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E D I TO R’S L E T T E R

‘Homemade’ creates personal connection with others In an age where products increas-

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ingly are mass produced, it’s comfortHave an event you would like to run in Around Kansas? ing when you can find something A story idea or comments you want to share with the homemade like your mom or grandma editor? A recipe and photo for us to consider publishing? used to make—fruit preserves, freshLet us know: baked bread, hand-churned vanilla ice cream for summer family gatherings. ffevents@kansascountryliving.com And remember when your dad and ffletters@kansascountryliving.com grandpa, in addition to their fullffphotos@kansascountryliving.com time jobs, moonlighted as carpenters, plumbers and electricians to fix ffeditor@kansascountryliving.com whatever needed fixing around the ffrecipes@kansascountryliving.com homestead or at the neighbor’s place? If they couldn’t do it themselves, they had a “guy” for everything, someone they could around the Wamego community band together turn to when they needed a car or tractor part, to create the tastes and experiences of a traditickets to an event or an exclusive ingredient for tional, homemade Fourth of July for neighbors their secret barbecue sauce. and tourists, estimated at 60,000 people some It’s interesting to observe the modernistic years. Where they once contracted for their “do-it-yourself ” craze and wonder when simply massive fireworks display, they now produce it taking care of business became a novelty, and “in-house” and have for 18 years to save money, a money-making one at that. As long as I can which is then used to purchase additional fireremember, doing it yourself was the only way to works and special effects. This story of Wamego’s do things. Unless you had a “guy,” of course. Celebrate Freedom festival begins on page 12. The Wamego area has about 31 “guys” who Here’s to homemade everything, especially volunteer countless hours every year working my daughter’s often-requested lemonade, as we on a pyrotechnics crew to offer their commugather to celebrate our nation’s birthday. KCL nity and thousands of visitors a do-it-yourself ol’ fashioned Fourth of July—only their’s is on steroids. Dozens, if not hundreds, living in and VICKI ESTES, EDITOR

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017


(ISSN 0091-9586) JULY 2017 VOL. 67, NO. 7 © KANSAS ELECTRIC COOPERATIVES, INC., 2017 WWW.KEC.COOP

Bruce Graham

GETTY IMAGES-BRIAN 101

Chief Executive Officer

Doug Shepherd

Vice President, Management Consulting

Shana Read

Director of Communications

Vicki Estes Editor

JULY

Carrie Kimberlin

Manager of Creative Solutions

Jackie Kamphaus

Communications Specialist

Trae Green

Communications Intern Officers Kansas Electric Cooperatives, Inc.

Kathleen O’Brien President

“LIKE” Kansas Country Living on Facebook.

Keith McNickle Vice President Secretary

Craig Kostman Treasurer

Cooperatives You receive Kansas ­Country Living as a communications service of these electric cooperatives: Alfalfa, Cherokee, OK Bluestem, Wamego Brown-Atchison, Horton Butler, El Dorado CMS, Meade Caney Valley, Cedar Vale DS&O, Solomon Flint Hills, Council Grove FreeState, McLouth & Topeka Lane-Scott, Dighton Lyon-Coffey, Burlington Ninnescah, Pratt Pioneer, Ulysses Prairie Land, Norton Radiant, Fredonia Rolling Hills, Beloit Sedgwick County, Cheney Sumner-Cowley, Wellington Tri-County, Hooker, OK Twin Valley, Altamont Victory, Dodge City Western, WaKeeney Wheatland, Scott City Kansas Country Living (ISSN 0091-9586) is published monthly for $10 per year (tax included) by Kansas Electric Cooperatives, Inc., P.O. Box 4267, Topeka, KS 66604. Periodicals postage paid at Topeka, KS and additional entry offices. For members of Kansas rural electric systems, subscription cost is $5.88 per year. This cost is part of your electric service billing. Editorial offices: P.O. Box 4267, Topeka, KS 66604-0267. Phone 785-478-4554. Fax 785-478-4852.

12| Community Pride

D E PA RT M E N T S

Wamego residents produce homemade Fourth of July.

Kansas 4| Around Ol’ time summer events

14| Balancing Act

6| Commentary Cultivate safety every day

E nergy providers maintain diverse power portfolio for reliable, affordable electricity.

Talk 8| Guest Serving each other

22| Legislative Wrap-Up

Your Utility Bills 10| Cut Applying low-E window film

Several bills and concepts affecting the electric co-ops and utilities were considered during the 2017 session.

12

Place in the Garden 18| Your Grow history in the garden My Way Home 24| Cooking Lifelong love of fried chicken WA M E G O A R E A C H A M B E R O F CO M M E RC E

Terry Hobbs

Address Changes Please report any change in address to your local electric cooperative. Postmaster Send address changes to Kansas Country Living, P.O. Box 4267, Topeka, KS 66604-0267. Advertisers Contact National Country Market: 512-441-5200, or see www.­ nationalcountrymarket.com. Acceptance of advertising by Kansas Country Living does not imply endorsement by the publisher or Kansas’ electric cooperatives of the product or services advertised. Kansas Country Living assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. Submissions must be accompanied by self-addressed envelopes with sufficient postage to be returned. The publication does not guarantee publication of material received and reserves the right to edit any material published.

26| Marketplace Find products, services you need 28| Safety Cooling off safely Recipes 29| Monthly Celebratory recipes ON THE COVER Volunteers and local support keep Wamego’s July Fourth celebration “homemade.” P H OTO BY JEFF TUTTLE

22

JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

3


T H I N G S TO D O

JULY 12-16 Kansas Wheat Festival, Wellington.This year’s event celebrates the 150th anniversary of the Chisholm Trail with activities for all ages including street dances with live entertainment, arts & crafts, carnival, car show, baby and toddler contest, quilt show, parade, a run/walk, kids rodeo, artisans and demonstrations, chuck wagons and other trail-themed fun.wellingtonkschamber.com/wfkansas-wheat-festival, facebook.com/kswheatfestival, 620-326-7466. At right: The Kansas Wheat Festival offers unique events and activities, including a chance to find a wheat penny. JUNE 29-1 The Odd Couple, Hutchinson.Slovenly, easy-going Olive Madison is pitted against her roommate, the neat, uptight Florence Unger in this hilarious revival of Neil Simon’s comic classic.Stage 9, 9 S. Main St., 316-350-7529, stage9hutch.com, info@state9hutch.com. JUNE 30-JULY 3 Toronto Days, Toronto.

Have a grand time at Toronto Days with a street dance, live music, concessions, breakfast, mud volleyball, horseshoes and fireworks. Call 620-637-2251. JULY 1-JAN. 1 Ice Age Exhibit, Blue Rapids.When glaciers bulldozed northeastern Kansas thousands of years ago, they created natural resources favorable to launching a new frontier town. The Ice Age Exhibit recognizes and honors the role of glaciers in creating Blue Rapids.Blue Rapids History Museum, Patricia Osborne, brhissoc@yahoo.com, 785-363-7949. JULY 1-DEC. 2 Show and Sell Regional

Flea Market, White City.Formerly White City Trunk Sales is now the Show and Sell Regional Flea Market the first Saturday of every month (except November). Hosted in the City Building from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. an assortment of crafts, baked goods, goat milk products, jams & jellies, artwork, jewelry and more will be available. Call Ciri 785-349-2411. JULY 1 Fireworks Display, Stockton.

Celebrate our country’s Independence Day with a fireworks display. Event is sponsored

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017

by Friends of Webster State Park. Webster State Park, 785-302-0030. JULY 4 Coors Freedom Run, Junction

City.Runners can choose from the 5K, 10K, or the 1-Mile Fun Run. Awards ceremony after the last race. Afterward, enjoy the Sundown Salute Parade and celebration. The fun starts at 7 a.m.Heritage Park, 6th & Washington St., 785-238-3103, sundownsalute.org. JULY 4 Fourth of July Celebration,

Norton.Enjoy the day’s activities starting with a 5K run/walk. Evening events will kick off with the watermelon feed followed by a patriotic program by the local Legion Riders with a concert to follow. One of the largest fireworks displays in the region fires off over Sebelius Lake. 785-877-2501. JULY 5-9 Barton County Fair, Great

Bend.Enjoy ATV races, commercial booths, carnival, antique tractor pull, Kids Day, musical entertainment, 4-H and open exhibits, quilt block contest plus many more.455 W. Barton County Rd., bartoncountyfair.com. JULY 7-8 Norton Classic Cruisers Car Show, Norton.Attracting enthusiasts from four states sharing classic automobiles, hot rods and muscle cars. The 15th annual show will be held around the courthouse square in historic downtown. Drag races sponsored by the Chamber will follow this show. 785-8773207, 785-877-2501.

