Page 1

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

News for members of Northcentral Electric Power Association

igns S Times of the

PAGE 4

6

Old roads paved way to modern living

13 Marigolds deserve

space in every garden

14 The Cooking Lady’s Southern kitchen


2

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

“ Our Mueller custom building is the place we call home.�

Mueller custom buildings make beautiful living spaces. Our strong, engineered exteriors provide flexibility for you to design a completely customized interior, while supporting large spans and open floor plans. Create your own unique space to call JQOG)KXGWUCECNNQTFTQRD[VQFC[CPFĆ’PFQWVOQTGCDQWVEWUVQOOGVCNDWKNFKPIUHTQO/WGNNGT* *Some exterior structures, such as carport & porches, were added post-engineering and not designed by Mueller. Please check local building codes before ordering.

www.muellerinc.com |

877-2-MUELLER (877-268-3553)


May 2017

May is National Electrical Safety Month

‘Look up’ is life-saving advice hey’re so common most people hardly notice them. And therein lies the problem. Nearly everywhere we go, power lines surround us. They may appear lifeless but just the opposite is true. Power lines hum 24/7 with electricity moving at the speed of light from the generating plant to wherever you need it. The lines are suspended high overhead or buried in the ground for good reason: Human contact with a power line is always disastrous. Electric cooperative linemen make working on the lines look easy, but every move they make around electricity is carefully considered. These are highly trained and experienced workers who have the utmost respect for electricity. Tragedy occurs when anyone gets careless with electricity. You can’t see or smell it. The only sure way for you to prevent contact is to stay far away from power lines— whether they are “live” or not. Should a spring storm or other circumstances bring down a line near you, please call your electric cooperative or 911 immediately. People working outdoors must constantly be aware of power lines to avoid electrocution and serious injury. The use of backhoes, cranes, ladders, scaffolding and other equipment or materials carries a high risk of accidental power line contact when workers are not paying attention. In fact, working too close to power lines is illegal. Mississippi’s “10-foot rule” prohibits the public from conducting activities within 10 feet of a power line. If the power lines serving your property or job site are buried underground, you must know their exact location before doing any excavation work. Call 811 to have the locations of all underground utilities marked before you dig or drill. Find out more about this free service and related state law requirements at the Mississippi 811 website,

T

Farewell to a long-time co-worker A long, outstanding cooperative career is coming to an end. Linda Hutcherson joined the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi in April 1983. Linda served ECM in many areas, the last 10 years as Today in Mississippi’s administrative assistant. Our publication has benefited from her hard work and diligence. Linda has a tremendous and diversified skill set and was someone we could rely on every day. She performed her duties in a professional manner, and we appreciate her loyalty and willingness to accept

On the cover Southern Pine Electric members Ronnie and Dianne Sanford, of Covington County, have devoted decades to amassing an eclectic collection of memorabilia and artifacts, mostly from old stores, barns and other sources in Mississippi. And they built a small village to display it all. Our visit to Sanford Village begins on page 4.

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK

www.ms1call.org. Electrical safety is just as important to your daily activities inside the home. If your household includes young children, you should have tamper-resistant receptacles on the electrical outlets. Plastic outlet caps are easy for little fingers to pry off; tamper-resistant receptacles are far more effective at keeping kids safe by preventing objects from being inserted into the outlet. My Opinion Another life-saving device for Michael Callahan the home is the ground fault cirExecutive Vice President/CEO cuit interrupter (GFCI), a safety Electric Cooperatives outlet that protects people from of Mississippi electrical shock. The Consumer Products Safety Commission estimates that 50 percent of home electrocutions have been prevented since the introduction of the GFCI in the 1970s. Electrical safety extends to the home workshop and garage too. Store power tools in a secure, dry place, and never use them in wet or damp conditions. Use a heavyduty extension cord if you must, but never a cord rated only for indoor use. Electrical safety is not just for grownups. Kids need to know that electricity can strike like a snake when you get too close. Please help the children in your world stay safe through your own example and guidance. Today in Mississippi readers know we promote electrical safety often in the publication. But with May being National Electrical Safety Month, we want to repeat our electrical safety mantra: Never, ever touch a power line for any reason. You may not live to regret it. assignments that were often beyond her normal duties. Linda’s contributions to our overall mission and the daily operation of our department will be missed. The success we have achieved over the years was due in part to her tireless contributions and ability to resolve problems. A woman of integrity, Linda has always put her work first and was dedicated to helping our staff to deliver the highest quality publication each month. She was devoted to providing the best publication to our readers and believed in the importance of making sure the job was done accurately. We extend our special thanks to Linda and wish her and her husband, Bill, a very happy and healthy retirement.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

Vol. 70 No. 5 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 440,559 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

I

Today in Mississippi

I

Our Homeplace

“Fallen Comrade,” a life-size bronze sculpture by Sam Gore, stands in tribute to all veterans of every military branch at the Clinton Visitors Center. Gore’s rendering depicts Marine Joe Albritton carrying the body of his lifelong friend and fellow Marine, Homer Ainsworth, from the Korean battlefield in June 1951. Albritton crossed enemy lines in the dark to retrieve his friend’s body. Both men grew up in Clinton. The visitors center is located on Pinehaven Road, just north of the Natchez Trace Parkway in Clinton.

Mississippi is a garden of memories, and as I walk through this garden, I am reminded of the many churches that spread across the land. The church of my childhood in the tiny community of Stallo, in Neshoba County, is etched in my memory. This was one of those tall, white wooden churches which were scattered across the South. Stallo’s ministers were often students from Millsaps College, and it was one of these young men who decided that the children needed a Bible school. He and his wife rearranged benches into squares, and at 10 years old, I fell in love with this amazing time of singing, coloring pictures of the Holy Land and learning Bible verses. As I grew older, I became aware of one particular aspect of our church. Women and children always sat on the left side of the church, men in the middle and elderly men in the “Amen Corner.” I was so proud that my elderly grandfather was in that group. “Dinner on the ground” was served once a year on huge wooden tables nailed outside between large oak trees. Dinner consisted of fried chicken, ham, fresh vegetables and desserts so good that recipes were often kept secret by the women. Before the children ate, we had the beautiful oaks surrounding us where we could run and play. These oaks, however, proved to be the demise of Stallo church when a windstorm destroyed the church. The new church moved to Highway 15. —Carol Farish Vickers, Decatur

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

3


4

I

Today in Mississippi

I

igns STimes

May 2017

of the

Above right: A mannequin sports a Coca-Cola worker’s uniform dating to the 1930s. The cane-holding Col. Sanders sign is a vintage weathervane topper for KFC restaurants. Above left: As a boy, Sanford started his collection with this Coke sign. Above: The Sanfords’ Pure gas station was built to resemble the one-room stations once common in rural Mississippi. Authentic items include restored gas pumps, a telephone booth, automotive products, metal signs and much more inside.

