating supper until close to 9 p.m. By that time Mr. Roy is ready to eat anything, or he says, let’s go get fast food. I’m starving! Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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East Mississippi Electric Power Association Louisville 662.773.5741

Meridian 601.581.8600

Quitman 601.776.6271

DeKalb 601.743.2641

A message from your CEO

Lazy days of summer As the school year comes to a close, most of us will begin planning summer vacations and warm weather activities. Summer months are certainly welcome for many of us after being inside all winter. One of my favorite posters reads, “The answer may not be at the beach but shouldn’t we at least check?” My family has always enjoyed getting away to the beach and just relaxing for a few days. There is something about sitting in a beach chair, reading a good book and listening to the calming rhythm of the waves that puts my normally fast paced work week in the background and gives me the needed “mind” rest from the challenges of the world. While the end of May signals the end of the school year, it also signals electric cooperatives that hurricane season is approaching. Hurricane preparedness

week was May 7-13, and we at EMEPA began planning for what we hope and pray doesn’t happen. Tropical storms and hurricanes can be some of the most powerful and destructive storms we encounter as an electric distribution system. EMEPA maintains an emergency

plan that details who is responsible for what and how we will respond to any natural disaster Mother Nature may

send our way. As soon as a storm is forecast, we begin our preparation. Vehicles are checked to be sure they are ready and fuel tanks are topped off. Material levels are reviewed and our purchasing staff begins contacting vendors to have them on standby should we need additional poles, wire, repair sleeves and transformers. Communications personnel make initial media contacts to ensure they know who to contact and how to reach us so they can assist us with getting you needed information following the storm. Phone and outage systems are checked to be sure they are ready for the increased call volume. Schedules are developed to ensure we have around-the-clock personnel to respond to any situation that arises. Right-of-way and line crews check their work tools, safety equipment and familiarize themselves with distribution line changes throughout our service territory. For severe threats, outside contractors are contacted and placed

EMEPA will be closed Tuesday, July 4, in observance of

Independence Day Crews will be on call throughout the holiday weekend. Call 601-581-8600 or visit emepa.com to report an outage.

East Mississippi Electric Power Association wishes you and your family a safe and happy holiday!

CEO Randy Carroll

on standby to assist us in the restoration. Food vendors and hotels are contacted to supply the needed “food fuel” for workers and a place to take a short rest after typically sixteen hour days. Administrative staff begins pulling together the numerous forms that must accompany the work to verify required documentation is done properly for any reimbursement that may take place from our emergency management agencies. This and much more ensures we can respond quickly, safely and efficiently when the storms come.


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EMEPA’s new outage map keeps you informed

when the

lights go

out !

East Mississippi Electric Power Association recently introduced a powerful tool to aid in power restoration and keep you informed during an outage. With the new outage map, members can report an outage and view current outages with just a click of a button. Outage maps are just what they sound like: a graphical representation of an outage displayed on a map of EMEPA’s service area. The new map will show where the outage is occurring and the number of members without power. Behind the map is a sophisticated system that provides the data needed to populate the graphic. The system helps to improve control, reduce outage length, increase reliability and provide better information to employees, EMEPA members and the public. Maintaining an accurate outage map starts with the devices on EMEPA’s lines that can report their status to the cooperative by signaling if they have been tripped or if there is power at the meter. This data flows back over the power lines to EMEPA’s dispatch command center. There it is analyzed, and the results are presented to the engineering and operations folks for action. Let’s set up an example. Something causes a fault in the lines that blows a fuse or trips a circuit breaker. The cause could be a gust of wind dropping a

They can report an outage or check to see if their power is out with just the click of a button! But how do you access the Internet if your power is out? There are a couple of ways to do this. The first branch on a line. Or a furry critter is via your smart phone or cell-enabled tablet. deciding the brush around the transEMEPA’s outage map is available both on our webformer looks like dinner. A car hitting a pole. site and our free smart phone app. Another is to ask Regardless of the cause, the power is now out to a a friend or family member who has power to check number of members. for you. There are many ways you can access this The piece of equipment nearest the fault signals information during an outage and keep yourself that it cannot see anything down the line or that it informed on the status. has tripped. A program now runs to determine the Knowledge is power, and when it comes to outextent of the outage. It looks at other devices to ages, knowledge is also a comfort because it can tell determine where the flow of power stops. Once it you when the lights are coming back on. With this has completed its detective work, a map is generat- knowledge, you can take steps necessary to protect ed showing the extent of the outage. your family and your property. Outage maps are a Because of the power of the information contained great example of how EMEPA is working to keep in these maps, it is a valuable tool to both EMEPA members informed about their service. and its members. Members can use the map rather Check out EMEPA’s new outage map by downloadthan wait in a telephone queue to speak to a meming our free smart phone app or visiting ber service representative about their power outage. www.emepa.com/outage-map.