JULY 8 Flea Market Festival, Garden

City.Spend the day browsing vendors with dolls, embroidery, jewelry, children’s books, quilts, crocheted goods, pickles, canned goods, furniture and more. This event is a fund-raiser for the museum’s programs and exhibits; 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.Finney County Museum, 403 S. 4th St., 620-272-3664. JULY 9 Second Sunday Sing-Along, Hutchinson.Spend the evening participating in a community sing-along. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. on the second Sunday of each month. Donation suggested at the door. Stage 9, 9 S. Main St., 620-6640971 or 620-899-5564, bcolladay@gmail.com or dberndsen501@gmail.com. JULY 13 The Little Mermaid, Concordia.Starting at 7 p.m., enjoy a free movie showing. Concessions will be available. The Broadway Plaza, 606 Washington St., 785-243-2010, broadwayplazaconcordia.com. JULY 14-16 Veterans Muster (Camp-

out), Ellis.Kansas Calvary, a chapter in S.M.A.R.T. (Special Military Active Recreational Travelers) hosts this monthly muster. City RV Park. If you are a military veteran, please contact Sherwin and Dorothy Stielow at 785-483-1504 or ssslow@gorhamtel.com. JULY 14-15 & 21-22 Beauty and the Beast, Lindsborg.Hangout under the beautiful Kansas stars as Broadway RFD presents this musical at the Swensson Park Band Shell. Tickets are $15 for adults and $7 for 12 and


under. All shows begin at 8:30 p.m.400 block of N. Main St., broadwayrfd.org. JULY 14-15 Rodeo, Junction City.

Recognized as one of the largest open rodeos in Kansas, contestants from all over the state come to compete in several different events and provide exciting action for the entire family to enjoy. Starts at 7 p.m. Geary County Fairgrounds, 1025 S. Spring Valley Rd., 785-2106536, junctioncity.org. JULY 14-16 41st Annual Meriden

Threshing Show, Meriden.This show will host a variety of events including threshing demos each day, antique/classic tractors, gasoline engines, antique/classic tractor pull Saturday evening, garden tractor pull each day, parade daily, flour milling, blacksmithing, flea market, all building exhibits open and live music Friday and Saturday night.8275 K-4 Highway, 785-633-9706, meridenthreshers.org.

back-to-back regional tournaments as youth from around the country compete for the championship and the opportunity to advance to the Babe Ruth World Series. July 21-24: ages 16-18, July 27-30: ages 13-15.Rathert Stadium, 900 W. 13th St., kansasbaberuthleagues.com. JULY 22 37th Annual Carp Derby,

Norton.Two-person teams will compete to get the most carp by either rod and reel or archery, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. A catered meal follows the awards. 785-877-2501. JULY 22 Summer Sidewalk Sale, Great Bend.Stores will be slashing prices to get rid of summer stock. Shop local and save! Downtown Great Bend, 620-793-4111. JULY 24-27 Geary County Free Fair,

Junction City.Event includes 4-H and open class shows and exhibits, live entertainment,

pedal pull, inflatable amusements, ice cream social, kids’ activities and much more! 8 a.m. to 10 p.m. daily. Geary County 4-H/Senior Citizens’ Center, 1025 S. Spring Valley Rd., 785238-4161, geary.ksu.edu. JULY 25-AUG. 1 Norton County Fair,

Norton.Events include various horse and rodeo shows at the equine center, 4-H and animal exhibits, gospel concert, mutton busting, kids tractor pull, watermelon feed and the Norton Idol music competition. Amusement rides and midway games highlight the home-owned carnival, with stock car races at the Elmwood Park Speedway the last day. Elmwood Park, 785-877-5755, 785-877-2501. JULY 27 Jordan Marcotte, Concordia.

This free event starts at 7 p.m. B.Y.O.B. The Continued on page 20 

JULY 15 Sammy Matthews Play Day Drags and Charity Fundraiser, Great Bend.455 W. Barton County Road, srcadragstrip.com. JULY 16 New Stories of Old Murders,

Newton.Hear about newly rediscovered stories of murder that have touched the lives of Harvey county residents through the years. The program begins at 2 p.m. Harvey County Historical Museum, Debra Hiebert, info@ hchm.org, 316-283-2221. JULY 19-22 Lincoln County Fair, Sylvan Grove.4-H and open class horse show is Wednesday, July 19. FFA, 4-H and open class entries are accepted and judged on Thursday, July 20. Ranch Rodeo at 7 p.m. on Friday, July 21. Demolition Derby at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, July 22. Other events include a barbecue contest, archery contest and a kids pedal pull. Lincoln County-Sylvan Grove Fair Grounds, 301 S. Main St., 785-524-4432, facebook.com/ LincolnCountySylvanGroveFair. JULY 21-30 Babe Ruth MWP Regional

Tournament, Junction City.Watch JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

5


C O M M E N TA RY

Reminders to Cultivate Safety Every Day

BY B R U C E G R A H A M

From time to time, it’s impor-

tant to remind ourselves of some basic safety lessons. For most of us, buckling up is probably second nature. We know better Bruce Graham than to text and drive. Hazardous materials should be stored out of reach of children and basic first aid skills are great to learn. I hope safety awareness around electricity is also automatic: water and electricity don’t mix, ladders and power lines should not get acquainted, and call 811 to dig safe. This time of year, it is also important to remember safety during our outdoor activities. On the farm, harvest means long hours and little rest which can make it difficult to stay alert and on the lookout for potential hazards. Equipment improvements, such as GPS auto-guidance, have increased productivity and quality, but they have also added a safety concern when working near power lines. Safety should not be put on auto-pilot. Most agricultural equipment is not a problem for overhead lines when stowed for road travel or in operation for field work. The problems occur when equipment is prepared for operation as it enters the field and in the process of unloading the harvested product. These operations typically occur at the edge of the field and, oftentimes, under the overhead power line. The good news is with the following safety steps, risk can be greatly reduced: ffKeep a 20-foot minimum distance around power lines—above, below, and to the side. ffUse a spotter when moving

6 

KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017

machinery around the farm. It can be difficult to judge how close a piece of machinery is to an electrical hazard from the driver’s seat. ffUse caution when handling long items such as irrigation pipe, ladders and rods. Coming too close to a power line can cause electricity to arc, or “jump,” to conducting material or objects. ffBe aware of increased height when loading and transporting tractors on trailer beds. Many tractors are now equipped with radios and communications systems that have tall antennas extending from the cab that could make contact with power lines. ffAvoid raising the arms of planters, cultivators and truck beds near power lines. ffNever attempt to raise or move a power line to clear a path. ffRemember, even non-metallic materials such as lumber, tree limbs, tires, ropes and hay will conduct electricity depending on dampness, dust and dirt contamination. Overhead electric wires are not

the only source of electrical contact that can result in a serious incident. Pole guy wires, used to stabilize utility poles, are grounded. However, when a guy wire is broken it can cause an electric current disruption. This can make those neutral wires anything but harmless. If you hit a guy wire and break it, call the utility to fix it. Do not try to fix it yourself. If you are in equipment or a vehicle that has come into contact with power lines, stay in place and call 911 to have the utility notified. Warn others to stay away and wait for the utility crew to cut the power. The only reason to exit is if the equipment starts on fire, which is very rare. If this is the case though, jump away with your feet together and without touching the ground and vehicle at the same time. Then, still keeping your feet together, hop at least 40 feet away to safety. For more information on electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org—and let’s cultivate safety every day. KCL BRUCE GRAHAM is Chief Executive Officer

of Kansas Electric Cooperatives, Inc. in Topeka.

ALERT TODAY,

If you must exit the machinery...

ALIVE TOMORROW

If you can safely drive away...

HEADS UP FOR FARM SAFETY

40 ft. radius safe distance Stay safe around downed power lines. Consider all lines, equipment and conductors to be live and dangerous. If the vehicle is on fire, or you must exit for other safety reasons, follow these steps:

1. Jump clear of the vehicle. 2. Land with feet together 3. Keep going 4. Call for help. Do not let any part of your body or clothes touch the ground and the machinery at the same time.

and hop away in small steps to minimize the path of electric current and avoid electric shock.

until you are at least 40 ft. away.

Make sure no one gets within 40 ft. of the downed line.

5. Do not re-enter the area

or vehicle until emergency responders and your electric co-op crews determine it is safe.


G U E S T TA L K

Greatness Defined by How We Serve Each Other

BY S T E V E E P P E R S O N

How do you define greatness? Muham-

Steve Epperson

... we have a lot to be thankful for, and I hope that we can all accomplish greatness by being servants together.