By Debbie Stringer It takes a village to house the eclectic collections of Ronnie and Dianne Sanford—a village the couple built themselves. The Sanfords are avid collectors of memorabilia, artifacts, ephemera and signs, mostly from original sources in Mississippi. Starting with a small backyard cabin they erected some 30 years ago, their Sanford Village has grown to include 15 wood structures, each one housing items arranged by theme. There’s an early-1900s Pure Oil gas station, a one-chair barbershop sharing space with a rural post office, a church with seating for 60, a 1950s-style diner and a tree house for grown-ups, among others. All but two of the buildings are recreations: The kitchen outbuilding was moved from an 1890s home site not far from the Sanfords’ own home in Covington County. And the building they call Miss Gracie’s Store is actually an old rural house they disassembled and moved to the site. The Sanfords built the remaining structures with wood they salvaged from old barns and other empty structures. Each building is a mini museum packed with the result of decades spent bringing home “other people’s trash,” as Ronnie likes to joke. Inside are vintage pedal cars and restored gas pumps, corn shuck brooms and electric butter churns, road signs and Coca-Cola memorabilia spanning decades. The gas station features two vintage gasoline pumps: a 1938 Pure model and a 1920s gravity-feed pump, its clear cylinder topped by a globe light. “People like to pull up here to the Pure pump with their cars, stick that nozzle in and take a picture,” Ronnie said. Old metal advertising signs cover walls throughout the village. Bold and colorful, they tout brands of motor oil, gasoline, batteries, soft drinks, bread, tobacco, agricultural products, tonics and tires. Pure, Texaco, Coca-Cola and Sinclair roadside signs hang over the gravel drive linking the buildings. For visitors of a certain age, the scene conjures memories of simpler, long-ago times in rural Mississippi. “Anything old from the South, people around here freak out over,” Ronnie said.


May 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

He and Dianne, members of Southern Pine Electric, built the village to preserve and display their growing collections, never intending to create a tourist attraction. Visitors are allowed, but by appointment only. “It’s to the point where we can’t keep it a secret any longer,” Dianne said. Ronnie was a boy growing up in the 60s and 70s when he pulled his first “piece of history” from a dump: a small, rusty “It’s the Real Thing” Coca-Cola sign. His collecting kicked into high gear in the mid-1980s, shortly after his marriage to Dianne, his partner in collecting and village building. “We never had any children, so this became our hobby. We just invested all our time and efforts into it, but we didn’t intend for it to turn out like this,” Dianne said with a laugh. The Sanfords have scoured attics, sheds, tumbledown barns and closed country Continued on page 17

Top photo: The Texaco gasoline pump, in the corner, is one of two Sanford restored after rescuing them from oblivion in a wooded area. Above right: The Sanfords’ tree house for grown-ups consists of a small room with table and chairs, and a wrap-around porch. Though it’s not built in a tree, the house affords tree-level views of the surrounding countryside. Above left: The diner, furnished and decorated with 1950s memorabilia, is a favorite stop for guests. Authentic menu signs, a tabletop juke box, car hop trays, clock signs and soda fountain fixtures all enhance the room’s upbeat mood.

I

5


6

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

Old roads paved the way to modern living he Daughters of the American Revolution placed a granite marker next to the little stretch of road in Saltillo in Lee County calling it “One of the first concrete roads south of the Mason-Dixon line.” It was actually the second, preceded only by a stretch of pavement in Pine Bluff, Ark. It was Highway 45 back in 1915 when it was completed. Today it is County Highway 681. And although the road has been reworked and improved during the century since it was built, they’ve saved about a 300-yard section of the original roadway so we can still see it today. It has asphalt lanes on either side to make it useable. But the slab of concrete there in the middle is a hunk of history, a section of the first paved road in Mississippi. The day I got the photograph of the old road there in Saltillo I stopped by the Tupelo Automobile Museum on my way home. Frank Spain collected the cars on display there over many, many years. The cars and the museum are owned and maintained by a non-profit organization today. Frank’s widow, Jane Spain, is the executive direcMississippi tor. Seen Jane and I by Walt Grayson had a great visit as she told me not only about a few of the cars (there’s over 150 in the collection so it’s hard to talk about all of them in one visit) but also about Frank’s love for them. He valued them as cars in and of themselves but also for what they represented: the mechanical engineering involved in their 100-year evolution from the earliest in the collection, from the 1890s, to the 1990s. I commented to Jane that I had just been in Saltillo and seen the preserved section of the first paved road in the state there. That led to a conversation about how far Saltillo used to be from Tupelo in the horse-and-buggy days. But now, with paved roads, Saltillo is practically a part of Tupelo, if, in fact, it isn’t.

T

There have been so many inventions that have made our lives drastically different from that of our great-grandparents, but paved roads and cars lie at the root of most of those innovations. This is a section of Mississippi's first paved road, preserved at Saltillo. Photo: Walt Grayson

One of the fellows I was talking to in Saltillo was telling me why so many people are choosing to move to the smaller satellite communities. This not only goes for the towns around Tupelo, but around any city in America. He said in Saltillo, he’s five minutes away from the mall at Tupelo in one direction, and five minutes away from his deer stand in the other. The automobile is what made stuff like that possible. Jane told me she tries to get across to school groups touring the museum that the automobile has made the world smaller because of the short time it takes to get from one place to another. She tells them the car has allowed us to dream bigger dreams and see places we would have only heard about, and to live farther away from where we grew up. I would add only that paved roads went hand and hand with the automobile in allowing you and me to live where we live, work where we work, attend church where we do, shop where we want and see relatives living halfway across the country—and lots more stuff. I remember a section of Highway 1 in the Delta long ago with the side slabs added. Daddy called the middle an old Model T road. Our cars have advanced along with our roads. And between the two, we have dreamed bigger dreams and gone anywhere we’ve had the energy and wherewithal to go.

Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


May 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

7

Rating the days e often rate days. This is commonly done by assigning those simple and generally ambiguous designations of good or bad. And while such an approach can be superficially understood and justified when dealing with the complexities of life, doing so lacks clarity, suffers from a poverty of creativity. I was just contemplating these matters this very morning. Today is Tuesday, April 4, 11 a.m. It started early for me and my fascination with sunrises and reflection and dewdraped spring leaves and grasses—and turkey hunting! And today, logically, followed yesterday, one of those days that I might say was bad. It really wasn’t, but it began with a stormy-weather drive to my cardiologist and a not-so-encouragby Tony Kinton ing report. However, it ended well—quiet conditions and sunshine. Still, that test scheduled for Friday plagued. As a result, I determined yesterday to make tomorrow, which is now today, far more pleasant. I found myself at a favorite spot, just as a faint glow began brushing away darkness from the eastern sky. I know

W

Outdoors Today

this place well, so navigating a logging road minus the assistance of a flashlight was no chore. Additionally, such a contrivance as bulb and batteries seemed an affront to the placid regeneration a new day promised. I stopped soon and sat at the base of a pine. Contemplation commenced. One genuine pleasure was the approval to pretend, and since I was alone there was no one else to disapprove. My pretense was to shift centuries. I was for the moment in 1770. Across my knees, these covered in buckskin leggings that have now seen 20-plus years of hard use, rested an English fowling piece. Twenty gauge and sporting 44 inches of barrel. Flintlock, of course. Moose-hide moccasins, coated in a fresh bath of morning dew, covered my feet. A long linen shirt went from thigh to shoulder, its once persuasive walnut-hull dye faded and splotchy from sunlight and rain showers and wear. A big felt hat topped off the outfit, its back pinned up with an extra vent pick. Pinning the hat back up helps when sitting against a tree, and no 18th century long hunter would even consider leaving cabin or settlement without an extra vent pick. Dangling from one shoulder was a shooting pouch, this made from subtle, well-tanned leather. It contained the essentials for numerous reloadings, primarily shot and wads. There was also a worm that screwed to the end of the ramrod for removing an errant wad or hesitant powder charge. The powder horn, attached to the pouch straps, rested peacefully on top of that pouch. On the other side was a haversack. This I made with double layers of canvas dyed in walnut hulls and treated with beeswax for a never-fail waterproofing. It contained water, a piece of linen for use

Medicare Supplements Low Rates!

