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News for members of Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association

Mississippi’s

Wild Side

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7 Music’s family tree Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

rooted in Mississippi

14 Mississippi Cooks:

Sweets for your sweetie Historic depot showcases

15 Mardi Gras and more


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COU UNTRY LIVING MADE EASIER R WITH MUELLER STEEL BUILDINGS


February 2018

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On the cover Robert Hitt Neill, an outdoors author and life-long hunting enthusiast living in Washington County, welcomes visitors to the Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Museum, which opened last summer in downtown Leland. The museum’s three exhibit galleries feature items donated in part by professional sportsmen and their descendants. Learn more about the museum in our story on pages 4-5.

and representatives learn the ropes of the big ship known as state government. One of our responsibilities as your electricity provider is to protect the integrity of your service. Our mission, as not-for-profit cooperatives, centers on keeping your service safe, reliable and efficient— all at the lowest cost possible. We achieve this mission in part by working closely with state elected officials to ensure proposed legislation won’t cause any problems with your electric service. Long-serving legislators My Opinion are familiar with the goals Michael Callahan and workings of MississipExecutive Vice President/CEO pi’s 26 electric cooperatives. Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi We also work to inform first-term lawmakers, who may not be familiar with the electric cooperative form of utility. No legislator wants do anything that may cause you to pay more for electricity. We help prevent that from happening by pointing out any potentially harmful consequences a proposed bill may have on your electric service. Electric cooperatives have a long history of serving as your legislative watchdog. ••• Learn more about current state and federal elected officials, including biographical and contact information, in the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Legislative Roster. The roster also lists the latest committee assignments for state legislators. View our roster online at ecm.coop. Click on Government Relations and then Legislative Roster. No login is required. The roster is also available as a free app for your mobile device. Search for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple App Store or Google Play.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith - First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Scott Cooper - Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 71 No. 2 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 437,129 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

Today in Mississippi

Our Homeplace

Electric cooperatives are all about Mississippi t seems 2018 is getting off to a rocky start, weather wise. Much of Mississippi experienced record low temperatures in January, and in some places the daytime temperatures stayed below freezing for several days in a row. In Jackson (and other US cities), the deep freeze crippled the city’s water system by causing more than 100 water-main breaks. Crews worked long shifts in freezing weather—sometimes knee-deep in water—to repair the breaks and restore service. Electric cooperative linemen can relate to this kind of hardship. Any lineman who has been on the job a while has probably rebuilt storm-damaged power lines in terrible weather—and in the dark. Thankfully, January’s extreme winter weather brought us no major ice problems, and thus no widespread power outages for electric cooperative members in Mississippi. I hope that luck holds through the winter. Whatever the weather brings, know that your electric cooperative is prepared to respond to service issues at any time of day or night. If you are a longtime reader of this publication, you’ve seen ample evidence of just how hard our linemen work to keep your lights on. In fact, all employees of your electric cooperative take pride in the high level of service they offer. They’re not strangers sitting at desks in some far-off corporate skyscraper; they live and work in your neck of the woods. It may sound trite, but they really do care about the well-being of the electric cooperative members they work for. To put it another way, your electric cooperative is a great example of the “buy local” concept. It is: • locally owned by the people it serves, • governed by a board composed of (and elected by) the people it serves, and • headquartered in the part of the state it serves. You can’t get more local than that. ••• With the unfolding of the 2018 session of the Mississippi Legislature, we are seeing some new faces around the state Capitol as first-term state senators

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The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

Visit us online at www.todayinmississippi.com

What a cold winter we’re having, with several inches of snow in early December and then rounds of frigid cold fronts bringing more snow and ice in recent weeks. In this photo, snowfall transforms a tree-lined roadway in the Ridgeland area. Photo: Scott Cooper

Mississippi is waking up with a hot cup of coffee. Planting a spring garden. Sitting on the porch, watching the red birds at the bird feeder. Making quilts for the winter. Makes cakes and pies for the church anniversary. Traveling to see God’s beautiful creations. Helping the less fortunate instead of yourself. – Joycelyn Thornton, West What I love most about Mississippi: Columbus, where our wonderful pilots are trained; churches; Tenn-Tom Waterway; and southern-style cooking. Relaxed atmosphere; smiles and greetings; southern speaking, soft and slow. Magnolia trees; sunflowers; knowing who our neighbor is. Delta cotton country; catfish ponds. A wonderful place to live. – Lois Banks, Columbus M...Mississippi, my home state, for all of my days, I...inviting you to come and share in our ways. S...southern is the style of life you’ll find most of all, S...seasons of winter, spring, summer and fall. I...interesting the sights you will see, S...sunrises and sunsets that are beautiful to me. S...songs fill the air of so many birds, I...intriguing you to listen and not say a word. P...peace and comfort you surely will find, P...pleasant thoughts to keep in your mind. I...isn’t life in Mississippi a most wonderful kind? – Rhonda Clark Cooley, Heidelberg

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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tales from mississippi’s

Among the donated items exhibited in the Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Museum are vintage outboard motors, background, and a wooden boat that was used to rescue victims of the 1927 Mississippi River flood, as shown in the photo on the easel. Kids are welcome to climb aboard the 11-foot alligator mount, below, for photos.

A new museum in Leland joins the growing number of attractions devoted to the culture, heritage and history of Mississippi. In this case, it’s all about the outdoors.

By Debbie Stringer The Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Museum celebrates the state’s deeply rooted outdoor sports traditions, and their evolution. Generations of Mississippians have fished, hunted, boated and camped—some for sport, others to put food on the table. A fortunate few have managed to build a career or business on their passion for the outdoors. Whatever their reasons for venturing into Mississippi’s woods and waters, these outdoor enthusiasts emerge with a treasury of knowledge and tales to tell. Their experiences enliven the wide variety of exhibits awaiting visitors at the Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Museum. Displays feature more than 3,000 items donated by sportsmen and their descendants. The collection encompasses historic photographs, firearms, bows, casting lures, game calls, full-mount taxidermy, prehis-

