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News for members of East Mississippi Electric Power Association

JEFF BALDOCK’S

Night Vision page 4

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

6 Road trip to Rodney’s historic church

13 Silver City’s

favorite Yankee

14 Church cookbook

mixes old with new


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March 2017

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Mississippi agriculture benefits all Mississippians ven if you are not involved in farming, it’s likely that you see benefits from Mississippi’s agricultural sector. Agriculture dominates our state’s economy. The estimated value of Mississippi commodities reached $7.6 billion in 2016, an increase of 1.8 percent from the previous year, according to the Mississippi State University Extension Service. Poultry remains the state’s largest agricultural commodity, with an estimated value of $2.9 billion in 2016, an increase of 8 percent since 2015. Rounding out Mississippi’s top five commodities are forestry at $1.41 billion, soybeans at $1.01 billion, cotton at $442 million and corn, $436 million. These figures reflect only the value of the products; agriculture’s total economic impact in the state is far greater. Consider that: • Producers buy seeds, livestock feed, chemicals, equipment, vehicles, machinery, fuel and energy from local businesses and utilities. • Mississippi companies provide agricultural support services such as metal fabrication, building construction, insect control, aerial spraying, processing, grain storage, banking, insurance and accounting. • Agriculture employs Mississippians in all aspects of production and processing. Workers are needed to operate equipment, run cotton gins and mills, cut timber, drive trucks, repair vehicles and machinery, and help bring products to market in other ways. But what happens when farmers are paid less for their commodities than it costs to produce them? What can they do to mitigate the impact of flooding, drought or other weather disasters on their productivity? Farmers who can pare down their expenses are more likely to survive such challenges. As a member of an electric cooperative, you may be surprised to know that you are a beneficiary of farmers’ long-ago efforts to control expenses and boost productivity. Back in the 1930s, Mississippi farmers were sick and tired of breaking their back for meager yields. Advancements in farm productivity were being hampered because farmers had no electricity to power pumps, motors, lights, refrigeration,

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On the cover Singing River Electric member Jeff Baldock, of Hurley, became serious about fine photography when he retired two years ago. One of his goals is to photograph old downtown districts in Mississippi at night. His expanding portfolio includes these images of downtown Wiggins (top photo) and Yazoo City. Learn more about his “Downtown at Night” photo series on page 4.

OFFICERS Tim Smith - President Barry Rowland - First Vice President Randy Smith - Second Vice President Keith Hayward - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 70 No. 3 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 435,649 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

milking machines and other farm equipment and household appliances. Rural Mississippians were still pumping water and milking cows by hand, just as their forefathers had done. Electric service was available then to residents of towns and cities, but not rural America. The existing investor-owned utilities were committed to generating profits for their stockholders, and there was no profit to be made in building lines to electrify rural farms. The outlook for farmers brightened considerably in 1935 when the newly creatMy Opinion ed Rural Electrification Michael Callahan Administration (REA) Executive Vice President/CEO began offering low-cost Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi loans for extending electric service into rural areas. Farmers formed local electric cooperatives, secured loans from REA and then built their own electric utilities, literally from the ground up. These not-for-profit electric cooperatives quickly proved they could deliver a sorely needed service at the lowest rates possible—just as they do today. Most aspects of farming have changed dramatically since the 1930s, but the mission of the local electric cooperative holds to providing affordable, reliable electric service to its members. Today your electric cooperative is part of a statewide network of 26 electric cooperatives serving a total of 1.8 million Mississippians. As the nation observes National Ag Day on March 21, this is an especially good time to express our gratitude to Mississippi’s agricultural community—not only for its contributions to the state’s economy but also for its leadership in laying the foundation for today’s electric cooperatives.

Today in Mississippi

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The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

The Foster-Smith Log Cabin is nearly as old as the state of Mississippi itself. John Foster built the cabin in 1825, about eight years after statehood, in Copiah County. The cabin was moved in 1997 to Brookhaven’s Railroad Park, located downtown on South Whitworth Avenue.

Mississippi is having love and compassion for others. When I was growing up in the 60s, our church was the hub of the community. We had homecoming dinners on the ground under the old oak trees. The preachers were fed at the homes of church members during revivals. Funerals saddened our Leake County community. Food was taken to the homes of the grieving families. My grandma had a small store and she sent hoop cheese, bread, sugar, tea and a can of coffee. Mississippi is the hospitality state, and we grew up knowing that. —Carolyn Robinson, Lawrence Late one afternoon, when the sun is going down, I take a stroll down the street of a quiet Mississippi town. Cats are sleeping, dogs are barking, men are mowing, women walking. A car parked here, a truck parked there, and children playing everywhere. A smell of cooking in the air, and Grandma in her rocking chair. Magnolia trees their blooms displayed, a flower bed along the way. Roses growing on a wall, trees standing straight and tall. The wind blows among the leaves gently swaying in the breeze. On I walk, as the day grows dim; the day is spent, night closing in. There is the church, also the steeple to sound the chimes for all the people. As we walk the street each day, the love of God we must display. Our life a picture book to me; God is alive! He lives in me. —Carrie Powell, Jones County

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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By Debbie Stringer Jeff Baldock’s photographs bring to light something that many never see: the beauty of an old downtown after sunset. Mississippi’s historic main streets take on a different character at night when the streets are empty. In Baldock’s pictures, street lamps emit starbursts of light, old buildings glow with color, and twilight paints the sky. Trees cast moon shadows on pavement still glistening from a late-afternoon rain. “I’ve had so many people tell me they did not realize that their town was that beautiful at night. In fact, I have one picture I took in Pascagoula that looks like a street scene in Paris,” said Baldock, a member of Singing River Electric who lives in Hurley. On location, Baldock uses long exposures and tiny lens apertures to achieve a sharp focus that appears infinite. Back home, he uses photo editing software to merge three different exposures of a subject and create a single image. The technique, known as high dynamic range (HDR) photography, produces pictures filled with light—even though they were made in darkness.

Jeff Baldock’s

Baldock is a relative newcomer to fine photography. He joined the Mississippi Gulf Coast Photography Club and bought his first professional-quality digi-

dent worked for a DuPont company before retiring. “I was stopping in places like Moss Point, taking pictures on the way to

“I’ve had so many people tell me they did not realize that their town was that beautiful at night.” —Jeff Baldock

tal SLR about three years ago. “I was retiring and I wanted something fun to do,” he said. “I didn’t know anything about fancy cameras, and I’m not trained in photography. Everything I know I learned from YouTube videos and talking with my peers.” The long-time Mississippi Coast resi-

work. I always had a camera on my office desk and would shoot after work too. “Once a month I’d drive all the way to Bay St. Louis on the coast and shoot my way back across toward Pascagoula.” One day, he set out for a hunting trip to Winston County. “I took the back

way, up Highway 63, and ended up in Waynesboro. And it was like a light went off. I shot their downtown and thought, this is a really cool thing to do.” Baldock posted those daytime photos on Facebook and the response took him by surprise. “Next thing I knew, I had 200 new Facebook friends.” And some requests to purchase prints. Baldock used Google Earth to find street-level views of more downtowns in the state. “It all had to do with the old buildings. I really wanted to capture the beauty of those,” he said. “My qualification is, if there are more than four or five buildings in a row that are old, I’m going to try to shoot them.” Baldock calls his project “Downtown at Night.” Of the 112 Mississippi downtowns he selected to include, he has photographed 75. Upon arriving in a town on his list, Baldock scouts the downtown area for any historic “jewels.” “There are three things I look for: old movie theaters, barber shops and soda fountains.” If the lights are on inside an old store,


March 2017

he might shoot the interior through the window, holding the camera close to the glass to avoid reflections. Baldock’s project demands plenty of