E.Insurance F. Hutton Agency

(Female age 65, “Plan F” = $111.19 )

P. O. Box 5277, Brandon, MS 39047

1-800-463-4348

E. F. Hutton nor its agents are affiliated with the Federal Medicare Program.

With a well-defined sentiment toward antiquity, Kinton feels that turkey-hunting gear should look like this: 20gauge flintlock fowling piece, shooting pouch/powder horn, haversack and handmade cedar box call. Photo: Tony Kinton

as a face mask, a pair of leather gloves and a handmade cedar turkey call. Comfortable in this setting and confident in the antiquated equipment at hand, I sat and thought. One thing that entered my mind was the sobering realization that had I actually been in the 18th century, I would not be where I was. I would have, back then, been gone from this earth by seven months. It was seven months back that my cardiologist, the same one I saw yesterday and would see again Friday, told me I should not have survived. Two 99percent blockages in the infamous “widow maker” is approaching serious business. For that survival I was and am grateful. I then found myself thinking with trepidation about this upcoming Friday. Were there more blockages? Would stents or perhaps even more invasive surgery be in order? I recognized that all I could do was wait and see, but just then something caught my attention. It was sunrise, creeping slowly above the horizon, accentuating the woods and fields and undergrowth with haunting but highly decorative fingers of mist that caressed the air with wonderment. All was again good, but that is a too-weak descriptor. No more appropriate than bad. Both are weak. And then something else. Two orioles chattered and flitted about a patch or brush that was only slightly more than head high with me in the sitting posi-

tion. I sat motionless, and one approached to little more distance that the reach of that 44-inch barrel of the fowling piece. I marveled at the beauty of this most-handsome specimen. My entire being twirled with delight. This was nature, the real world, and I was privileged to be a silent partner in it all for another day. A crow cawed over in the woods. Time passed too quickly this morning—as it often does. I gathered my gear and started back to the truck. Work awaited, this column you now read being a part of that work. As I took a sip of cool water and then dropped that little cedar call into the haversack, I had one more contemplative revelation. I didn’t feel particularly well and there was some secret dread of days to come, but I came to see that feelings, while powerful, are not or should not be the ruling force of life. Something much deeper and far more significant should fill that role. I recognized that my ability and willingness to express gratitude was of far more import than my being consumed by feelings, the entertaining of which can bring despair. And if I were forced to rate this day, it could in no way be labeled as simply good. Its rating would be spectacular. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


8 I Today in Mississippi I May 2017

Tired of struggling on the stairs? Introducing the Affordable Easy Climber® Elevator

Can be placed virtually anywhere in your home.

Home Improvement that actually improves your LIFE!

SAFE XEquipped with weight, balance and obstruction sensors XWorks even in a power outage

VERSATILE XCan be placed almost anywhere in your home XQuick professional installation

CONVENIENT

Imagine the possibilities

XFootprint is slightly larger than a washing machine XCompact and Quiet

• • • •

Revolutionary elevator can give you– and your home’s value– a lift

“We are tickled about our new elevator. This is the first time I’ve seen the second floor of my home! It’s like an early Christmas present.” Stan W. US war veteran and retired professor

an expensive shaft-way. Its small “footprint” and self-contained lift mechanism adds convenience and value to your home and quality to your life. It’s called the Easy Climber® Elevator. Call us now and we can tell you just how simple it is to own. For many people, particularly seniors, climbing stairs can be a struggle and a health threat. Some have installed motorized stair lifts, but they block access to the stairs and are hardly

an enhancement to your home’s décor. By contrast, the Easy Climber® Elevator can be installed almost anywhere in your home. That way you can move easily and safely from floor to floor without struggling or worse yet… falling. Why spend another day without this remarkable convenience. Knowledgeable product experts are standing by to answer any questions you may have. Call Now!

Call now to find out how you can get your own Easy Climber Elevator. Please mention promotional code 105822. For fastest service, call toll-free.

1-888-783-8471

Residential installations only. Not available in all areas. Call to see if you qualify. © 2017 Aging in the Home Remodelers Inc.

82821

Elevators have been around since the mid 19th century, and you can find them in almost every multi-story structure around… except homes. That’s because installing an elevator in a home has always been a complicated and expensive home renovation project… until now. Innovative designers have created a home elevator that can be easily installed almost anywhere in your home by our professional team without

No more climbing up stairs No more falling down stairs Plenty of room for groceries or laundry Perfect for people with older pets deal for Ranch houses with basements


May 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

9

Here’s why they’re called the Greatest Generation

I

have always had great respect for the group of Americans known as the “Greatest Generation.” Tom Brokaw wrote a wonderful book by that title. But each day this group dwindles, and soon there will be no

more. These men and women grew up during the years of the Great Depression, and they fought World War II to preserve the freedom that we enjoy today. They demonstrated personal responsibility, duty, honor and faith. When I met H.N. Eubanks, I wanted him to share his story. He agreed. “I was born in George County, Miss., May 11, 1920. More precisely, in the community of Rocky Creek on land granted to my grandfather as a Grin ‘n’ Civil War veteran,” he said. Bare It H.N is a member of the by Kay Grafe Greatest Generation. He grew up in a family of eight boys and six girls, and graduated from Rocky Creek High School in 1940. H.N. wanted to go to college, but the family could not afford it. So he went to work for his Uncle Lee Havard in his grocery store in Lucedale, delivering groceries on a bicycle for a salary of one dollar a day. I was spellbound listening to his story. “When I was 21 years old I had to register for the draft. When they told me I would soon be drafted, I joined the Marines, and left Lucedale July 14, 1941, for boot camp at San

Diego, California,” he said. “They sent me to North Carolina for training as a telephone wire man, and then to a Marine depot in Philadelphia. By this time the Japanese had attacked Pearl Harbor and the United States was at war.” “Were you afraid?” I asked “Not really. I wanted to serve my country. In June 1944, I received orders to report to the Fifth Marine Division at Fort Pendleton, Calif., for intense training, and then to Hawaii for additional training. We knew that we were being prepared for invasion of a Pacific island, we just did not know where. “Finally, on board a ship at sea, we were told the island was Iwo Jima. On Feb. 19, 1945, we waded ashore. The fighting was fierce and stayed that way for the next 36 days. The Japanese were in underground bunkers and tunnels and had to be forced out one by one. “After the battle was won, we sailed back to Hawaii for more training to prepare for the invasion of Japan,” H.N. said. I took a sharp breath. “Thankfully, the war ended in August 1945 with the dropping of atomic bombs on Japan. I truly believe that the Great Depression toughened Americans and prepared us for defeating Germany and Japan.” I asked H.N. to tell me about his wife and family. “I met my wife, Doris, when I was stationed in Philadelphia. A buddy and I were at a parade one weekend, and we started talking to two pretty young girls. The next weekend I put on my dress blues and my best Southern charm and went to her apartment. I asked if she wanted to go to a movie, and she said yes. Four months later we married. “Doris died in November 2013 after 71 years of a happy marriage. We have six wonderful children, one girl and five boys.”

I asked him about his working career. “After the war Doris and I moved to her hometown of Ashland, Penn., and I worked several jobs there. But Mississippi kept calling me home, so in 1949, we moved to Rocky Creek. For the next 26 years I worked for the Air Force, first at Brookley AFB. I had to leave Rocky Creek when my job went to Eglin AFB in Valparaiso, Fla. “I retired from federal service in 1977, found a maintenance job at an apartment complex and worked there until 2001. They wanted me to stay longer, but by that time I was 81 years old, and we wanted to return to Mississippi.” “H.N., you have lived a long and happy life. To what do you credit your longevity?” I asked. He thought a few minutes and said, “Well, I have always tried to take care of this body the Lord gave me. My wife cooked healthy, a lot of vegH.N. Eubanks etables. I never ate many sweets, and don’t keep any in the house today. I don’t drink any soft drinks, and I have always gotten a lot of exercise. And I don’t smoke.” “Mr. Roy has known you longer than I have, but he says that you have always had a good attitude and a smile on your face,” I said. “I have never wanted an abundance of material things. I have always been content with what I had and where I was,” H.N. replied. “I have never been a worrier. Worry does no one any good. I believe attitude is the real secret to a long and happy life. I feel good, I go where I want to and I am happy. I intend to live until I die.” Americans today owe all of those men and women of the Greatest Generation for our freedom. Thank you, and happy 97th birthday, H.N. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


10

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

Power strips

versus surge protectors As the proliferation of electronics impacts our daily lives, we realize there simply are not enough outlets in our homes. This is particularly true for older homes. As a result, we end up with a number of “outlet expanders,” more commonly known as power strips. Power strips are generic and fulfill a very simple function. They are inexpensive, and the quality is usually on par with the price. Keeping this in mind, let’s look at factors to consider when purchasing a power strip or a surge protector.

