Today in Mississippi January 2023 Magnolia

Page 1

FOR MEMBERS OF ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES OF MISSISSIPPI

BRISKET AND LEMON PIE TO DIE FOR PICTURE THIS: FOOTBALL SEASON HOUNDING SQUIRRELS

JANUARY 2023

Informed voters are the best voters

Jan. 3, 2023, happens to be the first Tuesday after the first Monday of January and thus, the start of the Mississippi Legislative session. For the next 90 days, my government relations team will be at the state capitol monitoring legislation and educating members of the Mississippi House and Senate, regarding the potential e ect such outcomes could have on Mississippi’s 26 electric cooperatives and their members. It just so happens that 2023 is an election year for Mississippi.

I know some of you are thinking, “Didn’t we just have an election in November?” Yes, we did, but this is Mississippi and in Mississippi, it is always an election year for some o ce! In 2022 you voted for the folks you send to Washington, D.C. In 2023, you will vote for your statewide o cials, House and Senate members, county sheri s, circuit and chancery clerks, county supervisors, right on down to your local dogcatcher. Ok, maybe not the dogcatcher, but you understand my meaning. All the folks who touch your life daily and make decisions directly a ecting you will be on the ballot.

These elections are important for determining the future course of Mississippi. Therefore, not only do we want to encourage our cooperative membership to vote, but we also want to help you become a better-informed voter. Throughout this year we will be doing interviews, both written and video, with current and potential state leaders, so you, as a voter, can understand why this person wants the job and what they intend to do should they be elected.

ECM Legislative Roster App

Check out our easy-to-use mobile app of Mississippi’s state and federal elected o cials. Look for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple App store. An Android version is also available through Google Play.

I know some of you are Republicans, while others are Democrats, and some vote the way my father did, “I vote for the man, not the party.” That’s fine with us. We are going to be, well I cannot say fair and balanced, someone else owns that line, but let’s just say we are going to give equal opportunity to all thoughts and ideas, regardless of party, so you, as a co-op member and voter, can make an informed decision on Election Day. (Whoa, flashback to my days of practicing law!)

“One of the penalties for refusing to participate in politics is that you end up being governed by your inferiors,” is a quote often attributed to Plato. As someone who has run for and won public o ce, I understand that not everyone has the desire or attributes to be a politician. But voting is a form of participation, and every qualified man and woman in Mississippi should not only cast their vote, but care enough to understand who they are voting for and why.

My goal in 2023 is to make that easier for you to do.

Enjoy our January issue.

Mississippi is...

My Mississippi

True to the heart of the music as it rings in the earth’s atmosphere.

The melody blues moving into the movement with an unforgettable rhythm and blues.

Bringing the flow of love as it lifts the soul of the people.

As it’s dashing by, they will never forget My Mississippi.

What’s Mississippi to you?

What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your brief thoughts to Today in Mississippi, news@ecm.coop or mail to P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158

Submit your beautiful digital photo of life in Mississippi to Today in Mississippi, news@ecm.coop

2023 | JANUARY 3
My Opinion
by Linda Kay Chandler, a resident of Maben and a member of 4-County Electric Executive Vice President/CEO Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi

Vol. 76 No. 1

OFFICERS

Randy Carroll - President

Ron Barnes - First Vice President

Tim Perkins - Second Vice President

Brian Hughey - Secretary/Treasurer

Michael Callahan - Executive Vice President/CEO

EDITORIAL STAFF

Lydia Walters - VP, Communications

Steven Ward - Editor

Chad Calcote - Creative Director/ Manager

Kevin Wood - Graphic Designer

Alan Burnitt - Graphic Designer

Courtney Warren - Graphic Designer

Chris Alexander - Member Services Coordinator

Steve Temple - Social Media Director

Mickey Jones - Administrative Assistant

EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING

601-605-8600

Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser.

• National advertising representative: American MainStreet Publications, 800-626-1181

Circulation of this issue: 482,018

Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year.

Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 12 times a year by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising.

POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2)

NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: send address corrections to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300 www.facebook.com/TodayinMississippi www.todayinmississippi.com

On the cover The “Elvis Becoming” statue at the Elvis Presley Birthplace Park in Tupelo. Photo by Chad Calcote. Southern Gardening The yellow of the winter cassia Outdoors Today Don’t be squirrely about hunting squirrels Scene Around the ‘Sip A look at special people and places in Mississippi 8 26 20 26 Picture This Football season On the Menu Brisket that’s perfect for the band Mississippi Seen Time flies like a flash 10 8 20 Local News Feature Had he lived, Elvis
would have
this month. We took a trip to his birthplace 15 7 In This Issue 31 28 4 JANUARY | 2023 Central Electric Power Association, Coahoma Electric Power Association, Coast Electric Power Association, Delta Electric Power Association, Dixie Electric Power Association, East Mississippi Electric Power Association, 4-County Electric Power Association, Magnolia Electric Power, Monroe County Electric Power Association, Natchez Trace Electric Power Association, North East Mississippi Electric Power Association, Northcentral Electric Cooperative, Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association, Pontotoc Electric Power Association, Singing River Electric, Southern Pine Electric, Southwest Electric, Tippah Electric Power Association, Twin County Electric Power Association, and Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association.
Presley
turned 88

75 years of Today in Mississippi

This month marks the 75th anniversary of the statewide publication of Mississippi’s electric cooperatives.

The first issue of Mississippi Rural Light & Power came out in January 1948. That publication became Rural Electric News in March 1950. The name was changed to Mississippi Rural Electric News in February 1962, and then Mississippi EPA News in October 1963. The name Today in Mississippi arrived in 1990.