8 

participating members and the proceeds fund mad Ali once proclaimed, “I am the greatest of those in need. all time.” Maybe he was, as a boxer. You often At Pioneer Electric Cooperative, headhear people debate the greatest NFL quarterback; quartered in Ulysses and serving 10 counties in is it Tom Brady with the most championships? southwest Kansas, we established a program call Peyton Manning because of his consistently high H.U.G.S. (Helping Us Give to Society). Pioneer’s quarterback rating? What is greatness? Michael Board of Directors allows employees to collect Jordan? Babe Ruth? Jack Nicklaus? Wayne all scrap metals in an effort to fund projects for Gretzky was called “The Great One.” What is our local communities. Over the past five years, really great? Aged steak cooked to perfection? tens of thousands of dollars have gone to local The finest car money can buy? Or the house schools, fire departments, police departments, of your dreams on a private lake? Too many emergency services, parks and recreation, youth answers to the same basic question. I guess it programs, crisis centers and institutions that depends a great deal on the context. assist developmentally challenged individuals. Interestingly, the greatest being whoever This is our effort to become great. lived said, “The greatest among you is the servant Servants serve. I hope you will take time of all.” It’s hard to ignore that one. Especially in to recognize your local servants at your local light of our context as a cooperative. I like to service organization. I hope you will take pride think of an electric cooperative as primarily a in the fact that you are a member-owner of service organization. It’s a service organization an organization that has chosen service as its that distributes electricity, but it is a service orga- primary focus. In conclusion, I hope you can nization. This is its essence, its DNA, and must agree, that we have a lot to be thankful for, and be how it defines greatness. Our cooperatives I hope that we can all accomplish greatness by and employees achieve greatness through service; being servants together. KCL service to our rural communities, especially to those in need. STEVE EPPERSON is Chief Operating Officer for Pioneer Electric Cooperative, Inc. in Ulysses. Pioneer Electric cooperatives across the state are Electric serves approximately 15,900 retail electric heavily invested in community service because meters in 10 counties in southwestern Kansas. of who they are. They’re not power companies. They are cooperatives. They are service organizations. Cooperative employees participate and sit on boards of many community clubs and organizations. Employees offer their time, energy and resources to coaching, mentoring and volunteering for area youth programs. Many cooperatives fund benevolent activities through a variety of means. One of the most popular is Operation Round-Up. This program Pioneer Electric’s Vice President of Energy Services Anita Wendt (right) rounds up your electric bill surprises Alan and Patty Bultman with a $3,200 check for their latest project, to the next dollar; that difPeach House Farms. The Pioneer Electric H.U.G.S. grant will be put toward the ference is collected from all installation of electrical wiring.

KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017


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C U T YO U R U T I L I T Y B I L L S

Apply Low-E Window Film Yourself for Year-Round Energy Savings, Comfort Dear Jim: I still have a few old single-

pane windows. The sun’s heat coming in is uncomfortable, and my cooling costs are high. Will applying window film improve the old windows much?—Rich W.

GILA FILMS

Dear Rich: If your old single-pane windows are in good condition, applying window film yourself can be effective. It is not as good as new multipane replacement windows, but film is an inexpensive improvement. Using one of the new year-round low-E window films can increase the glass by up to one-half an R-value and make it more comfortable by the windows summer and winter. Unless your windows are huge picture

windows, applying film is a simple do-ityourself project. These permanent films are extremely durable and last for many years. If you ever do want to remove or replace it, film manufacturers offer special solutions to dissolve the film adhesive for easy removal. These special year-round films have a microscopically thin low-E layer of metal to block heat gain during summer and heat loss during winter. They are barely tinted and not reflective like the mirrored office building windows with film. People will seldom notice the film on the glass from outdoors. The film color (typically bronze or gray) and depth of the tint also impacts how much heat and glare pass through the window glass. Darkly tinted film with a low-E coating blocks the most heat and glare and is best for a hot climate. This also reduces heat transfer coming in from the sun during winter, so it is not recommended for passive solar heating windows. For most climates, a lightly tinted, low-E film provides the greatest year-round energy savings and comfort improvement. When looking out from indoors, the tint is not noticeable. It blocks the intense heat from the sun during summer, yet still allows some solar heat in during winter. The typical chilly sensation when sitting near windows at night is also reduced. Another benefit of low-E window film is it blocks much of the sun’s UV (ultraviolet) fading rays to protect furniture and carpets. Applying completely clear film with no tint also reduces fading and the danger of the glass shattering when broken by children playing. Extra-thick safety/security films are also available. Dark window films reduce much of the sun’s heat by absorbing it

The energy-saving window film is installed on clean wet window glass using a squeegee to eliminate bubbles.

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

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Continued on page 17 


A DV E RT I S E M E N T

Drug Companies Fear Release of the New AloeCure Big Pharma stands to lose billions as doctors’ recommend drug-free “health cocktail” that adjusts and corrects your body’s health conditions.

Drug company execs are nervous. That’s because the greatest health advance in decades has hit the streets. And analysts expect it to put a huge crimp in “Big Pharma” profits. So what’s all the fuss about? It’s about a new ingredient that’s changing the lives of people who use it. Some call it “the greatest discovery since penicillin”! The name of the product is the AloeCure. It’s not a drug. It’s something completely different. And the product is available to anyone who wants it, at a reasonable price. But demands may force future prices to rise. TOP DOC WARNS: DIGESTION DRUGS CAN CRIPPLE YOU! Company spokesperson, Dr. Liza Leal; a leading integrative health specialist recommends AloeCure before she decides to prescribe any digestion drug. Especially after the FDA’s stern warning about long-term use of drugs classified as proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec®, Nexium®, and Prevacid®. In a nutshell, the FDA statement warned people should avoid taking these digestion drugs for longer than three 14-day treatment periods because there is an increased risk of bone fractures. Many people take them daily and for decades. Dr. Leal should know. Many patients come to her with bone and joint complaints and she does everything she can to help them. One way for digestion sufferers to help avoid possible risk of tragic joint and bone problems caused by overuse of digestion drugs is to take the AloeCure.

Acemannan has many of other health benefits?... HELPS THE IMMUNE SYSTEM TO CALM INFLAMMATION According to a leading aloe research, when correctly processed for digesting, the Aloe plant has a powerful component for regulating your immune system called Acemannan. So whether it’s damage that is physical, bacterial, chemical or autoimmune; the natural plant helps the body stay healthy. RAPID ACID AND HEARTBURN NEUTRALIZER Aloe has proved to have an astonishing effect on users who suffer with digestion problems like bouts of acid reflux, heartburn, cramping, gas and constipation because it acts as a natural acid buffer and soothes the digestive system. But new studies prove it does a whole lot more. SIDE-STEP HEART CONCERNS So you’ve been taking proton pump inhibitors (PPI’s) for years and you feel just fine. In June of 2015 a major study shows that chronic PPI use increases the risk of heart attack in general population. UNLEASH YOUR MEMORY Studies show that your brain needs the healthy bacteria from your gut in order function at its best. Both low and high dosages of digestion drugs are proven to destroy that healthy bacteria and get in the way of brain function. So you’re left with a sluggish, slow-to-react brain without a lot of room to store information. The acemannan used in AloeCure actually makes your gut healthier, so healthy bacteria flows freely to your brain so you think better, faster and with a larger capacity for memory.

Analysts expect the AloeCure to put a huge crimp in “Big Pharma” profits.

Doctors call it “The greatest health discovery in decades!”

The secret to AloeCure’s “health adjusting” formula is scientifically tested Acemannan, a polysaccharide extracted from Aloe Vera. But not the same aloe vera that mom used to apply to your cuts, scrapes and burns. This is a perfect strain of aloe that is organically grown under very strict conditions. AloeCure is so powerful it begins to benefit your health the instant you take it. It soothes intestinal discomfort and you can avoid the possibility of bone and health damage caused by overuse of digestion drugs. We all know how well aloe works externally on cuts, scrapes and burns. But did you know

SLEEP LIKE A BABY A night without sleep really damages your body. And continued lost sleep can lead to all sorts of health problems. But what you may not realize is the reason why you’re not sleeping. Some call it “Ghost Reflux”. A lowintensity form of acid reflux discomfort that quietly keeps you awake in the background. AloeCure helps digestion so you may find yourself sleeping through the night. CELEBRITY HAIR, SKIN & NAILS Certain antacids may greatly reduce your

by David Waxman Seattle Washington:

body’s ability to break down and absorb calcium. Aloe delivers calcium as it aids in balancing your stomach acidity. The result? Thicker, healthier looking hair…more youthful looking skin… And nails so strong they may never break again. SAVE YOUR KIDNEY National and local news outlets are reporting Kidney Failure linked to PPI’s. Your Kidney extracts waste from blood, balance body fluids, form urine, and aid in other important functions of the body. Without it your body would be overrun by deadly toxins. Aloe helps your kidney function properly. Studies suggest, if you started taking aloe today; you’d see a big difference in the way you feel. GUARANTEED RESULTS OR DOUBLE YOUR MONEY BACK Due to the incredible results people are reporting, AloeCure is being sold with an equally incredible guarantee. “We can only offer this incredible guarantee because we are 100% certain this product will work for those who use it,” Says Dr. Leal. Here’s how it works: Take the pill exactly as directed. You must see and feel remarkable improvements in your digestive health, your mental health, in your physical appearance, the amount inflammation you have throughout your body – even in your ability to fall asleep at night! Otherwise, simply return the empty bottles with a short note about how you took the pills and followed the simple instructions and the company will send you...Double your money back! HOW TO GET ALOECURE This is the official nationwide release of the new AloeCure pill in the United States. And so, the company is offering our readers up to 3 FREE bottles with their order. This special give-away is available for readers of this publication only. All you have to do is call TOLL-FREE 1-800-746-2899 and provide the operator with the Free Bottle Approval Code: JC025. The company will do the rest. Important: Due to AloeCure’s recent media exposure, phone lines are often busy. If you call and do not immediately get through, please be patient and call back.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE.


