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News for members of East Mississippi Electric Power Association

MISSISSIPPI

CIVIL RIGHTS MUSEUM OPENS IN JACKSON page 4

12 Good cooking funds

good works in Ellisville

14 Picture This: Readers’ best photos of 2017

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

18 Yesterday’s road trips


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Today in Mississippi

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January 2018

COU UNTRY LIVING MADE EASIER R WITH MUELLER STEEL BUILDINGS


January 2018

Our New Year’s resolutions always revolve around you oes anyone actually live up to their New Year’s Day resolutions? Whether we do or not, it’s interesting to think about how we could (and would) improve ourselves in the coming year. Along those lines (no pun intended), your electric cooperative is constantly evaluating and refining its year-round efforts to make sure your electric service is the best it can be. This has been our mission since 1934, when Alcorn County residents organized Mississippi’s first electric cooperative, Alcorn County Electric Power Association in Corinth. Today, 26 member-owned, not-for-profit electric cooperatives together serve an estimated 85 percent of the land mass in the state. Each cooperative is independent and locally owned, but they all work together to achieve common goals, like emergency power restoration. And each one remains true to its founders’ mission: to provide a valuable service, not generate profits. In keeping with the spirit of the new year, I’d like to point out the ongoing resolve of electric cooperatives to help improve the quality of life throughout Mississippi: • We make every effort to satisfy our members’ needs for high-quality electric service. Service to members is the reason for our existence. We call our customers “members” because they—not stockholders—actually own their cooperative. • We work closely with local and regional partners in the state to bring new job opportunities to Mississippi. Business and industry must be assured they can receive top-quality electric service before they will consider locating or expanding their operations in the state. Electric cooperatives can deliver on that promise. • We are diligent in working with state and federal elected officials to safeguard the reliability and affordability of your electric service. As long as electric cooperatives have existed, we have closely monitored legislative proposals in order to prevent any unintended consequences that could cause you to pay more than necessary, or worse, threaten the reliability or safety of our electrical system. No legislator

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On the cover Pamela Junior is the director of the new Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, which recently opened along with the Museum of Mississippi History in downtown Jackson. The grand opening of the two museums highlighted the Mississippi Bicentennial celebration on Dec. 9. Junior shares her thoughts about the Civil Rights Museum on pages 4-5. Photo courtesy of Mississippi Department of Archives and History

or member of Congress wants that to happen, so they heed our counsel. We deeply appreciate their cooperation. • Mississippi’s electric cooperatives work together to restore power as soon as possible during major outages. Rebuilding electric service is the crucial first step toward a community’s recovery from a natural disaster. We’ve developed an emergency work plan that provides for the sharing of workers and equipment to expedite the restoration of service. When the plan is activated—as it was last month when heavy snowfall My Opinion caused outages across south Michael Callahan Mississippi—it saves time Executive Vice President/CEO and money through the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi efficient coordination of resources. Most important, our emergency plan helps crews return home safely. After all power is restored, we review the plan to see what improvements can be made. • Electric cooperatives embrace new technologies that meet our high standards for efficiency, cost effectiveness, safety and reliability. Also, protecting our digital networks from intrusions by cybercriminals is a top priority. Every employee at your electric cooperative works toward this end. Finally, I have to brag on electric cooperative employees. They are well trained and absolutely committed to serving their community. An electric cooperative is an integral part of the area it serves because it is staffed, managed and governed by local people. Our employees know their work makes a difference in the community. Serving members, directly or indirectly, is fulfilling work. Just ask any lineman how it feels to get the lights back on for a family on a cold, stormy night.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Barry Rowland - President Randy Smith - First Vice President Keith Hayward - Second Vice President Kevin Bonds - Secretary/Treasurer EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Scott Cooper - Graphics Specialist Chris Alexander - Administrative Assistant

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

ON FACEBOOK Vol. 71 No. 1 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s electric power associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 461,946 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published 11 times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

Mont Helena was built atop a ceremonial Indian mound near Rolling Fork soon after the original structure, built in 1896, was destroyed by fire before the owners could move in. Photographer Karon Wilcher, of Carthage, submitted the photo to this month’s “Picture This” reader photo feature. See more of our readers’ photos on pages 14-15.

Mississippi is Born in New Orleans, I moved with my family to Mississippi due to the fact of Daddy relocating because he worked at various stations as an agent. My siblings and I grew up rooted and grounded in Mississippi. As a youngster, I rode my bike up and down the dirt road in the country. My sister, brother and I, plus neighboring friends, were sometimes entertained by the ever-glowing fireflies at nighttime. What I mostly enjoyed was singing at the top of my voice throughout the countryside. I sang whatever the songs of that time. We worked hard. We played hard in Mississippi. I remember sitting atop the ice-cream freezer til my bottom nearly froze. We kids helped out with the upkeep of a sprawling vegetable garden. We planted seeds and pulled weeds and all of the necessities. Mississippi was and is a land of opportunity and charm. —Glenda Flynt, Laurel I was born in Chicago Nov. 18, 1947. My father and mother were raised in the Harmony community, near Carthage. They owned land and decided to move back home to farm. Every kind of animal and vegetable was raised on our farm. We are a very religious family. We were teachers. I taught special-needs children in Western Line school district (Glen Allan) for 25 years. Mississippi is a place where you can walk the hills and through the woods. I still garden and fish a lot. I would rather live in Mississippi than any place on Earth. I love Mississippi, our Magnolia State, a place I call my home on Earth. —Patricia Lynette Langdon Marshall, Carthage

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@ecm.coop. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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January 2018

Mississippi Civil Rights Museum Mississippi Civil Rights Museum director Pamela Junior shares thoughts on the new museum’s mission and her hopes for its impact on visitors.