toric animal bones, boats, outboard motors and much more. THE IDEA BEHIND the 15,000square-foot museum started with Billy Johnson, curator and founder of the Highway 61 Blues Museum, also in Leland. Johnson and other like-minded individuals formed the nonprofit Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Foundation in 2013 to set the project in motion. The museum is located in the historic Joe Turner Hardware store building, which operated for more than 100 years in downtown Leland. South Delta Regional Housing Authority, the property’s last owner, donated the brick building for the museum. While renovating the interior, organizers retained as much of the old store’s character as practical. “We tried to preserve its heritage,” said Robert “Bob” Hitt Neill, secretarytreasurer of the Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Foundation and the author of several outdoors-related books. “These are the original floors, and we fixed the original ceiling. We put cypress on the walls—not original, but it just fit. And we tried to use all the old counters and showcases,” Neill said. The store’s nuts-and-bolts bin cabinet now displays a large collection of modern and vintage fishing lures. After four years of planning, renovating, exhibit building and artifact collecting, the museum opened last June. More than 1,000 visitors attended its two-day grand opening weekend. By the end of the summer, the museum’s visitor book had filled with more than 1,200 names from 27 states and seven foreign countries. Leland is a stop on the Mississippi Blues Trail, which may account for a large portion of the museum’s out-ofstate visitors. These visitors learn not only about Delta roots music but also Mississippi’s hunting and fishing traditions. THE MUSEUM’S EXHIBITS are housed in three large themed galleries. “We start with the original hunters, the Indians,” said Neill, a member of Delta Electric Power Association. This exhibit displays some of the thousands of Indian points and other artifacts Neill and his brother, Beau, collected from their family farm in Washington County. Some of the items date back 10,000 years, according to the Harvard archaeologist who conducted an excavation at the site in 1970. Flanking the entrance is a collection


February 2018

of whitetail buck mounts donated to the museum by Bobby Woods, of Greenville. Woods is a four-time winner of the Mississippi Bowhunter’s Association Bow Hunter of the Year award. Historic photos of hunts and hunters hang above displays of Mississippi-made turkey and duck calls. Included are silver trophies donated by Preston Pittman, a world champion turkey caller (the only person to hold five different world titles) and a member of the National Outdoor Hall of Fame. In one showcase stands a full-body wild turkey mount, in a color variation with partially white plumage. “That’s one of the most spectacular mounts that I know of. I’ve never seen one like that,” said Neill, a long-time turkey hunter. Mounted wild ducks and geese, a wing-flapping duck decoy and a mechanized feather plucker fill a corner of the duck hunting gallery. Propped against the wall is a Mississippi-made “Alligator Boat,” a small fiberglass boat/duck blind. The next gallery focuses on fishing and boating. Exhibits include a large assortment of vintage outboard motors, a wooden boat used to rescue victims of the 1927 Mississippi River flood, an early Super Skeeter fiberglass fishing boat and a canoe made by Grumman before the company converted to aircraft production during World War II. THE MISSISSIPPI OUTDOOR HALL OF FAME occupies the third gallery. Individual showcases display memorabilia, photos and brief biographies of each of the 17 inductees, beginning with famed hunter and former slave Holt Collier; he guided President Theodore Roosevelt on a Delta bear hunt that inspired the creation of the Teddy bear. Others include pioneering conservationist Fannye Cook, coon hunting legend Bill Tinnin, successful game call maker Will Primos and Mossy Oak

Above left: Visitors often mistake this mounted white raccoon for a fox. Above: A turkey mount displays a striking color variation. Right: Bob Neill, holding a pintail drake mount, is one of the individuals who organized and built the museum over a four-year period.

brand founder Toxey Haas. New inductees are added each year. Scattered throughout the museum is a virtual zoo of mounted animals, from mink to bear, fish to snakes. A mounted 11-foot alligator, its toothy jaws gaping, doubles as a designated “selfie station” for youngsters. Visitors may end their tour in the museum gift shop, which offers T-shirts and books with outdoor themes, including Neill’s own titles. THE PUBLIC’S RESPONSE, in both visitation and donations, has museum organizers already planning an expansion of the facility as well as special events and exhibits. “We have four storage buildings full of stuff that people have brought, that we don’t have a place for. If we had four times the space, we could fill it up,” Neill said. “It turned out even better than any of us envisioned, and stuff’s still coming in.” The Mississippi Wildlife Heritage Museum is located at 302 N. Broad St., in Leland. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday. Group tours and special event hosting are available. For more information, call 662-686-7789 or visit MSWildlifeHeritageMuseum.com.

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When it comes to American music,

Mississippi has bragging rights T he logo on our current Mississippi car tag reminds us that Mississippi is the “Birthplace of America’s Music.” I had a chance to have that slogan proved to me recently. ‘Course, I have always wholeheartedly agreed with it. I was invited to emcee the inaugural induction into the Mississippi Arts and Entertainment Experience (MAX) Hall of Fame one Saturday night last December in Meridian. There were 18 past and present writers, actors and musicians in that first round of inductees. I thought it significant that Mississippi the first person Seen inducted into by Walt Grayson the MAX Hall of Fame was also the first person inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame years ago. Jimmie Rodgers. Country music lore says Jimmie Rodgers was the “man who started it all.” And Jimmie Rodgers is from Meridian.