Important tip: Make sure you know the amperage rating of the outlet into which you are connecting the strip and other equipment. A residential circuit can overload if you are not careful. • Look for power strips with a built-in circuit breaker. If you connect too many electronics and devices, the strip will kick out the circuit breaker rather than causing the breaker in your electric panel to trip. • Pay attention to the orientation of the outlets. The typical design is along the length of the strip, facing the bottom or end of the strip. Power strips with the outlets perpendicular to the length of the strip are recommended. • Get a smart strip. These are becoming more common and less expensive. With smart strips, one outlet serves as a master, receiving power all the time. The other outlets do not receive power until the master device is turned on. This is ideal for home entertainment setups.

Purchasing a power strip: If you are connecting expensive electronics, you may want to consider a surge protector. Here, price is even more important because a cheap surge protector can be worse than

none at all for two reasons. One, they use cheap, small surge fighting components. Two, these components can fail and the strip still will provide power, all without any indication that its protective side is gone. Like power strips, there are some key factors to consider when buying a surge protector. • Go for a significant joule (jewel) rating. This is a measure of how much energy it can withstand. • Cable and internet connection protection. You may want to consider this for your entertainment and computing needs as surges can enter via any wired connection. Be sure the protector is designed to handle a digital television. Otherwise, it can cause pixilation if it’s only designed for analog signals. • Indicator light that shows if protection has burned out. • The same outlet orientation as previously mentioned. • Power conditioning feature (for PCs, this is a nice-to-have feature but not a necessity). • A smart capability as mentioned above.

May Is National Electrical Safety Month

Plug into safety Never use electrical equipment near water and other liquids.

Never use electrical cords that are frayed or damaged.

Do not overload electrical outlets.

Never use light bulbs that exceed the recommended wattage for any lighting unit or fixture.

Power strips and surge protectors are worth the investment when you follow these simple suggestions. Don’t get “burned” by purchasing cheap, inefficient strips and protectors.

Treat all downed power lines as energized and contact your electric cooperative to report downed power lines. While pruning trees or working near overhead power lines, do not touch anything that comes into contact with the power line.

Think safety FIRST!


May 2017 I Today in Mississippi

I

11

2017 Scholarship Recipients

Eight 2017 graduating high school seniors were each presented the Northcentral Electric Power Association scholarship for academic achievement and leadership. Each received a scholarship in the amount of $1,000 to the college of their choice.

Our congratulations go to these outstanding graduates.

Lane Oxner

Olivia Emmich

Lewisburg High School Lane will begin his studies at Mississippi State University this fall majoring in animal and dairy science. After graduation, he plans to attend veterinary school at MSU.

DeSoto Central High School Olivia plans to major in mathematics at Mississippi State University and then attend nursing school. Her goal is to become a certified registered nurse anesthetist.

Kyla Johnson

Olive Branch High School Kyla plans to attend the University of Mississippi and earn her degree in social work and counseling. Her goal is to help people and make a difference in their lives.

Whitt Rodgers

Marshall Academy Whitt will attend the University of Mississippi to first earn a degree in exercise science and then continue his education toward a degree in physical therapy.

Brooke Starnes

Brianna Lee

Center Hill High School Brooke will attend the University of Southern Mississippi where she will major in elementary education and minor in art and special education.

DeSoto Career and Technology Center East Brianna will attend the University of Mississippi to major in biology or nursing. She plans to earn her master’s and become a nurse practitioner.

Alexis Lunsford

Home School Alexis plans to obtain her degree from Northwest Mississippi Community College prior to attending the University of Mississippi earning her degree in special education with an emphasis in deaf education.

Louis Steen

Northpoint Christian School Louis is leaning towards attending Delta State University and majoring in commercial aviation or another college and major in engineering. He plans to earn at least his master’s degree and return to DeSoto County to give back to his community.

Northcentral Electric has an app that lets you I I

pay your bill with your smartphone I keep up with multiple accounts view your billing history I view payment history I track your use

Apps for iPhone, iPad and Android are available to download and they’re free! Search in Apple App Store or Google Play Store for Northcentral.


12

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

ADVANCED HEARING AID

TECHNOLOGY For Less Than 300 $

“I was amazed! Sounds I hadn’t heard in years came back to me!” — Don, January 2016

How can a hearing aid that costs less than $300 be every bit as good as one that sells for $3,000 or more? The answer: Although tremendous strides have been made in Advanced Hearing Aid Technology, those cost reductions have not been passed on to you. Until now... The MDHearingAid PRO® uses the same kind of Advanced Hearing Aid Technology incorporated into hearing aids that cost thousands more at a small fraction of the price. Over 75,000 satisfied PRO customers agree: High quality FDA registered hearing aids don’t have to cost a fortune. The fact is, you don’t need to spend thousands for a medical-grade hearing aid. MDHearingAid PRO® gives you a sophisticated high-performance hearing aid that works right out of the box with no time-consuming “adjustment” appointments. You can contact a hearing specialist conveniently online or by phone—even after sale at no cost. No other company provides such extensive support. Now that you know...why pay more?

TAKE ADVANTAGE OF OUR

45-DAY RISK-FREE TRIAL! Hearing is believing and we invite you to try this nearly invisible hearing aid with no annoying whistling or background noise for yourself. If you are not completely satisfied, simply return it within that time period for a 100% refund of your purchase price.

For the Lowest Price Call

800-586-2715 GetMDHearingAid.com

Nearly Invisible

BIG SOUND. TINY PRICE.

BATTERIES INCLUDED! READY TO USE RIGHT OUT OF THE BOX!

Batteries for 1 Year DD71 Plus FREE Shipping Use Code

and get FREE

©2017 MDHearingAid, Inc. All Rights Reserved.

DOCTOR DESIGNED | AUDIOLOGIST TESTED | FDA REGISTERED


May 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

13

Marigolds supply lasting color, help for tomatoes fter being laid up for the last few weeks recovering from a knee replacement, I’ve really enjoyed finally getting out and picking up some heat-loving summer annual color. The first flat of bedding plants I put in the cart contained marigolds. I know some gardeners may think marigolds are too easy, but that’s exactSouthern ly what I want Gardening from my summer landscape by Dr. Gary Bachman beds. There are a couple of types commonly available: the American marigold and the French marigold. The American marigold is also called

A

the African marigold, Tagetes erecta. The various series range in size from 15 inches to over 3 feet tall. American marigolds are recognizable for their double flowers that look like pom-poms. But my go-to favorites are the French marigolds, Tagetes patula. These plants are inherently smaller and have more flower variety, including striped flower petals. There are both single and double flowers, which generally grow less than 15 inches tall. French marigolds are free flowering from early summer to frost, but you may have to deadhead and remove the faded flowers. I consider marigolds to be all-season color. I’ve been known to do a second planting around Aug. 1. When we move into the cooler weather of fall, we can enjoy a second season of warm-season marigold color. Now, fall is traditionally the season for enjoying our garden mums. The marigolds being grown in the fall are commonly called mari-mums all across the Southeast.