Pride Community of the

BY M E L I N DA SCHNYDER

Residents Produce Homemade 4th of July

JEFF TUTTLE

They call the annual Fourth of July fireworks show in Wamego the finale that never ends because for 30 minutes, the sights and sounds are so spectacular you’re sure the show is hitting its peak. Equally as remarkable as the booms and crackling lights is the fact that this fireworks show is homemade. Volunteers donate hundreds of hours and sponsors donate thousands of dollars to offer the free show, which starts at 10 p.m. on July 4 at the Wamego Recreation Complex. The town, 10 miles west of Manhattan, grows from 5,000 residents to as many as 60,000 for the day, so it’s best to come early and enjoy the full day of activities that make up Wamego’s Celebrate Freedom festival. “Wamego exemplifies good ol’ hometown America that day: apple pie, ice cream, a carnival, a car show, a parade and the fireworks show,” said John Bettencourt, a Wamego resident and 38-year employee of Bluestem Electric Cooperative. And not just any fireworks show. “I guarantee you haven’t seen a fireworks show like this one,” he said. “There’s not a better one in Kansas and probably not in the surrounding states.” Sure, Bettencourt is biased—he’s a member of the pyrotechnic crew that organizes and executes the fireworks show. But there’s further proof that he’s right. During Kansas’ 150th anniversary in 2011, a contest voted on by the public named Wamego the best public fireworks display in the state. “We take the most pride in comments from visitors who have compared it to displays over Boston Harbor, New York, Disney, Paris, Berlin and others—all saying it is on par or exceeds their previous experiences,” said Chris Hupe, a secondgeneration pyro crew member and the show’s producer. Wamego’s Independence Day parade started 146 years ago, and they

Above: The pyrotechnics crew unloads the shooting infrastructure and fireworks to set up for the fireworks display.

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N E I L E B E RT

Right: Chris Hupe, the fireworks show producer, inspects channel settings and communication of COBRA electronic firing modules.   JULY 2017


Left: Known as the pyro crew, trained volunteers organize and execute the Wamego fireworks show.

V I S I T WA M E G O.CO M

Below left: The pyro crew volunteers include 17 “shooters” charged with lighting the show.

believe the fireworks started not long after that. For as long as Hupe and others can remember, Wamego residents organized the annual fireworks show. In the 1990s, however, increased regulations forced organizers to outsource the show. Paying for the fireworks and a professional crew resulted in a smaller show, so it wasn’t long before Hupe and other community leaders committed to the training and licensing necessary to return the show to a local production. “To have a grand display, we needed to find a way to use volunteer and free labor to support and execute the show so 100 percent of the funds could go to fireworks shells,” Hupe said. “Then we could produce a show that appeared much bigger than the budget would truly allow.” The community pulled together and in 2000 Wamego produced the first show with its newly formed pyro crew. Now in its 18th year, the pyro crew donates hours of labor and ingenuity to the cause while other community volunteers raise the money needed to purchase fireworks. All funding goes directly to show costs and the pyro crew works on the show year-round, which allows Wamego to produce a meticulously choreographed, grand 30-minute fireworks display.

JEFF TUTTLE

JEFF TUTTLE

Below: Vernon Fails places a special effects rack of fireworks along the shooting perimeter.

While many shows have one launch site and are shooting across maybe 1,000 square feet of space, Wamego has 62 launch sites inside a 200,000-square-foot area. Hupe calls the production 3D sky art. “We’re able to do things that other shows can’t because we have the acreage and instead of shooting in a line we are shooting in circles,” he said. “So instead of having a front side, we offer a 360-degree experience.” Hupe leads the 31-member pyro crew, whose members are all trained in the handling of pyrotechnics. Within that group, 17 are shooters, charged with lighting the show, and 14 are trained assistants that help with various elements of the show and set-up. There are also many other citizen helpers who assist with non-pyrotechnic elements such as equipment movement and cleanup, including the Wamego High School football team. “Our show has grown to four semi-trailer loads of shooting infrastructure and fireworks, so there is plenty of work to do before and after the actual lighting of the pyrotechnics,” Hupe said. Bettencourt, a power communication techContinued on page 16  JULY 2017 

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Energy Providers Strive for

BA L A N C E BY T R A E G R E E N

Generation and transmission suppliers use a mix of fuels to supply Kansas electric co-op members with safe, reliable and affordable power.

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The two feelings are unmistakable. First, the rush of adrenaline, then an overwhelming sense of relief. You just realized your phone was on its last leg of battery, but you somehow managed to get it plugged into the charger before its screen went black. Electricity’s instantaneous nature is truly something to behold. Within a split-second of plugging the charger into the phone’s battery it is revived and able to maintain its functionality. This instant response to our need for energy is made possible by a diverse mix of on-demand fuels: coal, natural gas and nuclear. Intermittent renewable energy sources—wind, hydro and solar— enrich the generation portfolio of suppliers. New ways of thinking and even newer methods of keeping your lights on continue transforming the energy industry. With the rapid rise in renewable energy sources and the fluctuation in costs for some fuels, energy providers balance their power supply with two key goals in mind: reliability and affordability. Both Sunflower Electric Power Corporation, Hays, and Kansas Electric Power Cooperative, Inc., Topeka, provide power to Kansas electric cooperatives throughout the state of Kansas and both echo the sentiment the consumer and their needs are always top priority. “Sunflower is not resource biased – it is member biased,” said Sunflower Electric communications manager Cindy Hertel. “Our board makes every decision, whether it be a generation or transmission decision, with the best interest of the members and the thousands of Kansans they serve in mind.” Les Evans, senior vice president and chief operating officer for KEPCo, explained the necessary forward-thinking suppliers must have when

KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017

making decisions on resource diversity. “Our board makes policies that will impact not only this generation of consumers, but the next generation of consumers,” Evans said. “Decisions involving how we manage carbon, the Clean Power Plan, integrating renewables and figuring out what the best mix is will impact not only today’s customers and environment, but generations to come.” A report by a panel of electric co-op experts in the Business and Technology Strategies Department at the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association (NRECA) identified natural gas as the biggest growing competitor to coal—as long as prices remain affordable. Energy providers are aware of the benefits of natural gas and have been using it for decades. “From the beginning, Sunflower had natural gas in its system. In fact, in August we will celebrate 60 years of natural gas,” Hertel said. “The history of the price of coal has remained stable in contrast to the price of natural gas. While the price of natural gas has been low recently, in the past the price rose above $12 per MMBTU. Having low-cost coal energy as part of our generation portfolio means we have hedge against those high prices.” When the conversation shifts to capitalizing on renewables like wind and solar, finding a balance that maintains reliability and affordability is at the forefront of decisions made by power providers, like KEPCo and Sunflower Electric. Without their diverse generation mix of coal, natural gas, nuclear, wind, solar and hydro, the rapid performance of electricity we expect, whether plugging in a phone charger or coffee pot, would not be available. Even though it seems the wind gusts across


the plains of the Sunflower State almost daily and the sun beams down on the population, Kansas has both cloudy and still days. Wind energy and solar energy can only be harnessed when weather conditions make renewable generation possible. Until battery storage technology is developed at a commercial level to store energy, relying solely on these resources for energy is not possible. “Electricity has to be generated in real-time to meet the consumers’ demands,” Evans said. “Electricity also has to be used in real-time because we don’t have battery storage or any type of storage that is economically feasible for large quantities for a long duration of time.” Although renewable energy is growing fast, it’s only beginning to make a difference in the share of electricity it generates. In 2013, nonhydroelectric renewables generated 6 percent of the nation’s power. By 2015, that number grew to 7 percent, and

the NRECA says it is projected to reach 10 percent by 2018. “They’re not something like a conventional fossil technology where I can control it by turning it up and dialing it back,” Evans said. “I’m at the mercy of when the wind blows and when the sun shines.” Energy providers must balance intermittent resources like solar and wind, with on-demand fuel sources like coal and natural gas to offer consumers reliable electricity at the most affordable costs “Sunflower understands each generation resource has its strengths,” Hertel said. “Having a diverse energy portfolio and having energy resources complement each other has been a priority for our board.”

Energy providers must balance intermittent resources like solar and wind with on-demand fuel sources like coal & natural gas.

Electric Cooperatives Utilize a Diverse Mix of Fuels Nationally, electric cooperatives use a diverse mix of fuels to supply members with safe, reliable and affordable power.

10,000 MW federally owned Hydro

14%

18%

Nuclear

Natural Gas

685 MW co-op owned/operated 5,497 MW

Wind

13%

Renewables

541 MW Biomass

195 MW Solar

54% Coal

1%

Oil and Other

Geothermal & Heat Capture

54 MW

Sources: 2014 U.S. Energy Information Administration, Rural Utilities Service and NRECA.