What Rodgers did was to marry blues themes to string band music. When you take the stuff of life expressed in blues— your sugar left you for someone else, times are hard and the baby is hungry, heartbreak and lonesomeness, the comedy and euphoria of pulling something over Robert Johnson was another of the initial inductees into the MAX Hall of Fame. His music influenced many of the top rock and blues and on someone, especially derivative genre musicians for decades. If there was a family tree of American music, Robert Johnson would be a strong branch if not a an enemy—and rock it trunk. This grave marker is located at Little Zion Missionary Baptist Church, near Greenwood. The MAX Museum opens in Meridian in with a guitar and a banjo, April. Photo: Walt Grayson you create another art other questions?” And then let out a belly to Mississippi music. form. A new canvas on which to paint laugh that everybody standing around lisB.B. King was an inductee. I had the the infinite emotions of the human heart tening to the interview joined in on. chance to interview B.B. at his annual attempting to navigate through life. Including me. Homecoming in Indianola back in the Elvis was obviously inducted in that But here’s the marvelous thing about first round. I was about 6 years old when 90s. I asked him what made him decide Elvis hit. His first influence on me was to to go into full-time blues and away from Mississippi. We all know we have high marks on blues, rock-and-roll and coungrow out the crew cut I had sported since gospel early on. try. But also inducted into the MAX Hall He told me he really liked gospel. But my first haircut. Couldn’t grow the of Fame last month were other Mississipwhen he would bring his guitar to the sideburns then. They still don’t look pi artists who are the best examples of streets of Indianola on a Saturday night worth a flip when I try. But I have had their fields. Leontyne Price, the opera and play a gospel song, people would long hair to one degree or another ever compliment him highly and slap him on diva from Laurel, for example, whose since (a longer degree for a while when name is recognized even by people who the back and tell him how great he was the Beatles came along). I can’t play don’t know Vivaldi from a Volkswagen. going to be some day. But they didn’t and I can’t sing that well. So I leave Muddy Waters was inducted. He piomy hair needing a cut as my contribution tip. Then, when he played a blues song he neered electric blues after he moved to Chicago and started playing Delta music said they would always tip, maybe buy Misssissippi Veterans’ on an electric guitar. The Rolling Stones him a hamburger or a beer. Home Purchase Program And he stopped dead cold and looked took their name from one of his songs. Mississsipppi Veteraans’ Ho H me Purc rcha Must be Mississi i s ppi Veteran to qualify And these first writers and actors and me straight in the eye and said, “Any musicians are just the beginning. We Loans up to $250,000 Medicare Supplements have lots more “first” and “most famous” and “most influential” right here in Mis15 year *2.75% 30 year *3 Low Rates! (APR 3.098%) (APR 3.191%) sissippi. (Female age 65, “Plan F” = $111.19 )

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Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.


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Quiet evening with a book ome will argue that reading is a thing of the past. This obviously doesn’t include such reading as office memos, instructions, specific information gathering and the like; these and others remain a necessity. The reading to which is referred here is more protracted, involved. This reading is the type that was once an integral part of entertainment and education, whether the education element was assigned or spurred into action simply by a desire of the reader to gain knowledge and insight. But that argument proffered in the first sentence above is not accurate. Reading is still practiced by many, and research indicates that it is coming full circle and gaining renewed popularity. True, the forms in which the words to be read have changed, perhaps for the better. I still like books, those warm and tangible entities that I hold and underline and mark pages and revisit with regularity. But the electronic devices are quite marvelous. Depending upon my planned length of stay, I often board an airplane while carrying a backpack so stuffed with books that it hardly fits in the overhead. Not so with the new rigs. They can store or load on demand a tremendous assortment of books and fit quite handily in small spaces. I probably should get one of those little units. All that aside, reading is not dead. What are the benefits of reading? The list is far too extensive for this limited space, but some few come to mind and have been proven true over decades. One clear plus is that reading demonstrates communication. Most writers are grand communicators, and reading their words, with proper grammar and sentence structure and thought develop-

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ment, is a terrific assist to the reader. It is disconcerting to hear individuals take the stage, whatever that stage may be, and spend their allotted time promoting this or that, announcing some event, giving some report or pleading for change, and those individuals fully fail to convey the message intended. Time is wasted for all, the potential information transfer not transferred. Reading can help rectify this situation. Reading also allows the reader to think, to visualize scenes and characters that the words portray rather than to just sit in a noise-induced fog and be told what to think. It allows readers to live adventures vicariously and become a part of the action and circumstances. To apply those circumstances to life. Let’s set aside other true benefits of reading and get to the one most pursued by a majority of those who read. Simply, reading is entertaining, fun. The reader can become lost in a story of his or her choosing, can thrill to the action and mourn over the losses. That reader can escape the mundane if so desired or can find challenge to prompt that one toward reconciliation, development, enhancement or a great many other progressions in life other than watching

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time slip away. So, what should the reader read? That depends upon the reader. Choosing something of interest is the first step, and this can be from a purely entertainment avenue or a desire for additional information on a subject. Since I am an outdoorsman and this is an outdoor column, I not only select a great many books bent in that direction for my own reading, but will take the by Tony Kinton remaining space in this piece to recommend reading related to the outdoors. The South in general and Mississippi in particular are filled with outstanding writers and characters who are the subjects of writers. The same can be said for locales writers choose. Mississippi is filled with them. Consequently, staying close to home is good advice. Disregard the age of that writing, unless, of course, updated information is sought. While style of older writings will be unlike that of newer materials, the messages can be rich. One specific out-

Outdoors Today

Good books are true treasures. Photo by Tony Kinton

door writer from years past is Nash Buckingham. He lived in Memphis but traveled via narrow-gauge rail on the Limb Dodger to hunt his beloved Beaver Dam Club in Tunica County, as well as other locations within the state. An upland bird and waterfowl hunter he was, and his words are truly remarkable. And there is Robert Ruark. Not specifically Southern, but grand in his own right. James F. McCafferty, a Mississippian, is a superb writer and has several books related to outdoor doings in the Magnolia State. His coverage of Robert Eager Bobo and Holt Collier is incredible. And don’t miss any writings about Holt Collier, regardless of author. He guided Theodore Roosevelt on the famous “Teddy Bear” hunt in Sharkey County, and was a particularly intriguing individual. The same can be said for Ben Lilly. His roots were in Kemper County and “colorful” is woefully lacking as a descriptor of this man. The Legend of Ben Lilly, if that book can be found, is a must read. And there are so many other writers and books; sorry I couldn’t mention them all. A reasonable beginning for writers and materials from or dealing with Mississippi, both past and present, would be to search Mississippi writers and go from there. So, join a growing number of individuals who are expanding their horizons and insights. Get a good book, even if on an electronic device, and read. A quiet evening with a good book is difficult if not impossible to surpass. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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February 2018

PRVEPA Contact Information: Columbia: 601-736-2666 Hattiesburg: 601-264-2458

Purvis: 601-794-8051 Wiggins: 601-928-7277

To pay bills or report outages:

855-2PRVEPA (855-277-8372)

Member owned. Locally operated. That’s the cooperative difference.