Medicare Supplement Insurance

CD or IRA

Low Rates for Plan F

14%

Male (Non Tobacco)

Female (Non Tobacco)

Age

Mo.Prem.

Age

Mo.Prem.

65 70 75 80

$126.00 $128.00 $147.00 $183.00

65 70 75 80

$108.00 $111.00 $128.00 $160.00

COMING DUE?

First Year GUARANTEED Includes First Year Bonus

Call Now for More Information

Rates vary slightly by zip code. Not affiliated with any government agency. Rates include household discount.

L.D. O’Mire

HAMILTON INSURANCE AGENCY

1-800-844-3254

Call

800-336-9861

6045 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211

Financial Services “ Helping families for over 50 years” Guarantees subject to the claim paying ability of the insurance company. Surrender of the contract may be subject to surrender charge or market value adjustment. Product not available in all states. This is a single premium deferred Annuity. Interest rates are subject to change. Withdrawals prior to age 591/2 may be subject to a 10% IRS penalty.

In fact, marigolds could start giving chrysanthemums a run for their fall gardening money. When we compare

One problem is that many garden centers are not on the bandwagon in favor of the notion that fall is a great time to plant marigolds. But that’s OK, because marigolds are so easy to grow from seed. I’ll collect seed heads from my summer plantings and scatter the seed throughout the summer in various places Also called the African marigold, various series of the American marigold, above, around my garcan range from 15 inches to 3 feet in height. French marigolds, at top, are smaller den. Not all the but have more flower variety than American marigolds. Photos: MSU seed will germiExtension/Gary Bachman nate, but I will length of fall color, marigolds win hands have marigolds popping up in random down. While chrysanthemums will have places. great color for a few weeks, my Besides providing pretty landscape marigolds will be blooming their stems and garden color, marigolds do show off all the way to the first hard frost. some promise as being a welcome Marigolds also give you the option of companion plant for garden tomatoes. planting in either containers or landscape Marigolds have been reported to supbeds, while chrysanthemums really need press nematode damage through the to be grown in containers. summer season. Many years ago, when I was a young horticulturist, I companion-planted marigolds with my tomatoes and didn’t seem to have as many problems. One thing I do know is that the bright, warm colors of marigolds are contrasted well by the dark-green foliage of the tomatoes. To me, it doesn’t matter which variety of marigold we grow in our gardens. Just grow some and enjoy them this summer. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


14

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

Red Cabbage Slaw 1 head red cabbage, cored 1 bunch broccoli florets (from 3 stems) 1 (10-oz.) box grape tomatoes, halved 4 green onions, tops and bottoms, thinly chopped ½ red onion, thinly sliced (optional)

‘The Cooking Lady’ RECIPES FROM:

Greenville councilwoman and cookbook author Ann Hollowell prefers recipes that are simple, delicious, healthy and heart-felt. Her approach to cooking reflects her roots in South Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi. In Hollowell’s kitchen, cooking is all about experimentation, with a nod to family and regional traditions. She explains (and entertains) in a new cookbook, “The Cooking Lady: Real Food from My Southern Kitchen,” coauthored with Tom Henkenius. Recipes come packaged in personal stories, cooking tips and color photographs, including these selections: • Red Cabbage Slaw is tangy and sweet with a kick of pepper, Hollowell says. Its bright reds and greens make the slaw a showy addition to the table. • Spicy Carrot Cake, her mother’s recipe, is dense and rich, and needs no further embellishment. • Catfish Courtbouillon is Hollowell’s twist on a traditional South Louisiana dish typically cooked with redfish. But Mississippi Delta catfish makes a fine fish stew as well, she says. The 208-page hardcover cookbook sells for $24.95. Find it in stores or order from AnnHollowell.com. Recipes reprinted with permission from Pelican Publishing Co.

Super-simple single servings for beginner cooks

Chopped Cucumber and Tomato Salad 1 or 2 pickling cucumbers, peeled and chopped 5 to 6 grape or cherry tomatoes, halved, or 1 small garden tomato, chopped 1 Tbsp. (or to taste) fresh flat-leaf parsley or fresh dill, chopped

¼ to ½ red onion, finely chopped Italian or Mediterranean-style salad dressing Salt and pepper to taste Feta cheese, crumbled (optional)

In a small bowl, toss cucumbers, tomatoes, parsley and onion with salad dressing. Season to taste with salt and pepper, and top with cheese. If time allows, cover and refrigerate for 1 hour to blend flavors. Makes 1 serving. Notes: Removing the seed portion of the cucumber helps keep the salad from becoming too watery. You can substitute mini English cucumbers, which do not need peeling. Adjust recipe amounts to suit your taste.

Dressing: 2⁄3 cup olive oil ½ cup apple cider vinegar 1⁄3 cup sugar 1 tsp. salt ¼ tsp. pepper ½ tsp. red pepper flakes

Thinly slice or shred the cabbage and place in a large bowl with the broccoli florets. Add the grape tomatoes, green onions and red onion. Mix all vegetables together. Combine the dressing ingredients in a bowl or jar and blend or shake well. Pour over the vegetables and toss. This will last at least a day in the fridge. Serves 8 generously.

Spicy Carrot Cake 2 cups all-purpose flour 2 cups sugar 2 tsp. baking soda 2 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. salt 4 eggs, slightly beaten 1 ½ cups vegetable or canola oil 3 cups grated carrots

Preheat oven to 350 F. In a mixing bowl, combine the flour, sugar, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. Mix well. Add the eggs and oil and mix well. Add the carrots and beat on medium speed with an electric mixer for about 2 minutes. Grease and flour a 10-inch Bundt pan. Pour in the batter and bake for 1 hour and 10 minutes. Let the cake rest for 5 minutes before turning it out. Serves up to 16.

Catfish Courtbouillon 2 onions, chopped 1 bunch green onions, chopped 1 bell pepper, chopped 3 stalks celery, chopped ½ cup chopped fresh parsley 2 Tbsp. olive oil 2 tomatoes, chopped 1 (14.5-oz.) can whole tomatoes 1 (6-oz.) can tomato paste

3 cloves garlic, minced 1 cup red wine 1 ½ cups water 1 lemon, sliced 3 bay leaves 1 tsp. salt ½ tsp. pepper 3 catfish fillets

Sauté the onions, green onions, bell pepper, celery and parsley in the olive oil in a deep pan over medium-high heat. Once the onions have become translucent, add the fresh and canned tomatoes (with the juice), tomato paste, garlic, wine, water, lemon slices, bay leaves, salt and pepper. Simmer for 15 minutes. Cut the catfish into 2-inch pieces and add to the courtbouillon. Continue simmering until cooked through, about 15 minutes. Remove the bay leaves and serve over rice. Serves 4.

Scrambled Egg Tacos with Veggies 2 eggs ½ tsp. taco seasoning mix, or to taste 1 tsp. butter or vegetable oil Handful of baby spinach, chopped

Finely shredded cheese 1 green onion, thinly sliced 1 small tomato, chopped 2 soft taco-size corn tortillas

In a small bowl, whisk eggs with taco seasoning. Melt butter in small nonstick skillet over medium heat. Pour in egg mixture. As eggs begin to set, use a spatula to pull and lift cooked portions to let any uncooked egg run onto the hot surface. Stir in spinach and cook until no liquid egg is visible. Sprinkle cheese over eggs, cover and remove skillet from heat. Warm tortillas for 30 seconds on high in the microwave. Spoon half of egg mixture onto each tortilla. Top with chopped tomato and green onion. Fold into a taco and serve. Makes 1 serving. Note: Flour tortillas work just as well; heat them according to package instructions. Additions could include warmed leftover taco meat, canned pinto beans (drained and heated), salsa, sour cream and guacamole.