Pamela Junior

By Debbie Stringer Mississippi is shining a light on one of its darkest periods in history with the recent opening of the new Mississippi Civil Rights Museum, along with the Museum of Mississippi History in downtown Jackson. The only state-operated civil rights museum in the nation presents stories of the Civil Rights Movement in Mississippi from the period 1945 to 1976. Exhibits focus on the personal experiences and contributions of individuals who served on the front lines of the movement. These activists and their supporters eventually succeeded in changing Mississippi while calling on America to live up to its promise of “liberty and justice for all.” “Mississippi was ground zero for the Civil Rights

Remembering

the Movement

and Reconstruction, and continues through the rise of Movement, so who could tell the story better than Mississippi? Who could be more able to give the hurt, Jim Crow laws and the Ku Klux Klan in the early the pain, the feeling of the movement better than us?” 1900s. The struggle for civil rights emerged as a nascent said Pamela D.C. Junior, museum director. A Jackson native, Junior holds a bachelor’s degree in movement in the mid-1940s. More than 85,000 black education from Jackson State University. She managed Mississippians served in the U.S. armed forces during the Smith-Robertson Museum and Cultural Center in World War II, yet they returned home to unequal treatment and discrimination. Determined to challenge Jackson before becoming director of the Mississippi Jim Crow laws, which enforced racial segregation in Civil Rights Museum last spring. Her initial challenge was to ensure the museum got most every aspect of their lives, many black veterans joined the National Association for the Advancement its story right. Its mission, in a word, is truth. of Colored People (NAACP). “When I first came in, I wanted to make sure that Black Mississippians the language was correct and would be murdered, beatthat everything was correct,” en or terrorized; denied Junior said. “The Civil Rights Movement was voting rights; endure legal She hopes museum visitors for all people. It wasn’t just for setbacks; and fight school will gain a better understanding desegregation battles in of the Civil Rights Movement’s African Americans.... Civil rights their decades-long struggle purpose, and its beneficiaries. are human rights.” for equality and justice. “The civil rights movement – Pamela Junior Their stories are told in was for all people. It wasn’t just seven museum galleries, for African Americans.... Civil through interactive elerights are human rights,” Junior ments, audiovisual theaters, historic photographs and said. “So what I say to everybody is, make sure you come artifacts. “I think people are going to be surprised at how and see what people did for all of us to help make Mistruthful and how authentic the [museum’s] story sissippi a great state.” really is. And there is nothing sugar coated about it. The museum story opens with exhibits on slavery


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“This Little Light of Mine,” the museum’s four-story central gallery, above, features sculpture that reacts with light and music to visitors who enter the space. Historic photographs and artifacts, left, recall the experiences of activists who protested racial discrimination despite death threats and violence. Cooperative Energy is among the private contributors who helped fund museum exhibits. Photos courtesy of Mississippi Department of Archives and History

The “Separate Is Not Equal” exhibit signifies the disparity in educational funding between schools for blacks, left, and whites, right, during segregation. “Telling Our Stories,” right, a companion book to the civil rights and the Mississippi history museums, is available in the museums’ store.

It tells the truth,” Junior said. Visitors will see how activists stood up for civil rights in the face of racial segregation, knowing they may not survive to benefit from their actions. “So many people laid their lives on the line for us,” Junior said. “I ask people the question, is there a cause that you would die for? Is there a cause that you would lay your life on the line for today, and not see the effects of it for 20 years down the road?” The seven galleries encircle a central four-story gallery, where a 40-foot memorial sculpture hanging overhead reacts with music and glowing color as visitors enter the space. The song “This Little Light of Mine,” a civil rights anthem, swells from individual voices to an entire choir as more visitors enter. The interaction evokes the unity of citizens who led the Civil Rights Movement in the state with those who traveled to Mississippi to help support it, despite the danger. Junior describes the gallery as a “magnificent place to pay homage to the people

who fought and died” for civil rights. “It gives me chills when I think about it,” she said. The final gallery, “Where Do We Go From Here?”, encourages visitors to consider ways they could take part in racial reconciliation. “I wanted people to have a charge, to go out and do whatever we can to make Mississippi the best Mississippi that it can be. And I think that from looking at what’s [in the museum], you’ll be able to look at yourself in the mirror and say, ‘Okay, I know what I need to do,’” Junior said. The Mississippi Civil Rights Museum is part of a complex that also houses the Museum of Mississippi History, located at 222 North St. in downtown Jackson. Both museums are open Tuesday through Sunday. Visitor information is available at mcrm.mdah.ms.gov and 601-5766800.


ROAD TRIP 6

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January 2018

Time for a

fter the holidays I try to start the New Year off with a road trip somewhere that’s a long way from my house. It’s a pleasant thought in the middle of December when everything is so hectic. Knowing that after all of it is over I can get some real “peace on earth” while I unwind on my way to somewhere interesting. Since I live in the Jackson Metro area, there are all sorts of places that qualify as a long road trip from my house. In the past I have headed down to Wilkinson County in the southwest in the “chin” of Mississippi. Mississippi January is a litSeen tle cold for the by Walt Grayson Clark Creek Waterfalls down there. But there is always a neat story around Woodville. In the other direction, Tishomingo State Park up northeast is a fun place in the winter. Well, I like it in winter. There aren’t a lot of people there in the cold months. And there is nothing better on a winter night than a wood fire and an open hearth like in the cabins there. But this year I am thinking I will head for Sandy Hook south of Columbia and do a story about the John Ford Home. It’s a couple of hours from where I live. The house is an elevated pioneer-type home built about 1809. The beams are

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ax-hewed logs from the first timber cut from the virgin forest. All heart pine. The architecture alone makes the house significant. But there’s more to it than how it’s built. There’s also the fact that Andrew Jackson stayed there. I was there several years ago. Myra Boone, who showed The John Ford Home is owned by the Marion County Historical Society. You can Google it to get directions and find out when you can visit. me around, told me Photo: Walt Grayson that Andrew Jackson was there on his way to is reason enough to go there. Plus it’s a the way over in Natchez. But the politithe Battle of New Orleans in 1814. But he had to get John Ford’s consent to stay cals in Natchez wanted to keep everything couple of hours from my house. because, as Myra put it, “He was an ugly- intact so they would have influence over Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi the whole shebang. talking man and he drank.” As more people moved into the north- Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting In exchange for getting to sleep inside, television, and the author of two “Looking ern and eastern areas, however, the posiJackson had to swear off swearing and Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That tions flip flopped. Now it was the piopromise not to drink. And, oh yeah, he Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown neers who wanted to keep the territory as Stories.” Contact Grayson at had to go to prayer meeting. The Marion County Historical Society, a whole state and the Natchez folks who walt@waltgrayson.com. wanted it divided, because the political who owns the house, calls the room where Andrew Jackson stayed “The Presi- clout had shifted away from the river and Medicare Supplements into the interior. (I think I got most of dential Suite,” although technically he Low Rates! wasn’t president yet when he stayed there. that right.) (Female age 65, “Plan F” = $111.19 ) Anyway, a statehood convention was The John Ford home is also pertinent held at the John Ford home. The Territoto the recent Mississippi Bicentennial. Statehood was a complicated process. For rial Congressional Delegation had already been working on making a state (or starters they had to decide how big the Insurance Agency states) from the territory. But the petition state should be. P. O. Box 5277, Brandon, MS 39047 The Mississippi Territory encompassed drafted at the John Ford home pushed 1-800-463-4348 the issue across the finish line. all of what is now Mississippi and AlaE. F. Hutton nor its agents are affiliated with the Federal Medicare Program. Andrew Jackson’s room and statehood bama. Natchez, way over in the west, was the Territorial Capital. When statehood was first discussed, settlers in the east wanted to split the territory because they figured their interest couldn’t be served all

