{' '} {' '}
Limited time offer
SAVE % on your upgrade.

Page 1

FEBRUARY 2020

Backcountry

HEROES Search & Rescue Prepares for It All


THE ONE TIME, LIFETIME LAWN SOLUTION!

Plant Faster, Easier With NEW SUPER PLUGS!

SAVE OVER 50%

Pre-cut plugs are 10x bigger!

OR… Plant Your Way With FREESTYLE PLUGS!

NEW PRE-CUT SUPER PLUGS now available!

Cut any size plugs from sheets!

Stays lush and green in summer

Mow your Zoysia lawn once a month – or less! It rewards you with weed-free beauty all summer long.

7 Ways Our Amazoy Zoysia Lawn ™

Saves You Time, Work and Money!

1

CUTS WATER BILLS AND MOWING BY AS MUCH AS 2/3 Would you believe a lawn could look perfect when watered just once? In Iowa, the state’s biggest Men’s Garden club picked a Zoysia lawn as “top lawn – nearly perfect.” Yet, this lawn had been watered only once all summer to August! In PA, Mrs. M.R. Mitter wrote, “I’ve never watered it, only when I put the plugs in...Last summer we had it mowed 2 times...When everybody’s lawns here are brown from drought, ours stays as green as ever.” That’s how Amazoy Zoysia lawns cut water bills and mowing! Now read on!

5

IT STAYS GREEN IN SPITE OF HEAT AND DROUGHT

“The hotter it gets, the better it grows!” Plug-in Zoysia thrives in blistering heat, yet it won’t winter-kill to 30° below zero. It just goes off its green color after killing frosts, and begins regaining its green color as temperatures in the spring are consistently warm.

2

NO NEED TO DIG UP OLD GRASS Plant Amazoy your way in an old lawn or new ground. Set plugs into holes in the soil checkerboard style. Plugs spread to create a lush, thick lawn, driving out weeds and unwanted growth. Easy instructions included with every order.

3

ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLY No weeding means no costly chemicals. Since Amazoy Zoysia lawns naturally resist insects, you’ll save money, while helping to protect the environment. You’ll never have to expose your family and pets to the risk of weed killers and pesticide poisons.

Thrives from partial shade to full sun.

Plant it from plugs.

Your Assurance of Lawn SUCCESS

Amazoy Zoysia Grass is

GUARANTEED

FOR SLOPES, PLAY AREAS, BARE SPOTS AND PARTIAL SHADE You can’t beat Amazoy Zoysia as the low-cost answer for hard-to-cover spots, play-worn areas, places that have partial shade and erosion on slopes.

Guaranteed to grow new green shoots within 45-60 days or we’ll replace it FREE – for up to 1 year – just call us. Guarantee is valid on one order at a time, typically the most recent. We ONLY ship you hardy field grown genuine Amazoy Zoysia grass harvested direct from our farms. Easy planting and watering instructions are included with each order.

Meyer Zoysia Grass was perfected by the U.S. Gov’t, released in cooperation with the U.S. Golf Association as a superior grass.

©2020 Zoysia Farm Nurseries, 3617 Old Taneytown Rd, Taneytown, MD 21787

4

Freestyle Plugs You decide how big to cut the plugs. Each grass sheet can produce up to 150-1 in. plugs. Plant minimum 1 plug per sq. ft. Max Plugs

Free Plugs Grass Sheets

Your PRICE

+ Shipping

SAVINGS

— 25% 36% 44% 52%

300

2

$29.95

$15.00

500

+100

4

$50.00

$17.00

750

+150

6

$66.00

$20.00

1100

+400

10

$95.00

$30.00

2000

+1000

20

$165.00

$50.00

6

CHOKES OUT CRABGRASS AND WEEDS ALL SUMMER

7

NOW 3 WAYS TO START YOUR AMAZOY ZOYSIA LAWN!

Your established Amazoy Zoysia lawn grows so thick, it simply stops crabgrass and most summer weeds from germinating!

1) Freestyle plugs come in uncut sheets containing a maximum of 150 - 1” plugs that can be planted up to 1 ft. apart. Freestyle plugs allow you to make each plug bigger and plant further apart – less cutting and planting – you decide. 2) New Super Plugs come precut into individual 3”x3” plugs ready-to-plant (minimum 1 per 4 sq. ft.). They arrive in easy to handle trays of 15 Super Plugs. Save more time and get your new lawn even faster! 3) Amazoy Approved Seed-As The Zoysia Specialists for 60+years, we finally have a Zoysia seed available that meets our standards and homeowners expectations. Learn why at zoysiafarms.com/mag or by phone at 410-756-2311. ORDER TODAY – GET UP TO

1000 FREESTYLE PLUGS –

Super Plugs Precut plugs 3 inches by 3 inches READY TO PLANT Packed in trays of 15 Super Plugs. Plant minimum 1 plug per 4 sq. ft. Super Plugs

Free Plugs

Tray

Your PRICE

+ Shipping

SAVINGS

15

1

$24.95

$10.00

60

+15

5

$90.00

$22.00

— 35% 49% 53% 56%

95

+25

8

$110.00

$32.00

120

+30

10

$125.00

$36.00

180

+45

15

$180.00

$50.00

EVERYTHING YOU NEED TO START AND MAINTAIN A CAREFREE BEAUTIFUL ZOYSIA LAWN

Zoysia Farm

NURSERIES

Improving America’s Lawns Since 1953

3617 Old Taneytown Rd./Taneytown, MD 21787

PLANTING TOOLS • PLANT FOOD • WEED AND PEST CONTROLS • ORGANIC PRODUCTS SOIL TESTS • GARDEN GLOVES • EDGING AND MORE . .. ALL AVAILABLE EXCLUSIVELY AT:

www.ZoysiaFarms.com/mag OR 410-756-2311

Dept. 5424

Harvested Daily from Our Farms and Shipped to You the Same Day the Plugs are Packed Amazoy is the Trademark Registered U.S. Patent Office for our Meyer Zoysia grass. Savings shown over aggregate base price and shipping


Volume 51

Number 02

February 2020 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2020, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

On the

Cover FEBRUARY 2020

Backcountry

HEROES Search & Rescue Prepares for It All

Routt County Search & Rescue members Jason Blair, Harry Sandler and Matt Karzen attend to a mock patient during a training session on Rabbit Ears Pass, just outside of Steamboat Springs, in January. Photo by John Russell.

“Deer One” by Sandy Calwell, a consumer-member of Yampa Valley Electric Association.

4 VIEWPOINT 5 LETTERS 6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT 7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS 12 RECIPES

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK

14 NEWS CLIPS

COCountryLife pinned: Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.

16 COVER STORY BACKCOUNTRY HEROES 20 INDUSTRY 22 GARDENING 24 OUTDOORS 26 MARKETPLACE

FACEBOOK CHATTER

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS 29 YOUR STORIES 30 DISCOVERIES

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win an Adventure Medical Kit: Mountain Series. Visit our contest page at coloradocountrylife. coop to learn how to enter.

Win a Free First Aid Kit coloradocountrylife.coop

Colorado Rural Electric Association shared: Highline Electric Association’s new 1.5-megawatt Riverview solar project will produce enough energy to power 300-500 homes or about 20 irrigation wells.

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month cocountrylife posted: Colorado Country Life is always looking for #books by local Colorado authors for our annual #bookreview issue. #readytoread

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

3


VIEWPOINT

Regional Transmission Organization Colorado needs a robust electricity market BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

I

n most parts of the United States, regional transmission organizations (RTOs) or independent system operators (ISOs) oversee the regional transmission system and operate wholesale electricity markets. These nonprofit entities determine power requirements, on a day-to-day and hourto-hour basis, and dispatch power from the most efficient units. They also set transmission rates across lines owned by multiple utilities and plan the regional transmission system. These companies, such as the Southwest Power Pool, the Mid-Continent Independent System Operator and the California Independent System Operator, were created by groups of electric utilities in the various regions of the country to reduce costs to consumers by maximizing the efficiencies that can be achieved with multiple sources of power generation and transmission capacity. They also enable utilities to incorporate more renewable energy into their power supply mix by providing a system where the resources of one utility or power marketer are more easily accessed by another utility. Colorado’s electric utilities, including the electric co-ops, do not operate within the boundaries of an RTO or ISO, although co-op power supplier Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association operates

within an RTO outside of Colorado. For a variety of reasons, Colorado and its neighboring states have not created a regional electricity market despite the benefits that could be realized by electricity consumers. The largest electric utilities in Colorado worked together for several years, and it appeared that an RTO would be expanded to include Colorado, but ultimately the effort failed when one large utility pulled out. Currently, the Colorado Public Utilities Commission is soliciting comments in a proceeding that stems from the passage of S.B. 19-236 during last year’s legislative session. One provision of that bill, the “Colorado Transmission Coordination Act,” required the commission to initiate an investigation into the merits of an RTO or ISO and report back to the legislature. Many parties, including several electric co-ops and the Colorado Rural Electric Association, filed comments in that proceeding in favor of the creation of an RTO that would include Colorado’s electric utilities. Reasons given for supporting a regional market include greater access to lower cost resources; the elimination of transmission “pancaking” costs; and opportunities for the integration of additional renewable generation. In this proceeding, there is near-unanimous support by electric

An RTO in Colorado,

we think it is a good thing.