“There are three things I look for: old movie theaters, barber shops and soda fountains.” —Jeff Baldock

patience, the ability to work through the night at times and even a bit of bravery. “It can get a little hairy at times, if you’re the only person on the street and all the sudden someone comes walking up to you.... Many times people just come up and want to talk, and I’ll share my pictures and show them what I’m doing.” Patrolling police officers are relieved to learn he’s not up to any mischief. One of the advantages of shooting in the dark is the lack of traffic—most of the time. He has found, however, that teens like to cruise around courthouse squares at night, the glare of their headlights reflecting off store windows. “I was having to shoot between cars, and that’s hard to do with a 30-second exposure,” Baldock said. “Another thing I found out not too long ago is you don’t shoot on Wednesday nights. A lot of small churches have moved into some of these buildings in the downtown areas, and they have services on Wednesdays—and so you have a lot of cars.” Last year, Baldock traveled some 19,000 miles for work associated with his photography. He and his wife, Margaret, use their camper as his “base of operations” while he works. Next on this photographer’s to-do list are visits to towns along the Great River Road, from Natchez into the Mississippi Delta, most of which will be new to him. “It’s such an experience to go into a town you’ve never been to before. I passed Laurel how many times and never got off the interstate.” Making the most of his visits, Baldock also photographs courthouses, old

Using a high-quality digital camera and photo-editing software, Jeff Baldock produces images with remarkable sharpness, color and detail. These nighttime street scenes were made in Columbia, far left; Wiggins, right; and Pascagoula, below. The interior photo, above, is Borroum’s Drug Store in Corinth, as seen through the store’s window at night. Vintage soda fountains like Borroum’s are one of Baldock’s favorite subjects.

train depots, trains and anything else that catches his eye while waiting for the sun to go down. Baldock sells framed prints of his work at festivals, in a few galleries and through his Creative Visions Facebook page. This spring, he will exhibit at six festivals in the coast area. He hopes to eventually sell exclusively through major art galleries. An exhibit of Baldock’s Gulf Coast photographs will open March 2 with a reception from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Maritime and Seafood Industry Museum, in Biloxi. The exhibit will hang through May 30. See Jeff Baldock’s work at his Creative Visions Facebook page, JBaldock74. His website is JeffBaldock.ZenFolio.com. For information on the Maritime and Seafood Industry Museum exhibit, call 228-435-6320.

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Rodney church escaped war but not aging ow that spring is almost here it’s time to take some road trips to see the world coming alive again after the harsh winter we had that one weekend back in January. Well, maybe it was cold more than just one weekend, but not much more. I started seeing those early signs of spring that I associate with the first part of March popping out in February while on a road trip to the old Mississippi River Port town of Rodney to get some fresh shots of the Rodney Presbyterian Church. The woods were putting on that slight haze of color as sprouts peeked out through winter limbs. Even azaleas were blooming before Valentine’s Day. My destination, the old church in Rodney, was dedicated in 1832. Back then Rodney had two banks, nearly two dozen stores and about 500 people living there. Although it was a thriving port on the Mississippi River, Rodney stayed relatively unscathed during the Civil War unlike its neighbor, Vicksburg, some 40 or so miles to the north—with at least one notable exception: There is a cannonball lodged in the front wall of the Presbyterian church. The scar shows where the church building took a hit from a Union gunboat as it shelled the town in an attempt to free some of its sailors, who had gone ashore one Sunday morning to worship at the church. They were captured by Confederates who had gotten wind the sailors were there. Although thriving then, the town started dwindling shortly after the war when the river suddenly changed course and kicked west of Rodney about two miles. As the river moved away so did the people, to the extent that the church stopped

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having regular services by 1922. Now, I have been taking pictures of the old Presbyterian Church at Rodney for over 25 years. It was one of my early destinations when I started doing Mississippi my own stories Seen at WLBT. Back by Walt Grayson then the church had just undergone several years of renovation and was to be dedicated the following Sunday. It was pristine. New shutters, interior cleaned and remodeled. But now, for over a quarter century, I’ve watched the building slowly slip back into old age. The new paint weathered. The shutters rotted and fell away. Cracks appeared in the brickwork that had never been noticed before. The doors, once locked and secured, grew so flimsy that they would hardly close, much less lock. Individuals and groups have come along through the years to keep the grass mowed, clean up, replace windowpanes and try to secure the church. But in spite of all the efforts, the inevitable aging of the building has outpaced the energy and especially the funds of the volunteers. Now a dire situation has begun to happen; one of the brick walls is forming a buckle at the bottom. And reinforcing a buckling brick wall is way above the restoration-pay-grade of any of the volunteers who are keeping the building alive right now. Legislation has been introduced for a bond issue that would benefit the Rodney Foundation with enough funds to shore

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up the building and also do some face lifting. Hopefully, other farsighted plans can be made to save the old church. Rodney Presbyterian Church is a great road trip destination right now. And tourism is a vast part of the economics in that part of the state, from Natchez up Highway 61 into the Delta. But nobody is going to be very interested in going to see where something used to be.

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The Rodney Presbyterian Church is one of a small handful of original buildings still standing from the heyday of a Mississippi river port town. Rodney was nearly as important as the better-known towns that flank it, Natchez and Vicksburg. Most of the town has vanished. Attempts are being made to save the church. Photo: Walt Grayson

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March 2017

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Today in Mississippi

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HISTORY

8 I Today in Mississippi I March 2017

A JOURNEY INTO

here is something especially captivating about southwest Mississippi—a peculiar essence, a whisper from the past, the bluffs and hardwoods and stream lowlands and romance. Then there is the Mighty River. It twists and roils and delineates its border path separating states. At times placid; at times angry. But always fascinating. It is a thing of legend, luring anyone who is filled with fantasy and wanderlust to come near, to stand and watch and dream and contemplate. I never see it without considering Mark Twain as a youngster doing likewise from the edges of his small world and questioning where those waters came from and where they are going. A great many true gems make the region their home. There is Natchez, naturally, a destinaby Tony Kinton tion that demands exploration. And there is the landscape, accentuated by those mysterious hills and hollows. There are Indian mounds and historical markers and Grant’s March and the terminus of that ancient route known as the Natchez Trace. All quite marvelous. Go north from Natchez on Highway 61 a little more than half-way to Vicksburg and there is Port Gibson, an absolute must for visitors to the area. And not far northwest of there is Grand Gulf, once a wealthy town that fell on hard times, including storms, a Yellow Fever epidemic, a terrific steamboat explosion and fire, and whims of monstrous currents from the Mississippi River. And then the war. But even today, the area is inviting. This invitation centers particularly on Grand Gulf Military Park. The park is rife with history. Four miles upstream and across the Big River is the spot from which Gen. Grant planned to launch his invasion of

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Outdoors Today

Mississippi. Grand Gulf, though crippled by this time, was strategic. Supplies for Confederate support were transported via the Big Black River, the juncture of that stream and the Mississippi only a short distance up from Grand Gulf. Confederate forces under the command of Gen. Bowen had established strong stations in the bluffs some 800 yards from the mouth of Big Black and 100 feet above the river. These must be taken if Grant were to execute his plan. The heart of Bowen’s efforts is where Grand Gulf Military Park now stands. The centerpiece of this park is the museum, located right at the entrance and also housing the primary office. But there is much more. Buildings of various persuasions are there. The sites of forts Cobun and Wade, the structures no longer standing, are clearly visible, rifle pits and passage ways evident. Emplacements that held field pieces and were constructed by Confederate soldiers are there. Sheds behind the museum contain a vast assortment of period equipment: carriages, wagons, fire-fighting implements, tack, tools. The list is long. Even the original jail from Grand Gulf is there. Perhaps morbid in a sense but truly remarkable in another is the Grand Gulf Cemetery, stationed high atop a ridge toward the back of the park. Mixed with the obvious loss portrayed by such a facility is the artistry of it all. Unlike modern cemeteries, this one speaks of a time long past. This cemetery is a place for study and thought. Quiet and tucked among cedars and oaks, it is a spot for remembering. And not far away from there is an observation tower. Not for the faint of heart, it is built with many decks connected by countless stairs that eventually

reach the top. The view from there, however, can be spectacular. Then there are campgrounds, two Jim Baker prepares for one of the many living history programs scheduled each year at to be specific. Grand Gulf Park. At top, the park’s restored Spanish House was built in the late 1790s. The One is the Grand Gulf Cemetery, center, is a haunting and intriguing spot. Photos: Tony Kinton lower, the other the upper. As the names suggest, there; it is safe to walk there. My one is at the bottom of the bluff near the favorite, bicycling, is the perfect way to park’s entrance, and the other is on the make the half-mile run. But however you bluff above it all. The regular amenities go there, go at sunset. You should be are available for travel trailers, fifth greeted by a haunting and uncommon wheels and motor homes. And a tent portrait painted by nature itself. Those will work as well. sunsets are exquisite. All the locales highlighted to this For more information about Grand point are worthy venues, but should I be Gulf Military Park and its offerings, go forced to choose only one as the brightto www.grandgulfpark.state.ms.us, or call est jewel at Grand Gulf Park, my reflec- 601-473-5911. That call will put you in tive nature points again to the river. touch with a staff member there, and Leave the park gate, cross the main road, each is helpful and knowledgeable. and there you will find a park road that leads directly to that big stream. You can Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors actually stand on the banks of the writer for 30 years. His newest book, Mississippi River, a task not so easily “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is accomplished along most stretches of now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com. Big Muddy. It is permissible to drive