KEPCo also supplies power through renewable means, utilizing hydro, nuclear, wind and solar, with its most recent addition of Prairie Sky Solar in Butler County. “We have a significant amount of hydro, Wolf Creek Generating Station is non-greenhouse gas emitting and we get wind renewables through our purchase power agreements,” Evans said. “We have recently invested in a solar power installation. If you put all of those together, our carbon free footprint for the last 30 to 40 years has been nearly 50 percent or greater. We have always been on the very leading edge of that.” The responsibility of continually juggling consumers’ expectations on cost and reliability, while incorporating renewable energy sources and making lasting decisions on behalf of people who are years away from paying their own energy bills, is a tall task. “It’s a constant balance,” Evans said. “Kind of like the three-legged stool, where each one of the legs has to be in balance or it will tip over.” Energy providers like KEPCo and Sunflower Electric balance a diverse portfolio of energy resources every day to ensure your phone’s battery can be charged at a moment’s notice, at an affordable cost. KCL JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

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JEFF TUTTLE

nician for Bluestem, joined the crew seven years ago as a shooter, bringing experience with explosives and a safety mindset. “My brother was on the crew first and Chris Hupe knew me,” Bettencourt said. “He knew I started at Bluestem as a lineman and that safety is paramount to being a lineman. Safety is No. 1 with the pyro crew so he invited me to join.” During the show, Bettencourt stands beside Tim Wolf, a 15-year Bluestem lineman who joined the pyro crew in 2014. They wear hard hats, earplugs, earmuffs, safety glasses and fire coats to protect them from debris that comes back down. Over the 30 minutes, each of the 17 shooters uses a flare to light 200-300 shells placed in 3-inch tubes side-by-side on 100-footlong racks. They watch the scoreboard for time cues as well as hand signals from nearby spotters. “You’re sweating, you’re squatting down and trying to stay below the top of the tube because you can feel the concussion when the shells launch,” Bettencourt said. “The show’s 30 minutes long but it feels like two maybe three minutes at the max. You go into a time warp.” But the work isn’t just on July 4. Each pyro crew member works 50 to 100 hours in the weeks leading up to the event, making racks,

JEFF TUTTLE

Continued from page 13 

Wamego grows from 5,000 residents to as many as 60,000 for its Celebrate Freedom festival.

loading racks, wiring the fusing and other preparations to make the show go smoothly and keep the timing with the music. Hupe puts in hundreds of hours to design the show. He and a few other leaders rescripted the entire show this year to add a new soundtrack, which features wellrecognized music from movies that will appeal to all generations. On July 4, the crew’s day starts about 6 a.m. and there’s cleanup on July 5. That means they spend more time with their crewmates than their families for the holiday. “The crew is phenomenal; it’s more of a brotherhood than a friendship,” Wolf said. “We do a lot together aside from the fireworks display—fishing trips, duck hunting. The Fourth of July has always been my favorite holiday so it was hard to give up time with my family but it’s a great feeling to be part of this, and I hope when he’s old enough my son will join me on the crew. “If you really want the true All-American Fourth of July experience, you should check out Wamego,” he added. “I promise you won’t Some call the Fourth of July fireworks show in Wamego the finale that never ends because for be disappointed and you 30 minutes the sights and sounds are so spectacular you’re sure the show is hitting its peak. will come back.” KCL

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C U T YO U R U T I L I T Y B I L L S

instead of reflecting it. This can be a problem if installed on double-pane glass because the air gap between the panes may get hot enough to cause the seals to leak. Nearly clear films do not cause as much heat buildup, but still check your replacement window glass warranty before applying film. Year-round low-E films are available in large rolls or small do-it-yourself kits at most home centers. These kits include the adhesive-backed film, a squeegee and application tools. If you are doing many windows in your house, it is much less expensive to buy a large roll and a few tools separately instead of many kits. To install the film yourself, first clean the indoor glass surface thoroughly. Wet the cleaned glass and the water-activated adhesive on the film using a spray bottle. Place the film In addition to blocking the heat gain in the summer and heat loss in the winter, against the wet glass. Run the squeewindow film reduces glare making computer and TV screens easier to see. Also gee over the film from the center to notice some sun still shines through the windows for natural lighting. the edges to force out air bubbles and cut off the excess film at the edges. It may take several days to dry completely and for madico.com; Plastic-View International, 800bubbles to disappear. 468-6301, www.pvifilm.com; and Solar Gard, The following companies offer energy877-273-4364, www.solargard.com. KCL saving window films: 3M, www.3m.com, 866499-8857; Gila Films, 800-528-4481, www. Send inquiries to James Dulley, Kansas Country Living, 6906 Royalgreen Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45244 gilafilms.com; Madico, 800-456-4331, www. or visit www.dulley.com.

HIGH WATER PRESSURE CAN LEAD TO FAUCET LEAKS

DEAR JIM: It seems like my faucets leak often and I have to install new washers. With all the leaks that I have, I imagine it is pushing up my water bills. How can I fix them permanently? – EDDIE F.

GET T YIMAGES MILOSLUZ

DEAR EDDIE: Small continuous leaks can increase your water bills. Check with some neighbors to see if they

have similar problems. If they do, you probably have unusually high water pressure in your area. This can make leaks worse and more frequent. If you have high water pressure, have a pressure-reducing valve installed. Install a small expansion tank in the pumping. This may help reduce pressure spikes and some of your leaks. KCL

JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

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GILA FILMS

Continued from page 10 


YO U R P L A C E I N T H E G A R D E N

Growing History in the Garden: Hostas

Cynthia Domenghini, Ph.D.

Many hostas grow well in rock gardens and require little effort in terms of maintenance.

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BY C Y N T H I A D O M E N G H I N I , P H . D .

As summer heats up the shade garden is in rock gardens and require little effort in terms a perfect place to direct your gardening efforts. of maintenance. Most will benefit from at least Originating from Asia hundreds of years ago, filtered sunlight and require only minimal waterHostas (Hosta spp.) are a time-tested Kansas ing. However, if hostas are exposed to more than favorite for shade gardens with some varieties a couple hours of sunlight daily and/or wind, that also tolerate sun. With the variability of leaf they will need additional water to ensure healthy texture, size and color, the genus is a low-mainte- growth. nance attraction. Each year hostas will multiply and can be Hostas, also known as plantain lilies, are an divided every few years to increase your hosta herbaceous perennial with great visual appeal quantity, but this isn’t required unless they from the time leaves emerge in the spring until become restricted in their growing space. Some dormancy begins in late fall. Though hostas varieties are more susceptible to slug damage do flower, they are favored primarily for their requiring a pest management protocol. There foliage. Leaves are colored in shades of green, are also plenty of slug resistant varieties. When gold, blue-grey or variegated. Some leaves have leaves go dormant they can be left on the plant distinct venation bringing an eye-catching to provide protection from the winter cold, but texture to the garden. Varieties such as “Dixie beware that this debris can become a perfect Cups” and “Abiqua Drinking Gourd” have habitat for pests. If diseases and/or pests are a unique cup-shaped leaves. Other varieties have concern, the leaves can be removed and a layer leaves shaped as hearts, ovals or are more narrow of mulch can be used to cover the soil surface. and linear. With the thousands of varieties of hostas Flowers appear on spikes in shades of purple available, there is a plant to match every garor white typically in summer. Flower spikes can dener’s preferences. Planting a selection of two be removed when the blooms are spent although or three types of hostas in the garden together some gardeners remove them before the blooms can make a fantastic display resembling a patcheven appear to maintain the focus on the leaves. work quilt. Hostas are a great way to connect to As varied as the leaf texture and shape is history while growing in the garden. KCL the plant size. Ranging from just a few inches to more than 3 feet, there is a hosta that can fit any garden size. “Blue Mouse Ears” has rounded leaves only 2 inches in diameter. The plant itself reaches a height of 8 inches with a spread of 19 inches. “Tears of Joy” is another miniature variety reaching 4 inches tall but with narrow, wavy leaves. The smaller hostas are great options for a fairy garden and are a drastic contrast to their giant counterparts. “Sum and Substance” grows more than 30 inches with large, chartreuseSunlight filters through to three varieties of hostas including a dwarf colored, rounded leaves. variety tucked beneath a giant blue hosta and a medium-sized variegated Many hostas grow well species.

KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

  JULY 2017


Health

How a Chicago Doctor Shook Up the Hearing Aid Industry with his Newest Invention New nearly invisible digital hearing aid breaks price barrier - 90% LESS

The doctor evaluated the high priced digital hearing aids on the market, broke them down to their base components, and then created his own affordable version - called the MDHearingAid AIR® for its virtually invisible, lightweight appearance.

Reported by J. Page

Chicago: Board-certified physician Dr. S. Cherukuri has done it once again with his newest invention of a medical-grade, ALL-DIGITAL, affordable hearing aid. This new digital hearing aid is packed with all the features of $4,000 competitors at a mere fraction of the cost. Now, most people with hearing loss are able to enjoy crystal clear, natural sound— in a crowd, on the phone, in the wind—without suffering through “whistling” and annoying background noise.

Digital Hearing Aid Outperforms Expensive Competitors This sleek, fully programmed, light-weight, hearing aid is the outgrowth of the digital revolution that is changing our world. While demand for “all things digital” caused most prices to plunge (consider DVD players and computers, which originally sold for thousands of dollars and today can be purchased for less), the cost of a digital medical-grade hearing aid remains out of reach. Dr. Cherukuri knew that many of his patients would benefit but couldn’t afford the expense of these new digital hearing aids. Generally they are not covered by Medicare and most private health insurance plans.

Nearly Invisible!