4

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

KENT SINGER

utilities, environmental groups and other stakeholders for the creation of an RTO. While the discussion of this issue by the Colorado PUC is important, the Colorado legislature should also weigh in and pass legislation that would move Colorado electric utilities toward an RTO in a more expedited manner. Other states have passed similar legislation to spur the move toward an organized electricity market, and the Colorado General Assembly should follow their lead. Of course, there are costs associated with the creation of a new RTO or expansion of an existing RTO that has to hire employees and incur other expenses so it can provide service to Colorado electric utilities. In the other parts of the country where RTOs have been established, these costs have been outweighed by the savings that are possible with a more efficient dispatch of generation and transmission resources. With the adoption of H.B. 19-1261 last year, the Colorado legislature established aggressive requirements for electric utilities to significantly reduce their carbon emissions over a short period of time. A regional electricity market is a necessary tool to enable utilities, including electric co-ops, to reach those goals. We urge the Colorado legislature to act this year to help establish an RTO for Colorado electric utilities. Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.


LETTERS

FROM THE EDITOR

A magazine and its amazing readers

BY MONA NEELEY

I

EDITOR

love Colorado Country Life readers. Since I put out my plea for the best pie places in Colorado, I received lots of delicious suggestions for bakeries and cafes around the state. I’ll report back once my husband and I have done some taste testing. I also recently heard from Elisabeth Berger, an Empire Electric consumer-member from Cortez. She faithfully took her copy of Colorado Country Life on a recent trip to India and it led to what she described as “the most heartwarming moment of the whole trip.” She and a friend visited a local park in Kakinada, India, on Children’s Day. When Elisabeth pulled out her magazine to take a photo to send to CCL, it was a conversation

starter. She spent a MONA NEELEY half-hour talking with the children (who spoke English), their teachers, the driver who was ferrying her and her friend around the city and even the local police. There was “an underlying understanding and harmony in this precious situation with no room for differences (despite) backgrounds, various age groups, different cultures and languages,” she noted. The group spent “some truly valuable time together [to] build great memories.” All because of a magazine. Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

The Peak of Racing

We enjoyed “Racing for the Top” (August ’19). We later met Chris Lennon at a Colorado Springs library and heard him talk about the Pikes Peak International Hill Climb. He also published his first book, The Peak of Racing — Pikes Peak through the Racer’s Eyes (peakofracing.com). For us old-timers, the Hill Climb has been part of our lives and Lennon’s book is full of historical details. Judy Kilgore, Black Forest Mountain View Electric consumer-member

Lights for All

While I enjoyed “Christmas lights on a dark, cold night” (December ’19), I found it ironic that just below it was an ad for Energy Outreach Colorado. That ad stated that for “some of our neighbors” the security of knowing their “lights will turn on” doesn’t exist. The holiday lighting contest, offering credits on electric bills as prizes, seems counterintuitive. I wish there were ways to pass the electric bill credits to those who need them most, rather than to those who decorate with thousands of lights. It would be my Christmas wish that all co-op customers have a warm, safe and comfortable Christmas. Mary LaPorta via email Mountain View Electric consumer-member

Holiday Stories

Kent Singer’s story of “Christmas With the Fords” in Vail (December ’19) reminds me of my dad’s big skiing story. His family took a trip to Aspen in 1964 when he was 10. He got going too fast and slammed into a pretty lady, sending her sprawling. She was asking him if he was OK when several scary-looking men grabbed my dad and gruffly sent him on his way over the protests of the nice lady. Dad told his parents about it that night. They’d just read in the paper that Jackie Kennedy was skiing at Aspen. My dad saw the photo and confirmed it was the same lady he sent flying into a snowbank. Nan Hassey, Rye San Isabel Electric consumer-member

SEND US YOUR LETTERS Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Include full name and contact information. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

5


ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

COLORADO LEGISLATIVE DIRECTORY Download Our Mobile App for FREE! Stay in touch with legislators while on the go.

Energy Efficiency Upgrades Take these first three steps today

BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN aking your home more energy efficient can be done by taking one step at a time, or by taking it on all at once as a larger project. Either way, it’s helpful to have a plan in place before diving in so you don’t do unnecessary work or repeat steps along the way.

M

Here’s a three-step checklist to help you get organized: 1. Set goals and constraints. Set your primary goal. Are you looking to save money on your home’s energy bills, make it more comfortable, increase the resale value or help the environment? Next, set a deadline for the project’s completion. This may affect whether you do some of the work yourself and which contractor you choose. Last, set your budget. How much is it worth to you to live in an energy-efficient home? One way to look at this is to review your annual energy bills. If they’re around $2,000 per year, ask yourself how much you’re willing to spend if you could cut that expense in half. Maybe you’re willing to spend $10,000 to save $1,000 each year. That would be a 10% rate of return on your investment. Or, if your home is drafty and cold, how much are you willing to spend to make it more comfortable? 2. Educate yourself. Weighing the costs and benefits of each potential improvement is crucial. There are many helpful lists of small and large energy efficiency upgrades available online. There are also some great resources like the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Star® and Consumer Reports. Your local electric co-op may have a home energy advisor on staff or available literature that can help. 3. Schedule an energy assessment. An energy assessment will help you prioritize so you can spend money on the measures that bring the most benefit. An energy advisor can help in other ways. For example, if you hire a contractor to do major efficiency upgrades around your home, an energy advisor or auditor can inspect the work and ensure the level agreed in the contract is met before you pay the bill. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

Download the FREE App today! Using the camera on your smartphone, scan this code to get the download link.

iOS App Store

6

Android Google Play

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to find out four more ways you LEARN MORE ONLINE can save on your home energy costs. Look under the Energy tab.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

PART OF THE FAMILY

EMPIRE

ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

Echoes of the Empire FEBRUARY 2020

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box K Cortez, CO 81321-0676 STREET ADDRESS 801 North Broadway Cortez, CO 81321

ph 970-565-4444 tf 800-709-3726 fax 970-564-4401 web www.eea.coop facebook.com/EEACortez

COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .COOP

BY ANDY CARTER MEMBER ENGAGEMENT MANAGER

F

amily reunions can be interesting affairs where stories are told, old acquaintances are refreshed and new connections are made. Quite often, the family line is discussed, and it can be challenging to remember just how you are related to your great-uncle, Phil. Cooperatives and families share many similarities. Empire Electric Association, Inc., is a member-owned cooperative that was formed over 80 years ago and is a small part of the worldwide cooperative family. Data compiled for the 2018 World Cooperative Monitor report states that the 3 million cooperatives in the world provide jobs or work opportunities for 10% of the world’s employable population, and the 300 top cooperatives or cooperative groups generate $2.1 trillion in income through trading goods and services (International Co-operative Alliance, 2020). The cooperative business model is unique in that when you engage in the service offered by the cooperative, you become part of the family. Being “family” means that you have responsibilities as well as benefits when you are accepted into the membership.

ANDY CARTER

Your obvious responsibility as a consumer-member is to pay the power bill when it arrives. Paying your bill is important, but an equally important responsibility of every consumer-member is to be an active participant. A hallmark of cooperatives is their democratic form of governance. You have the power of a vote as well as the opportunity to provide input into how EEA operates. Members can provide feedback via a phone call, a letter, an email or through social media. You can also stop by the office and talk personally with a co-op employee or attend EEA’s monthly board meetings where we always set aside time for members to bring their concerns and suggestions to the co-op leadership. EEA also has responsibilities that we take seriously. Our mission is to provide electric service to your home or business in a safe, reliable and responsible manner. Our employees take pride in “keeping the lights on” while making sure we all go home to our families when our tasks are completed. EEA takes time every day to make sure we are working in a safe manner and that we are being responsive to member requests. The high reliability you experience is a product of disciplined use of resources and attention to detail. The benefits for an EEA consumer-member start with reliable electricity but go far beyond that. EEA is an active community member and supports a variety of activities through monetary donations COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

7


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Photo Contest Winner for February 2020

Foggy Morning by Sandra Bryan

Scholarship applications are due February 17, 2020. Apply and upload your application on-line at www.eea.coop

and employee involvement. Every year, EEA awards scholarships to graduating high school seniors for a variety of education opportunities and also supports the continuing education efforts of adult consumer-members. EEA provides energy efficiency recommendations and supports efficient use through energy efficiency rebates. Consumer-members also benefit from their investment over time through capital credit payments. EEA has returned nearly $29 million in capital credits since its formation in 1939. I have been part of the EEA family for over 13 years as a consumer-member and have had the privilege of being an employee for the past three years. I have worked in many roles in the energy industry and working for a rural electric co-op has been my favorite because of the cooperative difference. It really does feel like I work with and for family. So, the next time you see a lineman in a bucket truck, smile and wave … you’re related!

Co-op Calendar February 2

Groundhog Day

February 14

Valentine’s Day

February 14

EEA’s board meeting begins at 8:30 a.m. at its headquarters in Cortez. The agenda is posted 10 days in advance of the meeting at eea.coop. Consumer-members are reminded that public comment is heard at the beginning of the meeting.

February 17

Presidents Day

February 17

Scholarship applications due

8

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Youth and Adult Scholarship Program

E

ach year, Empire Electric offers scholarships for high school seniors who are dependents of a consumer-member of Empire Electric. Scholarships for $1,000 are available for students who plan on attending a two-year community college or a four-year college or university program. Also, $1,000 scholarships are available for students who plan to attend lineman school. Scholarships for $500 are available for any student who will attend a vocational or technical school and will pursue an electrical trade or related field of study that requires less than two years to complete. Homeschooled seniors and Southwest Open High School seniors are encouraged to apply and will be considered with other applicants from the local high school they are affiliated with. Scholarships are also available to adults who are

furthering their education. Applicants must be EEA consumer-members, or a spouse or dependent of a consumer-member. Scholarship applicants can apply online at eea.coop or applications can be picked up at EEA’s headquarters located at 801 N. Broadway, Cortez. Separate applications are available for each type of scholarship. In addition, high school seniors can pick up a student scholarship application or a lineman or other related trade vocational or technical school scholarship application from their guidance counselor’s office. Only complete applications will be considered for scholarships and scholarship applications must be received by Monday, February 17, 2020. For more information, contact Denise Moore at denise.moore@ eea.coop or 970-564-4458. Utah residents may call 800-709-3726 ext. 458.