Visit us on line at www.PRVEPA.com

A message from your general manager

Our most valuable asset: Our employees It’s another new year, and I wanted to take a moment to focus on our employees. Whenever I talk about the people who serve our members, it is with much pride and admiration, especially in the aftermath of storm restoration or other crises. Pearl River Valley Electric is one of 24 other electric cooperatives in Mississippi; a few are larger than we are but most are smaller in terms of the size of our 12-county service area and the number of accounts (about 50,000) served along our 5,900+ miles of lines. In spite of the growth we’ve seen, especially in the last 10-15 years, we have pretty much stayed at around 130 employees. The majority of those

employees work to design, build, maintain and operate our lines and other electric facilities. Of course, we also have people who oversee finance, materials, information technology, vehicles and consumer services. We recently celebrated the service anniversary milestones of many employees, which is one of my favorite occasions of the year. (See story on Randy Wallace General Manager opposite page.) More than one third of our employees have been with PRVEPA for more than 20 years, and many

have worked with us for more than 30 years. All of our employees are professional, dedicated and intent on doing their best every day to meet your expectations. That is the hallmark of a member-owned, locally-operated, not-for-profit cooperative business like ours. Sometimes those unique characteristics of our business model are overlooked or under-appreciated, but being a cooperative has proved to be the best way to deliver affordable electricity to our members, help grow the communities we serve, and add to the quality of life

for everyone living in our service area. As you can see from the story below, it is also common for our employees to respond effectively to crisis situations. Our crews restored service to more than 11,000 members after a freak snowfall in early December, and they’re equally as good lending a hand to other electric cooperatives when the need arises. After Hurricane Irma moved through Florida in September, we sent crews to help restore service to co-op members there. I am very proud of all of the men and women at PRVEPA and the work they do every day to serve our members. I hope you’re as proud of their efforts as I am.

Crews meet snowy challenge in early December An unexpected and record-setting snowstorm arrived during the morning hours of Friday, December 8th, dumping more than 5 inches of snow in many parts of PRVEPA’s 12-county service area and causing more than 11,000 outages. The vast majority of the outages were due to trees and branches falling on power lines. All Association crews were called into action to respond to the event. They worked throughout the first day as the snow continued to pile up, often causing outages to lines that had been previously restored. “Nearly all of the outages were relatively small and widely scattered,” said Kurt Brautigam, manager of member services. “In a normal storm, entire feeder lines can be restored and re-energize hundreds of members at a time. With this storm, crews were primarily working individual cases, clearing and often re-clearing

downed trees and limbs off of lines to reach members who lost service.” Saturday morning, with overnight temperatures dipping below freezing, nearly 7,000 members remained without power. Crews were back to work at sunrise and were being assisted, ironically, by additional crews called in from four electric cooperatives in north Mississippi. “By midnight Saturday, service had been restored to all but about 300 members,” Brautigam noted. “We still faced some new outages during the day, but the overall effort was outstanding. Trying to find and get to that many scattered locations, many of them deep in wooded areas that were hard to reach, indicates the level of dedication and professionalism our workers possess. Restoring service to just one or two members at a time was a frustrating process, but everyone stayed

with it and they achieved great success by the end of the day.” Crews went back to work first thing Sunday morning and were able to finish restoring service to everyone by noon. Thank you to all members affected by this event for their patience and support.

Photos by Brandon Ramshur


February 2018  Today in Mississippi

mean higher Once again, south Mississippi is seeing more stretches of cold weather this winter—with abnormally chilly temperatures. When temperatures get down below freezing and stay there for several days, all forms of electric home heating must work overtime, leading to much higher electric use. As a result, the amount of members’ recent monthly bills will be higher than those that reflect more normal weather patterns. “Over the past two months, we have had to deal with several instances of unusually cold days,” said Kurt Brautigam, manager of member services. “When we help members understand how much electricity they’re using to keep their homes warm, it becomes apparent that the highest electric use occurs

on those coldest days.” Any increase in your monthly bill is ultimately a direct result of higher electric consumption. For the average home, heating in the winter and cooling during the summer are the largest drivers of electric use, by far. When you receive your bill this month, remember how many long, bitterly cold stretches we faced in January. “Some homes are using 10 killowatt-hours or more per hour when the temperatures are below freezing, because that’s when auxiliary heat strips cut on in heat pump systems,” said Scott Arinder, member services representative. “That equates to a dollar an hour or more. Multiply that by 24 hours per day for several days at a time, and staying



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electric bills comfortable inside means your bill will be higher.” “We’re happy to talk with any member about their bill and offer tips for possibly reducing use,” Arinder noted. “But the kind of weather we’ve been seeing lately will put stress on just about any home’s heating system, causing it to run much more than usual.” Here are some ways to save energy when the temperature drops. Lower your thermostat to 68 degrees (or lower): If you decrease the temperature by just one degree, you can save up to 5 percent on heating costs. Consider a programmable thermostat that you can set to lower the temperature when away from home and increase before you

come back. Adjust blinds and curtains: Keep them open to let in sunlight during the day, and closed at night to keep heat inside and protect from drafts. Keep doors and windows closed as much as possible: That includes overhead doors on attached garages. Also close the fireplace damper and seal the opening when not in use. Visit www.PRVEPA.com for more ways to save, as well as easy-touse home energy calculators.

Employees recognized for service anniversaries Sixteen Pearl River Valley Electric employees reached years-of-service milestones in 2017. At an employee gathering in December, the honorees were recognized for their efforts, dedication and service to the Association and its members.

40 Years

20 Years

Jim Sellers Randy Wallace

Keith Dale Billy McCrary

35 Years

10 Years

Melissa Bourn Shane Coleman

Russell Jarvis Jeff Sloan

Sherry Farmer Jeffry Hearn Anthony Jackson Joel Pylant Shirley Smith Michael Stringer

25 Years

5 Years

Cedric Thompson

Haley Stoll

30 Years

(left to right) Randy Wallace, Jim Sellers, Melissa Bourn, Shane Coleman

(left to right) Cedric Thompson, Jeff Sloan, Billy McCrary

(left to right) Haley Stoll, Shirley Smith, Jeffry Hearn, Sherry Farmer, Michael Stringer


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Today in Mississippi I February 2018


February 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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Nandina

shrubs offer gorgeous winter color he weather to start 2018 has certainly been crazy. We had more than a week of temperatures in the mid-20s (Freezemageddon) followed by a week of moderate, more normal January temperatures. The next week we’re were freezing again. But one good thing that happens in cold weather—as if anything good happens in the cold—is we get to enjoy the foliage on many evergreen landscape plants that turn gorgeous shades of red and purple. This is a physiological response, but I think the plants are simply cold. Boxwoods, cleyeras and some hollies are great examples of this color change.