Today in Mississippi

I

15

s o N ac t r nt

“My friends all hate their cell phones… I love mine!” Here’s why.

I

Co

B B u ig tt ge on r s

May 2017

FREE Car Charge r

Say good-bye to everything you hate about cell phones. Say hello to the Jitterbug Flip. “Cell phones have gotten so small, I can barely dial mine.” Not the Jitterbug® Flip. It features a large keypad for easier dialing. It even has a larger display and a powerful, hearing aid-compatible speaker, so it’s easy to see and conversations are clear. “I had to get my son to program it.” Your Jitterbug Flip set-up process is simple. We’ll even program it with your favorite numbers. “What if I don’t remember a number?” Friendly, helpful Personal Operators are available 24 hours a day and will even greet you by name when you call. “I’d like a cell phone to use in an emergency.” Now you can turn your phone into a personal safety device when you select a Health & Safety Package. With 5Star® Service, in any uncertain or unsafe situation, simply press the 5Star button to speak immediately with a highly-trained Urgent Response Agent who will confirm your location, evaluate your situation and get you the help you need, 24/7. “My cell phone company wants to lock me in a two-year contract!” Not with the Jitterbug Flip. There are no contracts to sign and no cancellation fees.

Order now and receive a FREE Car Charger – a $25 value for your Jitterbug Flip. Call now!

Monthly Plan

$14.99/mo*

$19.99/mo*

Monthly Minutes

200

600

Operator Assistance

24/7

24/7

Long Distance Calls

No add’l charge

No add’l charge

Voice Dial

FREE

FREE

Nationwide Coverage

YES

YES

30 days

30 days

Friendly Return Policy1

Health & Safety Packages available as low as $19.99/month*. More minute plans available. Ask your Jitterbug expert for details.

“Many phones have features that are rarely needed and hard to use!” The Jitterbug Flip contains easy-to-use features that are meaningful to you. A built-in camera makes it easy and fun for you to capture and share your favorite memories. And a flashlight with a built-in magnifier helps you see in dimly lit areas, the Jitterbug Flip has all the features you need. 5Star Enabled

12:45P Mon May 08

Enough talk. Isn’t it time you found out more about the cell phone that’s changing all the rules? Call now, Jitterbug product experts are standing by.

Available in Red and Graphite.

Call toll-free to get your

Jitterbug Flip Cell Phone Please mention promotional code 105823.

1-888-862-2871

www.JitterbugDirect.com

47666

We proudly accept the following credit cards:

IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc. Your invoices will come from GreatCall. Plans and Services require purchase of a Jitterbug phone and a one-time setup fee of $35. *Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Coverage is not available everywhere. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can only be made when cellular service is available. 5Star Service will be able to track an approximate location when your device is turned on, but we cannot guarantee an exact location. 1We will refund the full price of the Jitterbug phone and the activation fee (or setup fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes. You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S.-based customer service. However, for calls to a GreatCall Operator in which a service is completed, you will be charged 99 cents per call, and minutes will be deducted from your monthly rate plan balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Operator. Jitterbug, GreatCall, and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.


16

I

Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

Mississippi

MISCELLANEOUS PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982. FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon Church and Government uniting, will supress “Religious Liberty” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark of the Beast.” Be informed/Be forewarned! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 the biblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715.

VACATION RENTALS PIGEON FORGE, TN Cabins, peaceful, convenient location, owner rates, 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049; www.hideawayprop.com.

KILL LAKE WEEDS

Proven AQUACIDE PELLETS

Marble size pellets. Work at any depth.

Before

After

10 lb. bag treats up to 4,000 sq.ft. $86.00. 50 lb. bag treats up to 20,000 sq.ft. $327.00.

FREE SHIPPING! Certified and approved for use by state agencies. State permit may be required. Registered with the Federal E. P. A.

800-328-9350

KillLakeWeeds.com Order online today, or request free information.

Our 62nd year

AQUACIDE CO.

PO Box 10748, DEPT 52C White Bear Lake, MN 55110-0748

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch, charcoal grill. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures E-mail: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com.

FARM BARNS

Hattiesburg, MS • 1-601-296-0550

GULF SHORES HOUSE. Nice 2 BR, Gulf View, Summer $1095/week. 251-666-5476.

Our Prices Include

FOR SALE SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial sawmill equipment for woodlot and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. Call for a free list or to sell your equipment, 800-459-2148; www.sawmillexchange.com.

LAND FOR SALE by owner - 8.2 acres on Wilson Welch Road, Mendenhall, MS 3,500 per acre. Call 601-826-2246

Labor & Metal Sides Also Available in Wood Sides

Garage with hardy siding and concrete slab, any size.

www.farmbarnsinc.com

We will build any size barn.


May 2017

18-35 HP

I

Today in Mississippi

I

17

0% Fiin nancin ng Ava ailla able* *WAC

JOYSTICK OR TWINSTICK STEERING 42� - 72� Cutting Width

FROM THIS TO

Advertise in the Marketplace, reach over 450,000

this

0 Seconds In 60 d       L      E          

1-800-627-7276 ww ww.marrbro ros.co om

Holding a rare can of Capitan Parlube motor oil from the 1920s, Ronnie Sanford tinkers with his 1964 Chevrolet Custom pickup truck, his latest restoration project.

Signs of the times Continued from page 5

Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

Mobile Home Super Insulated Roof Over Systems. 40 Year Warranty. Factory Direct from

ROOF KING 1-800-276-0176 www.roofking.net

SINCE 1982

stores, always with the owner’s permission (or by invitation). They’ve shooed away rats and dodged snakes and trudged into woods. They’ve cruised the back roads, slamming on brakes when an old store pops into view. “We really have to work hard to get what we’ve got,� Dianne said. “We very seldom buy anything from an antiques shop. We had rather dig out our stuff.� Ronnie pulled two 1957 Texaco gasoline pumps, covered in rust and inhabited by snakes, from a wooded area near Mt. Olive. After a lot of sandblasting, priming and painting, he brought them back to a like-new appearance. Trash dumps can yield treasures too. The Sanfords rescued an old wooden pulpit discarded by a church and a 1946 Bible being tossed in a dump. “Why people would throw things like that away is beyond me,� Dianne said. The popularity of the TV reality show “American Pickers� seems to have made productive picking increasingly difficult, the Sanfords say. A few years ago, the show’s producer asked to shoot an episode at their village, but the Sanfords politely refused; their collectibles are not for sale. The couple’s steadfast refusal to sell has helped grow the collection in an unexpected way, through donations and referrals from individuals who get what they’re doing. “People find out what we do here, and that we don’t sell or give away things. So occasionally we’ll have someone to donate something because they would love for it to be displayed,� Dianne said. Reactions from visitors range from awe to joy to tears as they explore the village. The displays seem to reconnect many with personal memories of childhood, wartime or family life. “It’s so much work to keep something like this up,� Dianne said. “And sometimes I wonder why we do all this. Then we’ll have visitors, especially older people, that just enjoy it so much, and I’ll say, that is why we do this. That is the reward right there.� Despite decades of collecting, a few things remain on the Sanfords’ wish list. Dianne hopes to find a Mobil Oil Flying Red Horse (Pegasus) sign, the version without text, and an old farm wagon with wooden wheels. “I’m looking for a Coca-Cola policeman too,� Ronnie said, referring to the die-cut “slow school zone� sign from the 1950s. Yet the couple always keep an open mind when considering items to buy. Ronnie sees no end to the hobby he has enjoyed since childhood. “I will quit when they lay me down,� he quipped. Sanford Village is open to visitors by appointment only. Call Ronnie and Dianne Sanford at 601-722-4123.