February 2020

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month Are you using your fireplace efficiently? Remember to turn down the thermostat when burning a fire, and close the damper when a fire is not burning. Source: energy.gov

By Popular Demand... The LED Residential Rebate Program has been extended through 2020! Visit www.eea.coop for full details. Online applications are available!

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

9


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Do Your Part to Keep Lineworkers Safe

Wildlife Woes With Equipment

B

esides being cute and fun to watch, animals can disrupt power. Although we do all we can to prevent animal interference by using equipment guards, antiroosting devices or other animalfriendly deterrents, sometimes our efforts are no match for persistent and curious critters who use overhead power lines as a superhighway or substations as a nesting ground. According to the Electrical Engineering Portal, the following classes of animals have caused shorts and subsequent power outages or service disruptions: • Squirrels love to use power lines as their overhead highway. They are agile and crafty — oftentimes equipment guards and other deterrents cannot keep them away, much like a squirrel outsmarting a bird feeder. If they touch the power line and pole simultaneously, the electric current travels through them and their demise can cause problems with power transmission. • Mice, rats and gophers sometimes cause interruptions in service by gnawing through underground cables. These offenders and others can also try to make a home in a

10

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

substation, which often does not turn out well for them and can cause a hiccup in power distribution for us. • Birds of different species can cause different types of problems. Although small birds can sit on a wire without a problem, some larger varieties like to build nests at the tops of poles, on transmission towers and in substations. Nesting material can cause faults (abnormal electric currents), and bird droppings can contaminate insulators, according to EEP. Other times, large birds with long wing spans can touch a live power line with one wing tip and something else with the other and become a conductor for the voltage to pass through them. This is called “bridging.” • Large animals like cattle, horses, bison and bears can cause damage to guy wires and poles. They can cause physical damage, creating an outage or making the system more prone to outages in the future. Feisty bears can climb wooden utility poles and contact live conductors. For more information about electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org.

Imagine this scenario: It’s nearing 5 p.m. on a workday. Your boss wants that lastminute report and your kids need to be picked up from soccer practice or play rehearsal. You jump in your car and on the way you approach a work zone. You don’t have time to slow down so you rush through it and ignore the orange work zone signs. Or this one: You’re having a garage sale and you think posting a sign on a utility pole won’t hurt. Everyone does it, right? In reality, either of these scenarios could injure or kill one of our lineworkers. The job of an electric lineworker is not easy. Lineworkers take great pride in providing safe and reliable service, but their job involves working on and around live power out in the elements. We ask you to do your part to keep them safe: • Slow down and move over in work zones. Cars or trucks that go too fast not only endanger workers on the ground, but driving too fast or not moving over can also put a lineworker who is working high up in a bucket in danger by causing it to move or sway. • Do not post anything on a utility pole, especially with staples, nails or tacks. These can puncture insulated gloves or other protective clothing and expose workers to high voltages. • Never plug a generator into an indoor or outdoor wall outlet. The power that backfeeds into the electric line could electrocute a utility worker. • Please be patient when the power goes out. Workers need to efficiently and safely restore power. We appreciate your help in keeping our employees safe. For questions about employee safety, contact us at Empire Electric Association at 970-565-4444.


ADVERTISEMENT

Leading Ingredient For Acid Reflux Bouts Linked To Anti-Aging Phenomenon Scientific studies show breakthrough acid reflux treatment also helps maintain vital health and helps protect users from the serious conditions that accompany aging such as fatigue and poor cardiovascular health by David Waxman Seattle Washington:

A published study on a leading acid reflux ingredient shows that its key ingredient improves digestive health while maintaining health levels of inflammation that contributes to premature aging in men and women. And, if consumer sales are any indication of a product’s effectiveness, this ‘acid reflux pill turned anti-aging phenomenon’ is nothing short of a miracle. Sold under the brand name AloeCure®, its ingredient was already backed by research showing its ability to neutralize acid levels and hold them down for long lasting day and night relief from bouts of heartburn and, acid reflux, gas, bloating, and more. But soon doctors started reporting some incredible results... “With AloeCure, my patients started reporting, better sleep, more energy, stronger immune systems... even less stress and better skin, hair, and nails” explains Dr. Liza Leal; a leading integrative health specialist and company spokesperson. AloeCure contains an active ingredient that helps improve digestion by acting as a natural acid-buffer that improves the pH balance of your stomach. Scientists now believe that this acid imbalance could be a major contributing factor to painful inflammation throughout the rest of the body. The daily allowance of AloeCure has shown to calm this inflammation through immune system adjustments which is why AloeCure is so effective. Relieving other stressful symptoms related to GI health like pain, bloating, fatigue, cramping, acid overproduction, and nausea. Now, backed with new scientific studies, AloeCure is being doctor recommended to help improve digestion, and even reduce the appearance of wrinkles – helping patients look and feel decades younger. FIX YOUR GUT & FIGHT INFLAMMATION Since hitting the market, sales for AloeCure have taken off and there are some very good reasons why. To start, the clinical studies have been impressive. Virtually all participants taking it reported stunning improvement in digestive symptoms including bouts of heartburn. Users can also experience higher energy levels and endurance, relief from chronic discomfort and better sleep, healthier looking skin, hair, and nails.

A healthy gut is the key to a reducing swelling and inflammation that can wreak havoc on the human body. Doctors say this is why AloeCure works on so many aspects of your health. AloeCure’s active ingredient is made from the famous healing compound found in Aloe Vera. It is both safe and healthy. There are also no known side effects. Scientists believe that it helps improve digestive by acting as a natural acid-buffer that improves the pH balance of your stomach and helps the immune system maintain healthy functions. Research has shown that this acid imbalance contributes to painful inflammation throughout your entire body and is why AloeCure seems to be so effective. EXCITING RESULTS FROM PATIENTS To date millions of bottles of AloeCure have been sold, and the community seeking non-pharma therapy for their GI health continues to grow. According to Dr. Leal, her patients are absolutely thrilled with their results and are often shocked by how fast it works. “For the first time in years, they are free from concerns about their digestion and almost every other aspect of their health,” says Dr. Leal, “and I recommend it to everyone who wants to improve GI health before considering drugs, surgery, or OTC medications.” “All the problems with my stomach are gone. Completely gone. I can say AloeCure is a miracle. It’s a miracle.” Another user turned spokesperson said, “I started to notice a difference because I was sleeping through the night and that was great. AloeCure does work for me. It’s made a huge difference.” With so much positive feedback, it’s easy to see why the community of believers is growing and sales for the new pill are soaring. THE SCIENCE BEHIND ALOECURE AloeCure is a pill that’s taken just once daily. The pill is small. Easy to swallow. There are no harmful side effects and it does not require a prescription. The active ingredient is a rare Aloe Vera component known as acemannan. Millions spent in developing a proprietary process for extracting acemannan resulted in the highest quality, most bio-available levels of acemannan known to exist, and it’s made from organic aloe. According to Dr. Leal and leading experts, improving the pH balance of your stomach and restoring gut health is the key to revitalizing your entire body.

When your digestive system isn’t healthy, it causes unwanted stress on your immune system, which results in inflammation in the rest of the body. The recommended daily allowance of acemannan in AloeCure has been proven to support digestive health and manage painful inflammation through immune system adjustments without side effects or drugs. This would explain why so many users are experiencing impressive results so quickly. REVITALIZE YOUR ENTIRE BODY With daily use, AloeCure helps users look and feel decades younger and defend against some of the painful inflammation that accompanies aging and can make life hard. By buffering stomach acid and restoring gut health, AloeCure’s ingredient maintains healthy immune system function to combat painful inflammation...reduce the appearance of winkles and help strengthen hair and nails ... maintains healthy cholesterol and oxidative stress... improves sleep and energy…. and supports brain function by way of gut biome... without side effects or expense. Readers can now reclaim their energy, vitality, and youth regardless of age.

AloeCure Taken Daily • Helps End Digestion Nightmares • Reduces appearance of Wrinkles and Increases Elasticity • Supports Healthy Immune System HOW TO GET ALOECURE This is the official nationwide release of the new AloeCure pill in the United States. And so, the company is offering our readers up to 3 FREE bottles with their order. This special give-away is only available for a limited time. All you have to do is call TOLLFREE 1-800-746-2898 and provide the operator with the Free Bottle Approval Code: AC100. The company will do the rest. Important: Due to AloeCure’s recent media exposure, phone lines are often busy. If you call and do not immediately get through, please be patient and call back. Those who miss the 48-hour deadline may lose out on this free bottle offer.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE, OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. ALL DOCTORS MENTIONED ARE REMUNERATED FOR THEIR SERVICES. ALL CLINICAL STUDIES ON ALOECURE’S ACTIVE INGREDIENT WERE INDEPENDENTLY CONDUCTED AND WERE NOT SPONSORED BY THE AMERICAN GLOBAL HEALTH GROUP.


RECIPES

Make Meatless Meals More Mmm A Colorado chef shares vegan morning recipes even a carnivore wants to devour BY AMY HIGGINS

GET ANOTHER RECIPE Even if you aren’t vegan, try the No-Sugar Whole Grain Banana Pancakes. They are delicious! Go to the Recipes page at coloradocountrylife.coop.

| RECIPES@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

Vegan breakfast recipes you just have to try.