Affordable Digital Technology

SAME FEATURES AS EXPENSIVE HEARING AID COMPETITORS Mini Behind-the-Ear hearing aid with thin tubing for a nearly

invisible profile Advanced Noise Reduction to make speech clearer Feedback Cancellation eliminates whistling Wide Dynamic Range Compression makes soft sounds audible and loud sounds comfortable Telecoil setting for use with compatible phones, and looped environments like churches 3 Programs and Volume Dial accommodate most common types of hearing loss even in challenging listening environments

   

Can a hearing aid delay or prevent dementia? A study by Johns Hopkins and the National Institute on Aging suggests older individuals with hearing loss are significantly more likely to develop dementia over time than those who retain their hearing. They suggest that an intervention—such as a hearing aid—could delay or prevent dementia by improving hearing!

“Satisfied Buyers Agree AIR is the Best Digital Value!” “I am hearing things I didn’t know I was missing. Really amazing. I’m wearing them all the time.” —Larry I., Indiana “Almost work too well. I am a teacher and hearing much better now.” —Lillian B., California “I have used many expensive hearing aids, some over $5,000. The AIRs have greatly improved my enjoyment of life.” —Sam Y., Michigan

“I would definitely recommend them to my patients with hearing loss.” —Amy S., Audiologist, Indiana

Using advanced digital technology, the MDHearingAid AIR® automatically adjusts to your listening environment — prioritizing speech and de-emphasizing background noise. Experience all of the sounds you’ve been missing at a price you can afford. This doctor designed and approved hearing aid comes with a full year’s supply of long-life batteries. It delivers crisp, clear sound all day long and the soft flexible ear domes are so comfortable you won’t realize you’re wearing them.

Try it Yourself at Home With Our 45-Day RISK-FREE Trial Of course, hearing is believing and we invite you to try it for yourself with our -RISK-FREE 45-DAY HOME TRIAL. If you are not completely satisfied, simply return it within that time period for a full refund of your purchase price.

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800-479-1476 DE86 to get FREE BATTERIES Use Code

for a Full Year!

GetMDHearingAid.com ©2017


T H I N G S TO D O

Continued from page 5 

JULY 28-29 Czech Festival, Wilson.Join us for our 57th Annual After Harvest

Czech Festival “Rural Roots & Dusty Boots.” Events include Czech Queen Pageant & Princess Pageant, parade, Czech dancers, rides & games, social garden and vendors. Live performances by Jimmy Dee & The Fabulous Destinations, Freddy Fox & The Hotrods, and many more.785-658-2272, czechfestival@wilsoncom.us, wilsonczechfest.com. At left: Czech dancers perform during the parade.

Broadway Plaza, 606 Washington St., 785-2432010, www.broadwayplazaconcordia.com. JULY 28-29 Nicodemus Homecoming,

Nicodemus.A variety of activities are scheduled including a parade, pancake feed, baseball games, historical program, vendors, watermelon feed and lots of fun for the whole family. View schedule at nicodemushomecoming.org, 785-839-4238 or 785-839-4470.

AUGUST AUG. 3-6 The Laramie Project,

Hutchinson.In 1998, Matthew Shepard was brutally murdered in Laramie, Wyoming. This tragic, yet crystallizing event is explored in the docudrama, The Laramie Project. Stage 9, 9 S. Main, stage9hutch.com info@stage9hutch. com 316-350-PLAY (7529). AUG. 4-6 44th Annual Country

Threshing Days, Goessel.Old-fashioned country threshing demonstrations and show with more than 100 exhibitors from a sevenstate area. Displays and demonstrations of old or antique farm-related equipment from the past century.wheatco.org. AUG. 4-6 Kansas Singles in Agriculture,

Hillsboro, Goessel & Newton. Building new friendships and enjoying new tomorrows is what Singles In Agriculture is all about. See ventriloquist, parade, Mennonite Heritage, Agriculture Museum and more. Larry Voth, 620-345-9879, Jill 620-682-1179, singlesinagriculture.org/kschapter.

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

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AUG. 5 Dwight Summerfest, Dwight. Enjoy the day with a 5K run/walk, parade, vendor fair, kids games, food trucks, live music, and free health screenings. From 7 a.m. to midnight.785-482-3455, cityofdwight@tctelco.net. AUG. 5 NHRA Summit Points Race #5,

Great Bend.Featuring Rocky Mountain Super Chargers. Come see funny cars and altereds, pro/mods and dragsters—all supercharged. 455 W. Barton County Road,. srcadragstrip.com. AUG. 10 The Wizard of Oz, Concordia.

Starting at 7 p.m., enjoy a free movie showing. Concessions will be available.The Broadway Plaza, 606 Washington St., 785243-2010, broadwayplazaconcordia.com. AUG. 11 Community Family Board

Game Night, Wichita.Before going back to school and facing the stress new routines bring, spend a relaxed evening playing board games as a family for free from 7 to 9 p.m. Sedgwick County Extension Sunflower Room., 7001 W. 21st. N. (21st & Ridge), lizb@ ksu.edu, www.sedgwick.ksu.edu. AUG. 12-SEPT. 24 “Water/Ways” Exhibit,

Colby.Enjoy this Smithsonian exhibit exploring themes such as water and humanity, climate and weather, harnessing the power of water, and many more. Prairie Museum, 1905 S. Franklin Ave, 785-460-4590. AUG. 12 Back to School Sale, Great

Bend.Participating stores are slashing their

prices for you right before the school year begins. Buy what you need all in Great Bend. Stores vary, for more information call 620793-4111. AUG. 12 Float Your Boat Cardboard

Boat Races, Junction City.Are you ready to “Rock the Boat?!” Build a boat out of only cardboard and duct tape that can hold at least two people and can be paddled on a set course and you could win. No entry fees. Participants need to be on site by noon. Event starts at 2 p.m. The Gathering Pond, 785-2382885, junctioncity.org. AUG. 12 Party in the Park & Car Show,

Great Bend.The last big party before school starts! This event runs from 8 a.m. to midnight and includes an obstacle mud run, parade, inflatable fun zone, car show, dog park fun, concert, fireworks over the lake and more! Veteran’s Memorial Park, 17th & McKinnley St., www.facebook.com/ ExploreGreatBend, www.greatbend.org. AUG. 13 Second Sunday Sing-Along,

Hutchinson.Spend the evening participating in a community sing-along. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. on the second Sunday of each month. Donation suggested. 9 S. Main St., 620-664-0971, 620-899-5564, bcolladay@ gmail.com or dberndsen501@gmail.com. AUG. 17-20 150th Year Cowtown Celebration, Ellsworth.Come celebrate the rich western heritage and cowboy culture with many special events with western artists and musicians, cowboy trade show,


El-Kan Western Riders Rodeo, re-enactments including the shooting of Sheriff Whitney and parade, with the driving of 100 longhorns through the town! Downtown, 405-550-0970, ellsworthcowtowndays.com. AUG. 18-19 Two-Day Fun at the strip, Great Bend.Test and Tune & Gamblers Race on Friday night. NHRA Summit Points Race #6 on Saturday, including the NHRA National Dragster Challenge and NHRA Summit JR Dragster Challenge.Visit srcadragstrip.com. AUG. 19-20 Car Show and Big Poker Run,

Scott City.Check out the best two-day show in Kansas at the 38th annual Lake Scott Car Show and Big Poker Run. Awards, door prizes, music, Lake Scott cruise, hog roast, movie in the park, Sunday breakfast and more. City Park, Call

Rex at 620-214-9039 or Phil at 620-290-2618. AUG. 19 Genealogy & History Fair,

Manhattan.Be transported back in time by looking through genealogy societies, history projects, family stories, quilts, record preservation, food history, photo albums and more from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Admission is $5, while food from the delicious Vista Food Truck will be on site.Pottorf Hall, CICO Park, 785565-6495, rileycgs.com. AUG. 24 Mountain Deer Revival, Concordia.Starting ar 7 p.m., enjoy a free concert by Mountain Deer Revival. This event is B.Y.O.B. The Broadway Plaza, 606 Washington St., 785-243-2010, broadwayplazaconcordia.com.

AUG. 29 Business Expo, Junction City. Browse booths for information and products by area businesses. Children can enjoy the bounce house, face painting and more! Food and beverages will be available. From 5 to 8 p.m. Heritage Park, 6th & Washington St., 785-762-2632, www.jcacc.org. KCL

Submit your information to events@ kansascountryliving.com by the fifth of the month prior to publication. Be sure to include contact information in case readers have questions. We publish Around Kansas listings as a courtesy and as space allows and cannot guarantee publication. To guarantee placement of your event in the magazine, contact ad sales at 785-478-4554 or advertising@kansascountryliving.com.

JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

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Wrap-Up LEGISLATIVE SESSION

With school finance, taxes, and a budget passed, the Kansas Legislature adjourned Saturday, June 10, after a record-tying 113 days. Along the way, several bills and concepts affecting electric cooperatives and utilities were also considered. Here’s a quick review: School Finance/Education

Lawmakers approved a plan to phase in a $293 million increase for Kansas schools. The move comes after a March ruling by the Kansas Supreme Court that the block grant program approved in 2015 was inadequate. The new K-12 bill raises $194 million for schools in the 2018 fiscal year and another $100 million in 2019. The bill was approved by Governor Brownback but the plan is still subject to review by the Kansas Supreme Court.