18

I

Today in Mississippi

I

May 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Que on the Yazoo, May 5-6, Greenwood. Motorcycle ride/show, MBN-sanctioned BBQ contest, steak/kid’s burger contest, run, ArtZone, live music, more. Free admission. Downtown. Details: 662-453-9197; QueOnTheYazoo.com. Rummage/Bake Sale, May 6, Brandon. Indoors. 8 a.m. - 2 p.m. Free admission. Nativity Lutheran Church. Details: 601-8255125. Spring Plant Sale, May 6, Meridian. East Miss. Master Gardeners; 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Earth’s Bounty. Details: 601-485-8096; bwells1812@gmail.com. Author event: Yvette Johnson, May 9, Greenwood. Author of “Song and the Silence: Searching for Booker Wright”; 5:30 p.m. TurnRow Book Co. Details: 662-453-5995. Author event: Thomas Oliphant, Curtis Wilkie, May 11, Greenwood. Authors of “The Road to Camelot: Inside JFK’s Five-Year Campaign”; 5:30 p.m. TurnRow Book Co. Details: 662-453-5995. MayFest and Mayfest 5K, May 13, Olive Branch. Music, food, arts, crafts, children’s activities. Details: 662-893-0888; OliveBranchOldTowne.org. 45th Annual Gospel Singing Jubilee, May 13, Pearl. Featuring Hinson Family, Tim Frith & Gospel Echoes, Terry Terrell, Revelations; 6:30 p.m. Admission. Pearl Community Center. Details: 601-906-0677, 601-720-8870. “I’m Goin’ to Sing, Shout, Pray!,” May 13, Bay St. Louis. Coast Chorale concert; 2 p.m. Christ Episcopal Church. St. Jude Gospel Singing for a Cure, May 13, Southaven. Local groups begin 11 a.m.; The Pounders Family, Masters Quartet at 6 p.m. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 901488-4766. Lower Delta Talks: Looking Around the Lower Delta, May 16, Rolling Fork. Presenter: Walt Grayson; 6:30 p.m. Free admission. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-6261; LowerDelta.org. Shape Note Singing Workshop, May 18, Jackson. Free admission; 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum.

Details: 601-953-1094. US 11 Antique Alley Yard Sale, May 18-21, Meridian to Bristol, Va. Roadside sales and special events in towns along 502-mile route. Details: 601-917-3727; US11AntiqueAlley.com. 154th Battle of Hernando, May 19-21, Hernando. Civil War reenactment, C.S.S. Hunley submarine traveling exhibit, period dance. Historic Mussecuna Plantation. Details: 901-553-3878, 901-238-4393. Square Affair, May 20, Carthage. Arts, crafts, Kids Fun Zone, tractor pull, fishing rodeo, 5K run/walk, antique car show, more. Carthage Coliseum. Details: 601-267-9231. Arts and Crafts Jubilee, May 20, Greenwood. Hill View Baptist Church; 8 a.m. 4 p.m. Details: 662-299-7217. “Mississippi Encyclopedia” Celebration and Signing, May 20, Oxford. Celebrates encyclopedia’s publication; panel discussion, signing, party; begins 3 p.m. Oxford Courthouse, Off Square Books. Details: 662915-5993; SouthernStudies.olemiss.edu. Native Orchids of South Mississippi, May 20, Picayune. Glen Ladner leads presentation and field walk; 10-11:30 a.m. Admission; register by May 19. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. 20th Annual Southaven Fishing Rodeo, May 20, Southaven. Catfish pond fishing for ages 4-12 with free breakfast, prizes, trophies; 8-11 a.m. Jim Saucier Park. Free admission; bring fishing gear. Details: 662-890-7275; Southaven.org. Eighth Annual Mendenhall in May, May 20, Mendenhall. Arts, crafts, car show, 5K run/walk, barbecue cook-off, Kids Zone, Fordie Hays concert, more; begins 7 a.m. Downtown. Details: 601-847-1725. 20th Annual Steak Dinner and Silent Auction, May 20, Collins. Benefits Boys & Girls Club of Covington County; 6 p.m. Admission. Collins Civic Center. Details: 601-517-1123. Dixon Day, May 20, Philadelphia. Picnic-style lunch; begins 10 a.m. Neshoba County Fairgrounds. Details: 601-656-3795. Gem, Mineral and Jewelry Show, May 20-

21, Biloxi. Vendors, kids corner, exhibits, displays, demos, prizes. Admission. Joppa Shrine Temple. Details: 228-342-2963, 601-9477245; GulfportGems.org. Big Pop Gun Show, May 20-21, Pascagoula. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. Repticon Memphis Reptile and Exotic Animal Show, May 20-21, Southaven. Vendors, live animal seminars, more. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 863-2684273; Repticon.com. Magnolia Fest, May 24-27, Horn Lake. Carnival, midway, live music, food, more. Free admission. Latimer Lakes Park. Details: 662342-3468; HornLakeParks.com. World Championship Old-Time Piano Playing Contest and Festival, May 25-28, Oxford. Competition in pre-1940 piano music, workshops, guest artists, more. Nutt Auditorium, University of Mississippi. Details: 662-915-2036; OldTimePianoContest.com. Brussel’s Bonsai Annual Rendezvous, May 25-28, Olive Branch. Guest bonsai artists, lectures, demos, more; 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Admission. Brussel’s Bonsai Nursery. Details: 800-5822593; BrusselsBonsai.com. Atwood Music Festival, May 26-27, Monticello. Music, vendors, food, kids’ activities. Camping available. Admission. Atwood Water Park. Details: 601-587-3007; AtwoodMusicFestival.com. St. Clare Seafood Festival, May 26-28, Waveland. Classic car show, arts, crafts, 5K run/1-mile walk, live music, carnival rides, more. St. Clare Catholic Church. Details: 228467-9275; StClareCatholic@yahoo.com. Memorial Day Classic College Softball Expo, May 26-28, Southaven. Tournament for ages 14, 16, 18. Greenbrook Softball Complex. Details: 901-849-3563; CoachK1661@gmail.com. Art Exhibit: “Wolfe: The Family Legacy,” May 26 - Oct. 14, Jackson. Works by Karl and Mildred Wolfe and daughter Elizabeth Wolfe. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Art. Details: 601-960-1515; MSMuseumArt.org. Shape Note Singing, May 27-28, Vicksburg. A cappella singing from oblong hymnals; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Old Courthouse Museum. Details: 601-953-1094. “The Lion King Jr.,” June 1-4, Laurel. Kids’

Camp production featuring 100 students. Admission. Laurel Little Theatre. Details: 601428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. City Wide Garage Sale, June 3, Morton. Spaces available; 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Farris Municipal Park. Details: 601-732-8609, 601732-6135. Old Towne Farmers Market, Saturdays, June 3 - Sept. 30, Olive Branch. Baked treats, cottage foods, honey, artisans, crafters, special guests, demos, more. City Hall parking lot; 8 a.m. - 1 p.m. Details: 662-893-0888; OliveBranchOldTowne.org. Choctaw Cruisers Car and Truck Show, June 3, Ackerman. Health fair, kiddy slide, live band, burgers, homemade ice cream; 8 a.m. 1:30 p.m. Sponsored by Choctaw Regional Medical Center. Hwys. 12 and 9. Details: 662285-3351. Fifth Annual My First String Camp, June 5, Hattiesburg. Classes for Suzuki and elementary string students, grades 1-6; 9 a.m. - 12 p.m. Admission; bring or rent instrument. Parkway United Methodist Church. Details: 414-7374620; jmartin@wmcarey.edu. Windsor Car Show, June 10, Port Gibson. Car/truck/motorcycle show Dilla Dash, 5K run/walk, fun run, more; 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Downtown. Details: 601-618-4405; Facebook.com/PortGibson.Chamber. 16th Annual Noxubee County Juneteenth Festival, June 10, Macon. Parade/drumline, food, gospel, blues, more. Free. North St. and Hwy. 14 W. Details: 662-726-5475. East Mississippi Sportsmen Association Flea Market, June 10, DeKalb. Vendors, concessions. Hwy. 16 between DeKalb and Scooba. Details: 601-227-6370. Blueberry Jubilee, June 10, Poplarville. Arts, crafts, 5K run. Downtown. Details: festival: 601-795-7033; run: 601-403-1342; BlueberryJubilee.org. Stennis Astro Camp, June 5 - July 21, Hancock County. Weekly camps with STEM activities and NASA content for grades 2-10. Registration required. Stennis Space Center. Details: 228-688-3485; NASA.gov/centers/stennis. Prentiss Institute All School Reunion, June 16-17, Prentiss. Prentiss Institute campus. Details: 601-792-5248, 601-792-7617.