Are you ready for hurricane season? June 1, marks the official start of the hurricane season, with the peak storm threat occurring from midAugust to late October. East Mississippi Electric Power Association wants you to be prepared in the event of a dangerous storm. It’s not pleasant to think about worst-case scenarios, but a little planning can make a difference if the worst does happen. Keep your family safe with these handy tips. Before the Storm: • Put together an emergency kit and

plan. Communicate the plan with your family. • Know the elevation level of your property and whether the land is flood-prone. This will help you prepare for the storm surge and any tidal flooding. • Secure your home: cover all windows with either storm shutters or boards, clear loose and clogged rain gutters and bring all outdoor furniture indoors. • Learn your community hurricane evacuation routes.

During the Storm: • Listen to the radio or TV for information, if possible. • Avoid using the phone unless there is an emergency. • Turn off utilities if instructed to do so. Otherwise, keep the refrigerator thermostat on the coldest setting and keep the doors closed. After the Storm: • Keep away from loose or dangling power lines and report them immediately to EMEPA. • Drive only if necessary and avoid

flooded roads. Watch out for fallen objects, downed power lines, and weakened walls, bridges, or sidewalks. • NEVER use a generator inside homes, garages, crawlspaces, sheds or similar areas. Deadly levels of carbon monoxide can quickly build up in these areas. For more tips on planning before, during and after the storm, visit www.ready.gov/hurricanes. Source: www.ready.gov


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We are prepared for

summer storms

Generator Safety Tips Never connect a standby generator into your home’s electrical system. There are only two safe ways to connect a standby generator to your equipment.

Stationary Generator: An approved generator transfer switch, which keeps your house circuits separate from EMEPA, should be installed by a professional. Portable Generator: Plug appliances directly into the outlet provided on the generator.

Setup and run your generator in a well-ventilated area outside the home. Make sure it’s out and away from your garage, doors, windows and vents. The carbon monoxide generated is deadly. Use a heavy-duty extension cord to connect electric appliances to the outlet on the generator. Start the generator first before connecting appliances. Source: SafeElectricity.org

Summer is here, school is out and families are gearing up for a few months of fun and relaxation. While summer brings much fun in the sun, it can also bring the occasional severe storm. In the event of a power outage, you can trust that East Mississippi Electric Power Association is ready to respond. The major cause of most power outages comes from damage to power lines due to falling trees and branches. We work year round – through right-ofway clearing – to ensure power lines in our service territory stand little risk of being damaged by trees, branches or other types of vegetation. Despite our best efforts, during major storms, damage can occur to transmission stations, substations and power lines. When this happens, our first priority is to safely restore power to as many members as possible in the shortest amount of time. We start by mobilizing our line crews and other critical staff. Every phone line available is utilized to take your outage report calls. The big problems are

handled first – like damage to transmission lines, which serve tens of thousands of people. These problems must be corrected before we can focus on other areas where more localized damage may have occurred. EMEPA’s line crews inspect substations to determine if the problem starts there, or if there could be an issue down the line. If the root of the problem is at the substation, power can be restored to thousands of members. Next, line crews check the service lines that deliver power into neighborhoods and communities. Line crews repair the damaged lines, restoring power to hundreds of people. If you continue to experience an outage, there may be damage to a tap line outside of your home or business. Make sure you notify EMEPA so crews can inspect these lines. We will do our best to avoid power outages, but sometimes Mother Nature has other plans. Be sure to check www.emepa.com on your smartphone for the latest updates during a power outage.