Budget

The basic bill allows approximately $6.3 billion State General Fund spending in 2018 and about $6.5 billion the following year which will fund K-12 education as noted above. It will also begin to restore state payments to the employee retirement fund (KPERS) and provide most state employees with the first raise in almost a decade.

Taxes

Tax plans were created and debated throughout the session. The Legislature, back in March, passed a tax package but it was vetoed by Governor

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

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Brownback and an attempt to override the veto failed. The final bill was approved with a successful veto override in June. Key provisions of the state’s new tax bill: ffRepeals the LLC tax break and stops the “march to zero income tax.” ffRestores deductions and credits for medical expenses, child and dependent care, mortgage interest and property taxes, and enhances low income tax exclusions. On behalf of Kansas electric cooperative members, KEC monitored a number of legislative and regulatory concepts that could impact electric cooperatives and their members. Their status at the end of the session is as follows:

Taxes and Fees on Residential Utility Bills

Many revenue ideas were considered during the session including the repeal of a broad list of current tax exemptions. Increases in existing fees and some new ideas were also considered—with two targeted at the utility bill. The first was to add sales tax to residential utility bills. Currently, residential customers do not pay sales tax on their electric bill but many in the Legislature advocated adding the state sales tax of 6.5 percent to the bottom line. Another idea would add a meter fee to all existing utilities (electricity, natural gas, water). Utilities were concerned that they would receive the brunt of customer blame for such a significant boost in their bill and Legislators heard the objections from many constituents to these “hidden” taxes. These ideas, however, remain intriguing to many in the Statehouse.


Bill “Unbundling”

KEC and utilities across the state joined forces in opposition to Senate Bill 209. The proposed legislation sought to “unbundle” utility bills and require the listing of nearly a dozen new cost components. Although many co-ops already provide details such as the customer access charge, power costs, taxes and more, advocates for this legislation made no secret that this is the first step in a move to retail choice in Kansas. Several legislators were impressed with the approximately 40 electric cooperative representatives present during the hearing to demonstrate concern.

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Retail choice, also called retail wheeling, would restructure the electric industry. This concept was considered in Kansas and many other states 20 years ago. Several states went through with restructuring but it has only seen arguable success in Texas. Under this idea, the current electric provider would most likely retain responsibility for poles, wires and other infrastructure necessary to deliver electricity— but every consumer would be forced to evaluate different rate plans from another company to secure the actual kilowatts needed to keep their lights on. Some large commercial or industrial customers appear to be pushing for this change because they might be able to aggregate power purchases and reduce their energy bills. Residential and small commercial customers are less attractive to energy marketers and won’t have the same clout. And remember, a market price doesn’t mean a lower price. While our strong concerns are being heard, we expect future consideration of this concept by the Kansas Legislature. The January issue of Kansas Country Living forecast debate on two other topics: pole attachments and a Property Assessed Clean Energy (PACE) initiative. As it turned out, neither of these issues were considered in Kansas this session. KCL

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JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

23


C O O K I N G M Y WAY H O M E

Lifelong Love of Fried Chicken No Flash in the Pan BY R E B E C C A H O WA R D

Growing up eating some of the best fried

folks in my grandparents’ backyard, where my mother’s mountain of fried chicken, just as delichicken your fingers could ever take a shine to cious served cold, disappeared quickly from her (or from) presents a singular problem: for the giant yellow Tupperware bowl. rest of your life, all other fried chicken pales. My mom’s fried chicken was as symbolic of I’ve eaten much-touted chicken in all sorts Independence Day as parades, smoke bombs, of places—from revered mom-and-pop joints to the Sundown Salute at Milford Lake, Black Cat the restaurants of celebrity chefs from the South firecrackers and my Grandpa Howard flinging to the West. The fried chicken was mostly excelsaid firecrackers—lit from the business end of his lent, but it was not my mom’s. Rebecca Howard hand-rolled cigarettes—under lawn chairs. I’ve tried my own hand at frying chicken, Funny that fried chicken—American, iconic, too, testing out formulas that have included and as author John T. Edge described it, a “totem everything from brined-in-buttermilk and of tradition”—is so connected to summer, when dipped in self-rising flour to coatings of potato it requires standing over a hot pan, for a good chips or Japanese Panko crumbs, cooking in all while, in a ritual that, without the luxury of manner of fat, from butter to peanut oil. But air-conditioning, is a sweaty pursuit that cannot something is missing, and it’s my mother, standbe hurried. If she fried at least three chickens ing over a snapping skillet, fork poised to turn for our family gatherings, my mom would be golden chunks of chicken dressed simply in a cooking for a few hours into her own kind of coating of seasoning salt and all-purpose flour. sundown salute the night before. Juicy, tender and perfectly crusted, my “‘Chicken to fry for the Fourth of July’ was mom’s chicken has always been met with as traditional as turkey for Thanksgiving Day,” much fanfare, expressed in wordless crunchwrote Kansas food writer Clementine Paddleford ing, whether it was just the four of us around in her 1960 book, How America Eats (Charles a platter of it served hot for Sunday dinner, Scribner’s Sons). Paddleford, who chronicled accompanied by mashed potatoes slathered in too-thick-to-pour milk gravy studded with crispy recipes from coast to coast, knew that while other regions, especially the South, laid claim pan leavings, or a Fourth-of-July potluck of 40 to fried chicken expertise, “honest-to-goodness Kansas fried chicken,” represented the best of her home state, where “women did handsomely by the picnic bird.” Rural Kansans, often raising their own birds, contributed to the ritual of special dinners built around fried ff 1/3 cup fine sea salt ff 1 tsp. garlic powder chicken. In my own Kansas lineage, ff 1 -1/2 Tbs. superfine sugar ff 1 tsp. ground turmeric my mother’s mother—ever resourceff 1 -1/2 tsp. cornstarch ff 1/2 tsp. celery seeds (optional) ful in all manner of farm life—on ff 1 Tbs. paprika ff Pinch of ground cayenne Sundays fried chicken that was so irrepepper (optional) ff 2 tsp. celery salt sistible, she attached a warning note ff 1- 1/2 tsp. onion powder to it where it lured from a warm oven: This flavorful salt is perfect for fried chicken, fish, squash, potatoes and more! It’s also great “No, no, no! This is for supper!” on grilled vegetables. A mind-boggling number of fried chicken methods exist, all claiming to Combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir until well-combined (or place in a be THE one. When I pressed my mom lidded jar and shake until mixed). Store in an airtight jelly jar or spice jar. You can tailor the mix to your liking by adjusting quantities or adding your favorite dried herbs for her process recently, she intro(such as thyme) and spices. duced it by saying, “I don’t know what I do.” Ah, was she keeping a secret

GETTY IMAGES/BARONB

Seasoned Salt

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

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A mind-boggling number of fried chicken methods exist, all claiming to be THE one. or merely operating by instinct as most really good cooks do? Cooking from the heart, not a map. I like to describe her method in three “s” words: SOAK: By this I mean, soaking the chicken (a young fryer, not too big), cut into parts, in a large bowl of bathwarm water. It brings the chicken to room temperature and the wet chicken allows the flour to adhere thickly (my mom credits her cousin, Sheryl, for this trick). SEASON: While many recipes suggest that salt and pepper are enough, my mom swears by Lawry’s Seasoned Salt, a flavorful and colorful blend of salt, sugar, paprika, celery salt, onion, turmeric and garlic powder. Low on Lawry’s during her recent chickenfrying demo, she mixed up a batch herself (from a well-stocked cupboard) that was a dead ringer (see recipe here). My mother season-salts the chicken liberally, then dusts it in a pan of flour that has been mixed with pepper (she has also shaken everything in a paper bag). SIZZLE: My mom sometimes uses an electric skillet; sometimes her good old cast iron. Either way, a generous amount of a vegetable oil/shortening combo (“halfway up the chicken,” as Edna Lewis wrote) heated at high temp to start ensures a good sear as the chicken pieces begin to fry. She turns the heat down, allows browning to

begin; after several minutes, turns the chicken and covers it (essential for juiciness). She lifts the lid and turns the chicken again for a few more minutes of cooking to ensure crispiness. Pieces are fried by category: white and dark meat (white cooks quicker), and no overcrowding the pan. She guesstimates it takes 8 to 10 minutes per side, about 20 minutes per pan. Or, as she puts it, “I’ll cook until I get tired of cooking.” Let’s hope that’s not for awhile. KCL grew up in Kansas and received a bachelor’s degree in journalism and mass communications from Kansas State University. She currently writes the food blog, “A Woman Sconed.”

REBECCA HOWARD

JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

25


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27


SAFETY

Cool Off This Summer—Safely

In 2006, an estimated 33,500 injuries were reported to hospital emergency rooms as involving air conditioners, fans, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, air purifiers and heat pumps.

Hot weather brings increased use of air conditioners. Contact with electric current from air conditioners accounts for a significant number of electrocutions and electrical injuries each year. ESFI recommends that you always contact a qualified, licensed electrician to perform any electrical work in your home, including the installation and services of air conditioning and other cooling equipment.

and related equipment included 2,400 per year involving central and room air conditioners specifically and 3,700 per year involving fans. From 1995-2003 (excluding 1999, which was not reported), there were 11.5 electrocution deaths per year involving air conditioners and 4.3 electrocution deaths per year involving fans.