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Today in Mississippi

Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi

Providing an outlet for our future. Some 1.8 million Mississippians depend on member-owned electric cooperatives to help power their pursuit of a better quality of life at home and on the job. By providing reliable, affordable service and fast emergency response, we have become powerful partners for members in business, agriculture, industry, education and healthcare. We work to empower Mississippians the cooperative way.

a quality of life partner www.ecm.com • P.O. Box 3300 Ridgeland, Mississippi 39158 • 601-605-8600

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East Mississippi Electric Power Association Louisville 662.773.5741

Meridian 601.581.8600

Quitman 601.776.6271

DeKalb 601.743.2641

A message from your CEO

Meeting the challenge through the storm The weekend of January 20 and 21 challenged electric cooperatives across Mississippi. East Mississippi Electric Power Association personnel worked

most of both nights restoring power to members throughout our service territory. All through the night, these dedicated employees worked to remove trees from power lines, repair damage and restore power to our members as quickly as possible. As I watched on radar, I realized we already had crews out working on a small outage in what looked to be the path of an approaching storm. I always worry about you, our members, and how you will be impacted by severe weather, but when employees that are my responsibility are in harm’s way, it really ratchets up my anxiety. Luckily the storm went south of their location, and they were able to complete their work and move on to the next outage. Our members near Naval Air Station Meridian were not so lucky. A small tornado touched down and

destroyed several homes. Thankfully, there was no loss of life and the community rushed to the aid of those impacted. While it will take some time, they will be able to put homes and lives back together again with the help of friends, families and community. The news was not as good for our neighbors to the south. Hattiesburg and Petal were hit by a strong tornado that damaged schools, homes and businesses. Sadly, several lost their lives in this storm, and our deepest sympathies go to those families. Even with so much destruction, the good in mankind can be seen in those that responded with aid. During times like these, electric cooperatives help each other. Cooperatives that have no damage mobilize crews and rush to the aid of those that have been impacted.

Prepay now available

CEO Randy Carroll

EMEPA’s new, convenient and budget friendly prepay option lets you pay for electricity before you use it and alerts you when you’re almost out. Call your local office for details or to sign up.

How do I submit a payment for prepay electricity? Members enrolled in prepay have several convenient options for making payments. • Make a secure payment 24/7 from your smartphone with EMEPA’s free mobile app. • Register and make payments 24/7 online at EMEPA.com. • Use the convenient 24/7 payment kiosks located at each of EMEPA’s four offices. • Make payments during business hours in person or by phone at your local EMEPA office.

Repairing downed power lines is a challenging and dangerous task in the daylight but that degree of difficulty and risk increases exponentially in the rain and darkness with additional storms approaching. It takes exceptional people to leave their families during stormy weather, go out into the storm, endure the rain running down their collars and bring light back to a darkened community. But they do it because of their dedication and commitment to serve our members. As we move into warmer weather, I encourage you to take the time to plan for severe weather. Put together some supplies and know where your flashlights are stored. Know where your safe place is should severe weather approach. And when the storms come, you can count on the employees of EMEPA to respond.


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EMEPA provides meals across east Mississippi Left: Matt Sampley and Jamie Sistrunk help unload donated food items at the Lauderdale County Baptist Association. Below: Krystal Reynolds, Jackie McClendon and Barry Vowell deliver canned goods to the Winston County Baptist Association.

East Mississippi Electric Power Association employees recently donated enough canned goods and nonperishable food items to provide 288 meals to those in need across our service area. The items were collected throughout the month of January and recently delivered to Lauderdale, Clarke, Kemper and Winston counties’ Baptist Associations for distribution. Concern for community is a key principle by which EMEPA operates. For us, that means more than providing safe, reliable electricity; that means doing our part to provide care and support for the communities where we live, work and play. EMEPA’s new “We Care Commitment” employee initiative is one way we are working to fulfill that promise.

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Don Moore and Kevin McCarra deliver canned goods to the Clarke County Baptist Association.

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March 2017

Easy steps to greater efficiency Do you want to save money and electricity but have limited time, money and patience? According to the Department of Energy, a “typical American family” spends nearly $2,000 per year on their home energy bills. Much of that money, however, is wasted through leaky windows or ducts, old appliances or inefficient heating and cooling systems. Luckily, there are several relatively easy ways to save energy without a substantial commitment of time and money. These efforts will help you save whether you own or rent an older or newly constructed home. And, you won’t have to hire a specialist or call in a favor from someone who is handy with tools to help you. Where to start According to Money Magazine, “improving the envelope” of your home is a good place to start. Sunlight, seasonal temperature changes and wind vibrations can loosen up even a tight home, increasing air leakage. Doors and windows may not close tightly, and duct work can spring leaks, wasting cooled and heated air. By placing weather stripping and caulk around windows and doors, you can keep cool air inside during warm months and prevent chilly air from penetrating the indoors during colder months. Sealing gaps around piping, dryer vents, fans and outlets also helps to seal the envelope and creates greater efficiency. Apply weather stripping around overlooked spaces like your attic hatch or pull-down stairs. Replacing incandescent bulbs with LED bulbs can make a big difference in home efficiency and is one of the fastest ways to cut your energy bill. Known for their longevity and efficiency, LED bulbs have an estimated operational life span of typically 10,000 to 20,000 hours compared to 1,000 hours of a typical incandescent. According to the Dept. of Energy, by replacing your home's five most frequently used light fixtures or bulbs with models that have earned the ENERGY STAR rating, you can save $75 each year. Wrapping up savings Installing a blanket around your water heater could reduce standby heat losses by 25 to 45 percent and save you about 7 to 16 percent in water heating costs, according to the Dept. of Energy. For a small investment of about $30, you can

purchase pre-cut jackets or blankets and install them in about one hour. On a safety note, the Dept. of Energy recommends that you not set the thermostat above 130 degrees Fahrenheit on an electric water heater with an insulating jacket or blanket; the higher temperature setting could cause the wiring to overheat. Given that a large portion of your monthly energy bill goes toward heating and cooling your home, it makes sense to ensure your home’s heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system is performing at an optimal level. Checking, changing or cleaning your filter extends the life of your HVAC system and saves you money. Air filters prevent dust and allergens from clogging your HVAC system. Otherwise, dust and dirt trapped in a system’s air filter leads to several problems, including: reduced air flow in the home and up to 15 percent higher operating costs; lowered system efficiency; and costly duct cleaning or replacement. Many HVAC professionals recommend cleaning the system filters monthly. A simple task like changing the filters on your HVAC system makes your unit run more efficiently, keeping your house cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter. Take control of your energy savings Take a look at your programmable

thermostat. When was the last time you ly. Most models come with an override checked to make sure it was programmed option so you can make manual adjustfor the current season and family schedments without losing overall programing. ule? This is one of the best energy-saving You can only achieve these efficiencies tools at your fingertips. It enables you to and savings if it is programmed properly fine tune the temperature during particu- and adjusted periodically to keep pace lar hours of the day. Many models allow with changes in household routines. you to differentiate between weekday Remember, there are easy steps you and weekend can take now to improve the energy efficiency schedules, and internet-connected of your home. To learn about additional thermostats can ways to save, contact East Mississippi learn your schedule Electric Power Association at 601-581-8600 and make adjustor visit emepa.com. ments automatical-

Tip of the Month

Warmer weather is on the way! Use energy efficient window treatments or coverings, like blinds, shades and films, to reduce heat gain in your home. These devices not only improve the look of your home but also reduce energy costs.