Thunderstorm safety tips from the American Red Cross When thunderstorms are rolling your way, stay safe with these helpful tips from the American Red Cross: • Listen to local news or NOAA Weather Radio for emergency updates. Watch for signs of a storm, like darkening skies, lightning flashes or increasing wind. • Postpone outdoor activities if thunderstorms are likely to occur. Many people struck by lightning are not in the area where rain is occurring. • If a severe thunderstorm warning is issued, take shelter in a substantial building or in a vehicle with the windows closed. Get out of mobile homes that can blow over in high winds. • If you can hear thunder, you are close enough to be in danger from lightning. If thunder roars, go indoors! The National Weather Service recommends staying inside for at least 30 minutes after the last thunder clap.

• Avoid electrical equipment and telephones. Use battery-powered TVs and radios instead. • Shutter windows and close outside doors securely. Keep away from windows. • Do not take a bath, shower or use plumbing. • If you are driving, try to safely exit the roadway and park. Stay in the vehicle and turn on the emergency flashers until the heavy rain ends. Avoid touching metal or other surfaces that conduct electricity in and outside the vehicle. • If you are outside and cannot reach a safe building, avoid high ground; water; tall, isolated trees; and metal objects such as fences or bleachers. Picnic shelters, dugouts and sheds are NOT safe. Source: American Red Cross

Think safety FIRST!


June 2017 I Today in Mississippi

Smart window use can regulate indoor comfort

You can use your windows to let cool air into your home and keep hot air out during the summer. HERE’S HOW: Whenever it cools off at night, turn off the air conditioner and open the windows to let the breeze in while you sleep.

when you close the slats. And draperies with white plastic backings can reduce heat gain by 33 percent when they’re closed.

• In the morning, close the windows and the blinds or curtains. That will “trap” the cool air indoors and prevent hot air from getting in as the day heats up.

• If you shade the exterior of your windows with wooden or vinyl blinds, overhangs, awnings, shutters or storm panels, you’ll keep the sun from heating up your interior.

• Choose window treatments that not only look nice but that save energy. Some choices: Interior blinds made from heat-reflective material can reduce heat gain by 45 percent

• Replacing old, single-pane windows with double-pane models can keep your home more comfortable and shave dollars off of your energy bills, according to Energy Star.

Tip of the

Month

Avoid setting your thermostat at a colder setting than normal when you turn on your air conditioner. It will not cool your home any faster and could result in excessive cooling and unnecessary expense. Source: energy.gov

Cool summer evenings call for fans, not a/c

Even the hottest summer gives us a break occasionally, sending pleasant temperatures and gentle breezes our way, especially in the evenings. When it’s not too hot outside, you can cool your house more economically with fans than by running your central or window air conditioner. Placing a fan in a window circulates the air and freshens the home by exhausting stale air. It can remove odors from smoking and cooking that tend to linger in the air when all the windows are closed. A ceiling fan can be used whether the air conditioning is on or off. During the summer, the blades send a slight breeze down into the room, which will make anyone in that room feel more comfortable. Fans don’t actually cool the house off. Instead, they make the rooms where they are located feel cooler because they move the air around. So turn them off when you leave the room.

Powering your comfort this summer!

Member Survey Notification Help us serve you better! EMEPA has commissioned NRECA Market Research Services to conduct a member satisfaction survey on our behalf in June. The survey will be done both by phone and online, but not everyone will be contacted. If you are one who is randomly selected, we would greatly appreciate you taking the time to share your views of the cooperative. The survey will take approximately 10 minutes and individual responses are completely confidential and will only be reported to us in aggregate. We strive to provide all members with safe, affordable and reliable service. Your participation in the survey will help us make decisions that benefit you, your family and your neighbors.

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Supreme Court Justice takes on challenge of protecting

Mississippi’s neglected children By Elissa Fulton

Taking care of Mississippi’s children is not for the faint of heart, but after serious prayer and consideration, Dr. David Chandler decided he was up to the challenge. Before Chandler was named the new Commissioner of Child Protection Services in December 2015, he was serving as a Justice on the Mississippi Supreme Court. It was an appointment he was proud of and as a Winston County resident and EMEPA member, he worked hard for those north Mississippians who helped him to get to that position. In early 2015, Gov. Phil Bryant approached Chandler and expressed his concerns for the foster care program in the state. The governor shared with him about some troubling litigation that Mississippi was facing and admitted that the state was about to be placed into what is called a receivership by the federal courts. If that happened, Mississippi would be the only state in the nation to be placed in receivership because Mississippians were not caring for our foster children.