Facts and Statistics

ffHave a qualified, licensed electrician install

According to the CPSC, 15 percent of consumer product-related electrocutions are attributed to large appliances. These electrocutions occur most commonly while someone is attempting to service or repair the appliance. In 2006, an estimated 33,500 injuries were reported to hospital emergency rooms as involving air conditioners, fans, humidifiers, dehumidifiers, air purifiers and heat pumps. The leading types of injuries were laceration (14,890), contusion or abrasion (6,110), and strain or sprain (4,430). In 2006, air conditioning or related equipment was involved in an estimated 7,400 reported U.S. home structure fires, with associated losses of 270 civilian injuries and $200 million indirect property damage. From 2003-2006, the 7,000 reported home structure fires per year involving air conditioning

CARRIER & BRYANT RECALL HEAT PUMPS

The U.S. Product Safety Commission has issued the following air conditioner recall. If you have purchased one of these products, please follow the remedy instructions that follow for each of the products. CARRIER AND BRYANT HEAT PUMPS – Carrier has received 41

reports of the heat pumps overheating. No injuries, fires or property damage have been reported. This recall involves 2-, 3-, 4-, and

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KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING 

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Cooling Equipment Safety Tips

ffKeep safety in mind when selecting cooling

equipment for your home.

and service any electrical equipment in your home. ffHave electric-powered equipment inspected and maintained regularly for safety. ffMake sure your equipment has the label showing that it is listed by a recognized testing laboratory. ffDo not store or place objects near the air handler unit. This unit should have plenty of open space to breath. ffKeep children away from the condensing unit. The moving fan blade is covered by a grill, but can be dangerous if a child tries to stick objects through the grill. ffKeep the cover on the thermostat unit on at all times. There are live electrical components inside the unit that can be dangerous if exposed. KCL

5-ton size heat pump units sold under the Carrier Greenspeed and Bryant Evolution Extreme brand names. The Carrier Greenspeed model numbers are: 25VNA024, 25VNA036, 25VNA048, and 25VNA060. The Bryant Evolution Extreme model numbers are:  280ANV024, 280ANV036, 280ANV048, and 280ANV060.  ffHAZARD: The capacitors in the fuse boards in the heat pumps can stop working causing the unit to overheat, posing a fire hazard. ffREMEDY: Repair. Contact Carrier or Bryant for instructions on receiving a free replacement fuse board installed by authorized Carrier or Bryant technicians. KCL


JULY 2017 

  KANSAS COUNTRY LIVING  

29

White Barbecue Sauce with Smoky Chicken

Watermelon Caprese Salad with Balsamic Vinegar

KANS AS COUNTRY LIVING, JULY 2017

Smother grilled chicken with the South’s tangy little secret—white barbecue sauce.

KANS AS COUNTRY LIVING, JULY 2017

Watermelon is a flavorful substitute for tomatoes in this traditional Italian appetizer.

Red, White & Blue Cake

Grilled & Loaded Smashed Potatoes

KAN S AS COU N T RY L IVIN G, JU LY 201 7

This festive Fourth of July cake looks as impressive as it tastes.

KAN S AS COU N T RY L IVIN G, JU LY 201 7

Keep the heat outside by cooking this side dish alongside the grilled chicken.


ff 1/4 cup sour cream

ff 2 Tbs. finely chopped green onions

ff 1/2 cup shredded cheddar cheese

ff 1/2 cup chopped red bell pepper

ff 1 cup chopped yellow onion

Grilled & Loaded Smashed Potatoes ff 1-1/2 pounds medium Yukon gold potatoes ff 1 Tbs. vegetable oil ff 5 tsp. bacon chipotle seasoning, divided ff 6 slices smoked bacon, cut into 1/4-inch pieces

Heat grill to medium. Place potatoes on microwavable plate. Pierce potatoes with fork several times. Microwave on high 5-6 minutes or until fork-tender but still firm. Let stand until cool enough to handle. In large bowl, toss potatoes, oil and 3 teaspoons seasoning until well coated. Place potatoes on grill and cook, turning frequently, 4-5 minutes or until skin is crispy. In large cast-iron skillet on grill, cook and stir bacon 8-10 minutes, or until crisp. Add yellow onion and bell pepper; cook and stir 2-3 minutes, or until tender-crisp. Push bacon mixture to one side of skillet. Add potatoes to other side of skillet. Smash each potato with heavy spatula, bottom of small sturdy bowl or meat pounder. Sprinkle potatoes with remaining seasoning. Spoon bacon mixture over potatoes. Sprinkle with cheese. Cover pan or close grill. Cook 3-5 minutes or until cheese is melted. To serve, sprinkle with green onions and dollops of sour cream. Serves 12.

COURTESY MCCORMICK SPICE

ff 1/2 cup blueberries

ff 1 cup raspberries

ff 1 container (16 ounces) white frosting

ff nonstick spray

Test Kitchen Tip: Cooking potatoes before grilling reduces overall grill time.

Red, White and Blue Cake ff 1 package (2-layer size) white cake mix ff 2 tsp. vanilla extract ff 1/2 tsp. neon blue food color ff 2 Tbs. unsweetened cocoa powder ff 2 tsp. red food color

Heat oven to 350 F. Prepare cake mix as directed on package, adding vanilla. Transfer 1-1/2 cups batter to small bowl and tint with neon blue food color. Tint remaining batter red by adding cocoa powder and red food color. Pour each color batter into separate 9-by-5-inch loaf pans sprayed with nonstick cooking spray. Bake blue-tinted cake 20-25 minutes; red-tinted cake 30-35 minutes. Cool cakes in pans 10 minutes. Remove from pans; cool completely. Trim cakes to remove rounded tops and edges. Slice red cake in half horizontally to form two thin layers. Place one layer on platter. Slice remaining red cake layer in half lengthwise. Slice blue cake in half lengthwise. (Blue and red cakes should be same dimensions.) Frost red cake layer on platter with 1/3 frosting. Top with lengthwise slices of red and blue cake side-byside. Frost with 1/3 frosting. Repeat cake layer and frosting. Garnish with raspberries and blueberries to resemble flag. Serves 12.

COURTESY MCCORMICK SPICE

Watermelon Caprese Salad with Balsamic Vinegar Reduction

ff salt, to taste

ff 1/4 cup fresh basil leaves, loosely chopped

ff 2 Tbs. extra-virgin olive oil

ff pepper, to taste

ff 12 slices watermelon cut into rounds or squares, approximately 3 inches wide and 1/2-inch thick, with seeds removed

ff 1 sprig basil, for garnish

ff 1/2 cup balsamic vinegar ff 2 Tbs. honey

cheese, cut into 12 slices

ff 1/2 pound fresh mozzarella

Place watermelon slices on paper towels and cover with additional paper towels to absorb excess fluid. In small saucepan over medium heat, add vinegar and honey. Stir to blend, bring to simmer and reduce heat. Stir occasionally until mixture is reduced by almost half. (Do not let reduce too far or allow to froth.) Set aside to cool slightly.

On large platter, place watermelon slices and top each with slice of cheese. Add salt and pepper, to taste, then sprinkle basil leaves evenly over top. Drizzle with olive oil, followed by reduced balsamic vinegar. Garnish with sprig of basil. Serves 6.

Test Kitchen Tip: Use red and yellow watermelon for an extra pretty presentation.

COURTESY NATIO NA L WATERMELON PROM OTIO N B OAR D

ff 1/4 tsp. salt

ff 1/2 tsp. garlic powder

White Barbecue Sauce with Smoky Chicken White Barbecue Sauce:

ff 1 cup mayonnaise

Smoky Chicken:

ff 2 Tbs. applewood spice rub

ff 1 cup hickory wood chips

ff 1/2 cup cider vinegar

ff 2 pounds bone-in chicken parts

ff 2 Tbs. creole-type mustard

ff 1 tsp. prepared horseradish

ff 1/2 tsp. coarse ground black pepper

To make sauce: In medium bowl, mix mayonnaise, vinegar, creole mustard, horseradish, black pepper, garlic and salt until well blended. Cover. Refrigerate at least 2 hours before serving to blend flavors. To make chicken: Soak wood chips in water for 30 minutes. Season chicken with rub. Drain wood chips. Fill smoker box with wet wood chips and place under grill rack on one side of grill before lighting. Prepare grill for indirect medium heat (350-375 F). Heat grill by turning all burners to medium. Once cooking temperature is reached, turn off burner(s) on one side. Place chicken on unlit side of grill. Close grill cover. Grill, turning occasionally, 30-40 minutes, or until internal temperature of thickest part of chicken is 165 F. Move chicken to lit side of grill with skin side down. Turn lit side of grill to high. Grill, uncovered, 3-5 minutes longer, or until chicken is charred. Serve chicken with White Barbecue Sauce. Serves 6.

Test Kitchen Tip: Refrigerate leftover sauce and use as salad dressing, condiment for burgers or dipping sauce for pretzels and vegetables.

COURTESY MCCOR MICK SPI CE

  JULY 2017

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Kansas Country Living July 2017  

Kansas Country Living July 2017

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