DAYLIGHT SAVING TIME Don’t forget to spring forward on March 12! Source: U.S. Department of Energy

Set your clocks ahead by one hour.


An electrifying story

March 2017 I Today in Mississippi

New novel tells an exciting version of how we came to receive electricity in our homes. By Paul Wesslund What if Thomas Edison was a bad guy? An evil genius? A man so desperate to protect his inventions that he would bribe the police and even electrocute dogs to show his electric systems were better than his competitors? You’d have what writers like me have always been searching for—a dramatic, can’t-put-it-down story about electricity. Graham Moore’s new novel “The Last Days of Night” tells the based-on-fact story of the ultra-high stakes battle between Edison and George Westinghouse over nothing less than what kind of electricity would power the U.S. As with any good novel, it’s also about more than just the basic plot—it’s about invention and the creative process. It’s about the business, scheming, teamwork and luck that can make the difference between a genius who lives his life undiscovered and unknown, and one who enjoys wealth and fame.

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Oscar-winning author The storytelling moves briskly through courtroom drama, corporate intrigue, romance, greed and political corruption. It’s a history lesson, with a cast of famous characters, including the Wall Street baron J.P. Morgan, Alexander Graham Bell and eccentric inventor Nikola Tesla. The book includes an author’s note at the end to help separate fact from fiction. If it was a movie (and a movie is in the planning stages) it would be rated PG—a graphic description of the use of the electric chair plays a role, though the account was taken from actual newspaper reports of the day. Moore is most popularly known as the Oscar-winning screenwriter for the 2014 movie “The Imitation Game” about WWII codebreakers. “The Last Days of Night” tells its story through the character of Paul Cravath, the smart but inexperienced attorney Westinghouse hired to fight the scores of lawsuits Edison had filed against him. In the late 1800s, Edison was turning his invention of the light bulb into a network for electrifying the country, starting in New York City. The Westinghouse company had invented what it felt was a better light bulb, but the lawsuits claimed it was just a copy of Edison’s. The much bigger issue came with how the electricity would be delivered to those light bulbs. Edison’s system used direct current (DC), which is what comes out of any battery you have in your home. Westinghouse and Nikola Tesla had developed alternating current (AC), so named because it actually changes direction about 60 times a second, as a more efficient way to deliver electricity over long distances. Alternating current won—AC is the kind of electricity found in your home today.

Fear of electricity A feature of the fight was a media relations war over whether AC or DC was more dangerous. In those early days of electricity, it created both fear and amazement since few people understood the phenomenon. In the 1930s, 40 years after the events in this book, electricity started coming to rural parts of our country. And some of those same fears came with it. One story told of a man who wanted to make sure a bulb stayed screwed into the overhead socket so the electricity wouldn’t flow out and electrocute everyone in the room. In the book, Moore covers the complexities of generating and delivering electricity—but he does so with a sense of excitement. The great gift to Moore was that his unlikely and compelling character, attorney Paul Cravath, was a real person. And he had a real romance with a real celebrity, who happened to have her own creative genius, backed by a cleverness for selfpromotion and a willingness to cut ethical corners. The story ends on an intelligently positive note, making the point that invention and creation require a cast of talents. The book concludes with a tribute to all of the characters: “Only together could they have birthed the system that was now the bone and sinew of these United States. No one man could have done it. In order to produce such a wonder … the world required … Visionaries like Tesla. Craftsmen like Westinghouse. Salesmen like Edison.” Paul Wesslund writes on cooperative issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the Arlington, Va.-based service arm of the nation’s 900-plus consumer-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives.

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The Value of Membership Our mission. Electric co-ops were established to provide at-cost electric service. Providing safe, reliable and affordable power has remained our mission since day one. You are a member, not a customer. Cooperatives are unique businesses because they are owned by you, the member. This means you have a voice in the way we run the co-op. Members elect the co-op’s board of directors and have the ability to run for a seat on the board if they wish to do so. Your vote and participation help shape the direction of the cooperative. We are not-for-profit. Unlike investor-owned utilities, which are operated to make the most profits for stakeholders, electric co-ops do not earn profits. Instead, any mar-

gins or revenue remaining (after all expenses have been paid) are returned to members in the form of capital credits. Capital credit returns are based on each member’s years of participation in the co-op. We are local, communityfocused businesses. Because we are owned by the members we serve, electric cooperatives have a strong commitment to our local communities. In addition to providing safe, reliable and affordable power, electric co-ops are involved in local community development programs and projects, such as Relay for Life, Youth Tour, Volunteer Fire Departments and other community projects and services. We are guided by a set of principles. All co-ops operate according to

the same set of Seven Cooperative Principles: voluntary and open membership; democratic member control; members’ economic participation; autonomy and independence; education, training and information; cooperation among cooperatives; and concern for community. These principles guide every decision made by the co-op. We are committed to innovation. Because we answer to local members rather than far-away shareholders, electric cooperatives are more nimble and able to respond quickly to changing member needs. We are committed to experimenting and innovating in ways that benefit the local communities and members we serve.

A solid investment in your electric co-op As a member of East Mississippi Electric Power Association, you make an investment in the co-op every time you pay your bill. This collective investment in the co-op benefits you and the community immediately and over time. So what exactly is this monthly investment, and how do you benefit from it? The customer charge is a monthly investment that helps your co-op cover the expenses of maintaining the overall electric system. Combatting cyber security threats and maintaining poles, wires, substations and co-op equipment takes

strategic planning and significant resources. The customer charge essentially ensures that all equipment operates properly and staff is trained and ready so the lights turn on when you need them. Regardless of how much electricity a particular family uses, the cost of delivering power to that house is the same. As a not-for-profit electric cooperative, we believe the operational costs should be spread fairly and equitably across all of our members, regardless of the level of electricity use. That is why every member pays the customer charge each

month to cover basic operational costs. All members are charged the same amount for the cost of operation since all members benefit from the same service. In essence, this gives each co-op member an equal share in EMEPA’s operation. Your monthly investment ensures you have access to safe, reliable and affordable power when you need it. We appreciate and value the investment that you make in the co-op each month, and we strive to use that investment wisely for the benefit of all members of our community.

EAST MISSISSIPPI ELECTRIC POWER ASSOCIATION MERIDIAN, MS

EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY POLICY STATEMENT This policy is in conformance with the requirement of Presidential Executive Order 11246, the Age Discrimination Employment Act, the Vietnam Era Veterans Readjustment Act, the Rehabilitation Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, Equal Pay Act, Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and all other civil rights related to laws and regulations that have or may be enacted, as amended. It is the policy of East MS EPA not to discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, marital status, genetic information, disability or because he or she is a protected veteran. It is also the policy of East MS EPA to take affirmative action to employ and to advance in employment, all persons regardless of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, marital status, genetic information, pay secrecy, disability or protected veteran status, and to base all employment decisions only on valid job requirements. This policy shall apply to all employment actions, including but not limited to recruitment, hiring, upgrading, promotion, transfer, demotion, layoff, recall, termination, rates of pay or other forms of compensation and selection for training, including apprenticeship, at all levels of employment. Employees and applicants of East MS EPA will not be subject to harassment on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, age, marital status, genetic information, disability or because he or she is a protected veteran. Additionally, retaliation, including intimidation, threats, or coercion, because an employee or applicant has objected to discrimination, engaged or may engage in filing a complaint, assisted in a review, investigation, or hearing or have otherwise sought to obtain their legal rights under any Federal, State, or local EEO law is prohibited. As Chief Executive Officer of East MS EPA, I am committed to the principles of Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity. In order to ensure dissemination and implementation of Equal Employment Opportunity and affirmative action throughout all levels of the company, I have selected Sherry Wallace, Director of Human Resources, as the Equal Employment Opportunity (EEO) Manager for East MS EPA. One of the EEO Manager’s duties will be to establish and maintain internal audit and reporting systems to allow for effective measurement of East MS EPA’s programs. In furtherance of East MS EPA’s policy regarding Affirmative Action and Equal Employment Opportunity, East MS EPA has developed a written Affirmative Action Program which sets forth the policies, practices and procedures that East MS EPA is committed to in order to ensure that its policy of nondiscrimination and affirmative action is accomplished. This Affirmative Action Program is available in the Human Resources office for inspection by any employee or applicant for employment upon request, during normal business hours. Interested persons should contact Sherry Wallace for assistance. We request the support of all employees in accomplishing Equal Employment Opportunity. Dated: 02.11.2017