The publication was a newspaper for years until Today in Mississippi was transformed into a glossy magazine, debuting its new format with the September 2019 issue.

With a print circulation of close to half a million readers, Today in Mississippi has the largest print circulation of any publication in the state.

2023 | JANUARY 5 News and Notes
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are great coastal landscape plants

Many gardeners consider winter a less interesting outdoor season compared to the warmer spring and summer seasons.

To add color, we depend on cool-season annuals like dianthuses, pansies, violas, and the various kales and cabbages. Of course, we’re also entering camellia season, but that’s really about it.

Until we’re surprised by a forgotten landscape plant that’s about to burst into action from nowhere.

Winter cassia, known botanically as Senna bicapsularis and sometimes Cassia bicapsularis, is not a common landscape plant. It’s a tropical plant with yellow flowers that resemble golden butterflies, causing it to sometimes be called butterfly bush.

Be sure to plant your winter cassia in a full-sun location for the best growth and flower production. We planted some at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi along our service drive in partial shade, and these plants did not flower reliably and eventually did not survive.

Good drainage is a must, as cassia do not like wet feet. They also do not tolerate droughty soil conditions.

Winter cassia is hardy in the coastal Mississippi counties.

It is common for this landscape plant to die back to the ground during extreme cold snaps on the coast. A layer of mulch is a good idea once nighttime temperatures start dipping into the 30s.

Winter cassia is one of those show-stopping plants, especially considering the prolific blooms it produces in the winter. The e ect is heightened because the brightly colored blooms seem to appear out of nowhere.

I still remember moving to Mississippi 15 years ago and being astonished when I saw my first winter cassia.

The golden-yellow flowers are displayed in loose clusters, each having up to 12 individual blossoms. Each individual flower has five petals. The curved shape of the stamens and pistil give it the butterfly appearance.

The large flower clusters, which form toward the ends of the slender branches, can be so heavy that the branches are pulled down, giving many plants a distinctive vase-shaped form. This e ect can be accentuated after a rain or heavy dew.

The leaves are pinnately compound with three to five pairs of ovalshaped leaflets. The foliage is a deep green in the summer, but with falling temperatures, these leaflets display a greenish-yellow tint.

While the leaf shape and color do have landscape interest all year, winter cassia primarily fills in garden gaps and provides a consistent backdrop for more showy summer plants.

That said, there are some nice large specimens — up to 8 feet by 8 feet — to be found growing in protected microclimates along the coast. In more northern Mississippi counties, I believe winter cassia could be grown in large containers, so the plant can be moved into winter protection.

Winter cassia is a landscape plant that deserves more attention in our Mississippi landscapes.

2023 | JANUARY 7
Southern Gardening
Gary Bachman, Ph.D., Extension/Research Professor of Horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs. He lives in Ocean Springs and is a Singing River Electric member. by Dr. Gary Bachman Winter cassia’s large flower clusters form toward the ends of slender branches, pulling the branches down and giving many plants a distinctive vase-shaped form. The oval-shaped leaflets of winter cassia are deep green in the summer, but with falling temperatures, these leaflets display a greenish-yellow tint.

Chasing after dogs makes exciting, social sport for everyone

Minutes after they bolted from the truck kennel, the dogs started barking hysterically a couple hundred yards away before we could even load our guns.

8 JANUARY | 2023 Outdoors Today

We rushed to the sound as fast as we could. Beneath a tree, dogs jumped and barked at their unseen quarry perched somewhere high in a white oak. We positioned ourselves around the tree looking up into its leafy branches. The “gray ghosts of the forest” can easily disappear anywhere in a tree.

“I’m going to shake some vines going up into the tree to see if the squirrel will move,” advised one of our companions. “Get ready. It might come out running.”

After our partner shook the vines, three gray blurs rocketed from cover and scattered in different directions. Watching the ruckus and our poor marksmanship, the dogs chased after the bushytails, possibly to tree them again.

“Hunting squirrels with dogs is an old tradition in Mississippi,” said Mark Beason, who learned to hunt squirrels with dogs from his grandfather. “It goes back a long time. I grew up hunting squirrels with dogs.”

Most squirrel hunters stalk quietly through forests, pausing periodically to stop, look and listen, but hunting with dogs seems more like a rowdy cross-country steeplechase than a stalk. Dog handlers release one or two animals at a time and swap them out periodically throughout the day to avoid excessively tiring them. Humans, on the other hand, must keep up with the boisterous energetic creatures as best as they can while running up hills, down ravines, across creeks and through swamps.

Most dog hunters enjoy watching and listening to their animals more than shooting at squirrels. An experienced handler knows when a dog crosses a hot scent, sees, or trees a squirrel by the sound it makes. When hunting with more than one dog, handlers can distinguish the unique sounds of their individual animals from the cacophony of chaos surrounding a tree, even from great distances.

By late winter, most of the acorns and other squirrel foods dropped to the ground already. Therefore, squirrels spend more time foraging on the ground. That leaves more scent for dogs to follow.

Mississippi sportsmen can hunt two squirrel species, gray and fox squirrels, and two subspecies of fox squirrel. The Bachman, or “hill country” fox squirrel, prefers upland forests. The delta fox squirrel primarily lives in thick mature hardwood bottoms along the Mississippi River. Fox squirrels can come in variations of white, black, and red coloration with some almost entirely black, possibly with white ears or noses.

When hunting with dogs, sportsmen can talk and move around rather than remain still and quiet. Some dog fanatics even engage in a little friendly bantering over whose dog treed the first, fastest and most squirrels.