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Who doesn’t appreciate evergreen landscape shrubs’ patina of bronzy golds and reds being displayed on winter foliage? But I think the best evergreen plant for winter foliage color is nandina. I like nandina because of its exotic, tropical look, as well as a couple of its common names, like heavenly bamboo or sacred bamboo. The upright growth habit of the straight Nandina domestica species indeed resembles bamboo. The green foliage transforms to red for the cooler months. It is attractive and thrice bisected, adding to their charm. The intensity of foliage color depends on whether it is planted in full sun or partial shade. Colors are markedly more vivid with increasing sunlight. Nandina domestica flowers in the spring, with big panicles of white clusters. The red berries are the main event in the fall and winter. These clusters start upright, and as the berries mature, they weigh down the canes. If there is one problem, it is the potential for some weediness from the heavy fruit production. Several states have identified heavenly bamboo as invasive. If you have a small space, you’re in luck, because dwarf nandina varieties have been developed to increase the

6045 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211

Southern Gardening by Dr. Gary Bachman

landscape options. The foliage colors are even more exciting than the straight species. But most of the dwarfs do not flower consistently, if at all, so they do not have the gorgeous fruit production of

regular species. One of the better dwarfs, in my opinion, is an old favorite called Firepower. It is a great choice for a small focal point or for massing together to make a statement. Firepower grows about 2 feet tall

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and wide, with a compact mounding habit. Other good choices are Blush Pink and Gulf Stream. A new and totally different colored nandina is Lemon Lime. The lime-green foliage of this beauty will brighten any dark spaces in the landscape. Because nandina tends to be a slow grower, my advice is to buy the biggest plants you can afford. Sometimes, homeowners buy smaller plants and place them close together to fill an area, but these plants ultimately become crowded, and some have to be removed. Buy large plants and transplant them according to their mature size. This actually results in better fill-in with fewer plants. As with all landscape shrubs, plant in well-drained soil, and use a layer of organic mulch after planting. Scratch a little slow-release fertilizer into the soil around the plant each spring to keep your nandina shrubs well fed. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.


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Today in Mississippi

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Recipe Hall of Fame Dessert Cookbook RECIPES FROM

February 2018

With Valentine’s Day on the horizon, we have sweets for your sweetie from the “Recipe Hall of Fame Dessert Cookbook.” Subtitled “Winning Recipes from Hometown America,” this cookbook is the result of editors Gwen McKee and Barbara Moseley’s search for the best dessert recipes in cookbooks from across the country. The cookbook has been one of the most popular offered by publisher Quail Ridge Press, a Southern Pine Electric member based in Brandon. That should come as no surprise; after all, who wouldn’t love a book dedicated to delicious decadence? Inside are 318 recipes for cakes, cheesecakes, pies, pastries, frozen desserts, puddings, trifles, tortes, cookies, brownies, bars, candies and more—from traditional favorites to fresh ideas. The comb-bound cookbook sells for $16.95 and is available in stores. To order, visit QuailRidge.com or call 800-343-1583.

Chocolate Dipped Strawberries 1 quart strawberries, washed and unstemmed Sauce: 2 Tbsp. butter 1 (6-oz.) pkg. semisweet chocolate morsels 1 tsp. vanilla or orange extract 1 (14-oz.) can sweetened condensed milk

Arrange strawberries on doilied plate. Place sauce ingredients in top of double boiler and stir until blended. Serve in bowl over hot water (or fondue pot) and let guests hand-dip the strawberries. If there is any sauce left over, freeze and re-use as fudge sauce for ice cream. Serves 4.

Scintillating Lemon Pie Pastry for a 2-crust (9-inch) pie, divided 1 ½ Tbsp. sugar 1 tsp. nutmeg 3 lemons

1 ½ cups sugar 1⁄3 cup butter, softened 3 Tbsp. flour 3 eggs ½ cup water

Preheat oven to 400 F. Roll out ½ of the dough into a 9-inch circle. Cut into 6 wedges. Place wedges on cookie sheet. Mix 1 ½ tablespoons sugar and nutmeg in a small bowl. Sprinkle over pastry wedges. Bake for no longer than 5 minutes, or until set. Remove from cookie sheet and set aside. Grate yellow part of 1 lemon rind. Peel and slice lemons very thinly. Set aside. Cream 1 ½ cups sugar, butter and flour in mixer bowl. Beat in eggs. Beat in water. Stir in reserved lemon slices and grated rind. Roll out remaining pastry to form 9-inch pie shell. Pour lemon mixture into prepared pie shell. Bake for 25 minutes. Arrange baked pastry wedges on top of filling and bake for an additional 5 minutes, or until filling is firm. Makes 1 (9-inch) pie.

Lime Cheesecake 1 (9-oz.) pkg. chocolate wafers, finely crushed 4 Tbsp. butter, melted 3 extra-large eggs 1 cup sugar

½ cup fresh lime juice 1 Tbsp. vanilla extract 24 ounces cream cheese 16 ounces sour cream ¼ cup sugar

Preheat oven to 300 F. Mix crushed chocolate wafers with melted butter, and press mixture into the bottom and 1 inch up the sides of a 9-inch springform pan. Chill. Mix eggs and 1 cup sugar with a blender for several minutes until pale yellow. Add lime juice and vanilla, and combine. In a bowl, cream the cream cheese until soft, and slowly add the egg-and-sugar mixture. Fill the prepared pan and bake at 300 F for 50 minutes or until the top is set. Allow to cool. In a separate bowl, mix the sour cream with the ¼ cup sugar and spoon over the top of the cooled cake. Bake for 10 minutes more. Chill overnight. Run a sharp knife between the crust and the pan before you unmold the cake. Serves 8 to 12.

Chocolate Squares 2 cups graham cracker crumbs 12 ounces chocolate chips

1 can sweetened condensed milk

Mix all ingredients together. Pour into a greased oblong pan. Bake at 350 F for 20 minutes. Cool before cutting into squares.