March 2017

Co-op Connections Business Spotlight

EMEPA has been delivering value to our communities for more than 78 years and now we are proud to offer another member benefit – the Co-op Connections Card. Through this free program, you will receive discounts on products and services from participating local and national businesses. The card is a simple membership card that in identifying you as a member, also qualifies you for special discounts and offers at local participating businesses. There are no sign-up or participation fees and we do not track your participation or purchases. There is no charge to you for this program. This is just one more way you benefit from being a cooperative member. To receive discounts, simply show your Co-op Connections card to any participating business. Each month, EMEPA spotlights local businesses that participate in the Co-op Connections Program. This month’s featured businesses are:

D&H Construction & Cabinetry, Inc. 8589 A.C. Brown Road, Meridian, MS 39305 601-737-8543 5% Off • dandhconstructionms.com

Today in Mississippi

EMEPA.COM TOUCHSTONEENERGY.COM

ALL OF OUR LINES ARE MEMBER SERVICE LINES. Some deliver electricity. Others deliver information. All must deliver on the Touchstone Energy Cooperatives mission: to provide you with service that’s just as dependable as the energy you count on us for every day. Learn more about your locally owned and operated Touchstone Energy cooperative at EMEPA.com or TouchstoneEnergy.com.

YOUR SOURCE OF POWER. AND INFORMATION.

Déjà vu 4919 Poplar Springs Dr. Meridian, MS 39302 • 601-693-0609 15% off total purchase - not valid with any other discounts or offers https://www.facebook.com/DejavuMeridian/

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“My friends all hate their cell phones… I love mine!” Here’s why.

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IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION: Jitterbug is owned by GreatCall, Inc. Your invoices will come from GreatCall. Plans and Services require purchase of a Jitterbug phone and a one-time setup fee of $35. *Monthly fees do not include government taxes or assessment surcharges and are subject to change. Coverage is not available everywhere. 5Star or 9-1-1 calls can only be made when cellular service is available. 5Star Service will be able to track an approximate location when your device is turned on, but we cannot guarantee an exact location. 1We will refund the full price of the Jitterbug phone and the activation fee (or setup fee) if it is returned within 30 days of purchase in like-new condition. We will also refund your first monthly service charge if you have less than 30 minutes of usage. If you have more than 30 minutes of usage, a per minute charge of 35 cents will be deducted from your refund for each minute over 30 minutes. You will be charged a $10 restocking fee. The shipping charges are not refundable. There are no additional fees to call GreatCall’s U.S.-based customer service. However, for calls to a GreatCall Operator in which a service is completed, you will be charged 99 cents per call, and minutes will be deducted from your monthly rate plan balance equal to the length of the call and any call connected by the Operator. Jitterbug, GreatCall, and 5Star are registered trademarks of GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 GreatCall, Inc. ©2017 firstSTREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc.


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Jack Reed lived his dream few mornings ago when Mr. Roy brought me my morning coffee, he had that special sparkle in his eyes. Before I could speak, he said, “Well, it’s about time for baseball spring training camps to crank up. As a teenager I’d already have my glove dusted off. I’m sure our old friend Jack Reed feels the excitement too.” Roy is always excited about something, even if it’s work around the house. “I have never been interested in baseball unless MSU has a good team,” I said and rubbed my eyes. “I don’t see you watching a major league game anymore, even the World Series.” “You’re right,” he said, “but when I was a teenager in the 50s and later as a young adult in the late 50s and early 60s, baseball was truly America’s favorite sport. Most people picked a team and pulled for them, even though they didn’t get to see them play in person. “Both my parents liked baseball, so every other Sunday afternoon during the summer we drove to Mobile and watched the Mobile Bears play. They were a Brooklyn Dodgers farm club, so I

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liked the Dodgers. We all liked the Chicago Cubs because our own Claude Passeau was their star pitcher. “Most of us boys followed our favorite team daily and we could tell you a player’s batting average or pitcher’s record. But whether you liked baseball or not, the one team that everyone knew something about was the New York Yankees. They had a lineup of players that was awesome. I can still remember Mickey Mantle, Yogi Berra, Clete Boyer, Whitey Ford, Roger Maris, Grin ‘n’ Elston Howard Bare It and so many by Kay Grafe more. And their star of stars was Mickey Mantle. Remember the summer of 1962? I had to go to New York City on business, and that weekend I went to Yankee Stadium to watch a game. What a thrill.” “Our friend Jack Reed played for the Yankees, didn’t he?” I asked.

“He sure did, and with that same group of great players I just mentioned. Jack truly appreciated that experience; he told me that he had been blessed to live his dream. When he was a young boy growing up in rural Mississippi he said the St. Louis Cardinals were his favorite team, and he would dream for hours about one day playing major league baseball.” Mr. Roy explained that Jack grew up in Silver City, Miss., and still lives there. For his high school education his parents sent him to Gulf Coast Military School in Gulfport. There he starred in football, baseball and track. He had always planned to go to college at Mississippi State. After graduation State offered him a baseball scholarship, but coach Swayze told him he could play baseball and football at Ole Miss, so he became a Rebel and played both sports. In fact, Jack is only one of four people ever to play in a major college football bowl game (the 1953 Sugar Bowl) and a World Series contest (in 1961). In 1953 at the end of his junior year, he signed a contract with the New York Yankees and played for six different

Yankee minor league clubs before being called up to the major league in 1961. During his three-year major league career, he was used by the Yankees primarily as a backup and relief player for Mickey Mantle. Mantle’s legs began giving him trouble, so he would normally be pulled out of a game in the seventh or eigth inning. Jack played in 222 games during the seasons of 1961-1963, and earned two World Series rings. “He only hit one home run during his major league career, but it was a memorable one,” Mr. Roy said. “In the longest game the Yankees had ever played, in the 22nd inning Jack hit a two-run home run that won the game. The game played against the Detroit Tigers lasted seven hours.” I held out my cup to Mr. Roy. He took it and said, “Be right back.” Roy began talking again coming up the stairs. “I enjoy discussing baseball with Jack and he always has a story to tell me. After a meeting in Hattiesburg last year he told me about a series in Chicago. The day they were flying back to New York on a charter flight the team had the morning off before a 3:30 flight. Mickey Mantle and Whitey Ford asked Jack to go with them to a local country club to play a round of golf. They borrowed clubs and started playing. “He said at 3:00 they were still on the course, and Jack started worrying about the plane leaving without him. Then Jack said it dawned on him they might leave him but they won’t leave Mantle. And sure enough, when they got to the airport the plane was waiting on the runway.” “Some people are privileged to live their dreams; Jack Reed was one of them,” I said. “Jack and his wife, Lou, returned home after baseball.” You will know when you get there because the welcome sign says, “Silver City, Miss.—Birthplace and Home of Jack Reed, New York Yankees 19611963.” You won’t miss the sign, but the town’s so small you may miss it! Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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MISSISSIPPI

Cooks RECIPES FROM:

‘One Hundred Years of Good Cooking’ A small group of worshippers organized Unity Baptist Church in 1913. Throughout the church’s 103-year history, countless home-cooked dishes have been served under its roof, and recipes shared. In observance of its 100th anniversary, Unity Baptist Church published a cookbook, “One Hundred Years of Good Cooking.” Many of the recipes have been passed from one generation to the next and now adapted to modern cooking techniques and tastes. Recipes from some of the original church families include Fried Field Corn, Sesame Shrimp Salad, Cracklin Corn Bread, Apple Pound Cake and Lemon Ice Box Pie. In the spirit of St. Patrick’s Day, we share a few recipes here that call for green ingredients (and that sound delicious). The church uses proceeds from cookbook sales to purchase equipment for its playground and kitchen. The spiral-bound softcover cookbook includes 208 pages of recipes, photographs and church history. Price is $15. To order, send check to Susan Turner, 1566 Bradley Road, Leakesville, MS 39451.