With more action and less need for quiet, chasing squirrels with dogs offers an exciting way to introduce children or novices to hunting. On a good morning, youngsters can probably fire more shots than sitting in a deer stand all season.

2023 | JANUARY 9
John N. Felsher is a professional freelance writer, broadcaster, photographer, and editor who lives in Alabama. An avid sportsman, he’s written more than 3,300 articles for more than 170 different magazines on a wide variety of outdoors topics. Contact him at j.felsher@hotmail.com.

Exhumations imminent as progress mounts on UMMC’s Asylum Hill

In a milestone for the years-long Asylum Hill Project, a team of

remains last fall on the campus of the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Their work commenced in November on a section of land holding

were residents of the vanished State Hospital for the Insane which

Medical Center ground.

It’s a major phase in the ongoing mission to unearth, study,

patients whose bodies were never claimed, as UMMC o

site for potential land development.

Equipment used to remove the remains includes a track hoe, which has a digging arm. Its operator carefully scrapes away the top layer of soil over the burial ground, just inches at a time, until the soil’s appearance changes, indicating the presence of interments beneath.

“The contractor, who is from Mississippi, specializes in this type of archaeological machine excavation,” said Dr. Jennifer Mack, lead bioarchaeologist for the undertaking.

A team of several archaeologists, including Mack and scholars drawn from locations such as Florida, Georgia, Ohio, and the Mississippi Gulf Coast will do the rest by shovel and hand.

Also clearing the way for the excavations was the removal of trees over an approximately four-acre section of the project area.

As work proceeds, the experts cannot be sure how deep the graves lie. Thanks to geophysical surveys and other means, they have been able to estimate that as many as 7,000 graves constitute the asylum cemetery. The first co n discovered, in late 2012, was about one foot deep.

Mack estimates that the ones about to be uncovered will be four or five feet down.

Originally named the Mississippi State Lunatic Asylum, the institution served about 30,000 patients between 1855 and 1935. The thousands of residents who died were buried with wooden markers which deteriorated and disappeared over time.

10 JANUARY | 2023 Scene Around the ‘Sip
archaeologists began exhuming human the graves of thousands of people who operated for 80 years on what is now and respectfully memorialize those asylum cials map out an ethical way to reclaim the burial Dustin Clarke, left, crew chief, and Dr. Jennifer Mack, lead bioarchaeologist, survey a section of land cleared of trees in September, a prelude to excavation work for the Asylum Hill Project at UMMC. The project includes plans for tree replanting. The types of replacement trees will be based on the inventory documented by Lida Gibson, the assessment and research coordinator for Asylum Hill.
Thanks to geophysical surveys and other means, they have been able to estimate that as many as 7,000 graves constitute the asylum cemetery. The first coffin discovered, in late 2012, was about one foot deep.

A list of asylum patients who were buried in the cemetery between 1912 and 1935 is available; but, without markers, no one knows exactly where each one lies.

In July, Mack and Gibson held a virtual seminar to inform UMMC employees about the archaeological work funded, so far, by $3.7 million from the State Legislature. In addressing some misconceptions, they said:

• There is no reason to think that the asylum dead were buried in mass graves. Ground-penetrating radar and other means have revealed the presence of individual grave shafts.

• There is no risk of biohazard contamination.

• The graves will not be bulldozed.

“As we excavate, we are also looking at co n materials, personal items such as buttons and pins,” Mack said during the presentation. “They will be documented; each item could potentially help narrow down a burial date, and could therefore help with identification.”

They will gather osteo-biographical sketches as well: age, sex, ancestry, height, past illness, trauma, etc. Those details can help whittle down the list of candidates for potential identification.

“This will allow us to tell a person’s story,” Mack said. “Even if no name is found, we can rescue the individual from the anonymity imposed by the grave.”

Gibson has been in contact with about 150 descendants of patients. They have been kept abreast of Asylum Hill’s progress and have been invited to participate in virtual question-and-answer sessions about the excavations and to contribute oral histories and other information through the project’s website.

Many of the patients committed to the asylum may not have had a mental illness, Gibson said. “What was considered mental illness then is not always considered mental illness today. Some of those conditions are treatable now.”

Why would a family not claim a body? Transportation and communication were issues, Mack said. Documentation shows that hospital o cials tried to contact families, but there was no refrigeration then. So, they were buried, if not claimed, within 24 hours.

So far, 66 graves have been excavated – those uncovered after a construction crew discovered a single pine co n a decade ago.

It may take five to seven years to disinter the remaining thousands and accomplish other aims. Another goal, when funding becomes available, is to create a memorial and laboratory that will serve as a permanent resting place for those who could not be positively identified and returned to their families for reburial.

Those buried represent every county in the state; at least half are African Americans, Mack said.

“We continue to work with a community advisory board, answering people’s questions about their ancestors. This process truly serves the people all over Mississippi.”

2023 | JANUARY 11
Gary Pettus is a writer-editor in the public a airs department at UMMC. A harvesting machine known as a feller buncher takes down a hardwood during the tree removal phase of the Asylum Hill Project. The project includes plans for tree replanting to re-establish the tree canopy on campus. Dr. Jennifer Mack
This will allow us to tell a person’s story. Even if no name is found, we can rescue the individual from the anonymity imposed by the grave.

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Magnolia Electric reports over $2.6 MILLION CAPITAL CREDITS returned to members

The Magnolia Electric Power Board of Directors has announced that the cooperative has recently retired $2,661,780 in Capital Credits to its members.

Capita Credit checks were put in the mail in early December; therefore, MEP’s eligible members should have received their Capital Credit checks by now.