Although Chandler was honored that Gov. Bryant would look to him for the position, he really did not initially believe that he would accept the job, mainly because he felt a responsibility to those who had appointed him to the Supreme Court; but also because the job would be a huge challenge. When he left the meeting with the Governor and returned to his chambers, he asked one of his lawyers to locate the litigation that the Gov. Bryant had been referring to. “As I began to read the complaint, and as you know the complaint is only one side of the story, I saw where the litigation had been pending for over 10 years, and I could not see where our state had done an awful lot to refute what was in the complaint,” said Chandler. “The complaint is about a 10-year-old child who was half of the physical size that she should be. The child was suffering from malnutrition, she was very depressed – as I guess should be expected of someone who has been deprived of ever having had one meal when she had enough to eat. Every day of her life she had been hungry and there was evidence of sexual abuse. I just could not get that child out of my mind. I was on the Supreme Court and I had seen some pretty egregious acts by mankind during my tenure on the court, but for some reason that poor, starving child affected me more than anything I have seen as a Justice on the Supreme Court.” Although the thought of this child kept Chandler awake at night, he still could not see leaving the court to become a director of the program. He continued to think about it and pray about it and one morning, while having breakfast with his wife, he mentioned it to her. Being a nurse and one who cares for people, she looked at him and said, “What is more important? Deciding who wins some lawsuit, or saving a child’s

life?” He immediately knew what he had to do and called the Governor’s Chief of Staff and told him that he was ready to commit to the job. Chandler was officially appointed the Commissioner on Dec. 7, 2015, and immediately went to work with the agency’s lawyers to meet the requirements of the pending court order. They were given one year to comply, but met those objectives within six months. Being six months ahead of schedule, they renegotiated another court order to give them more breathing room, in addition to an order that gave them one year out from under the court monitor, saving the state about $1 million per year. When Chandler came on board in 2015, there

“We went to work hiring people to do good investigations, to take into custody any children who were in unsafe conditions” - Dr. David Chandler

were 5,000 children in custody and that number has increased to 6,000 to date. “We went to work hiring people to do good investigations, to take into custody any children who were in unsafe conditions. We were experiencing some fatalities and I wanted that to end,” said Chandler. “My first objective, first and foremost, is to make sure every child in our state is safe. My second objective is to make sure that we can sustain that level of function. My third objective is to exit this lawsuit – to get Mississippi out from under this federal court case. Those are my three primary objectives and I work day and night in that effort.” Hiring more social workers to do more investigative work was one cause of the increase of children in custody. Another factor, of course, is the opioid drug epidemic that is affecting young parents not only in

Mississippi but nationwide. “We see so many young mothers or expectant mothers who are just hopelessly and helplessly addicted,” said Chandler. “We are doing everything in our power to help them beat that addiction because it causes such trauma to their children. Trauma while they are in their custody and extreme trauma if we have to remove them from their custody.” The biggest challenge for Chandler has been identifying, recruiting and retaining good, competent and conscientious social workers to do the fieldwork. “Imagine if your job required when your phone rang at 2 a.m. to jump out of bed and go to one of the most undesirable areas you can imagine, and knock on the door, and an adult comes to the door, and you tell that adult that you are there to make sure that her children are safe. And when you find out that they are not safe, you tell him or her that you are taking their children. It’s a job that just everyone cannot do,” he said. “We don’t want just anyone doing it, because we are asking a person to make critical decisions in a very stressful environment, on the spur of the moment, that are life changing – and maybe lifesaving. They have to be trained to assess in a few minutes a situation and determine whether a child is safe, or whether the child or children must be removed from that environment.” Another challenge that Chandler and his staff face is that once those children are taken, they must have a place for that child or those children to go. Locating, identifying and properly screening and training foster families is another great task. Chandler added, “Our hope is that more Mississippians will wrap around these children and adults responsible for them. I really think that maybe the greatest hope for these youngsters is to get people in the churches, and people in the communities to help these struggling families so they can stay together.”