Arroz Con Pollo (Rice with Chicken) 3 ½-lb. chicken, cut into pieces ½ cup vegetable oil 1 large onion, chopped 1 green bell pepper, chopped 1 clove garlic, crushed 2 cups canned tomatoes ½ cup tomato paste ½ cup water ½ tsp. salt

2 bay leaves 1 cup long-grain rice ½ Tbsp. vinegar ½ lb. fresh mushrooms, sautéed in 2 Tbsp. oil* 1 can canned peas, drained, liquid reserved 1 dozen small stuffed olives Parsley for garnish

In a large skillet, brown chicken pieces in hot oil for about 15 minutes; add onion, bell pepper and garlic during the last 5 minutes. Add tomatoes, tomato paste, water, salt and bay leaves. Cover and cook slowly for 1 hour. Add rice to chicken mixture. Cover and cook 20 minutes, stirring once. Add vinegar, mushrooms, olives, peas and reserved pea liquid. Cover and cook 10 minutes. Discard bay leaves. To serve, on a large platter arrange chicken pieces in the center. Make a border with the rice mixture. Garnish with bits of parsley. * May substitute 1 small can mushrooms, well drained and sautéed a few minutes in 2 tablespoons butter or margarine.

Amish Broccoli Bake 1 (10 ¾-oz.) can cream of mushroom soup 1 cup mayonnaise ½ cup chopped onion ½ tsp. salt ¼ tsp. black pepper

2 (10-oz.) pkgs. frozen chopped broccoli, thawed 1 cup shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 1 (6-oz.) box herb stuffing mix ¼ cup (½ stick) butter, melted, divided

Preheat oven to 350 F. Coat a 3-quart casserole dish with cooking spray. In a medium bowl, combine soup, mayonnaise, onion, salt and pepper; mix well. Place half the broccoli into the casserole dish. Sprinkle with half the cheese and half the stuffing mix. Pour half the butter and half the soup mixture over stuffing. Repeat layers once. Bake 35 to 40 minutes, or until hot in center.

Fried Green Tomatoes or Squash 3 cups self-rising flour 2 Tbsp. Creole seasoning 1 cup buttermilk ½ cup milk

1 Tbsp. Worcestershire sauce Vegetable oil 5 large green tomatoes or squash, sliced ½ inch thick

Combine flour and Creole seasoning in a bowl. In another bowl, combine buttermilk, milk and Worcestershire sauce. Pour oil 1 inch deep in skillet over mediumhigh heat. Dredge sliced tomatoes or squash in flour mixture, dip in milk, then dredge in flour again. Fry slices until golden brown. Drain on paper towels.

Key Lime Cupcakes 1 box Betty Crocker Super Moist lemon cake mix 1 (4-serving size) box lime-flavored gelatin ¾ cup water 1⁄3 cup Key lime juice, fresh or bottled 1⁄3 cup vegetable oil 3 eggs 2 to 3 drops green food coloring, optional

Glaze: 1 cup powdered sugar 2 to 2 ½ Tbsp. Key lime juice Frosting: 1 (8-oz.) pkg. cream cheese, softened ¼ cup butter or margarine, softened 1 tsp. vanilla extract 3 ½ cups powdered sugar Grated lime peel, optional

Preheat oven to 350 F (325 F for dark or nonstick pan). Place a paper baking cup in each of 24 regular-size muffin cups. In a large bowl, beat cupcake ingredients with electric mixer on low speed 30 seconds, then on medium speed 2 minutes, scraping bowl occasionally. Divide batter evenly among muffin cups, filling each about ⅔ full. Bake 19 to 24 minutes, or until toothpick inserted in center comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes. Remove from pan to cooling rack. With toothpick or wooden skewer, pierce tops of cupcakes in several places. Glaze: In a small bowl, mix 1 cup powdered sugar and enough of the lime juice to make a smooth glaze thin enough to drizzle. Drizzle and spread glaze over cupcakes. Cool completely, about 30 minutes. Frosting: In a large bowl, beat cream cheese and butter on medium speed until light and fluffy. On low speed, beat in vanilla and powdered sugar; beat on medium speed until fluffy. Frost cupcakes, mounding and swirling frosting in center. Garnish with lime peel. Store covered in refrigerator.

Egg Salad Wraps 4 hard-boiled eggs, chopped 2 Tbsp. chopped pickles (dill, sweet or bread-and-butter) 1 Tbsp. chopped fresh dill weed 2 Tbsp. finely chopped red onion 3 Tbsp. light mayonnaise

¼ tsp. salt 4 (8-inch) flour tortillas 2 cups shredded lettuce 1 tomato, finely chopped Alfalfa sprouts, optional

In a large bowl, combine eggs, pickles, dill weed, onion, mayonnaise and salt. Spread mixture evenly on each tortilla. Top with lettuce, tomato and sprouts. Fold in sides of each wrap and roll up from one end. Cut each wrap in half crosswise. Serve immediately. Makes 4 servings.


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Choices abound in roses for the home garden had an opportunity to attend the Gulf District American Rose Society MidWinter Workshop in Gonzales, La., in early February. It was a fantastic event that allowed me to meet lots of new people and catch up with a few old garden friends. I also learned that I have had the same experiences and developed the same misperceptions that many home gardeners have with garden roses. As young homeowners—just for perspective, this story occurred 40 years ago—my wife and I started growing hybrid tea roses in South Carolina. We loved having the fresh-cut stems, but we did not love the maintenance and pest management. So, we stopped growing garden roses. This attitude persisted even after I became the Southern Gardener. But then Knockout roses came along, and I started to come back around. After spending a couple of days with genuine rose enthusiasts, I’m thinking about adding a few roses to my Ocean Springs landscape. Just choosing the selections to add to my landscape will be a daunting task, as the number of selections on the market is quite broad. I’m not going to make specific rec-

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Roses are a beautiful addition to home landscapes, and certain modern varieties offer reliable performance without requiring expert care. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

ommendations today, but I do want to give you some information about groups of roses for the home gardener to consider. One group the rosarians were raving about is the David Austin English rose. I

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ing and a wider range of colors more commonly found in modern roses. I will have at least one David Austin rose in my landscape this year. I also learned at the workshop that efforts to breed disease resistance into beautiful garden roses come with a tradeoff. This breeding often causes the rose to lose its fragrance. At Kordes Roses, the breeders’ top priorities are disease resistance and fragrance. I was fascinated seeing all the complex flower styles and gorgeous colors they offer. I will have at least one Kordes rose in my landscape this year. If you are a gardening novice unsure about planting garden roses, the easiest way to enjoy Southern them is to plant Gardening Knockout roses. by Dr. Gary Bachman Knockouts are shrub-type roses that are highly disease resistant. They produce flower clusters nonstop in huge numbers. Flower colors range from red to pink and yellow, but I like the red best. This plant has multiseason interest. Its foliage in the spring and summer is a dark, glossy green, and fall brings on a deep, maroon-purple show. Always plant in a location that receives at least five hours of full sun a day, with morning sun being the most beneficial. Once you have a little success growing Knockouts, I’m sure you’ll have garden roses in your landscape next year. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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March 2017

Mississippi

FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS

SAWMILL EXCHANGE: North America’s largest source of used portable sawmills and commercial sawmill equipment for woodlot and sawmill operations. Over 800 listings. Call for a free list or to sell your equipment, 800-459-2148; www.sawmillexchange.com.

PLAY GOSPEL SONGS by Ear! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95. Both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, Kansas 66204. 913-262-4982.

VACATION RENTALS

FREE BOOKS/DVDS. Soon Church and Government uniting, will supress “Religious Liberty” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark of the Beast.” Be informed/Be forewarned! Need mailing address: TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771 the biblesaystruth@yahoo.com, 1-888-211-1715.