“Capital Credits represent the amount remaining after all operating, maintenance, and general expenses are deducted from the total amount members paid on their electric bill during the fiscal year,” said General Manager Darrell Smith. “It is the member’s investment in the association’s physical plant including poles, substations, and other equipment.

“Capital Credits are allocated to members each year based on power use, and the amount of your capital credit check is a percentage of these allocations,” he said. “We are proud to be able to return these capital credits to our members,” Smith added.

Capital Credits are one of the things that separate a not-for-profit electric cooperative, like Magnolia Electric Power, from investor-owned electric utilities, explained Smith.

There is an updated list on the MEP website at MEPCoop.com of older Capital Credits that MEP has been unable to return due to incorrect member addresses. Please be sure to check the list to see if your or a family member’s

If you have not received your Capital Credits or should find your name/a family name on the website list, please contact the o ce at 601-684-4011. Since 1960, MEP has returned a total of $57,141,461 in Capital Credits to

Magnolia Electric Power was established in 1938. The cooperative employs 100 full-time employees, maintains over 4,964 miles of power lines, and serves

Magnolia Electric Power business o ce will be

closed on Monday, Jan. 16, 2023, for

MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY

In observance of MLK Day, MEP has joined with Cooperative Energy and will be participating in their Cooperative Day of Service. Employees of MEP will be holding a food drive through Friday, Jan. 20, 2023, as part of the observance. The food collected will help to restock local food pantries. If any MEP member would like to make a donation, please drop your food item o at the o ce.

In case of an outage or an emergency, a dispatcher will be on duty and linemen will be on call.

www.MEPCoop.com Follow us on Facebook and Twitter P: 3027 HIGHWAY 98 WEST, SUMMIT 39666 | M: P.O. BOX 747, McCOMB 39649 | REPORT OUTAGES 601-684-4011 | PAY BY PHONE 1-877-779-7740

elected oFFicials MEET YOUR 2023 MISSISSIPPI

Magnolia Electric Power salutes Mississippi’s senators and representatives who represent our state in Washington, D.C., and at our state capitol in Jackson. We appreciate their dedication and willingness to serve in the spirit of public service to help shape the future of our state.

1

for a job well done to all our representatives and senators who represent constituents residing in our service area.

congressional delegation

U.S. SENATORS

U.S. REPRESENTATIVES

555 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510

CINDY HYDE-SMITH

702 Hart Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510

Third District

450 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515

TATE REEVES Governor DELBERT HOSEMANN Lieutenant Governor ROGER WICKER MICHAEL GUEST
2 3 4

Adams, Amite, Franklin, and Pike counties

Address: Rd., Natchez, MS 39120

Adams, Amite, Pike, Walthall, and Wilkinson counties

Sojourner HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

Rep. Vince

Mangold

District 53: Franklin, Jefferson Davis, Lawrence, Lincoln, and Pike counties

Address: P.O. Box 1018 Jackson, MS 39215 Years in Legislature: 8

Rep. Sam C. Mims V

District 97: Adams, Amite, Franklin, and Pike counties

Address: P.O. Box 1018 Jackson, MS 39215 Years in Legislature: 20

Address: 2018 Hawthorne Dr. McComb, MS 39648

Rep. Beckie Currie District 92: Copiah, Lawrence, and Lincoln counties

Address: 407 Oliver Dr. Brookhaven, MS 39601 Years in Legislature: 16

Rep. Daryl L. Porter Jr. District 98: Pike and Walthall counties Address: P.O. Box 772 Summit, MS 39666 Years in Legislature: 4

Copiah, Lawrence, Lincoln, and Walthall counties

Address: P.O. Box 729 Brookhaven, MS 39602

Rep. Angela Cockerham

District 96: Adams, Amite, Pike, and Wilkinson counties

Address: P.O. Box 613 Magnolia, MS 39652 Years in Legislature: 18

Rep. Bill Pigott

District 99: Lamar, Marion, and Walthall counties

Address: 92 Pigott Easterling Rd. Tylertown, MS 39667 Years in Legislature: 16

2023 | JANUARY 17
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2023 Magnolia Electric Power Annual Meeting

Preliminary Notice of Annual Meeting of Members

For the purposes of electing directors, hearing and passing upon reports covering the previous fiscal year, and transacting such other business, the Annual Meeting of the members of Magnolia Electric Power shall be held in March each year, at such place in one of the counties of Mississippi within which the Association serves. At each Annual Meeting of the members, approximately one-third (1/3) of the total number of directors shall be elected by ballot, by and from the members, to serve for a term of three (3) years as provided by law.

By-Laws Governing the Association: Article IV, Section 4.04. (a) Committee on Nominations. It shall be the duty of the Board to appoint, no less than sixty (60) calendar days nor more than one hundred and twenty (120) calendar days before the date of the meeting of the members at which directors are to be elected, a committee on nominations from each district from which a director is to be elected, consisting of not less than 3 nor more than 5 members who shall be selected from di erent sections of the district so as to insure equitable geographic representation. No existing Association employee, agents, o cers, directors or known candidates for director, and close relatives (as hereinafter defined) or members of the same household of existing association employees, agents, o cers, directors or know candidates for director may serve on such committees. The committees shall receive and consider any written suggestion as to nominees submitted by members of the Association. The committee shall prepare and post at the principal o ce of the Association at least fifty (50) calendar days before the meeting a list of nominations for board members.