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Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves

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Mississippi moving in the right direction By Lt. Gov. Tate Reeves Last year marked the 200th anniversary of Mississippi’s entry into the United States of America. The bicentennial has given Mississippians an opportunity to brag about our rich culture and the incredible accomplishments of our people. Mississippi has a complicated past, but I believe our future is bright. There are positive developments that are often skimmed over by our news media, and I believe they deserve the spotlight. Let’s start with education. Since 2012, the state has increased investment in all levels of education from the kindergarten class to the university campus. That investment has been targeted in the classroom where we can make a difference through a combination of teacher raises and new programs to boost literacy. Mississippi now has prekindergarten programs in communities that want early childhood education. These collaboratives, which draw together state, local and private contributions, are nationally recognized models that prepare young Mississippians for kindergarten. We’ve also stressed the importance of literacy through efforts that prepare third-grade students to read at grade level before moving to the fourth grade. For too long, Mississippi third graders who couldn’t read at grade level were pushed along to the next grade, falling further behind in their ability to complete their classwork. The Literacy Promotion Act set this new standard because we know that up until the third grade, you are learning to read; in each grade thereafter, you are reading to learn. We also spent tax dollars on continuing education programs for teachers, sharpening their techniques when it comes to teaching reading skills. When the law initially passed, the naysayers said that half of Mississippi’s third graders would fail. Well, I had more faith in our students, teachers and administrators. The first year, 85 percent of students passed the test, proving they could read at grade level. Two years later, 92 percent of our third graders are passing on the first try. These results prove that if you raise the level of expectations, Mississippi teachers, administrators, parents and, most importantly, the students will rise up and meet those raised expectations. We’re seeing progress in the upper grades where more students are graduating with a diploma at a higher rate than ever before. Six years ago, Mississippi’s graduation rate was 73.7 percent while the national average was around 82 percent. Today, the national average is basically the same while 82.3 percent of Mississippi students are walking across that stage.

That number represents thousands of kids who have a diploma and an opportunity for success. For far too long, we have defined education based on inputs, not outcomes. Now, we’re focusing on outcomes, and we’re seeing positive results. We ought to celebrate the successes that we’re having in education. The work being done will lead to a transformational change in the abilities of our workforce and the potential for growth in our economy. Even with those successes, we cannot let off the gas when it comes to student achievement and training for careers. We need to develop innovative approaches that bring together educators and Mississippi businesses to train our people for the jobs of tomorrow.

efforts saved the state more than $20 million total. However, we must continue to invest in core functions of government. Mississippi has spent more than $7 billion on roads and bridges since I became lieutenant governor. While we need to look for ways to invest in our infrastructure, we also should find efficiencies in the current way we build and maintain roads and bridges. A prosperous economy requires a private sector that can invest and create jobs, which is why I have supported reducing taxes on your personal income and Mississippi businesses. In January, the first phase of the Taxpayer Pay Raise Act passed in 2016 takes effect. Sole proprietors, including attorneys, pastors, plumbers and other entrepreneurs (which comprise about 160,000 self-employed Mississippians), will be able to claim the We need to develop same deductions on their state taxes that they do on their federal innovative approaches taxes. Eventually, the 3-percent tax bracket on income will be that bring together eliminated, as will the tax on a educators and Missiscompany’s investment in the state. This meaningful tax relief sippi businesses to can spur long-term economic train our people for the growth for Mississippi. As a conservative, I believe you jobs of tomorrow. know how to spend your money better than bureaucrats in Jackson. And I will continue to work Our universities and community colleges are to grow our economy for all Mississippians. responding to the challenge by partnering with Finally, Mississippians have a proud tradition of employers to meet their workforce needs. In Jackson supporting the men and women who risk their lives County, Mississippi Gulf Coast Community College each day for our health and safety. and Ingalls Shipbuilding develop courses that teach stuOur first responders deserve our continued support, dents what they need to know to build the complex as they are there for us in times of crisis. In 2017, the vessels that sail the world defending freedom. legislature passed the Blue, Red and Med Lives Matter At Mississippi State University, the Raspet Flight Act, which enhanced the punishment for criminals who Lab partners with the private sector to develop the lat- intentionally harm a police officer, paramedic, fire est technology in the aerospace field, offering students fighter or other emergency worker in the course of invaluable experience and a path to a good career. their work. Continued job growth requires government to do its This year, the state budget also included funds for a part by creating an environment where government is new trooper training school, which is currently underlimited and taxes are flatter and fairer for everyone. way, to place more highway patrolmen on the roads. A Looking forward, I expect the state budget for the next planned pay raise for state troopers also has been implefiscal year to be one that is balanced, that sets aside mented. money for a rainy day and that spends only recurring Mississippi has earned a reputation as a state that dollars on recurring expenses. can lead in innovation and discovery in our country. Agencies will likely see slight reductions in spending May the next 200 years of our state’s progress be as or be funded at similar levels as this year. Government successful as the last. should live within its means, and we will keep looking Thank you for the opportunity to serve as your lieufor savings. For the third time, the legislature has sustenant governor. May you have a blessed and prosperpended new vehicle purchases for one year, with an ous 2018. exception for law enforcement vehicles. Two previous


# Speaker Philip Gunn # Workforce development: Why it works

8 I Today in Mississippi I January 2018

By Speaker Philip Gunn When we first began recruiting businesses to Mississippi, incentives played a big role. Many companies wanted to know, “What will you do for us?” That is changing. The No. 1 thing businesses want to know now is, “Do you have a trained, reliable, educated workforce?” If Mississippi is to prosper, we must be able to provide a solid answer to that question. A strong, educated workforce is the backbone of Mississippi. It directly impacts our level of prosperity. If our workforce is strong, we prosper. If it is weak, we suffer. Over the last six years, your legislature has focused on workforce development. We have passed legislation to create: • Mississippi Works Fund, which provides training to unemployed people, giving them skills to prepare them to enter the workforce. • Mississippi Works Dual Enrollment A strong, educated Option, allowworkforce is the ing potential or recent high backbone of Mississippi. school dropouts It directly impacts our to dually enroll in their local level of prosperity. school district If our workforce is and the local community colstrong, we prosper. lege in dual credit programs. • MDA Job Training Grants that authorize MDA to make grants to colleges to pay a portion of the costs associated with training or retraining employees for businesses that expand or locate their operations in Mississippi. • Districts of Innovation, allowing local school districts to implement innovative ideas in their schools to increase performance and explore different ways to prepare students for either college or careers. Many of these districts have teamed up with manufacturers to ensure that they are teaching the appropriate curriculum and training the students on quality equipment. • Appropriations and bonding. In 2012, we appropriated $38.5 million for the Workforce Education Program and Industrial Training. We have steadily increased the appropriation for the program over the last six years, and this year we appropriated $51 million, an increase of 32 percent. We also appropriated $4 million in bonds for the MDA Workforce Training Fund. As industry changes and progresses, so must education. We want to be responsive to the needs of industry. We want to be nimble. We want to provide that skilled workforce. This is one of the motivations behind our efforts to seek a new K-12 funding formula. Our goal is to move to a student-centered formula, one that provides funding tailored to the specific needs of the student. Furthermore, my recent appointment of Sean Suggs, vice president of manufacturing for Toyota Mississippi, to our state board of education will bring a much-needed perspective to the role education plays in our workforce. Your legislature believes a strong workforce is the backbone of Mississippi and that the prosperity of our state hinges on how well we put forth a trained and educated workforce.

Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi

Providing an outlet for our future. Some 1.8 million Mississippians depend on a member-owned electric power association to help power their pursuit of a better quality of life at home and on the job. By providing reliable, affordable service and fast emergency response, we have become powerful partners for members in business, agriculture, industry, education and healthcare.

We work to empower Mississippians the cooperative way.

a quality of life partner

www.ecm.coop • P.O. Box 3300 • Ridgeland, Mississippi 39158 • 601-605-8600


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A strange encounter of great benefit It seems I was much younger that day an aging interloper walked up uninvited. I guessed him 70, give or take a year or two either side. He sported a ragged felt hat pulled low, no doubt boxing in a balding head. Grey sideburns and a halfmoon rim of bushy hair stood in stark contrast to what I concluded was likely underneath that old hat. Chin whiskers were, like that rim and those sideburns, grey. “What are you thinking?” His voice was kind enough, but the last thing I wanted was some stranger coming to my quiet spot and quizzing me about my thoughts. “Do you have troubles?” He was an incessant sort and determined to draw me into his mysterious aura. “I suppose everyone has troubles from time to time.” I was shocked at my response, but even more shocked that I had spoken at all. by Tony Kinton I immediately found myself thinking that I should have simply ignored his probing and told him soundly that I was content being alone and thinking what I was thinking, and that I would be much obliged if he would simply drift off down the trail and leave me to my mental ramblings. “I can’t see that as being much of your concern,” I offered, feeling bothered by such a curt rebuttal. He smiled, a curious wrinkle of time and compassion twisting those unruly whiskers. I tried but failed to remove my eyes from his. “Well, I guess that’s true, at least the part about troubles,” he noted. “Troubles are a part of everyone’s life. We can’t do much about some of them, like those associated with losing through death those we love or our own aging. Things like that are just a part of living. But those troubles we create through our own behavior we can do something about, and what we can do is guard

Outdoors Today

against creating them in the first place. You ever think about it that way?” My mind began to whirl, engulfed in this insightful serendipity. “Oh, I don’t suppose I have. But you said part of what I said was true. What part was not true?” He had my curiosity stirred. “That part about it being of no concern to me. Maybe it’s not, but I can tell you for certain that I am concerned. I’m concerned about folks like you, for I was like you at one time. Young, full of spunk, lots of unfulfilled dreams. But most of all full of troubles and the questions surrounding those troubles. So it may not be any of my business, but it is my concern. I’d like to offer my assistance.” He stopped talking. “I thank you, but I don’t feel up to listening to your advice or seeking your assistance.” That’s what I said, but down deep there was nothing I wanted more. This old man had my attention. “Now don’t go putting too much weight in how you feel, especially about listening or seeking. Feelings are generally not too reliable.” He again paused. “Maybe not, but I don’t feel….” “Go to the mountains.” He interrupted my attempt at ending this disturbing line of conversation. “The mountains?” I couldn’t avoid the question. “Yes, but not just any mountains. Go to those that possess a raw ambiance, those rugged mountains of the West. And while we’re at this going thing, make it Montana or Wyoming. Big mountains. Mountains that are wild and unforgiving, even foreboding. Be careful and don’t take foolish chances, but go to the big mountains. “Why?” Again I questioned, not really expecting or even wanting a viable answer. “To face and deal with your questions,” he said. “And what do you suggest I do when I get to those mountains you speak of so fondly?” I asked. He proffered that curious smile again, rubbing his stubbled chin all the while. “Watch that first snow of autumn come to the High Country. Embrace it. Let it transform your very core. Notice how it

Snow progresses downslope with each passing day, above. High passes can be brutal when cold winds howl. But they are grand locales for contemplation. With snow comes a complete forest filled with welldecorated trees, left. Photos: Tony Kinton

creeps downward from the peaks as days go by. See it fluff up on the spruce and hemlock, transforming each into a perfectly decorated Christmas tree. “And go upward to the high passes where winds buffet and blast and chill. But don’t cover your face and turn your back on the gusts. Rather, face them.

Look them in the eyes. It will be painful, but it will be rewarding. And listen to the moans of those gusts. Listening is too often neglected in this world, so listen intently. Their cries are not unlike the pangs of living, but they can be endured and you made stronger.” Suddenly, he was gone. I stood, startled. This time, however, I noticed a pronounced stiffness in my knees and an unfamiliar chill on my head. Had I in this meeting been the young participant gathering unsought advice or the aging teacher imparting that advice? Could it be I had been both? A strange and beneficial encounter this was. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book is “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories.” Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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January 2018

The Mississippi Legislature

convenes in January for the 2018 session

East Mississippi Electric Power Association salutes Mississippi’s senators and representatives who represent our state in Washington, D.C., and at our state capitol in Jackson. We appreciate their dedication and willingness to serve in the spirit of public service to help shape the future of our sta

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congressional delegation SENATORS

REPRESENTATIVES

SENATE Sen. Jenifer Branning District 18: Leake, Neshoba and Winston counties Address: 235 W. Beacon St. Philadelphia, MS 39350 Family: Husband: Chancy Children: Ethan, Ellis, Evan Years in Legislature: 3

THAD COCHRAN

TRENT KELLY

BENNIE G. THOMPSON

United States Senator

First District

Second District

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HOUSE OF REPRES Rep. Joey Hood

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ROGER ROGERWICKER WICKER United UnitedStates States Senator Senator

District 35: Attala, Choctaw, Webster and Winston counties Address: P.O. Box 759 Ackerman, MS 39735 Family: Wife: Cynthia Children: Jonah, Owen Years in Legislature: 7

GREGG HARPER

STEVEN PALAZZO

Third District

Fourth District

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Thank you!