F

ort Collins resident Jan Findlater has more than 30 years in the food industry. During that time she was a chef, certified nutritionist, culinary school owner, cooking instructor, event planner and caterer, which includes high-profile catering contracts with Gov. John Hickenlooper, Sen. Mark Udall and singer Willie Nelson, to name a few. She also opened and sold Great Harvest Bread Co., and received certifications as a sommelier and chocolatier. About three years ago, Findlater converted from vegetarian to vegan and wanted to find ways to create tasty recipes that typically require animal products. When we discovered she taught cooking classes at the Grand Lake Center and reached out to her, she offered to share a few vegan breakfast recipes. Whether you’re vegan or not, this recipe is seriously delicious and would be gobbled up even at the biggest meat lover’s table.

Chickpea Flour Omelets With a Latin Twist 1 cup chickpea (garbanzo) flour 1 cup water 2 tablespoons nutritional yeast 1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon black pepper 1/2 teaspoon onion powder 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/4 teaspoon turmeric 2 scallions, finely chopped 2 tablespoons chopped fresh cilantro or parsley 2 tablespoons chopped mild or hot canned chili peppers Optional fillings and toppings: chopped roasted pepper, chopped tomato, chopped artichoke, chopped cilantro, sliced black olives, avocado, shredded vegan cheddar (or regular cheddar cheese) Whisk or blend together the chickpea flour, water, nutritional yeast, lemon juice, mustard, salt, pepper, onion powder, baking powder and turmeric. Let the mixture sit for 10 minutes.

CHEF’S TIP Substitute the Spray Jan Findlater likes to use avocado oil in the place of cooking spray. Avocado oil is packed with nutrients you can’t get from traditional cooking spray.

Add chopped scallions, cilantro (or parsley) and chili peppers. Heat a small pan over medium heat and spray generously with cooking spray. When hot, ladle 1/3 to 1/2 cup of the mixture into the pan. The poured batter should not be more than 1/4-inch thick. Thick batter will make the omelet too gummy. Swirl to cover the bottom of the pan. Cover the pan and let steam until the bottom is lightly browned, about 3 to 5 minutes. Loosen carefully and flip the omelet; cook an additional 3 to 4 minutes. Enjoy as is or add optional fillings and/or toppings. ©2019 Jan Findlater. All rights reserved.

12

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020


ADVERTISEMENT

“I haven’t been this excited since I got my first bicycle!” Introducing ZOOMER!

The portable, folding, battery-powered chair that offers easy one-handed operation Sturdy & Lightweight Frame

One-touch Folding Comfortable Seating

Joystick Control (adaptable left or right)

If you are one of the countless Americans who need a little help getting around, there is a safe, simple and easy-to-use solution… the Zoomer. It is propelled by small yet powerful dual motors for speeds of 3.7 miles per hour over a variety of terrains, on up to a 10 degree incline. Its innovative airline-safe Lithium Ion battery enables you to go 8 miles on a single charge, and the automatic electromagnetic brakes let you stop on a dime.

Powerful Battery/ Dual Motors

10” Non-Marking Tires

8” Non-Marking Tires

Swivel Away Footrest

The secret to the Zoomer is its intuitive steering system. You operate it with a simple-to-use joystick, giving you precision maneuverability and the ability to navigate tight spaces easily with a 25” turning radius. It is designed to let you pull right up to a table or desk. You no longer have to move to another chair to work or eat at your table. Joystick conveniently rolls beneath table or desk

Remember when you were a child and got your first bicycle? I do. It gave me a sense of independence… I felt like I could go anywhere, and it was so much easier and more enjoyable than walking. Well, at my age, that bike wouldn’t do me much good. Fortunately, there’s a new invention that gives me the freedom and independence to go wherever I want… safely and easily. It’s called the Zoomer, and it’s changed my life.

12” Folds to 12” in seconds

What’s more, it folds up easily so it can fit in a trunk or a back seat. Why spend another day watching life pass you by, when instead you could be Zooming around! Call now and a knowledgeable, friendly Zoomer expert will tell you all about it. You’ll be glad you did.

Easy to use joystick control

Ready to get your own Zoomer? We’d love to talk to you. Call now toll free and order one today!

1-888-597-3671

The Zoomer Chair is a personal electric vehicle and is not a medical device nor a wheelchair. Zoomer is not intended for medical purposes to provide mobility to persons restricted to a sitting position. It is not covered by Medicare nor Medicaid. © 2020 first STREET for Boomers and Beyond, Inc. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

85006

Please mention code 109121 when ordering.

13


NEWS CLIPS

Co-op Power Supplier Greens its Future The closures of coal-fired power plants announced in mid-January and the addition of eight new solar and wind projects adding 1 gigawatt of renewable energy mean cleaner electricity for 18 of Colorado’s 22 electric co-ops. Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, which supplies electricity to the majority of Colorado’s electric co-ops, is closing Escalante Station in New Mexico by the end of 2020 and Craig Station plant and Colowyo Mine in northwestern Colorado by 2030. It has also cancelled the Holcomb coal project in Kansas and committed to cease development other coal facilities. “Serving our members’ clean energy and affordability needs, supporting state requirements and goals and leading the fundamental changes in our industry require the retirement of our coal facilities in Colorado and New Mexico,” said Rick Gordon, chairman of the board of Tri-State. These closures, along with the new resources announced, are part of Tri-State’s Responsible Energy Plan that is

Tri-State Generation and Transmission CEO Duane Highley announces its new Responsible Energy Plan at the State Capitol on Wednesday, January 15.

fundamentally transforming the power supplier while maintaining a strong financial position and stable rates. Six new solar projects and two wind projects will be added to Tri-State’s portfolio by 2024 at which time it will provide 50% of the electricity consumed will come from renewable resources. Tri-State’s clean energy transition significantly expands renewable energy generation while reducing greenhouse gas emissions and extending the benefits of a clean grid to its cooperative members. It will also share more flexibility for self-generation with members. “We’re not just changing direction, we’re emerging as the leader of the energy transition,” said Tri-State CEO Duane Highley.

GFCIs HELP KEEP YOU SAFE Help prevent electric shocks in your home by installing ground fault circuit interrupters. GFCIs can provide protection against shock from an electrified appliance, from equipment in contact with water and from a damaged or defective appliance. GFCIs should be installed in areas near water. This includes bathrooms, kitchens, garages, basements and the outdoors. A GFCI detects an abnormal flow of electricity and shuts off the power, preventing shock or electrocution. Electricity is always looking for a path to ground. A ground fault is an unintentional electrical path from the power source and a grounded surface. Under normal conditions, current flows in a circuit, traveling from the source, through the device it operates and back to the source. If an electrified appliance gets damaged by water, that flow is broken. Without a GFCI, your body could become that path to ground for the electrical current.

14

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

Tri-State is focused on the needs of the 600 employees and their communities that are affected by the closures. “As we make this difficult decision, we do so with a deep appreciation for the contributions of our employees who have dedicated their talents and energy to help us deliver on our mission to our members,” Highley said. Tri-State will work with state and local officials to support affected employees and their communities during the transition. “Our focus is on making these changes with the care and respect our employees and their communities deserve — easing the transition whenever and wherever possible,” Highley said.

SOLAR RECORDS SET The U.S. residential solar market reached a new record for solar installations in the third quarter of 2019, according to a report from the Solar Energy Industries Association. Residential installations totaling 712 megawatts were recorded in July, August and September. The industry also reported that, overall, 2.6 gigawatts were installed during the quarter, increasing total U.S. solar capacity to 71.3 gigawatts. That is a 45% increase over the previous year.


NEWS CLIPS

CO-OPS BEGIN RESEARCH ON UTILITY-CONNECTED HOME Electric cooperatives are researching the best ways to connect to smart homes in their service territories. The nonprofit utilities recently launched a Connected Home Research Project through a partnership between the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association and Dakota State University in South Dakota. The university, a national leader in technology and cybersecurity education, is creating a “home hub” that would allow the growing number of smart devices in consumer-members’ homes to communicate with co-ops to save energy and money. From WiFi thermostats to smart appliances, there is increased adoption of smart home technologies among co-op consumer-members. Those devices can help manage electricity usage and benefit consumers, but there is a gap between the capabilities of those technologies and the ability of the local electric co-op to connect to those technologies, if the consumer wants that kind of assistance. Co-op directors and employees attending the NRECA Annual Meeting in March will see a model of a utility-connected home. It will include a home hub that gives consumer-members a dashboard to

The co-ops’ national trade association is working with Dakota State University on a Connected Home Research Project to find ways that co-ops can help their members save energy and money. Photo Courtesy: East River Electric Cooperative.

access their smart home devices. It also connects to the co-op so that the co-op can learn a member’s preferences and make energy adjustments depending on when the consumer used electricity.

Average Prices for Residential Electricity 2018 figures, in cents per kWh U.S. Average: 12.9¢ per kWh WA 9.8¢ OR 11¢

NV 11.9¢

CO-OP VOTERS AND THE 2020 ELECTION Pollsters are predicting a record turnout for this coming fall’s national election. Find out more about what issues are important to voters in electric co-op territory by listening to “Along Those Lines,” a podcast presented by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. The January edition delves into how co-ops are making sure their consumers’ voices are heard and what to expect in terms of political engagement in co-op country. Listen to the podcast page at crea.coop/crea-podcasts.