(b) Nominations by Petition. Any fifty (50) members acting together may make other nominations by petition and the Secretary shall post at least fifty (50) calendar days before the meeting such nominations at the same place where the list of nominations by the committees are posted. Any petition for nomination shall be submitted on a form designated and provided by the Association. Each member signing such petition shall place thereon the date of signing, address, and account number of the member. The Secretary shall mail with the notice of the meeting or separately a statement of the number of board members to be elected and the names of candidates nominated by the committees and the names of candidates nominated by petition, if any.

Article IV, Section 4.03. Director Qualifications

(Summarized)

1. Active member in good standing of the Association.

2. Bona fide resident of the district from which they are to be elected or must be a permanent and year-round resident within or in close proximity to an area served by the Association that no more than one (1) such

Dear Member,

person may serve on the Board of Directors at the same time as set out in Section 4.03(e).

3. Must not be employed by or financially interested in a competing enterprise.

4. Must not have been finally convicted of a felony or misdemeanor involving moral turpitude.

5. Must not be a relative to the third degree by blood or marriage as defined in Section 4.08 of an employee, incumbent director, or the director being replaced.

6. No person shall take or hold o ce as a director who is the incumbent of or a candidate for any elective public o ce.

7. When a membership is held jointly by a married couple, either one, but not both, may be elected a director.

8. No person shall be eligible to become or remain a director of, or to hold any other position in trust in the Association who does not have the legal capacity to enter into a binding contract.

Article III, Section 3.05. Voting. Each member who is not in a status of suspension as provided for in Section 2.01, shall be entitled to only one vote upon each matter submitted to a vote at any meeting of the members at which a quorum is present. A member may vote in person or by proxy. At a meeting of the members where directors are to be elected, all members present in person or by proxy may cast one vote for each director to be elected; each member may vote their own vote plus those proxies executed in their favor, pursuant to Section 3.07 of these bylaws. Voting by members other than members who are natural persons shall be allowed upon the presentation to the Association, prior to or upon registration at each member, of satisfactory evidence entitling the person presenting same to vote. At all meetings of the members all questions shall be decided by a majority of the members voting thereon, except as otherwise provided by law or by the Association’s Certificate of Incorporation or these bylaws. Members may not cumulate their votes.

Article III, Section 3.06. Proxies. At all meetings of the members, a member may vote by proxy executed in writing by the member, subject to the provisions hereinafter set forth, provided, however, any member holding and intending to vote a proxy must file the executed proxy at the Association’s headquarters, not less than five (5) business days prior to the meeting. The proxy must have entered thereon the account number of the member appointed to vote the proxy. If one person shall receive electric service through two (2) or more meters at di erent premises, he or she shall be entitled to not more than one (1) vote at any meeting of the members. No proxy shall be voted at any meeting

This is a preliminary notice of the Annual Meeting of Magnolia Electric Power to be held March 30, 2023, at the Auditorium at Magnolia Electric Power headquarters, which is located at 3027 Highway 98 West, Summit, in Pike County, Mississippi.

At that meeting, directors from Districts one, four, and nine are to be elected to three-year terms.

District one is “all that portion of the certificated area of the Cooperative which lies south of Mississippi State Highway No. 24 and west of the east boundary line of Amite County, all being in Amite County, Mississippi.”

District four includes “all that portion of the certificated area of the Cooperative (a) situated in Lawrence County which lies north and west of a line beginning at the Northwest corner of Section 18, Township 6 North, Range 10 East, run thence east two miles, thence north to north boundary line of Lawrence County, and (b) situated in Lincoln County and is north and east of a line beginning at the northeast corner of Section 13, Township 6 North, Range 9 East, Lincoln County, Mississippi, run thence west to the northwest corner

of the members unless it shall designate the particular meeting at which it is to be voted, and no proxy shall be voted at any meeting other than the one so designated or any adjournment of such meeting. No proxy shall be voted by anyone except a member. No more than ten (10) proxies may be assigned to other members. No restriction shall apply to the number of proxies assigned to the Board of Directors who shall vote the proxies assigned to them according to the will of the majority of the members of the Board of Directors. The presence of a member at a meeting of the members shall revoke a proxy theretofore executed by that member, and such member shall be entitled to vote at such meeting in the same manner and with the same e ect as if the proxy had not been executed. In case of a joint membership, a proxy may be executed by either spouse. The timely presence of either spouse at a meeting of the members shall revoke a proxy theretofore executed by (either of) them and such joint member or members shall be entitled to vote at such meeting in the same manner and with the same e ect as if a proxy had not been executed. A standard proxy form shall be used which identifies the member by name and account number, in order to assure authenticity and facilitate the tabulation of votes. If the proxy form of a member is lost, stolen, or destroyed, the Association shall furnish the member with a replacement proxy form upon request, provided that the member executes a revocation of the lost, stolen or destroyed form, to be witnessed by an employee of the Association. Blank proxy forms will not be distributed in bulk to any member. Only the proxy form issued by the Association shall be valid.

Article III, Section 3.07. Representative Voting. Legal entity organizations and nonlegal entity organizations which are members of the Association may be represented at any meeting of the members and may vote only as follows: (a) any director, o cer or general manager may represent and cast the one vote of a corporation; (b) a trustee, steward, deacon, clerk, or pastor may represent and cast the one vote of a church; (c) a school trustee, principal or superintendent may represent and cast the one vote of a school; (d) or any other association or organization not a legal entity may be represented by and have its one vote cast by any person who is a trustee, or manager or part owner, or any o cer of such association or organization.

Respectfully, John McCabe, Secretary

A complete set of bylaws is available at the association’s headquarters upon request.