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79th EMEPA Annual Meeting set for October

Democracy is the co-op way Every October East Mississippi Electric Power Association has an annual meeting. One of the most important activities we conduct is the election for the board of directors. These are the 10 people we entrust to give strategic direction and ensure EMEPA has good governance. This year EMEPA will host its 79th Annual Meeting Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, at the EMEPA Meridian Auditorium to inform members of actions taken during the past year, conduct Association business and elect four directors. Notices will be mailed later this summer to invite all EMEPA members to attend the meeting. At EMEPA, we try to make it as convenient as possible for members to participate in the election by allowing members unable to attend the meeting the opportunity to vote by proxy. As the utility industry is experiencing some of the biggest changes since its founding, electric co-ops need your active participation. As a member of a EMEPA, you have the right (and some may even say the obligation) to help set the direction for the co-op. This is a critical difference between coops and other electricity providers, such as investor-owned utilities (IOUs) or municipally-owned systems. With IOUs, you are a customer and there is no required ownership. IOU stockholders live far away and have no direct attachment to the organization other than seeking a return on their investment. Communities served by municipally-owned systems may vote for the mayor or city council, but the connection to the electric service is very indirect.

The board of directors of a co-op makes important strategic decisions for the organization, while the operations (day-to-day running of the business) is entrusted to the employees. Examples of decisions boards make that impact all the members are: • the level of involvement in community economic development • whether to offer renewable types of energy such as solar or wind generated power to the members • offering other services such as broadband • approving the budget for the co-op As locally-owned businesses in the community, electric coops have the opportunity to introduce neighbors to neighbors and rekindle that spirit of democracy at the grassroots level. We can encourage respectful debate about the role we see our co-op playing in our community. We know that democracy is not a perfect form of governing, it just happens to be better than any of the others. Maybe if we can practice doing it well at the local level, it will have a positive impact on our democracy as a whole. Mark your calendar for Saturday, Oct. 7, 2017, and make plans to attend EMEPA’s 79th Annual Meeting. If you have any questions about the Annual Meeting or just want to know more, please contact EMEPA’s Marketing and Communication Department at 601-581-8624 or visit our website at www.emepa.com. Any member of EMEPA may obtain a complete set of bylaws by contacting their local EMEPA office.

Co-op Connections Business Spotlight Each month, EMEPA spotlights local businesses that participate in the Co-op Connections Program. This month’s featured businesses are:

All Star Painting & Pressure Wash

601-482-1926

10% EMEPA has been delivering value to our communities for more than 78 years and now we are proud to offer another member benefit – the Co-op Connections Card. Through this free program, you will receive discounts on products and services from participating local and national businesses. The card is a simple membership card that in identifying you as a member, also

qualifies you for special discounts and offers at local participating businesses. There are no sign-up or participation fees and we do not track your participation or purchases. There is no charge to you for this program. This is just one more way you benefit from being a cooperative member. To receive discounts, simply show your Co-op Connections card to any participating business.

off services

R&C Landscaping & Lawn Service, LLC

601-880-3974

10%

off services


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Mindset turns garden work into enjoyment In early April, my wife and I had the honor of being part of the 2017 Garden Clubs of Mississippi Spring Pilgrimage, as our little urban farm was one of the tour’s stops. It was a treat to open our doors to allow more than 170 visitors to peek behind the curtain at how we garden. The tour bus that brought everyone was a neighborhood first. Although we had committed to being a pilgrimage stop last fall, the majority of the work getting ready happened after the first of the year. On top of that, I had my knee replaced two weeks before the tour date, so my wife took over the final touches. I was fortunate to be able to visit with folks on tour day. One woman commented that she liked our garden but really didn’t like gardening herself because of all the hard work involved. I’ve been thinking about that comment ever since. And you know what? Gardening is hard work. As we move into the summer months, the weather is certainly going to take a toll on most gardeners. The heat and humidity can make even the most dedicated gardener decide to stay inside for the duration. But gardening is supposed to be fun and relaxing. And besides that, you can get tomatoes. There’s a group of people, and you know who you are, who are always thinking that the lawn has to be cut, the garden beds have to be weeded, and the flowers have to be planted. Work, work, work. Yada, yada, yada. I call this group “yardeners,” because they see no joy in the garden. I’ve decided to start championing the concept of changing the garden paradigm for those folks who think gardening is all work. People I call gardeners understand that they want to enjoy their landscapes, but they know there will be work involved in making it happen. They consider the work sweat equity. To them, there is