CA 18.8¢

MT 11¢ ID 10.2¢

UT 10.4¢

AZ 12.8¢

ND 10.3¢

WY 11.3¢ CO 12.2¢ NM 12.7¢

SD 11.6¢

MN 13.1¢

NE 10.7¢ KS 13.4¢ OK 10.3¢ TX 11.2¢

WI 14¢

IA 12.2¢ MO 11.3¢ AR 9.8¢ LA 9.6¢

MI 15.5¢

VT: 18¢ NH: 19.7¢ MA: 21.6¢ RI: 20.6¢ NY CT: 21.2¢ 18.5¢

PA 13.9¢ OH IN IL 12.8¢ 12.3¢ 12.6¢ WV VA KY 11.2¢ 11.7¢ 10.6¢ NC TN 11.1¢ 10.7¢ SC 12.4¢ GA AL MS 12.2¢ 11.5¢ 11.1¢

ME 16.8¢

NJ: 15.4¢ DE: 12.5¢ MD: 13.3¢ DC: 12.8¢

FL 11.5¢

AK 21.9¢ HI 32.5¢

Residential Average Price (cents per kilowatt-hour) Over 12.5¢ Under 10 ¢ 10¢ to 12.5¢ Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration Numbers rounded to nearest tenth of a cent

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

15


COVER STORY

Backcountry HEROES BY EUGENE BUCHANAN PHOTOGRAPHY BY JOHN RUSSELL

HELICOPTER RESCUE TRAINING Routt County Search & Rescue team members Jason Blair and Matt Karzen hunker down as a Classic Air Medical helicopter, piloted by Bryce Frankenberry, kicks up snow while hovering above the scene of a search and rescue training mission on Rabbit Ears Pass in January.

16

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

Routt County Search & Rescue prepares for it all


Y

ou’ll have to excuse Dan Gilchrist if he’s not at the head of his hand-built, Sunday dinner table for pot roast with his family. If his daughters Caroline, 15, and Mackenzie, 10, are staring at an empty seat, he’s likely out on a call as a volunteer for the Routt County Search & Rescue team in Steamboat Springs. “That’s usually when they get the calls,” says his wife, Karen. “It’s often around 7 p.m., which is right around dinner time. That’s when people are reported missing.” Karen knows it comes with the territory of the man she married. A loving father and builder, Gilchrist realizes it sometimes takes time away from his family, but it’s a calling that’s rooted deeply. “We worry but we support him — even though it means missing out on time with the kids,” Karen says. “It’s his way of giving back and we know it means a lot to him.”

Giving with a risk Gilchrist, as with the team’s other 25 members, has a lot to give. The longtime local is an expert backcountry skier and outdoorsman and knows the terrain of the area’s Park Range as well as he does the dinner table he built. He also has the skills to reach it. Still, the worry isn’t without reason. Oftentimes, rescuing someone else means putting yourself at risk. Take a rescue back in January 2017, for instance. During a 30-inch storm that blanketed the backcountry, with temperatures dropping below zero, a skier and a snowboarder lost their bearings atop Buffalo Pass and became lost in the

COVER STORY cliff-riddled North Fork Fish Creek drainage outside Steamboat. During the rescue, an avalanche released on the south-facing slope, burying search and rescue board president and team member Jay Bowman. “I was carried about 400 feet down, bouncing over rocks and tumbling in the snow the whole way,” says Bowman, 56, an eightyear member of the team. “Luckily I was able to hook myself around a tree, with my head and arm barely above the surface. But I was scared … I didn’t expect to survive it.” While he was in good hands — the rescue team got to him within two minutes — the call home to his wife afterward was difficult. It’s the type of call Karen hopes she never fields while spooning gravy onto mashed potatoes for Caroline and Mackenzie. Still, at least the danger of that kind of hazard is less in Steamboat than it is in other areas of Colorado. In more avalancheprone regions like Aspen, the slide danger is even more prominent. In February 2019, when Aspen locals Owen Green, 27, and Michael Goerne, 37, were reported missing and later confirmed dead in an avalanche in the Elk Mountains, local search and rescue personnel started out at midnight but had to suspend their search until the avalanche danger subsided. A similar situation arose closer to home in February 2017 when Steamboat musician and father-of-three Jesse Christensen, 55, was killed by an avalanche while riding his Timbersled (a motorcycle snowmobile) in the Flat Tops mountains. The rescue went from a search to body retrieval,

“We always joke that we see the area’s most beautiful spots in the dark with a headlamp.” Routt County Search & Rescue volunteer Dan Gilchrist

putting rescuers in the same risky terrain. “It seems like it happens a lot on holidays and weekends,” Gilchrist says. “And we definitely get calls at night a lot. We always joke that we see the area’s most beautiful spots in the dark with a headlamp.”

Skills to help others Growing up in Minnesota, Gilchrist moved to Steamboat in 1988 to ski. He brings that background, as well as rope skills, off-road-vehicle experience, freak-like endurance and more to the search and rescue table. The organization’s other members, including a seven-person board, each bring their own skills to the equation, a formula that seems to work. Bowman says he didn’t have any specialized search and rescue skills when he joined the organization, other than being a lifelong skier, mountain biker and climber, and explorer of northwestern Colorado’s backcountry for the past 23 years. With his wife being a physician, he didn’t have to work as

Routt County Search & Rescue team members pose for a group photograph before a training mission. They serve in Yampa Valley Electric’s service territory. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

17


COVER STORY much, affording him the time to volunteer. And he says his master of business administration degree helps him manage the organization on the business side. “For me it’s a perfect fit,” he says. “It takes me away from the family a fair amount, but it allows me to give back to the community I love.” This turns the team into a surrogate family of sorts as well — dealing with trauma and helping others has a way of bringing people together. “We all enjoy what we do,” Bowman says. “It’s something we choose to do, outside in an area we love, so it builds a real bond.” While the volunteers are on call all the time, they can pick and choose which missions they go on, he adds, responding only when commitments allow. “If a call interferes with birthdays and anniversaries and things, I try to stay with the family,” he says. “Unless it’s something urgent.” And with everyone’s different skill sets, the whole is greater than the sum of the parts. “Some people are physically fit for the demands it requires, others excel at motorized aspects and others are good at things like logistics and navigation,” Gilchrist says. “It’s this mix that makes it work.” Of course, not all rescues — like that of Christensen — have happy endings.

Members of Routt County Search & Rescue train after the lights go out at Howelsen Hill.

18

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

“It takes me away from the family a fair amount, but it allows me to give back to the community I love.” Routt County Search & Rescue board president Jay Bowman

“Unfortunately, the ones that stand out the most are the ones that weren’t necessarily a rescue,” says Gilchrist. “They’re the recoveries. But when you do help someone, whether they’re injured or weren’t prepared to spend the night out, it feels great.” Working under the jurisdiction of the state and the local sheriff ’s department, as with the state’s other 45 search and rescue teams, Routt County Search & Rescue was formed in 1968 by a group of friends who were often called on by other friends to help them get their snowmobiles unstuck in the backcountry. They then trained in other aspects of wilderness rescue to help others who might need assistance. That concept of helping strangers as though they’re friends remains the organization’s driving mantra today. There are similar starts for the state’s other teams, all of whose volunteer members are on call 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, in any type

of weather. While the incident commanders work on a rotating schedule, for the rest of the volunteers, “If the pager goes off and your schedule allows, you go,” says Gilchrist, who runs his own business, Alpine Craftsman, which affords him such flexibility. The calls they receive vary depending on the time of year and their location. Teams in the San Juans of southwestern Colorado, or the Elk Mountains surrounding Crested Butte and Aspen, might get more avalancheand mountaineering-related calls, and even those pertaining to high-altitude complications. The Routt County team fields a lot of hunting accidents and lost snowmobiler and hiker calls. The average mission, says Bowman, takes five to eight hours start to finish. “You never know what it’s going to be when the pager goes off,” Gilchrist says. “You have to be prepared for everything.” And it can get tricky in an area like

Anders Lowenfish, a paramedic with Classic Air Medical, guides a Routt County Search & Rescue team toward a waiting helicopter during a training session where search and rescue and Classic Air Medical members, including pilot Bryce Frankenberry and nurse Hunter Maddox, work together training on the proper way to secure, transport and load a patient on to a helicopter in the field. On this day, the teams were training on Rabbit Ears Pass just outside of Steamboat Springs.


COVER STORY

“It’s not always obvious at first what the best solution is; you have to figure it out as you go.” Routt County Search & Rescue volunteer Dan Gilchrist

northwestern Colorado, where Rabbit Ears Pass includes portions of three counties — Jackson, Grand and Routt — each of which has its own search and rescue team. Typically, a call comes into dispatch, which runs it through that county’s sheriff ’s department, which then assigns it to that region’s search and rescue team. If one team’s members are already busy or otherwise can’t reach the location quickly, they might assign it to another nearby team.