You will receive o cial notice of the 2023 Annual Meeting in the mail at a later date.

of Section 18 of Township 6 North, Range 7 East, and run thence north to the north boundary line of Lincoln County, being partly in Lincoln County and partly in Lawrence County, Mississippi.”

District nine is described as “all that portion of the certificated area of the Cooperative which lies within Walthall and Marion counties, Mississippi, and is located south of the U. S. Highway No. 98, all being in Walthall and Marion counties, Mississippi.”

In connection with the election of directors scheduled for the meeting, the following members have been appointed by the Association’s board, pursuant to Association bylaws, as members of the Nominating Committee:

District One

Gary Austin

Eddie Lee Bates

Jimmy Burns

Gerald Wall

Dalton Williams, Jr.

District Four

Kim Haley

Laverne Jackson

Robbie Jackson

Tommy Owens

Harold Rutland

District Nine

Jewell Holmes

Bonnie Kirkpatrick

Carrie Lewis

Robert Shivers

Ted Smith

18 JANUARY | 2023
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ELVIS HAS ENTERED THE BUILDING:

If you’ve ever visited Graceland in Memphis and thought Elvis Presley’s longtime home was gaudy, overly grand, or even pretentious, it all makes sense when you start at the beginning.

Elvis Presley was born in a tiny, 300-square-foot, two-room house in Tupelo that his father, Vernon, and his uncle, Vester, built with $180. Vernon Presley had to borrow the $180 from his employer.

The home was built in 1934. Elvis was born on Jan. 8, 1935. Had he lived to 2023, The King of Rock and Roll would have turned 88 this month.

Roy Turner, the executive director of the Elvis Presley Memorial Foundation and head of The Elvis Presley Birthplace Park in Tupelo, said he believes the best way to tackle the history of Elvis is to start at Chapter 1.

“Because this is how it all began. Come here first and then go to Graceland,” Turner, 70, said on a recent Friday at the park.

ViSiTiNG

That’s exactly how Scottish sisters Geri Forbes, 59, and Edna Clark, 64, approached their recent trip to America to investigate the life of their favorite singer.

Forbes and Clark — who live in Glasgow — planned their international trip to celebrate Forbes’ 60th birthday. The pair was walking around the park on a Friday and were slated to visit Graceland on the following Sunday.

“I’m so glad you did it this way and get to see his birthplace first,” Turner told the sisters after meeting them near the “Elvis at 13” statue.

Forbes and Clark’s mother was a huge Elvis Presley fan and played his music constantly when they were growing up in Glasgow.

amazing. The trip of a lifetime for us,”

“This has been amazing. The trip of a lifetime for us,” Forbes said.

Turner said visitors from Scotland were the norm. On the same day, a family from Liverpool, England was also touring the park.

Turner said the park sees between 60,000 to 80,000 visitors a year with half of that amount coming from other countries.

Sisters and lifelong Elvis fans Edna Clark (left) and Geri Forbes visited the park on a recent Friday on a trip from Glasgow, Scotland.

2023 | JANUARY 21
Photos by Chad Calcote Many Elvis Presley Birthplace Park visitors like to have photos taken as they hold the hand of the “Elvis at 13” statue. The inside of Elvis Presley’s 2-room birth house is adorned with period furniture.

WHAT TO SEE

The Elvis Presley Birthplace Park consists of the house, a museum, a chapel, a gift shop, the “Elvis at 13” statue, the “Elvis Becoming” statue, The Fountain of Life, The Walk of Life, a “Memphis Bound” car feature, a story wall, a theatre, picnic pavilion, amphitheater, and the Assembly of God Church.

There would probably be no Elvis Presley without that church.

The church was where Elvis was first exposed to traditional, Southern Pentecostal gospel music as a child.

A minister at the church, Brother Frank Smith, taught Elvis how to play D, A and E chords on his first guitar, Turner said. Elvis sang his first gospel song “Jesus Loves Me” as a child in that same church.

The church was moved from its original location to the park.

A mixture of white gospel music, black gospel, Mississippi blues, and the country music Elvis grew up on while listening to the Grand Ole Opry on the radio on Saturday nights, set the musical template for Elvis’s brand of rock and roll.

The most popular site at the park is the home where Elvis was born.

The City of Tupelo bought the home and surrounding property in 1957. Elvis wanted a park for the neighborhood children and donated the proceeds from a 1957 concert at the Tupelo Fairgrounds for the park. The house is in its original location and has been restored to its original condition with period furniture.

Turner said Elvis was born in the house and lived there until he was 3.

The family was kicked out of the house because Vernon Presley had to go to prison. Vernon Presley served nine months at Parchman Penitentiary on forgery charges but was later pardoned.

The Presley family moved around in Tupelo after that and then, eventually, to Memphis, where they lived in di erent homes until moving into Graceland.

Turner said the last time Elvis visited his hometown was in 1971.

“When Elvis was married to Priscilla, they came to Tupelo five times — usually on a Sunday. They would drive around and look at Elvis’s childhood haunts,” Turner said.

22 JANUARY | 2023
Elvis’s childhood church, The Assembly of God Church, was the first place he was exposed to gospel music. The Elvis Presley Museum originally opened in 1992 and consisted mainly of the personal collection of Tupelo resident Janell McComb. The facility was renovated in 2006.

Turner grew up in east Tupelo and went to the same school Elvis did.

Turner never met Elvis but was a fan — not a super fan — of his music and movies growing up.

Obsessed instead with Marilyn Monroe, Turner became the local Elvis historian after a visit with a British author who came to Tupelo in 1981 to write an Elvis Presley biography.

Elaine Dundy moved to Tupelo for five months to write a book about Elvis. She needed a local on the ground to help her with research and history. Someone gave her Turner’s name.