MARSHALL

DESOTO

Rep. Jason White ALCORN

BENTON

T I P PA H

TISHOMINGO PRENTISS

TAT E TUNICA

UNION

PA N O L A

L A FAY E T T E

LEE

PONTOTOC

COAHOMA

QUITMAN

YA L O B U S H A

I TAWA M B A

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CALHOUN

TA L L A H AT C H I E

MONROE

C H I C K A S AW

B O L I VA R

GRENADA LEFLORE

WEBSTER

CARROLL

SUNFLOWER

C L AY

LOWNDES MONTGOMERY

WA S H I N G T O N

C H O C TAW

HOLMES

OKTIBBEHA

AT TA L A

NOXUBEE

HUMPHREYS

District 48: Attala, Carroll, Holmes, and Leake counties Address: P.O. Box 246 West, MS 39192 Family: Wife: Jolynn Children: Sara, John, Carlyn Years in Legislature: 7

WINSTON

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SHARKEY

YA Z O O MADISON

LEAKE

NESHOBA

SCOTT

NEWTON

LAUDERDALE

SMITH

JASPER

CLARKE

KEMPER

ISSAQUENA

RANKIN

HINDS

Rep. Greg Snowden

WA R R E N

CLAIBORNE COPIAH

SIMPSON

3

JEFFERSON

COVINGTON LINCOLN ADAMS

L AW R E N C E

FRANKLIN

LAMAR WILKINSON

AMITE

WAY N E

JONES

JEFFERSON D AV I S

PIKE

for a job well done to all our representatives and senators who represent constituents residing in our service area.

FORREST

PERRY

GREENE

MARION

4

WA LT H A L L

GEORGE

PEARL RIVER STONE

JACKSON HARRISON

HANCOCK

District 83: Lauderdale County Address: P.O. Box 3807 Meridian, MS 39303-3807 Family: Wife: Renee Children: Emily, Katie Years in Legislature: 19


It’s easy to know your elected officials

January 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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Now available

A free, interactive legislative app for Mississippi The Electric Cooperatives of Mississippi offers free versions of the 2018 Mississippi Legislative Roster app. We hope they will be helpful in your involvement with state government.

ate.

ONLINE VERSION AVAILABLE AT

www.ecm.coop

Sen. Terry C. Burton District 31: Lauderdale, Newton and Scott counties Address: 101 Rew St. Newton, MS 39345 Family: Wife: Darleen Children: Ben Jones, Dawn Jones Powell Years in Legislature: 27

SENTATIVES Rep. Carl L. Mickens District 42: Lowndes, Noxubee and Winston counties Address: P.O. Box 427 Brooksville, MS 39739 Family: Wife: Cheryl Child: Carl L. II; Years in Legislature: 3

Sen. Sampson Jackson II

Sen. Videt Carmichael

District 32: Kemper, Lauderdale, Noxubee and Winston counties Address: P.O. Box 686 DeKalb, MS 39328 Family: Wife: Patricia Children: Kalvin B., Kieth K., Sampson III Years in Legislature: 27

District 33: Clarke and Lauderdale counties Address: 5396 Springhill Loop Meridian, MS 39301 Family: Wife: Donna Children: Kaycee Crane, Fredie Jr. Years in Legislature: 19

Rep. Loyd B. (Rob) Roberson

Rep. Michael T. Evans

District 43: Oktibbeha and Winston counties Address: 212 E. Main St. Starkville, MS 39759 Family: Wife: Karen Children: Kelly, Marley, Jack, Eli Years in Legislature: 7

Rep. Omeria Scott

Rep. Steve Horne

District 80: Clarke, Jasper and Jones counties Address: 615 E. 19th St. Laurel, MS 39440 Family: Husband: Charles Years in Legislature: 26

District 81: Clarke and Lauderdale counties Address: 5904 Causeyville Rd. Meridian, MS 39301 Family: Wife: Suzy Children: Lauren, Tommy, Hunter Years in Legislature: 15

Rep. William E. Shirley, Jr. District 84: Clarke, Jasper, and Newton counties Address: 911 CR 140 Quitman, MS 39355 Family: Wife: Benita Children: Kristan, Klaire, Kaylin Years in Legislature: 7

Our easy-to-use mobile app provides information on Mississippi’s state and federal elected officials. Look for “Mississippi Legislative Roster” in the Apple App Store. An Android version is also available through Google Play.

Rep. Shane Barnett District 86: Green, Perry and Wayne counties Address: P.O. Box 621, Waynesboro, MS 39367 Years in Legislature: 3

District 45: Kemper, Lauderdale, Neshoba and Winston counties Address: 1147 Mount Harmony Rd. Preston, MS 39354 Family: Wife: Heather Child: Hannah Years in Legislature: 7

Rep. Charles L. Young, Jr. District 82: Lauderdale County Address: P.O. Box 5393 Meridian, MS 39302 Family: Child: William Years in Legislature: 7

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Chili Cheese Dip with Beans 1 lb. lean ground beef 1 medium onion, chopped 1 (16-oz.) can kidney beans, rinsed and drained 1 (15-oz.) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 (14 ½-oz.) can diced tomatoes, undrained 1 cup frozen corn, thawed

¾ cup water 1 (2 ¼-oz.) can sliced ripe olives, drained 3 tsp. chili powder ½ tsp. dried oregano ½ tsp. chipotle hot pepper sauce ¼ tsp. garlic powder ¼ tsp. ground cumin 1 (16-oz.) pkg. Velveeta cheese, cubed Corn chips or tortilla chips

In a large skillet, cook beef and onion over medium heat 6 to 8 minutes or until beef is no longer pink and onion is tender, breaking up beef into crumbles; drain fat. Transfer to a 4-quart slow cooker. Stir in all ingredients except cheese and chips. Cook, covered, on low 4 to 5 hours or until heated through. Stir in cheese. Cook, covered, on low 30 minutes or until cheese is melted. Serve with chips.

Salted Caramel Chocolate Dump Cake

‘Something is Always Cooking at Ellisville First United Methodist Church’ Members of Ellisville FUMC love to cook—and it shows in their newest cookbook. There are short-cut recipes for busy cooks who need to get meals on the table fast, such as Five Ingredient Easy White Chicken Chili and 10-Minute Taco Salad. Those who enjoy spending more time in the kitchen will find plenty of made-from-scratch recipes featuring fresh ingredients and flavors. Some 60 of the cookbook’s 200 pages are devoted to sweet treats: cakes, pies, cobblers, puddings, cookies and candy. Ellisville FUMC members are equally devoted to sponsoring missionaries and supporting local missions. Sales of their cookbook help fund these good works. “Something is Always Cooking” may be ordered from Ellisville First United Methodist Church, P.O. Box 59, Ellisville, MS 39437. Price is $18. For more information, contact the church at 601-477-8776.