Assistance for law enforcement Local law enforcement is happy for the assistance. “They provide a much needed and widely used service to our community and are a big help,” says Routt County Sheriff Garrett Wiggins. “They’re a team of highly dedicated volunteers who train hard and dedicate themselves to saving others.” Bowman says the number of missions they go on each year is dropping, bucking statewide trends. Along the Front Range and elsewhere, more and more people are heading out into the backcountry, often unprepared, and they can access rough terrain relatively easily. This has resulted in more calls for assistance. Routt County is farther off the beaten path, however, meaning people have to want to come here, Bowman adds. And the terrain is different; they field more calls for people who are lost or have stuck snowmobiles than the injuries other Colorado teams might field. “We used to average about 100 missions per year, but now it’s decreased to about 60

with the advent of cellphones and handheld GPSs,” he says. “A lot of times we can walk people out over the phone.” And there’s a difference between a search and a rescue, he adds. If it’s a rescue, there’s no break; they’ll do whatever they can to evacuate the victim as quickly as possible. Searches can sometimes last days, with the team retiring at night to resume again the next dawn. In 2005, cross-country skier Charles Horton, 55, was rescued after spending nine days stranded in the Flat Tops Wilderness Area with a broken leg. To do so, the team employs a fleet of eight ATVs, eight snowmobiles, one snowcat, two rescue trucks, an SUV and a mobile communications center. It also has a wheeled litter for areas they can’t access with machines due to terrain or wilderness area designation. They might also use dogs — coordinated through the Colorado Search & Rescue Board — especially for searches that have gone on for awhile. All this costs money, for which they’re constantly scrambling. Funded primarily from donations, as well as hunting and fishing license purchases and snowmobile, ATV and boat registrations, all of its services are free, save for medical transportation by aircraft or ambulance. Proceeds from licenses and off-road vehicle registrations go to a state fund administered by the Department of Local Affairs. Teams then request a grant from the department, or a reimbursement

if costs are high on a particular mission. Local fundraisers, Bowman adds, are key to keeping the operation going. For the victims in question, it’s a great, free insurance policy for when things go wrong. All they have to cover financially is official medical transportation if it is needed. This has arisen in a handful of rescues that Gilchrist remembers well. Once he was called on a mission where a utility task vehicle had rolled near Lynx Pass in southern Routt County. The vehicle’s driver died on the scene, with the passenger suffering a broken back and pelvis. The rescuers had to first get her back up onto the trail, and then down the trail to a suitable location for a helicopter evacuation. Another time was on a popular hiking trail to King Solomon Falls, which requires scrambling up a creek bed to a set of waterfalls. Two hours into her hike, a woman was hit by rockfall, resulting in a severe lower leg injury. The team had to reach her, rig a litter to lower her, “carry her across a crazy sidehill along the creek” and then haul her back up another cliff. “A lot of times you have to improvise,” Gilchrist says. “It’s not always obvious at first what the best solution is; you have to figure it out as you go.” He was late for the dinner table again that night. But, boy, was his family glad to see him. Writer Eugene Buchanan writes about the outdoors from his home in Steamboat Springs. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

19


INDUSTRY

THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION 75 Years of Representing Colorado’s Electric Co-ops BY KYLEE COLEMAN

M

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT | KCOLEMAN@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

ost Coloradans don’t know life without electricity — it’s ready and available when they need it and at the flip of a switch. Yet in relatively recent history, simple electric lighting and service were not part of life in many rural areas. “The first 50 years of my life, I lived without electricity,” Paul Huntly said. A board director at Buena Vista-based Sangre de Cristo Electric Association from 1948 to 1977, Huntly once reflected about his experience growing up on an isolated 10,000-acre ranch in rural Colorado. In the February 1977 issue of Colorado Country Life, he said, “What was life like without electricity? [We were] walking through the snow to an outdoor toilet, carrying water from a well, using a coal oil lamp. We took our baths in a washtub in the kitchen, after heating the water on the cookstove.” Longtime Hugo-based K.C. Electric Association board member Bob Bledsoe also remembers when electricity came to his family’s ranch in eastern Colorado when he was 4 or 5 years old. His dad took him out to watch neighbors bring line in and set the power poles by hand. “Son, take a good look at what you see right now,” his dad said to him, “because

20

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

this is really going to change our country.” And it did. Neighbors helped neighbors in their collective effort to bring electricity to Colorado’s rural areas starting in 1936. Communities had solid plans based on the new Rural Electrification Act and people collected signatures and $5 fees to form local electric co-ops.

To work together on shared goals, these new, small, local electric co-ops banded together in 1945 to create what was then called the Colorado State Association of Cooperatives. This month, the Colorado Rural Electric Association celebrates its 75th anniversary as that trade association for Colorado’s 22 electric co-ops and power supplier Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association. Few Colorado rural electric cooperative founders are still living these days, but their original efforts and legacy still power our lives. That’s why the collective cooperative story deserves telling — and retelling.

Statewide support At its inception, CREA primarily worked on advancing legislative issues and political agendas promoting the rural electrification movement both locally and nationally. As needs arose, CREA’s focus expanded to indirectly support member co-ops’ consumer-members. Your co-op’s goal is to provide safe, reliable, affordable and environmentally responsible electricity to your community and home. CREA is a tool that co-ops rely on to make that possible. Simply put, CREA has a statewide perspective and a holistic approach to serving co-ops so your community co-op can serve you better. CREA continues the much needed work on shared co-op issues at the state Capitol as well as working on shared goals in other areas.

Safety and training A commitment to keep your co-op and its employees safe has always been at the forefront of CREA’s efforts. Since its formation, job training and safety has been a valued service offered by CREA. From providing training programs to organization-wide safety assessments, classes and seminars for all 22 co-ops across the state, the four-person


INDUSTRY safety team reaches far and wide. The safety team also facilitates mutual aid efforts. When the power goes out in a community or town due to a major weather event, there are 21 other Colorado co-ops that can assist with getting the power back on.

Education Education is an important spoke of the CREA wheel, and it helps perpetuate industry best practices. Through CREA’s education services, co-op staff and board members can advance their learning and leadership. A range of courses are available for directors, mechanics, accountants, member service managers and human resource specialists, as well as other co-op employees. CREA helps your co-op to support future leaders. For 25 years, CREA has promoted and organized Colorado co-op high schoolers’ annual Washington D.C. Youth Tour. A great opportunity for the students who are selected to go, the tour allows Colorado teens to meet with nearly 1,900 students from across the country to learn about cooperatives, the legislative process and sightseeing. A weeklong summer Leadership Camp in Steamboat Springs, offered since the 1970s, also gives teens a unique opportunity to learn about the co-op model, develop leadership skills and simply have fun.

Delegates of the 2019 Colorado Youth Camp.

Communication Along with these programs, CREA assists local co-ops with communication services and telling the cooperative story. Colorado Country Life, (which was originally published under the name Colorado Rural Electric News and, later, Rocky Mountain Rural Life) is now in its 67th year of production. This magazine is the most accessible and efficient way for your co-op to keep you informed. Readers get a little bit of everything: local co-op news and business, community events, local scholarship opportunities and relevant safety issues. Consumer-members also enjoy stories on interesting Colorado people, places, discoveries, recipes, political issues and gardening.

Serving Colorado communities and beyond Making space for local and international philanthropic efforts has evolved for CREA over the last 75 years. For eight years, Colorado’s electric cooperatives have sponsored a team in the Pedal the Plains bike tour across the eastern plains. The team raises money for Energy Outreach Colorado, a nonprofit organization that helps people with electric bills and energy efficiency updates in homes across Colorado. In 2018 and 2019, CREA partnered with co-ops from Oklahoma to travel to Guatemala where crews of volunteer linemen

electrified small, remote villages. Giving power to people who have never had it before is a proud and important moment for both the linemen and the co-ops they represent.

Still going strong Since day one of modern rural electrification, the co-op industry evolved remarkably fast. New technologies and generation sources are developed nearly every day and electric service is not going away. Neither is the co-op model. As Bledsoe says, “CREA, in its history, made a profound effect on the infrastructure in Colorado and the people who are served by it. CREA should be a community effort to make sure all the co-ops have affordable and reliable electricity.” And that, it is. Although the statewide trade association has changed over the past 75 years to meet modern cooperative needs, one thing remains the same: CREA continues to fight for co-op issues and encourage a new generation of people to connect with their cooperatives. CREA looks forward to many more years of representing and serving co-ops and consumer-members across the state. Kylee Coleman is the editorial assistant at Colorado Country Life magazine. She writes about innovations at Colorado’s electric cooperatives and enjoyed sifting through print archives researching CREA’s history.

Delegates of the 1973 Colorado Youth Camp. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

21


GARDENING

CREATE A CULINARY KITCHEN Bring your garden indoors for freshly made recipes BY VICKI SPENCER

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

C

ulinary gardens can be grown in the winter. Although, unless you have a greenhouse or grow plants indoors, you will be limited on what can survive. The easiest things to grow are salad greens, spinach, kale and herbs. You can grow them from seeds or plants. If you want to grow winter greens outside and don’t have a greenhouse, you can create a mini greenhouse with a little creativity. One idea that requires little effort is to use a clear plastic storage tub. Place the lid bottom side up on a flat surface in full sun, lay a bag of garden soil flat on top and then cut a hole in the middle of the bag using a utility knife. Be sure to leave wide edges on top of each side so soil won’t fall out. If any of the soil is compacted in the bag, loosen it up with your hands and scoop out excess soil to keep it below the cut edges. The idea is to prevent soil from washing over the edges when you water. Next, spread a packet of seeds over the soil and cover by gently rubbing your hand over the top. Sprinkle some spare soil lightly over the seeds if they are still visible. Salad green seeds are so small they should not be buried deeply or they won’t germinate. Gently use a watering can, carefully avoiding washing the seeds away. Last, place the plastic tub on top of the bag to create an inexpensive greenhouse. You should only need to water once per week after germination. If you see condensation inside the tub, prop one end open a few inches until the water dissipates. If you live in the high country, it will be too cold and snowy for this makeshift greenhouse to work. Fortunately, you can grow lettuce, spinach and kale in small pots on your kitchen counter

22

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

along with all your herbs. You can even mix the greens in one large pot for a beautiful display. Growing herbs indoors is not as difficult as you might think. If you don’t have the time to grow from seeds, which initially requires more attention, you can find a wide variety of plants at your garden store. A basic herb garden contains parsley, basil, sage, rosemary, thyme, mint and oregano. Most herb plants available to purchase can be kept in their pots unless they are root bound. You can also create a decorative display by mixing different herbs in larger containers. Use well-draining soil and cover up to the base of the plants where roots begin. Be sure to label individual plants if you are not familiar with their leaves. You can enjoy herbs longer if you prevent them from getting tall and spindly. Encourage horizontal spread by crowding the plants more than you normally would and pinch off leaves at the top of the stems. It’s easy to give herbs the attention they need when placed in the kitchen where they are easily accessible while cooking. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado.