“I love history and genealogy research. So, she hired me to help her with the book,” Turner said.

Dundy published the book “Elvis and Gladys” in 1985.

From that time on, Turner was the Elvis go to guy in Tupelo.

In 2001, Dundy told Turner she was getting older and wanted to set up a charitable trust in Tupelo to “expose all the little elvises to the arts,” he said.

Dundy died in 2008, and in 2009, The Elaine Dundy and Roy Turner Endowment for the Arts was created.

Turner was named executive director of the Elvis Presley Memorial Foundation in 2021.

“Getting to come here every day? It’s not a job. Are you kidding? This isn’t work. This is wonderful,” Turner said.

Getting to come here every day?

It’s not a job. Are you kidding? This isn’t work. This is wonderful.

For more information about the Elvis Presley Birthplace Park, visit elvispresleybirthplace.com or call 662-841-1245

The Elvis Presley Memorial Chapel was built with donations from fans because Elvis dreamed of having a place to meditate at the park. Roy Turner
ELVIS EXPERT
THE
HAPPY BiRTHDAY ELViS! “Thank you very much”

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Football Season

1.

2.

5.

2023 | JANUARY 27
Coach Chris Casio prays with Northpoint Christian middle school team, by Michelle Forsythe of Byhalia; Northcentral Electric member
2 3 6 1 Picture This
4 5 7 8 9 10
Desi. R. Monix II of Lee Academy, by Qua’Shara Monix of Clarksdale; Coahoma Electric member
3.
Family enjoying an MSU home game, by Teresa Barksdale of Columbus; 4-County Electric member
4.
Winnie Fall McGee, 4, at Ole Miss home game, by Brian S. McGee of Union Church; Southwest Electric member Louisville High School homecoming senior maid Kristin Jernigan, by Kristi Jernigan of Louisville; EMEPA member
6.
High school football fun, by Kittie Edwards of Amory; Monroe County Electric member
7.
The Ball family at USM vs. Arkansas State game, by Keith Ball of Petal; Dixie Electric member
8.
Senior Pearl High School cheerleader Kylee McDowell, by Sydnee Tapley of Pearl; Southern Pine Electric member
9.
Friday Night Lights fun, by Michelle Bramlitt of Bruce; Pontotoc Electric member
10.
Aneika and Virgle Moore Jr. at MSU vs. Texas A&M game, by Virgle Moore Jr. of Merigold; Delta Electric member

On the Menu

Jackson has seen legendary rhythm and blues artists pass through, such as Little Milton, Bobby “Blue” Bland, Johnny Taylor, Dorothy Moore, Z Z Hill, and Denise LaSalle. Performing at clubs like the Hidden Agenda, Queen of Hearts, George Street Grocery, Freddie B’s Hideaway, Hal and Mal’s, and the basement club of a defunct hotel, the Subway Lounge, they kept the music scene thriving in the capital city.

Midnight

The Tangents, known as the “House Band of the Delta,” occasionally rolled into town to stir up trouble. My mother made this brisket for them once and had me deliver it over to “Blues Central,” the nickname for a midtown flophouse frequented by musicians, back when I was in high school. She thought the guys in the band were looking a little peaked and thin. That gesture instilled in me the value of caring for and feeding musicians. This brisket is the perfect dish for anybody who works the night shift.

28 JANUARY | 2023
brisket and lemon ice box pie

(Serves 6)

INGREDIENTS

2 medium onions, cut into 1-inch-thick rounds

1 (5- to 6- pound) piece flat end beef brisket, with fat cap intact, tenderized

2 tablespoons natural liquid smoke seasoning

½ cup Worcestershire sauce

2 teaspoons celery salt

1 teaspoon sweet paprika

1 teaspoon garlic powder

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Choose a glass baking dish or lidded casserole large enough to comfortably hold the meat. Arrange the onion rounds in the bottom of the dish, then place the brisket fat side up on top of the onions. Pour the smoke flavoring and Worcestershire sauce over the meat. Sprinkle the celery salt, paprika, garlic powder, and pepper over the surface. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for 24 hours. Preheat the oven to 200 degrees. Remove the plastic wrap and cover the baking dish tightly with a lid or foil. Bake for 1 hour. Uncover and bake for an additional 5. Remove the brisket from the oven, and as hard as it seems, do not taste it. Allow to cool to room temperature. Cover and refrigerate for 5 hours. Preheat the oven to 325 degrees. Remove the cover and spoon o the fat that has solidified on the surface of the juices. Remove the brisket from the liquid and wrap it in foil. Pour the juices into a small saucepan. Place the foil-wrapped brisket in the baking dish in the oven and warm through, about 15 minutes. Simmer the pan juices and reduce to a thin, sauce-like consistency. Thinly slice the brisket diagonally across the grain. Serve with the sauce.

Sweetened condensed milk has a wondrous effect on eggs and citrus juice. Lemon icebox pie is a perfect example.

(Makes one 9-inch pie)

INGREDIENTS

1 ½ cups graham cracker crumbs

¼ cup granulated sugar

½ teaspoon ground cinnamon

½ cup (1 stick) unsalted butter, melted

2 (14-ounce) cans sweetened condensed milk

4 large egg yolks

1 teaspoon grated lemon zest

½ cup fresh lemon juice

2 cups heavy cream

6 tablespoons confectioners’ sugar

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. In a medium bowl, combine the crumbs, granulated sugar, cinnamon, and melted butter. Pat into a 9-inch deep-dish pie pan and bake for 6 to 8 minutes, or until slightly browned. Remove to a wire rack to cool. Meanwhile, in a large bowl, whisk together the milk, yolks, lemon zest, and lemon juice. Pour the lemon filling into the cooled crust. Bake for 10 minutes, until set. Cool on a rack. Chill the pie for 30 minutes. When the pie is completely cooled, whip the cream with the confectioners’ sugar until sti peak. Mound the whipped cream on top of the pie and chill for 1 hour.