PIGEON FORGE, TN Cabins, peaceful, convenient location, owner rates, 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049; www.hideawayprop.com. SMOKIES. TOWNSEND, TN 2 BR, 2 BATH Log Home, Jacuzzi, Fireplace, wrap-around porch, charcoal grill. 865-320-4216; For rental details and pictures E-mail: tncabin.lonnie@yahoo.com.

KILL LAKE WEEDS

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KillLakeWeeds.com Order online today, or request free information.

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Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

FARM BARNS

Hattiesburg, MS • 1-601-296-0550 Our Prices Include Labor & Metal Sides Also Available in Wood Sides

Garage with hardy siding and concrete slab, any size.

www.farmbarnsinc.com

We will build any size barn.


March 2017

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Today in Mississippi

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17

A free, interactive legislative app for Mississippi. Our easy-to-use mobile app provides information on Mississippi’s state and federal elected officials. Look for “Mississippi 2017 Legislative Roster� in the Apple AppStore. An Android version is also available through Google Play.

‘Picture This’ explores country roads Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

Country roads take us home in our next “Picture This� reader photo feature. Send us your photos of scenic rural roadways (paved or not) anywhere in Mississippi. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. Hurry! Deadline for submissions is March 17.

Submission guidelines Mobile Home Super Insulated Roof Over Systems. 40 Year Warranty. Factory Direct from

ROOF KING 1-800-276-0176 www.roofking.net

SINCE 1982

• Submit as many photos as you like, but select only photos in super-sharp focus. • Photos must relate to the given theme. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos eligible for publication may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Please do not send a photo with the

FFiin nanc

18-35 HP

0% iin ng Ava ailla able le* *WAC

JOYSTICK OR TWINSTICK STEERING 42� - 72� Cutting Width

FROM THIS TO this

In 60 S Seconds d       L      E          

1-8 800-627-727 76 www.marrbros.com marrbro ros.co om

date appearing on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by identifying information: photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. • Be sure to include the name of the town or county where your country road is located. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

How to submit photos Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Or, mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or email news@ecm.coop. Photographers whose photos are selected for publication are eligible for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in a random drawing in December.


18

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Today in Mississippi

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March 2017

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 450,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or send to news@ecm.coop. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Kids Market Consignment Sale, March 24, Hattiesburg. Used and new items for children. Cloverleaf Mall. Details: 601-467-5429; KidsMarketMS.com. Watoto Children’s Choir “Signs & Wonders” Concert, March 4, Jackson. Worship songs sharing stories of the children; 6 p.m. Free admission. Wells United Methodist Church. Also performing elsewhere in the state. Details: Watoto.com/choir. Gospel Bluegrass Concert, March 4, Fulton. Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver, Rhonda Vincent, Dailey & Vincent; 4 p.m. Admission. Itawamba Community College. Details: 662862-8039; iccms.edu. B&S Consignment, March 7-9, Brookhaven. Infant–adult clothing, shoes, toys, home decor, furniture. Free admission. Lincoln Civic Center. Details: BnSConsignment.com. Gulf Coast Messiah Chorus Spring Performances, March 9, Gulfport and April 8, Pascagoula. Greater Mt. Olive Baptist Church, Gulfport; 3 p.m. First United Methodist Church, Pascagoula; 7 p.m. Free admission. Details: 228-324-9292; ed.cake@yahoo.com. Audubon Naturalist Program, March 10 May 19, Holly Springs. Each Friday for 10 weeks; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Admission. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-2521155; strawberryplains.audubon.org. 44th Annual Gospel Singing Jubilee, March 11, Magee. Featuring Singing Echoes, Terry Joe Terrell, Tim Frith and Gospel Echoes, and others; 6:30 p.m. Admission. South Shady Grove Church of God. Details: 601-906-0677, 601-720-8870. Possum Town Quilt Guild Meeting, March 11, Columbus. Anyone interested in quilt making or quilts welcomed. Meets second Saturday monthly. Rosenweig Art Center. Details: 662-251-4263; PossumTownQuilters.blogspot.com. Grillin’ on the Green, March 11, Biloxi. Biloxi Town Green. BBQ cook-off, children’s play area, arts/crafts, entertainment; 10 a.m.5 p.m. Parade 2 p.m. Details: 228-435-6339; MainStreetBiloxi.com. Sheep to Shawl Fiber Arts Demos, March

18, Ridgeland. Live sheep shearing, handspinning, hands-on loom weaving, vendors, more; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Mississippi Craft Center. Details: 601-373-2495; cvillewsg.com. Hal’s St. Paddy’s Parade & Festival: “Happy St. Perennial @ Our Bicentennial,” March 18, Jackson. Grand marshals: Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. Downtown. Details: HalsStPaddysParade.com. Big Pop Gun Show, March 18-19, Laurel. Fairgrounds. Details: 601-498-4235; BigPopGunShows.com. Family Camp Out, March 18-19, Pascagoula. Tent set-up begins at noon; dinner, breakfast, campfire, storytelling, outdoor movie, beach activities, more. Rainout date March 25-26. Admission. Beach Park. Details: 228-938-2356. Twice As Nice Childrens Consignment Sale, March 22-25, D’Iberville. Children, infants and maternity. Civic Center. Details: 850-341-1676; 2AsNiceKidsResale.com. Schooling Horse Show, March 25, Gulfport. English, Wester, Dressage. Bienvenue Acres. Details: 228-357-0431; bienvenueacres.com. Sixth Annual Viking Half Marathon and 5K, March 25, Greenwood. Half marathon begins 8 a.m., 5K at 8:30 a.m. in historic Cotton Row District. Details: 662-453-4152; VikingHalfMarathon.racesonline.com. 11th Annual Charles Templeton Ragtime and Jazz Music Festival, March 30- April 1, Starkville. Performances by Jeff Barnhart, Brian

SOUTHEASTERN RED DEER FARMS

If you like deer hunting & the outdoors, then you will love raising Red Deer!

Holland, Dan Levinson’s Roof Garden Jass Band. Admission. Mitchell Memorial Library, MSU McComas Hall Auditorium. Details: 662325-6634; library.msstate.edu/templeton/festival. Arthur Miller’s “The Crucible,” March 3031, April 1-2, Laurel. Drama about 1690s Salem witch trials. Admission. Laurel Little Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140; LaurelLittleTheatre.com. The Collingsworth Family in Concert, March 31, Yazoo City. Admission; 7 p.m. Parkview Church of God. Details: 662-7464298; ParkviewChurchYC.com. “Whispers in the Cedars” Cemetery Tour, March 31- April 1, Port Gibson. Details: 601437-5103; EmmaCrisler@bellsouth.net. Hill Fire’s “Of Life and Lemons,” March 31 April 2, Winona. Montgomery County Arts Council production of an original folklife play. Comedy, drama, music. Admission. Performing Arts Center. Details: 662-3100199; HillFire.org. Picking 35 Through the Heart of Mississippi, April 1, Attala/Leake counties. Yard sales for 50 miles along Miss. 35, from Carmack to Walnut Grove; 7 a.m.- 7 p.m. Details: 601-267-9231. Shiloh Arts and Crafts Show, April 1, Pelahatchie. Featuring select Miss. craftsmen; Shiloh Museum; 9 a.m.- 3 p.m. Free admission. Shiloh United Methodist Church. Details: 601-213-7528. Art in the Pass, April 1-2, Pass Christian. Juried arts/crafts show, seafood cooking demos, food, marine festival, hands-on activities, more. War Memorial Park. Free admission. Details: 228-452-3315; ArtInThePass.com. Two Rivers Bluegrass Festival, Heritage & Forestry Expo, April 1-8, Leakesville. Live

music, RV hook-ups, special events, vendors. Admission. Greene County Rural Events Center. Details: 601-758-4976, 601-408-5965. Sacred Harp Singing, April 2, Bruce. A cappella congregational singing of early American hymns in four-part harmony; 10 a.m. - 2:30 p.m. Free admission. Bethel Primitive Baptist Church. Details: 601-5024634. Right 2 Ride, April 2, Pascagoula. Awareness bicycle ride for all abilities; 8, 21, 40, 83 miles. Admission. Starts at River Park. Details: 228938-2356; CityofPascagoula.com. Vancleave Quilting Bees Quilt Show, April 7-8, Vancleave. Refreshments, door prizes. Free admission. Vancleave Public Library. Details: snfox@cableone.net. Smokin’ on the Tracks BBQ Cook-off, April 7-8, Summit. Barbecue contest, entertainment, 5K run, car/motorcycle show. Details: 601-248-2509; SmokinOnTheTracks.com. Whistle Stop Festival, April 8, Waynesboro. Arts/crafts, 5K run, mechanical bull ride, jumps, pony rides, classic car/motorcycle show, children’s train rides, more. Details: 866-735-2268; Facebook. Quilter’s Trunk Show, April 8, Columbus. Various designs and genres presented by Chantay Rhone of Cotton Treasures quilting shop; 1-3 p.m. Free admission. Rosenweig Arts Center Theatre. Details: 662-251-4263. McComb Garden Club Flower Show: “A Salute in Flowers,” April 10, McComb. Patriotic standard flower show; 2-5 p.m. Free admission. Robbin and Jeff Daughdrill home, 619 Third St. Details: 601-303-7193. Shape Note Singing Workshop, April 12, Florence. Learn to sing Early American hymns in four-part harmony; second Wednesday monthly; 6-8 p.m. Free. Details: 601-9531094.