Fudgy Peanut Butter Cake 2 cups flour 2 cups sugar 1 tsp. baking soda 1 cup water 1 cup butter

¼ cup cocoa ½ cup buttermilk 2 eggs 1 tsp. vanilla extract

Combine flour, sugar and soda; mix well and set aside. Combine water, butter and cocoa in a heavy saucepan on low heat. Bring to a boil, stirring constantly. Gradually stir into flour mixture. Stir in buttermilk, eggs and vanilla. Pour into a greased and floured 9 x 13 x 2-inch baking pan; bake at 350 F for 30 minutes or until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean. Let cake cool. Icing: 1 cup peanut butter 1 Tbsp. vegetable oil ¼ cup + 1 Tbsp. butter 3 Tbsp. cocoa

1 tsp. vanilla extract 3 to 5 Tbsp. buttermilk 2 ½ cups sifted powdered sugar

Combine peanut butter and oil; mix well. Spread onto cooled cake. Combine butter and cocoa in a small saucepan; cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until butter melts and mixture is smooth. Remove from heat; add remaining ingredients. Beat until spreading consistency; spread over peanut butter mixture.


February 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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HEY MISTER, THROW ME A LITTLE

Mardi Gras HISTORYAT THE BAY ST. LOUIS DEPOT

By Nancy Jo Maples Considering its residents once rode the rails to participate in New Orleans’ Carnival season, it is only fitting that Bay St. Louis’ historical train depot houses the Mardi Gras Museum. Today, the former Louisville and Nashville Railroad Company (L&N Railroad) station serves as home to the Hancock County Tourism Development Bureau and Visitors Center with museum exhibitions on local history, art and Mardi Gras customs. Tourism manager Myrna Green said the rail line was once a vibrant passageway for those travelling between New Orleans and Bay St. Louis. The first railroad depot opened in 1876. Located about an hour from New Orleans, Bay St. Louis residents visited the city for amenities and festivities such as Mardi Gras parades while New Orleans residents ventured to Bay St. Louis to vacation on the beaches of the quaint seaside town. “We are hopeful that Amtrak will be back within the next year or two,” Green said. “If that happens, the depot will be a stopping point, which will bring us even more visitors.” Inspections by Amtrak and the Southern Rail Commission took place earlier this year, and the Bay St. Louis depot was approved as a stop on the line. Rail service once carried passengers from Los Angeles, Cal., to Jacksonville, Fla.; however, the line running east from New Orleans has been closed since 1993, except for a stretch from New

She moved to Bay St. Louis in her late is listed on the Orleans to Mobile, Ala., that operated seventies and continued to paint until National Register of Historic Places until 2005 when Hurricane Katrina her death in 2004 at age 94. and as a Mississippi Landmark Property. damaged the line. The depot also served as a backdrop After the depot closed, the building The Mardi Gras Museum, opened in for the Tennessee Williams play, “This later served as the site of city offices. 2013, gives visitors a glimpse into the Immediately following glamour and background of Katrina, the building and the local custom. Hancock surrounding park-like County began its own grounds became a staging parade and masquerade ball area for city government, in 1896. The Mardi Gras health care services and volMuseum explains the histounteers providing relief to ry of Mardi Gras and the storm victims. local traditions associated While the depot withwith the season. It also stood the injurious storm, showcases costumes worn some restoration was necesby kings and queens of sary. The area tourism local Carnival balls. About department, which had prea dozen costumes are on viously been housed in a display and are rotated local bank, relocated to the yearly. depot in 2007. Municipal Most of the costumes are Bay St. Louis’ historic L&N train depot was built in 1928 to replace the original structure government offices moved to from the all-female mystic destroyed by fire. Fashioned after Spanish Mission architecture, the depot is located at society, Krewe of Nereids, 1928 Depot Way. Among its attractions is the Mardi Gras Museum, a rotating exhibit of a newly built City Hall. The visitors center and which hosts a Mardi Gras elaborate costumes from local parades and balls. Admission is free. Photos courtesy of Mardi Gras Museum are parade each year starting in Hancock County Tourism Department open 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. Bay St. Louis and ending in nearby Waveland. Gowns, tunics and Monday through Saturday. There is no Property is Condemned,” which was headpieces are adorned with rhinestones, adapted as a film starring Robert charge for admission. For more informafeathers and intricate appliques; each Redford and Natalie Wood. The visitors tion, visit mswestcoast.org or call 228costume can take 400 to 600 hours to 463-9222. For information about the art center offers guests a 30-minute selfcreate. guided tour on the surrounding grounds museum visit AliceMoseley.com. The Mardi Gras Museum is on the that showcases scenes and artifacts from first floor of the depot along with the the 1966 movie. visitors center and an exhibit depicting Bay St. Louis’ first depot was Award winning journalist Nancy Jo Hancock County’s general history. The destroyed by fire in the 1920s. L&N Maples lives in Lucedale and is the second floor houses the Alice Moseley Railroad rebuilt the current facility in author of “Staying Power: The Story of Folk Art and Antique Museum. Moseley 1928. Fashioned after Spanish Mission South Mississippi Electric Power was an artist who began painting at age architecture, the structure remains the Association.” She can be reached at 60 and became nationally recognized. largest of its style in the United States. It nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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February 2018

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February 2018

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Today in Mississippi

Funny Felines OUR NEXT ‘PICTURE THIS’ THEME:

Send your funny cat photos to Today in Mississippi and one could become part of our next “Picture This� reader photo feature. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by March 14.

I SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

• Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If emailing a phone photo, select “actual sizeâ€? before sending.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2018. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8610 or news@ecm.coop.

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Today in Mississippi I February 2018

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 437,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Chili Cook-off and Family Fun Day, Feb. 3, Hattiesburg. Food, children’s activities, silent auction, bake sale; 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefits Hope for Hattiesburg home repair ministry. First Presbyterian Church. Details: HopeForHattiesburg.org/chili. Amour Danzar Dinner Dances, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24, Gulfport. Ballroom dancing and buffet dinner; 7-10 p.m. Casual dress. Admission. Continues Saturday nights through December. Details: 228-324-3730. Oxford Film Festival, Feb. 7-11, Oxford. Screenings short and feature-length films, including 18 films from Mississippi artists. Details: OxfordFilmFest.com.