Mocha Coffee 4 cups strong brewed coffee 1 (14-oz.) can Eagle Brand sweetened condensed milk 2 (1-oz.) squares unsweetened chocolate

½ tsp. ground cinnamon Whipped cream, for topping

In a large saucepan, combine coffee, milk, chocolate and cinnamon. Heat through, stirring constantly. Serve in mugs and top with whipped cream.

Easy Sweet Potato Cobbler 1 stick margarine 1 cup self-rising flour 1 cup sugar 1 cup milk 2 cups cooked, but firm, peeled and sliced sweet potatoes

1 cup sugar ½ cup light-brown sugar 1 ½ cups water 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 tsp. cinnamon or other spice

Melt margarine in a 9-by-12-inch glass baking dish. Mix flour, sugar and milk; pour into center of melted margarine. Do not stir. Combine sweet potatoes, sugar, light-brown sugar, water, vanilla and cinnamon; pour into center of melted margarine and batter. Do not stir. Bake at 350 F for 45 minutes or until light brown.

1 (3.9-oz.) pkg. instant chocolate pudding mix 1 ½ cups cold milk 1 box Betty Crocker SuperMoist devil’s food cake mix

1 ½ cups chopped caramels Coarse sea salt for sprinkling 1 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips Whipped cream, optional

Preheat oven to 350 F. Lightly grease a 9-by13-inch baking pan and set aside. In a large bowl, whisk together chocolate pudding mix and milk for 1 minute to combine. Add cake mix only and stir until thoroughly combined. Spread batter evenly into bottom of prepared pan (batter will be thick). Sprinkle with chopped caramels. Sprinkle with sea salt to taste (a little goes a long way). Bake cake 30 to 40 minues or until edges pull away from sides and a toothpick inserted into the cake comes out clean. Remove from oven and let cool on a cooling rack. Pour chocolate chips into a medium microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on high for 2 to 3 minutes, stirring every 30 seconds, until chocolate is fully melted. Using a spoon, drizzle chocolate over cooled cake. Serve cake with a dollop of whipped cream, if desired.

Orange Tangerine Roast Chicken 2 tangerines, halved (may substitute oranges 1 roasting chicken, 6 to 7 lbs. ¼ cup butter, at room temperature ¾ tsp. crushed dried rosemary ¾ tsp. salt

½ tsp. cracked pepper ½ cup white wine or chicken stock ¼ cup orange marmalade Orange and tangerine slices and fresh herbs for garnish, optional

Preheat oven to 350 F. Grate 1 ½ teaspoons zest and squeeze ⅔ cup juice from tangerines; reserve separately. Place squeezed tangerine halves in cavity of chicken. Transfer chicken to roasting pan. Combine butter, rosemary, salt, pepper and reserved zest; rub over chicken. Truss if desired. Combine wine and reserved tangerine juice; pour over chicken. Roast 1 hour 45 minutes or until thermometer inserted into thickest part of thigh away from the bone registers 180 F, brushing marmalade over chicken during the last 5 minutes. Let stand 20 minutes before carving. Garnish with fresh tangerines and herb sprigs, if desired.

Broccoli Apple Salad 4 cups fresh broccoli florets ½ cup shredded carrots ¼ cup diced red onion 2 large apples, finely chopped ½ cup pecans, coarsely chopped ½ cup dried cranberries

Creamy dressing: ½ cup light mayonnaise ½ cup low-fat Greek yogurt 2 Tbsp. lemon juice 1 Tbsp. sugar ¼ tsp. salt 1⁄8 tsp. pepper

In a large bowl, combine broccoli, carrots, red onion, apples, pecans and dried cranberries. To make the dressing, whisk together mayonnaise, yogurt, lemon juice, sugar, salt and pepper. Add dressing to salad and toss to coat. Chill until ready to serve.


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Try black-eyed Susan vine for a resilient ground cover ost folks have poinsettias and entertaining on the agenda during the holidays, but for this column, I want to highlight a plant that has been an outstanding performer for me all year. It took a hard freeze in December to finally shut down my black-eyed Susan vine (I’m going to use the abbreviation BES for this flower), known botanically as Thunbergia alata. For many gardeners, in their experience this is traditionally a basket plant that deserves to be grown more often. These plants are not related to our

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garden-variety BES, but they have similar-looking flowers with dark centers surrounded by colorful petals. This annual vining plant starts out small but grows fast, and it readily scampers up any fence. Its flower petal colors range from yellow to orange and white. An interesting selection that I like is African Sunset. This variety starts out a rusty orange, and, as it ages, the color will change, reflecting the various warm colors of sunset. I got the idea of planting the BES from seeing it being grown in the Mississippi State Southern Trial Gardens Gardening on the main by Dr. Gary Bachman campus in Starkville. Those plants were being trained to grow up a set of supports, but what caught my eye was how the plants created a fine and dense ground cover. I have a grouping of subirrigated EarthBoxes that I used last year to create a small garden with plants to attract pollinators and butterflies to my home landscape. I choose a mix from the tropical Asclepias variety with red and yellow

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African Sunset is a variety of black-eyed Susan vine that changes its color as it ages to reflect the warm colors of sunsets. Photo: MSU Extension/Gary Bachman

flowers, along with the variegated Monarch Promise and the yellow-flowered and the rusty-orange African Sunset. Both grew great in the EarthBoxes. By the end of the year, the BES had almost completely overrun the butterfly weed. This turned out OK because we didn’t have any monarch visitors until November and actually watched monarchs emerge between Christmas and New Year’s. The BES came back with a vengeance this year. I was surprised that four of the six original plants overwintered in our coastal Mississippi garden, along with numerous seedlings. I didn’t realize that BES could be that aggressive. Not only has my small wire fence been completely covered up, but the BES also decided to take on my 8-foot

privacy fence. I’ll admit I installed a few eye bolts and some fishing line to encourage it to climb. The best part of having all of this BES has been all the pollinator and butterfly action—lots of Gulf fritillary butterflies, yellow sulfurs and monarchs (again, no caterpillars feeding on the butterfly weeds, I think because they can’t find them). We also saw the occasional hummingbird. If you think you might like to try BES in your garden next year, seeds are readily available. Buy some from your local garden center, sit back and enjoy all the winged visitors. Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

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your

BEST SHOT of 2017

1. Hummingbird fuels up. Jeff Johnson, Quitman; East Mississippi Electric member. 2. A doe and her fawn graze, keeping an eye on the photographer. Jerry B. Hegwood, Forest; Southern Pine Electric member. 3. Colorful reflections ripple from a mandarin duck. Freddy Prosser, Pascagoula; Singing River Electric member. 4. Bluebirds claim real estate for springtime nesting. Betty Warner, Lauderdale; East Mississippi Electric member. 5. Three amigos: Maggie Mae with Ellis and Sam. June Clayton, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric member. 6. Historic Presbyterian church at Coatopa, Al. Mindy 2 Bradley, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric member. 7. Kaley Decelle seems to hold up the sky over Long Beach. 3 Susan Dunlap, Gulfport; Coast Electric member. 8. Honeybees feast on oranges. Jean Rena Mathis, Lucedale; Singing River Electric member. 9. Alligator appears to enjoy sunbathing. J.B. Barnes, Brandon; Central Electric member. 10. Great egret gulps supper. Loraine Walker, Macon; 4-County Electric member. 11. Jason White takes tea with

4 5

PICTURE THIS


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12 daughter Aspen. Leah White, Byhalia; Northcentral Electric member. 12. Peaceful sunrise at Waveland. Tammy Jones, Florence; Southern Pine Electric member.