something satisfying about finishing a project and doing a good job. Gardeners also learn what works and what doesn’t, despite what so-and-so advised on television that morning. And guess what? Despite how well you care for your plants, some are going to die on you. Yardeners get discouraged when this happens; gardeners say it’s just an opportunity to try another plant. Even if you get gardening and discover it just might be fun, you might be physically sore at the end of the day or the next day. So, it’s important to adjust how your garden. With my bad back and new knees, I garden a lot using Southern beds and Gardening raised big containers by Dr. Gary Bachman that prevent me from having to stoop over so much. I also bought a fourwheel garden scoot to help me get around to work in some of my in-ground flower beds. Gardening and strenuous exercise have something in common, and it’s an area almost all yardeners and gardens neglect. Stretching before—and, more importantly, after—garden activities is vital. Consider these tips, and you can make the transition from yardener to gardener. You, too, can then get out into the garden and landscape this summer, sweat a little (or a lot in my case), and enjoy your garden and landscape. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

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Snap Beans with Apple-Smoked Bacon 12 Tbsp. butter 1 lb. apple-smoked bacon, coarsely chopped 1 ½ to 2 lbs. fresh snap beans 1 large onion, thinly sliced

RECIPES FROM:

‘On the Coast’

“On the Coast: Mississippi Tales and Recipes,” by Mississippi Gulf Coast native Troy Gilbert and Ocean Springs chef Matthew Mayfield, brings the distinctive cuisine, history and beauty of this special region into your kitchen. Or living room. Featuring paintings by Gautier native Billy Solitario, along with color photographs and essays on unique aspects of coastal living, this cookbook should be elevated to coffee table status. Local chefs and others contributed more than 100 recipes for the book including old-school favorites (Winnie’s Butterbeans and Shrimp), restaurant specialties (Primo’s Eggplant Eloise), boat snacks (Back Bay Boiled Peanuts), as well entrees using seafood (Scranton’s Red Snapper) or meat (Pecan-Smoked Creole Brisket). The use of Mississippi-made cheese, rice, grits and other products reinforces the book’s local focus. Aspiring chefs will find plenty of inspiration in “On the Coast,” yet most of the recipes are simple and easy, much like coastal living itself. Find a sampling of the recipes at right. The 224-page hardcover book is available in stores and may be ordered from the publisher at PelicanPub.com. Price is $24.95. Recipes reprinted with permission from Pelican Publishing Co. Mississippi’s blueberry harvest kicks into high gear this month, and a good crop is expected. Head to your local farmers market to stock up!

Pineapple Blueberry Crunch 1 (20-oz.) can crushed pineapple, undrained 1 (18.25-oz.) pkg. yellow cake mix 3 cups blueberries, fresh or frozen ½ cup sugar ½ cup butter, melted 1 ½ cups chopped pecans or walnuts

Preheat oven to 350 F. Pour pineapple chunks with juice into a 9-by-13-inch buttered baking dish. Sprinkle with cake mix. Top with blueberries and then sugar. Pour melted margarine over the mixture and top with nuts. Bake for about 45 minutes, until brown and bubbly. Serves 12 to 15. • Blueberry freezing tip: Make sure blueberrries (washed or unwashed) are completely dry before pouring them into plastic freezer bags or containers. This way, the blueberries will freeze individually and you can scoop out only what you need. Rinse before use if the frozen berries haven’t been washed.

6 to 8 small red potatoes, halved or quartered 1 tsp. fresh tarragon leaves ½ tsp. Pickapeppa sauce 1 tsp. fresh thyme leaves

In a Dutch oven, melt butter over low heat, then add the bacon, beans and onion. Increase the heat to medium, cover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring often. If the beans begin to stick to the bottom, add butter as needed. Reduce heat to low and add potatoes and spices. Cook, covered, stirring often, for about 20 minutes or until the potatoes are soft enough to stick a fork into them. Remove from heat and serve immediately. Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Garlic Shrimp Spaghetti 1 lb. spaghetti, uncooked 4 Tbsp. butter ½ cup extra-virgin olive oil 1 bunch green onions, white parts only, chopped 1 Tbsp. garlic powder 2 tsp. oregano 2 tsp. red pepper flakes 2 tsp. paprika

1 tsp. thyme Salt and black pepper to taste 1 head garlic, minced 1 Tbsp. parsley, chopped 2 lbs. jumbo (U16/20) fresh Mississippi shrimp, peeled and deveined ¼ cup white wine ½ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese

Boil spaghetti according to package directions. Strain in a colander and set aside in a large bowl under aluminum foil or a kitchen towel to keep warm. In a large skillet over medium heat, add butter and olive oil. When butter is melted, add green onions and stir. When the green onions become translucent, about 3 minutes, reduce heat to medium low and add garlic powder, oregano, red pepper, paprika, thyme, salt, pepper and half the minced garlic. Stir. When the garlic becomes fragrant, about 30 seconds, increase the heat to medium and add parsley, shrimp, white wine and remaining minced garlic. Stir. Allow the shrimp to cook for no more than 3 minutes while periodically stirring. When sauce is done, remove from heat and carefully pour over the spaghetti. Using tongs, mix the shrimp and garlic liquor thoroughly with the spaghetti. Serve immediately, dusted with parmesan cheese, along with a green salad and crusty French bread. Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Debris BBQ Beef on Pistolettes for Ship Island 4 ½ to 5 lbs. beef chuck roast Salt and black pepper to taste 1 large onion, chopped 2 Tbsp. vinegar 2 Tbsp. dark-brown sugar Juice of 1 large lemon 1 cup Heinz Chili Sauce 5 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce 1 Tbsp. liquid hickory smoke

½ Tbsp. Coleman’s Hot English mustard 1 tsp. chili powder 3 bay leaves ½ cup water 1 cup red wine ½ cup chopped celery 1 head garlic, peeled and minced 1 tsp. garlic powder 1 Tbsp. Cajun seasoning

Preheat oven to 325 F. Season the roast with salt and pepper. In a large mixing bowl, combine all the other ingredients and mix thoroughly. Transfer roast to a Dutch oven, and pour the mixture on top. Cook for 6 hours, covered, periodically basting with the pot liquor. When the meat is tender and falling apart, remove from oven. Once cool, transfer to a cutting board and using two forks, shred the meat. Return the meat to the Dutch oven and cook in the oven, covered, for another 15 minutes. Remove and slather onto fresh pistolettes or crusty French bread with mayonnaise. Yield: 10 to 12 servings Chef’s note: If not serving immediately, transfer the meat to a resealable container and refrigerate for up to 1 week, or freeze for up to 6 months. These make ideal and always-at-the-ready sandwiches onboard and are equally as tasty cold as they are reheated.


Today in Mississippi

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15

FREE Car Charge r

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16

I

Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

I

June 2017

Mississippi

MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon Church and Government uniting, will supress “Religious Liberty” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark of the Beast.” Be informed/Be forewarned! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 the biblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715. FREE E-BOOK "Secrets Your Creditors Don't Want You To Know" Call 888-485-7757 NOW. Stop Letting Debt Ruin Your Life!

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

FOR SALE SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial sawmill equipment for woodlot and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. Call for a free list or to sell your equipment, 800-459-2148; www.sawmillexchange.com.

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18

I

Today in Mississippi

I

June 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

“Be the Dinosaur: Life in the Cretaceous,” through Dec. 31, Jackson. Interactive exhibit exploring dinosaur life through state-of-the-art video game technology, traditional exhibits, dinosaur bones and more. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. Details: 601-576-6000; mdwfp.com/museum. “Sunset on the Square” Summer Concert Series, June 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, Hernando. Food and musical acts; 7-9 p.m. Hernando Courthouse Square. Details: 662-429-9055; HernandoMS.org. Eight-mile Garage Sale, June 3, various locations. From K&M Store (Hwys. 17 & 430) in Black Hawk to Acy’s Grocery (Hwy. 430) in Greenwood; 7 a.m. - 1 p.m. Second Saturday Guided Hikes, June 3, July 8, Holly Springs. Led by certified Audubon Naturalists. Admission. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-2521155; mrrobinson@audubon.org. Sacred Harp Singing, June 4, Bruce. A capella congregational singing of early American hymns in four-part harmony; 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Free admission. Sherman Baptist Church. Details: 601-940-1612; Home.OleMiss.edu/~mudws/miss. Creative Craft Camps, June 5 - July 20, Ridgeland. Series of day camps for ages 5 and up. Mediums include pottery, weaving, mosaics, more. Mississippi Craft Center. Details: 601-856-7546; MSCrafts.org. “Home and Away: On the Road with Marie Hull,” June 8 - July 27, Cleveland. Oil