FINANCIAL FREEDOM

10% Interest Bonus on all Deposits! Featuring up to

I

1-844-AGENT4U

I FREE IN-HOME CONSULTATION (IRA, ROTH, CD, NQ, 401K and Pension Rollovers)

MORE GAIN • NO LOSS • SAFETY

A+

Culotta Insurance & Investments

#1 SAFE MONEY MAN in MS - LOU since 1992!

Richie Culotta


I

May 2017

Today in Mississippi

I

SUPER COUPON SOLAR ROPE LIGHT ITEM 62533/68353 shown

FREE 20%

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 750+ Stores Nationwide.

OFF SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINE

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $290

$

119

99 9 9 $ 9 99

$34.99 SUPER COUPON

SAVE 65%

STEP STOOL/ WORKING PLATFORM

Customer Rating

$19

29

Wheel kit sold separately.

Compare

$389.99

Compare 99 $57.55

$

33899

$10999 $12999

ITEM 62515 66911 shown

Compare

$599 $899

99

LIMIT 3 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

LIMIT 4 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

MECHANIC'S GLOVES

SAVE 60%

ITEM 62434/62426 62433/62428 62432/62429

Customer Rating

SAVE 12" SLIDING COMPOUND $204 DOUBLE-BEVEL MITER SAW • With Laser Guide

ITEM 60536 61632 shown

• Lift range: 5-1/2" to 17"

$69 SAVE

99

Item 62429 shown

$399 $599 Compare

Customer Rating

$

$9.98

LIMIT 3 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

$169

99

99

Compare

$

19999 $283.50 $1299 Compare

Compare

$17.98

$999

SAVE $360

Customer Rating

LIMIT 8 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SAVE 50% Customer Rating

LIMIT 7 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

Customer Rating

29 PIECE TITANIUM HIGH SPEED STEEL DRILL BIT SET ITEM 62281/61637 shown

SUPER COUPON

$

29999

$999

SAVE $ 83%

Compare

LIMIT 3 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

1699

Compare

$59.98

$579.99

LIMIT 6 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SUPER-WIDE TRI-FOLD 2 TON FOLDABLE SAVE SAVE SHOP CRANE $70 ALUMINUM LOADING RAMP $

ITEM 90018 shown 69595/60334

120 ITEM 60388/69514 shown

• Boom extends from 41" to 61-3/4" • Crane height adjusts from 73-5/8" to 89" SUPER COUPON • Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

$179

Customer Rating

$

21999 $299.99

LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

Use Coupons: In-Store, HarborFreight.com or 1-800-423-2567

SUPER COUPON

$7999

99

Compare

Customer Rating LIMIT 4 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

Compare

$219

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $113

$499.99

LIMIT 3 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

ITEM 63365 63360 shown

2999 $39.99

99

SUPER COUPON

ITEM 62859 63055/62860 shown

$

SUPER COUPON

10 FT. x 17 FT. MECHANIC'S CHOICE SHOP PORTABLE GARAGE SAVE TOWELS - PACK OF 50 44%

SUPER COUPON

$169 $17999

ITEM 69714/63354 47712 shown

Compare

SUPER COUPON

$1999

SUPER COUPON

6 FT. x 8 FT. ALUMINUM GREENHOUSE

99

LIMIT 4 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

$134 $19999

1499

LIMIT 7 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

$339

ITEM 61888 68885 shown

SAVE $330

8999 $99.99

SUPER COUPON

170 AMP MIG/FLUX CORED WELDER

$

Compare

Customer Rating LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

30

Blade sold separately.

SUPER COUPON

$20.13

ITEM 61969/61970/69684 shown

SUPER COUPON

$

Compare

Customer Rating

1500 LB. CAPACITY MOTORCYCLE LIFT

LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

ITEM 62314/63066 66383 shown

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

Compare

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER HEAVY DUTY FOLDABLE ITEM 69645 /60625shown ALUMINUM SPORTS CHAIR

$17.97

SUPER COUPON

99 9 9 $2 349

99

$952.99

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 50%

LIMIT 9 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

$

Compare

$9

Compare

Customer Rating SUPER COUPON

$752.99

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

Customer Rating

• Weighs 83.5 lbs. • 21-1/4" W x 10-1/8" H

99

• 350 lb. capacity

YOUR CHOICE

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

$199.99

SIZE MED LG X-LG

$28999

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 66%

• 1060 lb. capacity • 14,600 cu. in. of storage • Weighs 235 lbs.

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown

• Weighs 105 lbs.

26", 16 DRAWER SAVE ROLLER CABINET $653 ITEM 61609/67831 shown

AUTOMATIC BRAKE

SUPER COUPON

72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET

RAPID PUMP® 4 TON HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

SUPER COUPON

Voted Best Winches

ITEM 61256/61889 60813 shown

Compare

$98.62

only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Compare

B. PANCAKE ITEM 95275 shown 60637/61615

$3999 $5499

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

$28999 $32999 $439

SAVE 59%

YOUR CHOICE

B

SUPER COUPON

JACKS IN AMERICA

Customer Rating

99

$

# 1 SELLING

ITEM 60706/62319 68056 shown

SUPER COUPON

ITEM 69269/97080 shown

A Customer Rating

LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days LIMIT 5 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17. from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SAVE $90

A. HOT DOG

6

SAVE $149

Compare

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE OIL-AIR COMPRESSORS

VALUE

ITEM 69675/69728/63090/63089 CALIFORNIA ONLY

1399 $29.97

only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

4000 PEAK/3200 RUNNING WATTS SAVE 12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH 6.5 HP (212 CC) GAS GENERATOR $463 WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND ITEM 69676/69729/63080/63079 shown

ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

Compare

LIMIT 7 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER QUIET

$999

SUPER COUPON

$ 99

AMERICA'S BEST GENERATOR

ITEM 60363/69730

$4

8

LIMIT 6 - Original coupon from original purchase or

LIMIT 5 - Original coupon from original purchase or

99

$ 99

$

ITEM 69030/69031 shown

Limit 1 - Coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Bauer, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Hercules, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, StormCat, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

1" x 25 FT. TAPE MEASURE

ANY SINGLE ITEM

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

SAVE 66%

WITH ANY PURCHASE

SUPER COUPON

AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER ITEM SAVE 69594/69955 85% 42292 shown

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

• Great outdoor accent lighting • Super bright light

Customer Rating • 1500 lb.

capacity

$

9999

Compare

$149.99 LIMIT 3 - Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/5/17.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare” or “comp at” price means that the same item or a similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare” or “comp at” price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare” or "comp at" should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

19


Today in Mississippi May 2017 Northcentral  

Today in Mississippi May 2017 Northcentral

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you