Preserving Gospel with Melvin Williams, Feb. 13, Cleveland. Willliams to teach vocal/guitar techniques and demo song stylings to middle and high school students; 11 a.m. Admission. Grammy Museum Mississippi. Details: GrammyMuseumMS.org. Food as a Business for Producers, Feb. 14, Raymond. Workshop for producers seeking to compete and gain access to local markets; 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Pre-registration required. Central Research and Extension Center. Details: 662-325-3200; cac400@msstate.edu. Southern Strings Dulcimer Festival and Deep South Dulcimer Championship, Feb. 16-17, Petal. Workshops for all levels of play-

Baby, it’s cold outside he title of that old holiday song was very appropriate during this Christmas season. That is what “my man” told me every morning when he came back inside from taking Sugar Baby for her morning walk. And I had to agree with him that it was too cold for “this ole girl.” In fact, on Dec. 10 we experienced a rare phenomena for the southern part of south Mississippi. We received a a gift from heaven ... snow. Not just a tad, but a covering of 3 inches of beautiful puffy snow. With Mr. Roy telling me each morning how cold it was, I knew that a lecture about his weather experiences was just around the corner. After almost 62 years of marriage, we know each other pretty well. Do believe that number? And just as I predicted, after a week of “Baby, It's Cold Outside,” he followed it up with, “But not as cold as it used to get when I was a kid.” I debated whether to question that statement or just let it lie. But I knew at

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some point I was going to have to listen to his rationale. So I finally said, “How do you know that?” “I remember back in the ‘40s the ground would freeze,” he said. Then he proceeded to tell me a story about the winter of 1940 when the water line running from the meter to his house froze, and his dad dug several holes and built fires to thaw the pipe. I said, “You thought it was colder back then.” I knew this would shut him up for a while, as he figured out how to prove he was Grin ‘n’ right. Bare It While he figby Kay Grafe ured, my childhood came to mind. I remember how cold our house would get. We had only two heaters and my parents turned them off at bed time. Gas heaters were a big improvement over

ing in mountain dulcimer, hammered dulcimer, psaltery, auto harp, ukelele and more. Jam sessions, open stage. Calvary Baptist Church. Details: 601-270-4035; MississippiDulcimer.com; bethjohnem@msn.com. Greenville Gun Show, Feb. 17-18, Greenville. Buy, sell, trade, appraisals. Admission. Washington County Convention Center. Details: 601-319-5248; BigPopGunShows.com. Roosevelt State Park Bluegrass Festival, Feb. 22-24, Morton. Details: 601-408-5965. World of Customs Auto Show and Event, Feb. 23-25, Tupelo. Indoor show of custom cars, trucks and motorcyles; restored and antique vehicles; vendors. Smokey & Bandit truck and car. ISCA, True Street classes. Student Day Friday. Tupelo Furniture Market. Details: WorldofCustoms.com. Samuel Atkinson Benefit Gospel Sing and Fish Fry, Feb. 24, Waynesboro. Featuring Inspirations, Ricky Atkinson and Compassion, Answered Prayer, Day Three, Michael Roberts; 6 p.m. Donation. Catfish plates. South Miss. FWB Youth Camp. Details: 601-325-4047. 30th Arbor Day Run/Walk/Roll, Feb. 24, Biloxi. Food, music, disability awareness. Biloxi Town Green. Details: DisabilityConnection.org. 59th Gem, Mineral, Fossil and Jewelry

Show, Feb. 24-25, Jackson. Dealers, lapidary art demos and supplies, exhibits, children’s activities, door prizes, more. Admission. Mississippi Trade Mart. Details: MissGems.org. Kids Market Consignment Sale, March 1-3, Hattiesburg. Free admission. Cloverleaf Mall. Details: 601-467-5429; KidsMarketMS.com. Fossil Road Show, March 3, Jackson. Bring fossil finds to get expert opinions. Collector displays, exhibitors, hands-on activities, “fossil digs,” scavenger hunt; 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. Details: 601-576-6000; mdwfp.com/museum. Greenhouse Tomato Short Course, March 6-7, Raymond. Seminars on topics relevant to greenhouse tomato production; exhibitors. Pre-registration required. Eagle Ridge Conference Center. Details: 601-892-3731; Rick.Snyder@msstate.edu. Mississippi Bluegrass Reunion, March 810, Purvis. Details: 601-408-5965. “Noises Off,” March 8-11, Laurel. Michael Frayn’s slapstick comedy. Admission. Arabian Theatre. Details: 601-428-0140. LaurelLittleTheatre.com. Capital City Gun Show, March 10-11, Jackson. Buy, sell, trade, appraisals. Admission. Wahabi Shriners Building. Details: 601-319-5248; BigPopGunShows.com.

wood heaters and fireplaces, because with just the strike of a match you could have instant heat. So I was told. During my school days, one of my parents would come into my bedroom every winter morning before I sprang from bed and light my gas heater. I can remember the first cool day in the fall, we high school girls would wear a new winter outfit to school ... and burn up later in the day. After all, it was September. Yet, back in the fifties September had cool days. Could this current era really be global warming? Could Al Gore be right? Nah. After spending several hours at his computer, my weather man asked for a conference to discuss his findings. We agreed on a time and place, and I also noticed he had a humble attitude. At the end of the work day my man got coffee for us, and he began his report on what the weather was like in 1940s. He said, “I had assumed there was weather data that would verify my belief that when I was a young boy the winters were colder. But what I found out was that the 1940s actually experienced a warming cycle. “I also discovered there is enough

weather data to prove or disprove almost any opinion about the weather that you want to take. I believe that’s the reason so many people have varying views on global warming. “Did you know that the world did not have a true summer in 1834? Farmers were unable to raise crops and there was a fear of famines. And did you know that the winter of 1978 was one of the coldest on record for the U.S. and that 1934 was one of the warmest years on record?” I was nice and reacted, “Thank you Mr. Roy. I knew you would find an answer.” Then he said, “Maybe the reason that winters felt colder when I was young was that heating in homes, businesses and schools is so much better today. But I bet if you surveyed your readers who are in our age bracket, they would agree that it sure seemed colder in the 40s and 50s.” A few minutes later I heard Perry Como’s voice coming from the Bose, “Baby, It’s Cold Outside.” I love that old song. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


February 2018

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LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SAVE 83%

TORQUE WRENCHES LIFETIME WARRANTY

• Accuracy within ±4%

Customer Rating

HUSKY

$

84

97

MODEL: H2DTWA

Item 239 shown

YOUR CHOICE

$999

SAVE 88%

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

$

1799

ITEM 62281 61637 shown

$89

$

11999

119 249

$

67

10299 SAVE $53

BUFFALO BLACK MODEL: DP5UL ITEM 62520/60238 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

NOW

$799

16

SAVE $160

ITEM 62835

415

MODEL: H7723

SUPER COUPON

ULTRA-LIGHT, CRUSH PROOF WEATHER-RESISTANT LOCKABLE CASE • 13-3/4" L 11-1/2" W 5-7/8" H

NOW

$ 99

SAVE 73%

ITEM 62434, 62426, 62433, 62432, 62429, 62428 shown

COMPARE TO

$

PELICAN

MODEL:1300

5

8195

SAVE 71%

Case contents and locks not included.