CONGRATULATIONS to Pam Sing of Hernando, winner of $200 in our 2017 “Picture This” random prize drawing!

Our next ‘Picture This’ photo theme: Funny Felines Send us your photos by March 14. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of “Today in Mississippi.” Details on page 17.

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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi

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January 2018

Mississippi

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@ecm.coop.

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Our next ‘Picture This’ theme:

Funny Felines Send your funny cat photos to Today in Mississippi and one could become part of our next “Picture This” reader photo feature. Selected photos will appear in the April issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be emailed or postmarked by March 14.

power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people or places in the picture. Feel free to add any other details you like. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail.

SUBMISSION GUIDELINES

HOW TO SUBMIT PHOTOS

• Photos must be in sharp focus. • Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Digital photos must be high-resolution JPG files of at least 1 MB in size. (If emailing a phone photo, select “actual size” before sending.) • Please do not use photo-editing software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.) • Photos with the date stamped on the image cannot be used. • Each entry must be accompanied by the photographer’s name, address, phone number and electric

Attach digital photos to your email message and send to news@ecm.coop. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one email message, if possible. Please be sure to include all information requested in the guidelines. Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Photographers whose photos are published are entered in a random drawing for a $200 cash prize to be awarded in December 2018. Question? Contact Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601605-8610 or news@ecm.coop.

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Memories of traveling by auto r. Roy is not an impulse buyer like I am. In fact, if it’s a large purchase, he may study and analyze the pros and cons for weeks, or even months. He has wanted a new pickup truck for the past couple years, but just could not “pull the trigger” on the actual purchase. But this past October, he took his finalized data to the dealer he had selected and made a deal to order exactly the truck he wanted. Even though it had taken months for him to take the plunge, the days now passed ever so slowly for my man. Finally, the dealer called and said, “Your truck has arrived.” It was like Christmas day used to be for our girls. This truck is like a luxury automobile. It has more bells and whistles on it than my car does. I said, “I thought you wanted a truck to haul things in?” “I don’t intend to haul things in it,” he said. Which made me wonder why he wanted a truck, but he was too excited for me to ask at that moment. A few days later he said, “Let’s take a trip in my new truck.” When anyone says “road trip,” I’m ready to go. Especially when he told me he wanted to go see our grandson, Hunter, and his wife, Kelsey. So, the first weekend in December we drove to Nashville. As we started our trip, we began to

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talk about how travel by automobile has changed since we started traveling together. We talked about our first long road trip, our honeymoon. And how cars then did not have air conditioning or a fraction of the conveniences that cars have today. The radios were AM, so we had to continually change stations to find one that might be clear enough to actually enjoy. Since there was no air conditioning, we had to leave some of the windows rolled down to let in fresh air. And when I say rolled down, I mean manually, not by pushing a button. There were no turn signal lights to use when we intended to make a turn to the right or left. Just roll down the window and stick your arm out— Grin ‘n’ straight for a left Bare It turn and bent upward at the by Kay Grafe elbow for a right turn. If it was raining, we just hoped we didn’t have to make many turns that required a hand signal. The only good thing about those old cars were the bench seats. The girl could sit real close to the driver as he drove

Events MISSISSIPPI

Want more than 418,000 readers to know about your special event? Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Submit details at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@ecm.coop. Events are subject to change. We recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

The Nelons and Brandon Andrews in Concert, Jan. 13, Summit. Adams United Methodist Church; 6 p.m. Details: 601-5511489; BrandonAndrewsMusic.com. 11th Annual Winter Bird Count, Jan. 13, Holly Springs. Volunteers of all ages hike to survey winter bird population of various habi-

tats; 7 a.m. - 12 p.m. Free. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-252-1155; mrrobinson@audubon.org. Pecan Education Workshop, Jan. 18, Raymond. Various aspects of establishing and maintaining a pecan orchard. Details: rebecca.melanson@msstate.edu.

down the highway and tried to concentrate on driving. Another thing that made traveling difficult back then was the highways. This Our first long road trip was for our honeymoon, in Roy’s 1956 Plymouth. was before the interstate highway system was built, few tears, thinking about old times, we so four-lane highways were rare. settled into the luxury of Mr. Roy’s new Normally, highways went directly truck. I found some good music on the through the center of town. I remember satellite radio and set the temperature I we occasionally had to drive through wanted; Mr Roy set the navigation sysBirmingham, and that would take over tem, the radar control system, the blind an hour. Another big problem was finding and spot monitor and speed control. Then he said, “There’s a rest area just using restroom facilities. Service stations Let’s stop for a few minutes.” ahead. were the primary source, but in most I said, “Good, why don’t you put the cases we would have to go inside and ask window down and give an old-time for the restroom key. Oh, how Mr. Roy right-turn signal with your arm.” and I would have appreciated the rest As Roy started lowering the window areas along today’s interstate highways, the air began blasting into the truck, and especially with two young girls. he shouted, “How did we put up with Another complicating factor was the this noise?” poorly marked or unmarked highways I shouted back, “Bad idea.” and roads. If we were not familiar with an area, the only solution was to stop and Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” ask directions. Sixty years ago we could To order, send name, address, phone number and not even imagine such a thing as GPS. $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452. After laughing, and even shedding a The Kingsmen Quartet in Concert, Jan. 19, Hattiesburg. Admission donation; 7 p.m. Heritage United Methodist Church. Details: 601-261-3371; Heritage-UMC.org. Harlem Globetrotters, Jan. 23, Jackson. Admission; 7 p.m. Mississippi Coliseum. Details: 601-353-0603; Ticketmaster.com. “Riverdance”: 20th Anniversary World Tour, Jan. 23, Jackson. Admission; 7:30 p.m. Thalia Mara Hall. Details: Ticketmaster.com/Jackson. “The Sound of Music,” Jan. 25, Cleveland. New production of the classic Rodgers & Hammerstein musical; 7:30 p.m. Admission. Bologna Performing Arts Center, Delta State University. Details: BolognaPAC.com. Oxford Fiber Arts Festival, Jan. 25-28, Oxford. Fiber art workshops, demonstrations, vendors, children’s activities. Admission. Powerhouse. Details: 662-236-6429; OxfordArts.com; Facebook: OxfordFiber. Conservation Quest Exhibit, Jan. 27 - April