ADVERTISEMENT

Advanced Technology Allows Macular Degeneration Patients To See Again And Allows Many Low Vision Patients To Drive Again While there is currently no cure, promising research is being done on many fronts. everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,” says Dr. Stamm, “Even if it’s driving.” A scene as it might be viewed by a person with age-related macular degeneration

For many patients with macular degeneration and other visionrelated conditions, the loss of central visual detail also signals the end to one of the last bastions of independence driving. Colorado optometrist, Dr. Robert Stamm is using miniaturized telescopes which are mounted in glasses to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration and other eye conditions. “Some of my patients consider me their last chance for people who have vision loss,” said Dr. Stamm, one of only a few doctors in the world who specializes in fitting bioptic

Same scene of rancher as viewed by a person without macular degeneration

telescopes to help those who have lost vision due to macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases. Imagine a pair of glasses that can improve your vision enough to change your life. Bioptic telescopes may be the breakthrough in optical technology that will give you back your independence. Patients with vision in the 20/200 range can many times be improved to 20/50. Bioptic telescopes treat both dry and wet forms of macular degeneration as well as other vision limiting conditions.

bioptic telescope is that the lens automatically focuses on whatever you’re looking at,” said Dr. Stamm. “It’s like a self-focusing camera, but much more precise.”

For more information and to schedule an appointment today, call:

Robert Stamm, O.D. Low Vision Optometrist Member IALVS Offices Throughout South Dakota, Colorado and Nebraska

Toll Free:

(877) 393-0025

www.LowVisionofColorado.com COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

23


OUTDOORS

READER POETRY Memories

Memories like sunsets are slipping away as colors fade out by end of the day. Photographs capture a sunset in place, but memories dim, and time will erase. Ancients left paintings on walls of the cliffs or pecked them on stones we call petroglyphs. We’ve pencils and pens, computer keyboard. We don’t need stone tools with which to record. Tell of your era, events, others’ lives. Get words down on paper, create your archives. Families will treasure the stories you leave much more than you know, more than you believe. This window of time — twilight until dark closes down quickly, commit, leave your mark. Jane Ambrose Morton Mountain View Electric Association consumer-member

DO YOU WRITE POETRY? Send us your best work; we’d love to read it. Submission: Submit your poetry, name and address via email to: mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org or mail poem, name and address to: Colorado Country Life 5400 Washington St. Denver, CO 80216

24

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

Erring on the Safe Side

It’s better to have too much than not enough BY DENNIS SMITH

OUTDOORS@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

I

grew up in the southern Catskills decades ago when everything was decidedly simpler — including deer hunting. When we took to the woods after whitetails in those days, we did so with little more than a rifle, a belt knife, a hank of rope and a ham sandwich. Everything fit in the pockets of our heavy, woolen mackinaws. There were no hydration bladders or Lexan water bottles then — hell, Lexan wasn’t even a word — so we drank from brooks and natural springs in the woods. None of us had ever heard of Giardia and, luckily, none of us ever got it. Getting lost or injured or risking hypothermia never crossed our minds. In retrospect, I suppose we were ill-prepared but, in our defense, getting lost wasn’t much of a threat, since we hunted from a cabin in woods we knew well. Even if you managed to get “turned around” a bit, there are few mountains in the Catskills that aren’t crisscrossed by hiking trails or logging roads and following one of those would inevitably bring you to civilization. Our winter weather patterns were reasonably stable; storms blew in, of course, but they were rarely spontaneous or extreme. When we moved to Colorado, all that changed. The mountains here can kill you. They are rugged, remote and fearsomely unforgiving. Weather conditions, particularly at high altitude, can change from balmy to raging blizzard quicker than a duck on a June bug. I won’t hunt the Colorado backcountry these days without survival gear, a first aid kit, foul weather clothing, bottled water and a few other items vital to a safe and comfortable day (or night) in the boonies. The first aid kit is a self-contained affair stocked with basic wound care supplies, assorted medications and an instruction manual, all in a small zippered pouch. My

emergency gear consists of two space blankets, two fire starter kits with lighters and waterproof matches, 50 feet of paracord, orienteering compass, maps, Swiss Army knife, emergency whistle, headlamp, a compact high-intensity flashlight, walkie-talkie and a cellphone. Spare batteries for everything. I carry two of some items because critical equipment can fail when you need it most; hence, two is better than one, and three is better yet. Both kits fit in a red waterproof bag. Another sack holds foul weather gear: a down sweater, fleece vest, rain jacket, extra stocking cap, gloves and air-activated hand warmers. Bags of jerky, trail mix, dried fruit and cheese provide snacks and emergency grub. Yet another bag contains field dressing paraphernalia — latex gloves, fixed-blade knife, folding saw, drag rope and antibacterial hand wipes for cleanup. Oh yeah, and an insulated butt pad to sit on. It’s considerably more than we carried in the “old days,” but ’tis better to be safe than sorry. Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors under Living in Colorado.


Enjoy the Ease of Showering Safely So You Can Stay in the Home You Love! Upgrade your bathroom, upgrade your life. With a new

Introducing the

ALL Nk-EInW Wal Shower!

walk-in shower, you can make sure your bathroom ages as gracefully as you do. This shower was designed by experts, with you in mind, focusing on safety and convenience when it matters most. Discover how a walk-in shower can help reduce the risk of falling, giving you the freedom to enjoy your bathroom again.

Call today and receive exclusive savings of up to

✔ Commercial Grade Non-Slip Floor ✔ Easy-to-reach Shower Wand

✔ Optional Built-in Seat or

Fold Down Safety Seat

✔ Professionally Installed in 1 day

✔ Lifetime Warranty

✔ Tru Temp Anti Scald Shower Valve

✔ Optional Barrier Free

✔ Ergo L Shaped Grab Bar

Wheelchair Accessible

$750 OFF FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY

Call Toll-Free 1-888-376-4086

www.SafeStepShower.com With purchase of a new Safe Step Walk-In Shower. Not applicable with any previous walk-in shower purchase. No cash value. Must present offer at time of purchase.

Callfor Now Toll-Free 1-888-376-4086 more information and ask about our Senior Discounts. Financing available with approved credit.

CSLB 983603 F13000002885 13HV08744300


MARKETPLACE CHICKS FOR SALE

Buying anvils—blacksmith tools— cast iron (Griswold & Wagner). Old toys – colored pyrex – cowboy hats, boots, & spurs. Will come to you & we buy whole estates!

970-759-3455 or 970-565-1256

I want to purchase mineral and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201 Wanted: Jeep CJ or Wrangler. Reasonably priced. No rust buckets.

WE PAY CASH

for minerals and oil/gas interests, producing and non-producing.

888-735-5337

800-733-8122

CarrieYounger01_2019.qxp_Layout 1 12/1/18 6:46 PM

Want to work from home? Tired of the scams?

We are a legitimate work from home company Call Carrie 303-579-4207 www.WorkAtHomeUnited.com/OurAbundance

Wanted: Old Colorado cattle brand books Prefer prior to 1925 Call Wes 303-757-8553

Protective Sleeves: 100% Guaranteed

Stop feeding prairie dogs. We’ll rent hunting rights from you.

Seriously looking for duck & goose habitat. Encourage young sportsmen by providing safe, private access. You make the rules.

303-460-0273

25 Year Warranty • Easy Bolt-Together Design Engineered Stamp Blueprints

• Prevents Cuts & Scratches • Durable Soft Leather • Adjustable Air-Flow

armchaps.com • 651-492-4830

Farm • Industrial • Commercial

RHINO.BUILDERS/CO 940-304-8064 info@rhinobldg.com

our typical 1,864 S.F. home

for as little as $357 per YEAR

with natural gas at 53¢ per therm, $787 per year with propane at $1.21 per gallon, or $719 per year with electric at 8¢ per KWH in the winter and 10¢ per KWH in summer.

26

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

1320 E 7th St., Wayne, NE | 402-375-4770

Watch our Factory Tour Online | hhofne.com


As a cooperative we are taking bold steps to change how your energy is produced. That means fewer emissions and 50 percent of your electricity coming from renewable energy by 2024. Because whatever the future holds, we’ll power it.

To learn more about our Responsible Energy Plan, visit www.tristate.coop COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

27


COMMUNITY EVENTS February 15 Colorado Springs

Winter Hobby Wine Competition Event Preregistration Preferred Bear Creek Nature Center 7-9 pm • 719-520-6977

February 15 Longmont

February 20 Society for Range Management Events Range Practicum, National Western Complex, Denver The U.S. Forest Service and the Bureau of Land Management will lead a full-day workshop session about training wild horses, and a half-day session will be held called Women in Ranching. Smaller sessions include Soil Health, Winter Livestock Watering, NRCS Rainfall Simulator and more. For more information, visit http://www.srm2020.org/range-practicum.html. Healthy Grasslands Expo, Sheraton Denver Downtown Hotel, Denver Learn about the importance of rangelands; the effects that humans and animals have on grasslands; how grasslands store carbon; and the function, health and ecosystem processes of rangelands. For more information, visit http://www.srm2020. org/healthy-grasslands-expo.html.