Medicare Supplement Insurance

THINK SAFETY!

Low Rates for Plan F Male (Non Tobacco)

Female (Non Tobacco)

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65 70 75 80

$121.00 $135.00 $157.00 $182.00

65 70 75 80

$105.00 $117.00 $137.00 $158.00

Rates vary slightly by zip code. Not affiliated with any government agency

HAMILTON INSURANCE AGENCY A small amount of land needed. Raising red deer is fun & profitable. Red deer are ready to be delivered to your farm now.

Call: Willie Strickland, Southeastern Red Deer Farms, 601-736-5057.

Don’t forget to unplug

Extension Cords

Call

Extension cords are meant to be used temporarily, not as permanent plugs. They’re not sturdy enough for prolonged use.

6045 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211

A safety message from your local Electric Power Association

800-336-9861


March 2017

I

Today in Mississippi

I

SUPER COUPON • SAE and Customer Rating Metric

We have invested millions of dollars in our own state-of-the-art quality test labs and millions more in our factories, so our tools will go toe-to-toe with the top professional brands. And we can sell them for a fraction of the price because we cut out the middle man and pass the savings on to you. It’s just that simple! Come visit one of our 750+ Stores Nationwide.

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ITEM 61939/62884 62890 shown

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$1 999 $

99

4 2499 $7 $29.98

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

ITEM 63069/61369 shown

$

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 60390 5107 shown

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3/8" x 14 FT. GRADE 43 TOWING CHAIN

Not for overhead lifting.

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$1999

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$

399

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ITEM 60388 69514 shown

ITEM 61609/67831 shown

Customer Rating

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99

219

26", 16 DRAWER ROLLER CABINET

• 1060 lb. capacity • 14,600 cu. in. of storage

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G WATTS 4000 PEAK/3200 RUNNINERA S GEN TOR CC) GAS29/63 6.5 HP (212 6967 080/63079 shown 6/697 ITEM

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1114

99

• 70 dB noise level

comp at

Wheel kit sold separately.

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$

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99

$289

comp at

33999 $439

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1299

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SUPER COUPON Customer Rating T T Cu NKE NKE BLA BLA VINGG MOVIN 80"MO 72" x80"

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$599

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POWDER-FREE SAVE NITRILE GLOVES 62% PACK OF 100 Item 68498 shown YOUR CHOICE

HarborFreight.com

ITEM 62340/62546 63104/96289 shown

8

$ 99

comp at

$17.97

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 7 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase days 30 l coupon must be after ses Origina purcha s last. Non-transferable. er per day. custom per Offer good while supplie coupon h 7/5/17. Limit one presented. Valid throug

SUPER COUPON

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$6999 $599

99

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase must be purchases after 30 days ansferable. Original coupon Non-tr last. s per day. er supplie custom per Offer good while h 7/5/17. Limit one coupon presented. Valid throug

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LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

99

Customer Rating

1500 WATT DUAL TEMPERATURE HEAT GUN (572°/1112°)

Customer Rating

ITEM 62291 67090 shown

99 $ 9 $299 36 $952.99

99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

8

$ 99

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99

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2 TON FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE

• Includes Ram, Hook and Chain

$4

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• 800-423-2567

MOVER'S DOLLY ITEM 60497/93888 shown 61899/62399/63095/63096 63098/63097

SAVE 59%

ITEM 68496/61363 68497/61360 68498/61359

comp at

$ 99 $15.99 •

11999

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$

$

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot be from original purchase ble. Original coupon mustday. purchases after 30 days ansfera Non-tr last. s er per Offer good while supplie one coupon per custom Limit . 7/5/17 h presented. Valid throug

ITEM 69594/69955 42292 shown

10 TON HYDRAULIC LOG SPLITTER

$60.95

LIMIT 7 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

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AUTOMATIC BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER

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9 $999

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SAVE $30

comp at

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

$59.98

$179

39

comp at

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LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

5999 $98.62

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16" x 30" TWO SHELF STEEL SERVICE CART

$

comp at

$283.50

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comp at

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 68121/69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

B. PANCAKE ITEM 95275 shown 60637/61615

comp at

Customer Rating

6.5 HP (212 CC) OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINES

Customer Rating

A. HOT DOG

$16999 SUPER COUPON $ 99 99 199 $19999 $149 $369.99

$139.99

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ITEM 69269/97080 shown

B

SAVE $220

SUPER COUPON

compat

7999

. Cannot or by calling 800-423-2567 stores, HarborFreight.com 30 days from original LIMIT 7 - Good at our nt or coupon or prior purchases after ansferable. Original while supplies last. Non-tr be used with other discou per day. good er Offer . custom per receipt purchase with original ted. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon coupon must be presen

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OILLESS AIR COMPRESSORS

A

$141.88

10 FT. x 17 FT. 20 TON

$5999

comp at

SUPER COUPON

GARAGE SHOP PRESS SAVE PORTABLE ITEM 62859 $113 63055/62860 shown ITEM 32879

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$999 $ 1399 $29.97

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON • Weighs 74 lbs.

.com or by calling our stores, HarborFreight or prior LIMIT 5 - Good at be used with other discount or coupon receipt. with original 800-423-2567. Cannot from original purchase l coupon must be Origina ble. purchases after 30 days ansfera s last. Non-tr per customer per day. Offer good while supplie coupon one Limit . h 7/5/17 presented. Valid throug

60603 shown

SAVE $80

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

comp at

SAVE 66%

• 16 ft. lit, 22 ft. long

88499

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ITEM 62533/68353 shown

Customer Rating

comp at

Customer Rating

SOLAR ROPE LIGHT

4

g ITEM 69227/62116 Customer Ratin 62584/68048 shown

$

SUPER COUPON

VALUE

ID PUMP® SAVE RAP VY DUTY $66 3 TON HEA STEEL FLOOR JACK

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$ 97

JACKS IN AMERICA

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comp at

ADJUSTABLE STEEL WELDING TABLE

4

comp at $ 99 $9.99

ITEM 63599/69052 shown 69111/62522/62573

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Bauer, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Hercules, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, StormCat, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17.

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$399

3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT NINE LED ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

ANY SINGLE ITEM

$16999 $18499 $499.99

WE CARRY A FULL LINE OF WELDING WIRE AND ACCESSORIES

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WITH ANY PURCHASE

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ITEM 61888 68885 shown

SAVE 60%

FREE 20%

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170 AMP MIG/FLUX CORED WELDER

ITEM 63015 61328/62843 47902 shown

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How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

40 PIECE 1/4" AND 3/8" DRIVE SOCKET SET

$799

9

$ 99

comp at

$19.97

Customer Rating LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 7/5/17. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “comp at” price means that the same similar functioning item was advertised for sale at or above the price by another retailer in the U.S. within the past 180 days. Prices by others may vary by location. No other meaning of "comp at" implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store

item or a "comp at" advertised should be associate.

19


Today in Mississippi March 2017 East  
Today in Mississippi March 2017 East  

Today in Mississippi March 2017 East