ITEM 63926

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

1-1/4 GALLON • 300 lb. capacity HOME AND GARDEN • Weighs 72.5 lbs. SPRAYER Customer Rating NOW

ATV/LAWN MOWER LIFT

NOW

99

$79

99

SAVE Customer Rating $285

ITEM 93454/69054/63395/62603 shown

1099

ITEM 61899/63095/63096 63098/63097/93888 shown

Model 2800

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

1 159

$

MODEL: HDFDOLLY

MODEL: 5075800

14

99

$

Tools sold separately.

GRIZZLY

COMPARE TO

BUFFALO SAVE TOOLS 43 $ 59%

$2299 $29 2 99

MECHANIX $ 99

9 $1299

$

• 1000 lb. capacity

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

$399

COMPARE TO

NOW

COMPARE TO

18" x 12" MOVER'S DOLLY

Customer Rating

SAVE 51%

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

NOW

99

2 29

99

MECHANIC'S GLOVES

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

MODEL: H-21

60" HARDWOOD WORKBENCH WITH 4 DRAWERS

$

ITEM 68862/63190/62896 shown

NOW

SUPER COUPON

$4999

9998 SAVE $39

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO 99 $ CHICAGO PNEUMATIC MODEL: CP7749

8", 5 SPEED BENCHTOP DRILL PRESS

7999

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating Cu

$

Customer Rating 10 "

MODEL: WG309

LIMIT 6 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

TORQUE 950 FT. LBS. BOLT BREAKAWAY

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SUPER COUPON

$

GPL

• Weighs 5 lbs.

99

SAVE 65%

5755

COMPARE TO

$

ITEM 62515/66911 shown

1/2" HEAVY DUTY COMPOSITE PRO AIR IMPACT WRENCH

$9

$1999

• 350 lb. capacity

6999 SAVE 57%

29 PIECE TITANIUM DRILL BIT SET

ft.

SUPER COUPON

NOW

MODEL: SE-1250

1 TON CAPACITY FOLDABLE SHOP CRANE

SAVE 80

COMPARE TO

49 4

ITEM 60581/60653 shown

NOW

WORX

8

Customer Rating

99

SUPER COUPON

99

$

COMPARE TO

to

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

STEP STOOL/ WORKING PLATFORM

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

NOW

$

ft.

SUPER COUPON

$29

$

1899

ITEM 63100

99

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

Customer Rating

$

SAVE 70%

3359

MODEL: TL21RK

$59

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SUPER COUPON

ITEM 69512/61858/69445 shown

62431/239/63882

OPTRONICS

SUPER COUPON

• Boom extends from 36-1/4" to 50-1/4" • Crane height adjusts from 82" to 94"

$

COMPARE TO

Customer Rating 2/10/50 AMP, 12 VOLT BATTERY CHARGER/ ENGINE STARTER NOW

SCHUMACHER ELECTRIC

$99

1/2"

SAVE $400 SUPER COUPON

COMPARE TO

ITEM 69249/69115/69137/69129/69121/877 shown

$

807/61276/63880

69999

MODEL: 56467

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SAVE 65%

99

3/8"

$999

39999

$

NOW

ITEM 2696/61277/63881

NOW

4

COMPARE TO

6

99

$ 99 BLUE HAWK

7 AMP ELECTRIC POLE SAW 9.5" BAR NOW

$2

SAVE 60%

Customer Rating

12 VOLT MAGNETIC TOWING LIGHT KIT

ITEM 64046 /64045/63770shown

SUPER COUPON

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

DRIVE 1/4"

$

WARN

99

ITEM 62314/63066/66383 shown

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

Customer Rating 7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE/WEATHER RESISTANT TARP NOW

HEAVY DUTY Customer Rating FOLDABLE ALUMINUM SPORTS CHAIR NOW

COMPARE TO

SAVE $99

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SUPER COUPON

$1999 $22999

9999

$ 33 BRIGGS & MODEL: 20600 STRATTON ITEM 63255/63254 shown

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

99

$299 $

99

MODEL: KRSC33APBO

COLEMAN

NOW

SAVE $69

14998

COMPARE TO

ITEM 61253/62326/61282 shown

• Weighs 86.4 lbs. • 21" L x 10-1/8" H

NOW

Customer Rating

12,000 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH REMOTE CONTROL AND AUTOMATIC BRAKE

20"

Customer Rating

• Laser guide

SUPER COUPON

Battle Tested

• Weighs 73 lbs.

RAPID PUMP® 3 TON LOW PROFILE HEAVY DUTY STEEL FLOOR JACK

Blade sold 99 separately.

COMPARE TO

112499

ITEM 62511/62894/62380/68149/67696 shown

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $ $70

16999

MODEL: DWFP55126

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

NO W

$9999

Customer Rating

SUPER QUIET

ITEM 68530/63086/69671/63085 shown ITEM 63087/68525/63088, CALIFORNIA ONLY

$ LIMIT 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 6/7/18.

$

COMPARE TO

ANY SINGLE ITEM

LIFETIME WARRANTY • Thumb Lock • Rubber Wrapped Case ITEM 69080/69030/69031 shown

Customer Rating

8750 MAX. STARTING/ 7000 RUNNING WATTS 13 HP (420 CC) GAS GENERATOR NOW • GFCI

I

17999 SAVE $100 $8999

COMPARE TO

$

PRO LIFT

MODEL: T-5350B

ITEM 60395/62325/62493/61523 shown

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

800+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com *Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 6/7/18.

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

$

$899

1299 Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

ROUNDUP $ 71

18

MODEL: 190315

SAVE 51%

ITEM 63124/63145/95692 shown

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 6/7/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

19


Today in Mississippi February 2018 Pearl River Valley  

Today in Mississippi February 2018 Pearl River Valley

Today in Mississippi February 2018 Pearl River Valley  

Today in Mississippi February 2018 Pearl River Valley