29, Jackson. Learn about energy sources, use and conservation. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. Details: 601-5766000; mdwfp.com/museum. So You Think You Can Fish?, Feb. 3, Jackson. Fishing seminars, fish education and activities for anglers and families; 9 a.m. - noon. Admission. Mississippi Museum of Natural Science. Details: 601-576-6000; mdwfp.com/museum. Oxford Film Festival, Feb. 7-11, Oxford. Celebrates art of independent cinema with film screenings, workshops, educational programs. Details: OxfordFilmFest.com. North Mississippi Fruit and Vegetable Growers Conference, Feb. 8-9, Verona. North Mississippi Research and Extension Center, Magnolia Building. Details: local MSU Extension office or 662-566-2201. The McKameys in Concert, Feb. 9, Petal. Love offering; 7 p.m. First Baptist Church of Runnelstown. Details: 601-583-3733.


January 2018

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Today in Mississippi

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SUPER COUPON

3/8" x 50 FT. RETRACTABLE AIR HOSE REEL

Customer Rating

• 13-3/4" L 11-1/2" W 5-7/8" H NOW99

Customer Rating

ITEM 63926

*17199749 * 17199749 LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

800+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com *Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 5/6/18.

SAVE 71%

$

2999

COMPARE TO $

PELICAN

*17205631 * 17205631 LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

NO W

$5999

$22

Case contents and locks not included.

SAVE $114

Blade sold separately.

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

$84

199

8

$ 99 $1999 SAVE MODEL: 77280 70%

ITEM 69505/62418/66537 shown

*17179106 * 17179106

NOW

KOBALT $ ITEM 61971/61972/98199 shown

72" x 80" MOVING BLANKET

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

COMPARE TO

SAVE $400

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Customer Rating

33 ITEM 63255 BRIGGS & $ STRATTON MODEL: 20600 63254 shown

10" SLIDING COMPOUND MITER SAW • Powerful 15 amp motor 99

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

$7999

SUPER COUPON

$

32999 SAVE $230

MODEL: GX200UT2QX2

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8

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO $

HONDA

11999

ITEM 60363/69730 ITEM 69727 shown CALIFORNIA ONLY

SUPER COUPON

99

39999

109

$

99

ITEM 63381

MODEL: DCD780C2

LIMIT 6 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

99 $

17999

$

1750 PSI ELECTRIC PRESSURE WASHER

$599

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$9999

*17144841 * 17144841

SAVE MODEL: HCW10PCSAE 70% $ 99 *17175209 * 17175209

COMPARE TO $

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YOUR CHOICE

Item 42304 shown

METRIC 42305/69044/63171

ITEM 60395 62325/62493 61523 shown

Battle Tested

ITEM 69043/63282/42304

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

Customer Rating

SUPER COUPON

TYPE SAE

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

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$

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ITEM 63763/63444 shown

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

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LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

COMPARE TO

299 SAVE 199 $

*17142283 * 17142283

8999

17999 SAVE $100

COMPARE TO

*17157832 * 17157832

SAVE 85%

$

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$9999

SAVE $80

ITEM 63054 62858 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

SUPER COUPON

DEWALT

BEATS

• 576 in. lbs. of torque • 2.5 amp hour battery • Weighs 3.6 lbs.

$79

SAVE 99 66%

13

COMPARE TO

20599 $ SHELTER LOGIC MODEL: 23522 SAVE 106

*17131841 * 17131841

20 VOLT LITHIUM CORDLESS 1/2" COMPACT DRILL/DRIVER KIT

LIFETIME WARRANTY

$999

MODEL: 2411-1

12999

$

COMPARE TO

NOW

$99 $13999 DEWALT

SAVE $ 99 61% 14

2580

LIMIT 9 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

99

SUPER COUPON

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ATV/LAWN MOWER LIFT 9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED • 300 lb. capacity COMBINATION • Weighs 72.5 lbs. WRENCH SETS NOW Customer Rating 99 Customer Rating

Customer Rating

$

COMPARE TO

NOW

LIMIT 7 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

SOLAR ROPE LIGHT

ITEM 61634 61952/64096 95659 shown

Customer Rating

99

SUPER COUPON

$9

ITEM 69645/60625 shown

10 AMP DEEP CUT VARIABLE SPEED BAND SAW KIT

NO W

$9999

99

SUPER COUPON

*17134003 * 17134003

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

COMPARE TO

MODEL: HOUC3304B10

NOW

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

$799 SAVE ITEM 61363, 68497, 61360, 55% 61359, 68498, 68496 shown

VENOM $ 32

$

SAVE 79 $

SUPER COUPON

• 5 mil thickness

1190 TORQUE FT. LBS. BOLT BREAKAWAY

$

179

NOW

$9999

149999

SUPER COUPON

10 FT. x 20 FT. PORTABLE CAR CANOPY

Customer Rating

NOW

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COMPARE TO

$

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

SUPER COUPON

SNAP-ON

HUSKY

*17111813 * 17111813

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

NOW

Customer Rating

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER

Customer Rating

17999

*17095657 * 17095657

SUPER COUPON

• 6200 cu. in. of storage • 580 lb. capacity • Weighs 97 lbs.

NOW

MODEL: S322A-1

*17099443 * 17099443

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NO W

$9999

BUFFALO BLACK MODEL: DP5UL

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

2/10/50 AMP, 12 VOLT Customer Rating BATTERY CHARGER/ ENGINE STARTER

ITEM 68053/62160 62496/62516/69252/60569 shown

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

SUPER COUPON

SAVE $40

*17084644 * 17084644

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

*17074787 * 17074787

LIMIT 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trenchers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 5/6/18.

SUPER COUPON

21 GALLON, 2.5 HP, 125 PSI RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON VERTICAL OIL-LUBE ALUMINUM RACING JACK AIR COMPRESSOR • 3-1/2 pumps lifts most vehicles

M-REG128334_TodayinMississippi

SUPER COUPON

I

81

95

MODEL:1300

COMPARE TO $

KOBALT

99

MODEL: SGY-AIR184

$

SAVE $39

7999

ITEM 69265/62344/93897 shown

*17212654 * 17212654 LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 5/6/18*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.

19


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Today in Mississippi January 2018 East  
Today in Mississippi January 2018 East  

Today in Mississippi January 2018 East