If making the pie to serve the next day, 1 teaspoon of gelatin may be dissolved in 2 tablespoons water and added to the whipped cream just before it reaches a sti peak. To help the cream whip, have the cream, bowl, and beaters and whisk very cold. Set the beaters and bowl in the freezer for 10 minutes before you need them.

— Taken from Martha Hall Foose’s 2008 book, “Screen Doors and Sweet Tea.”

Martha Hall Foose

Martha Hall Foose, the author of “Screen Doors & Sweet Tea: Recipes and Tales of a Southern Cook,” won the James Beard Award for American Cooking. Her latest collaboration is “A Good Meal is Hard to Find: Storied Recipes from the Deep South” with Amy C. Evans. Martha makes her home in Hattiesburg with her husband and son. She is a member of Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association.

2023 | JANUARY 29

Events are subject to change.

Voices of Freedom: An MLK Jr. Day Celebration. Jan. 16. Jackson. Starring John Christopher Adams, Ti any Williams-Cole, Temperance Jones, Zachary Thaggard, and Jermaine Van Buren, Jr., with Tyler Kemp on piano. Showtime: 7 p.m. Admission: $35. Duling Hall, 622 Duling Ave. Details: 601-966-6601.

The Inspirations in Concert. Jan. 20. Petal. The First Baptist Church of Runnelstown will host the group at 7 p.m. A love o ering will be received. The church is located at 9211 Highway 42. Details: 601-583-3733 or 601-325-4047.

Holiday Gatherings

30
5 yr. Guarantee SOON Church/Government uniting, suppressing RELIGIOUS LIBERTY, enforcing NATIONAL SUNDAY LAW. Be informed! TBS, Pob 374, Ellijay, GA 30540. thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com 1-888-211-1715 Events Book online now at caravan.com PANAMA Fully guided tour. Includes all meals, all activities, all hotels. Tax and fees extra. 8 DAYS $ 995 MEXICO Fully guided tour. Includes all meals, all activities, all hotels. Tax and fees extra. 9 DAYS $ 995 COSTA RICA Fully guided tour. Includes all meals, all activities, all hotels. Tax and fees extra. 9 DAYS $ 995 Send us photos from your favorite holiday gathering. The photos could be with you and family or friends from Thanksgiving, Christmas, or New Year’s. The photos can be from the last year or a previous year. The photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. Please attach the photo to your email and send it to news@ecm.coop. Each entry must be accompanied by photographer’s name, address, and co-op. SUBMISSION DEADLINE: March 1. Select photos will appear in the
2023 issue.
Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Email to news@ecm.coop.
April

Most of the time, time just drifts by with no particular urgency. Or at least it seems like it until you hit a landmark, like a birthday or New Years. Then, all of a sudden, time seems to have zipped past.

A few months back I was at the Two Mississippi Museums speaking to a group of teachers during their lunch break at an all-day seminar, and ran into my friend at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Brother Rogers. He told me they had just opened the newly refreshed exhibit of the 500-year-old dugout canoe in the history museum, and that I needed to come take a look at it. They did a great job of showcasing the canoe. The lighting is much better, and the environment has improved.

Brother said that they had finished it just in time for the 5th anniversary celebration of the opening of the Two Mississippi Museums. That’s what struck me. That the museums have been open for five years! I remembered coming down and doing stories the few months prior, and then, during the grand opening. It didn’t seem like it happened yesterday, necessarily, but it didn’t seem like that had been five years ago, either.

Now, I can write about either lamenting the passing of time or we can talk about our pre-history, spring-boarding o of the canoe.

Let’s do the history. Time is going to pass, anyway. Not much else to say about it. But our history is always fascinating.

The canoe was found by the U.S. Army Corp of Engineers while they were dredging in the Delta in Steel Bayou near Swan Lake in Washington County. I forget what year — a couple of decades ago at least. Apparently, the canoe had been buried in mud for much of its lifetime — it is in good shape. Wooden artifacts like that won’t deteriorate in environments like mud because oxygen can’t get to them.

I grew up in the Delta around Indian mounds and other reminders of our Native American heritage. At grandmother’s house in Itawamba County, we regularly found arrow heads in the garden after it was plowed in spring. Not so much, anymore. But enough back when I was a kid for me to realize that people had been here for a long time before us.

It was only after doing television stories for “Mississippi Roads” and for whichever commercial station I was working for at the time that I found out how long people have been here. We have Native American mounds older than the Pyramids here in Mississippi.

Now, when you think that some of our predecessors on the soil of what we call our state have been here for thousands and thousands of years (the date being pushed back all the time), then the five years of the Two Mississippi Museums is just a flash.

Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Walt is also a reporter and 4 p.m. news anchor at WJTV in Jackson. He lives in Brandon and is a Central Electric member. Contact him at walt@waltgrayson.com.
2023 | JANUARY 31
by Walt Grayson The Swan Lake Canoe at the Two Mississippi Museums was built around the time Hernando DeSoto arrived in Mississippi in the early to mid 1500s. The canoe is 25 and a half-feet long and was chopped from a single bald cypress tree.
I found out how long people have been here. We have Native American mounds older than the Pyramids here in Mississippi.