paintings and sketchbook selections from the artist’s travels. Free admission. Fielding L. Wright Art Center, Delta State University. Details: 662-846-3000. Track, Sign & Scat, June 10, Holly Springs. Wildlife biologist John Defazio presentation on tracking wildlife; 10 a.m. - noon. Admission; registration. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-252-1155. Spring Campin’ and Jammin’, June 11-17, Foxworth. Free admission. Hickory Hills Bluegrass Park. Details: 601-441-1544, 225241-5521. Lower Delta Talks: “The Cooking Lady,” June 13, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Ann Hollowell; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Alzheimer’s Mississippi Conference for the Caregiver, June 13, Olive Branch. Presentations, caregiver discussion panel and exhibitors geared toward families and professionals dealing with Alzheimer’s and other dementia; 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Longview Heights Baptist Church. Details: 877930-6190; aagnew@alzms.org. Civil War Relic Show, June 17-18, Brandon. Vendors with authentic relics, weapons, documents, antiques and more. Living history, cannon, calvary and naval displays. Period food, free genealogy research. Free admission. Brandon City Hall. Details: 769-234-2966; timcupit@comcast.net. Horsemanship Camp, June 19-23, Gulfport. Full-day camp. Also, mini camps in July.

128th NESHOBA COUNTY FAIR

Mississippi’s Giant House Party since 1889 Philadelphia, Miss. (Neshoba Co.)

Arts & Crafts market, garden & field crop exhibits, home arts & crafts exhibits, needlework and quilt displays. State dairy cattle show, beef cattle & sheep shows. Petting zoo. Harper, Morgan & Smith PRCA Rodeo. Harness and Running horse races, pony pull. Antique car show. Local & statewide political speaking. Nightly variety & Nashville Entertainment. 38th Annual Heart O’ Dixie Triathlon. Thacker Mountain Radio Show. Fireworks. Midway amusement & rides by Mitchell Bros. Amusements. 8 huge days of family fun and hospitality. For more information,

Fri., July 21 thru Fri., July 28

visit www.neshobacountyfair.org or call 601-656-8480

Bienvenue Acres. Details: BienvenueAcres.com. Oxford Film Festival Tour, June 22, Grenada. Screenings of films from 2017 festival; 6:30-9 p.m. First & Green. Also, June 24 at The Strand Theatre, Vicksburg; 6-9 p.m. Free admission. Details: 877-560-3456; OxfordFilmFest.com. The Drop: Shannon McNally, June 22, Cleveland. Moderated conversation and special performance featuring Shannon McNally; 7 p.m. Admission. Grammy Museum Mississippi. Details: 662-441-0100; GrammyMuseumMS.org. Shape Note Singing, June 24, Decatur. A capella congregational singing of early American hymns in four-part harmony; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Singing workshops June 22-23, 6-8:30 p.m. Free admission. Macedonia Primitive Baptist Church. Details: 601-953-1094.

Patriotic Family Day, July 1, Laurel. Tour working homestead with over 80 buildings, wagon rides, gem mining, shooting gallery, demonstrations, more. Food and homemade ice cream. Admission. Landrum’s Homestead & Village. Details: 601-649-2546; Landrums.com. “Mississippi Remembers” Flag Field, July 1-2, Brandon. Display of 500 US flags honors 9/11 victims and military members who died in the war following the attack. Sponsored by Exchange Club of Crossgates. Frank Bridges Memorial Park. Details: 601-398-7654. Camp Shelby Centennial Salute, July 13, Hattiesburg. Dinner, entertainment; 6 p.m. Featuring The Victory Belles and military leadership from Camp Shelby. Formal attire. Admission. Details: Facebook: Lake Terrace Convention Center.

PICTURE THIS:

A Mississippi morning The beauty of a Mississippi morning is the theme of our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Send us your photo of a morning scene or activity in the Magnolia State. Selected photos will appear in the July issue of Today in Mississippi. DEADLINE FOR SUBMISSIONS IS JUNE 10.

Submission guidelines • Submit as many photos as you like, but select only photos in sharp focus. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the date appearing on the image.

• Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

How to submit photos Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Or, mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@ecm.coop. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a $200 cash prize drawing in December.


June 2017

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Today in Mississippi

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19


Today in Mississippi June 2017 East  
Today in Mississippi June 2017 East  

Today in Mississippi June 2017 East