February 2020 February 6-9 Copper

Dew Tour Ski and Snowboard Competition and Festival Copper Mountain dewtour.com

February 6-9 Lamar

High Plains Snow Goose Festival Lamar High School highplainssnowgoose.com

February 7-9 Greeley

“Shrek the Musical” by Stampede Troupe and Greeley Philharmonic Orchestra Union Colony Civic Center ucstars.com

February 8 Telluride

Chocolate Lovers’ Fling Sheridan Opera House 7 pm • 970-728-5842

February 9 Aspen

Owl Creek Chase Race Snowmass Cross Country Center 9 am • 970-429-2093

28

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

February 13 Grand Junction

Doo Wop Project Avalon Theatre 7-9 pm • avalontheatregj.com

February 13 Montrose

Beaded Medallion Class Preregistration Required Ute Indian Museum 6-7:30 pm • 970-249-3098

February 14 Colorado Springs

A Valentine’s Evening in Nature Preregistration Required Bear Creek Nature Center 6-8:30 pm • 719-520-6972

February 14-17 Creede

Cabin Fever Daze Various Creede Locations creede.com

February 14-15 Loveland

Loveland Sweetheart Festival Downtown Loveland visitlovelandco.org

Valentine’s Cuddles at the Sanctuary Good Life Refuge 2-4 pm • goodliferefuge.org

February 15 Loveland

Spring Toy Show and Sale Larimer County Fairgrounds 9 am-3 pm • lovelandlionsclubs.org

February 16 Fraser

Pregnancy Resource Connection Fundraising Banquet Preregistration Required Young Life Crooked Creek Ranch 5 pm • 970-887-3617

February 16 Grand Junction

Avalon Theatre Bow Wow Film Fest 1-3 pm • avalontheatregj.com

February 16 Steamboat Springs

Ski Free Sunday Howelsen Hill steamboatsprings.net

February 18-22 Aspen

Aspen Laugh Festival Various Aspen Locations aspenchamber.org

February 18 Fort Collins

Mini Makers: Up-Cycled Cardboard Box Creations Fort Collins Museum of Discovery 1:15 pm • fcmod.org

February 20 Aurora

Free Admission Day Plains Conservation Center 10 am-2 pm • botanicgardens.org

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS 3 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

February 21 Leadville

Women’s Suffrage in Colorado Lecture Healy House Museum 12 pm • historycolorado.org

February 22 Denver

Women’s Vote Centennial Symposium History Colorado Center 8 am-5 pm • historycolorado.org

February 22 Manitou Springs

Carnivale Parade Memorial Park • 12 pm manitousprings.org/carnivale-parade

February 22 Lake City

Ice Fishing Derby Lake San Cristobal Public Dock 7 am • 970-944-2527

February 22 Niwot

Let’s Wine About Winter! Tasting Event Various Historic Niwot Locations 1-5 pm • niwot.com

February 24 Denver

“Ale Throughout History” Program History Colorado Center 6-8 pm • 303-447-8679

February 27 Denver

“Battling the Japanese Beetle” Presentation Denver Botanic Gardens 6:30-8:30 pm • botanicgardens.org

February 27 Montrose

Family Dream Catcher Class Reservations Required Ute Indian Museum 6-7:30 pm • 970-249-3098

February 29 Gould and Walden

Gould Ski Scramble & Snowshoe Stomp, Potluck and Dance Gould Comm. Cntr./State Forest State Park • gouldskiscramble.com

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303-455-2807; or email calendar@coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information.


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES When my daughter was young she

Picture perfect! Dwayne, Nicola, Robin and Daniel Hopkins snap a shot with CCL at one of the 7 Natural Wonders of the World: Table Mountain in South Africa. The Hopkins’ are consumermembers of Poudre Valley REA.

had some health problems and had to learn to swallow pills at an extremely young age. Her brother was seldom sick and couldn’t swallow pills until he was an adult. One day, when the kids were still young, they were in the back seat of the car bickering about something. My son was upset with his sister. All of a sudden, my daughter shouted, “OMG, take a chill pill! Oh, that’s right — you can’t swallow one!” Diane Churchill, Black Forest

One morning, after a long and

unrestful night, I started making pancakes for the kids prior to school. Once all the ingredients were added and mixed together, I poured the first couple for my 7-year-old son. As I watched them cook I noticed they weren’t quite right. Through my foggy mind I realized I forgot to add the sugar. Knowing my son has quite the sweet tooth, I told him I’d add sugar and make him some new pancakes, but he told me he wanted to try the nonsugar ones. As he began to eat them, he exclaimed, “Dad, these pancakes have no joy!” Timm Smith, Greeley

I recently had the joy of an outing

Colorado Country Life travels halfway around the world to visit the iconic Sydney Opera House in Australia with Gordon and Julie Racine, consumermembers of San Isabel Electric.

Empire Electric Association consumer-members Mary Ann Graff and Beth Carter bring CCL on a visit to Patmara, Nepal, where they served local women through health education classes.

WINNER: Sharon, Bryon, Alan and Megan Fessler, and Terri and Casey Meadows bring CCL on a snorkel trip in Bonaire in the Caribbean. This fun bunch are all consumer-members of Poudre Valley REA.

It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo, your name and address to info@ coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Monday, February 17. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

with my grandsons — the youngest had just turned 4. As we drove up Buckhorn Road in Larimer County he yelled out that he had to go “number two” immediately. I pulled over, ran to the back seat and unstrapped him from his car seat. I grabbed him, pulled his pants and underpants down and held him up so that he could go. To my surprise nothing came out his rear but from his front instead, soaking the clothes I was wearing. As we climbed back into the car he proudly and happily told his brothers, “I peed on Grandpa!” It took me four hours to dry out. Roger Person, Loveland

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2020 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@ coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020

29


DISCOVERIES

SNOW COOL WINTER GEAR

Colorado-made products to enjoy this winter Photo courtesy of Grass Sticks

Sundance Leather In Guffey, Sundance Sheepskin & Leather owners Dylan Anderson and his mom Jean are busy constructing boots, moccasins, hats and more, just as his dad Barry and Jean did starting nearly 50 years ago. Using sheepskin from colder climates in Colorado, New Mexico and other Western areas — which the company touts produces a “superior, thicker pile” — Sundance merchandise lasts for years and keeps you warm on the coldest days. Find Sundance products at its Buena Vista retail store and online at sundanceleather.com.

Connect to Care for Your Camera More than a decade ago, Colorado Country Life featured Backcountry Solutions’ KEYHOLE® Hands-Free Camera Harness. Since then, the Tabernash-based company adapted its design to accommodate customers’ needs even more. The Universal KEYHOLE® harness attaches to all types of backpack straps and uses a standard knob that attaches to your camera to hold it in place, leaving your hands free to explore the world around you. Cost is $54.95 and info can be found at backcountrysolutions.com.

Hit the Hill In 2010, brothers Caleb and Morgan Weinberg built eight pairs of skis in their garage and gave them to their friends. While their appearance wasn’t exactly jaw dropping, the functionality was. Caleb and Morgan realized they were onto something, so they went back to work and created a collection of attractive, durable skis that they sold to the public that following year. Romp Skis, the Crested Butte-based company, has an array of stock skis but can also custom-make customers’ skis to fit their needs. For more information, call 970-3495353 or visit rompskis.com.

Trusty Ski Accessory — Pick Your Pole Bamboo is the primary ingredient for Grass Sticks’ ski poles and the element that makes the Steamboat Springs company stand out. Grass Sticks’ poles are flexible and lightweight yet rigid and resilient, and each set is designed with the user in mind. Simply provide the desired length of the pole and the preferred type of strap, and then pick the colors of the grip and basket. Also available in SUP and canoe paddles. For more information, call 970-4391624 or visit grasssticks.com.

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE FEBRUARY 2020


SUPER COUPON 1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

30", 5 DRAWER MECHANIC'S CARTS

SUPER COUPON

• Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3- AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

Customer Rating E YOUR CHOIC OF 7 COLORS

$

• Wireless, tool-free and easy installation

$1 99

PROMIER $ 99

4

MODEL: SW-SWITCH-12/24

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 59%

NOW

COMPARE TO

830

BLUE-POINT MODEL: KRBC10TBPES

Customer Rating

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

COMPARE TO ITEM 63878/63991 PERFORMANCE $ 52 64005/60566 MODEL: W2364 63601/67227 shown TOOL

13

$5 99

COMPARE TO

14

SAVE 60%

R PE N SU UPO CO

ITEM 64189/64723/63922 shown

$

7

$ 99

MODEL: VEN4145

HIGH OR LOW

VOLTAGE CONTROL

AC

OUTPUT

11999

Customer Rating

32 LBS.

$

MODEL: 45433

*97952046 * 97952046

*97952386 * 97952386

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

9

COMPARE TO

SCHUMACHER ELECTRIC

$

30

41

MODEL: SC1

ITEM 69594/69955/64284/42292 shown

$

99

$4

SAVE 83%

COMPARE TO

299

MODEL: 262800

ITEM 62915/60600 shown

99

2

8

$ 78

COMPARE TO

BLUE HAWK

MODEL: BG8X10-Y

SAVE 65%

4

$ 99

ITEM 69115/69121/69129/69137/69249/877 shown

*97954429 * 97954429

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

RAPID PUMP® 1.5 TON LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM FLOOR JACK • Weighs 33 lbs. 99 NOW $

SAVE $ 91

$59

99

4 PIECE, 1" x 15 FT. RATCHETING TIE DOWNS

• 400 lb. working load

79

SAVE 69% NOW

COMPARE TO

K TOOL $ 42

151

$

MODEL: KTI63094

ITEM 64552/64832/64980/64545 shown

12

COMPARE TO

KEEPER $ 80

99

22

$6

39

MODEL: 5505

ITEM 90984/63056/63057/63150/56668/63094 shown

COMPARE TO $ SAVE LINCOLN 439 $ 259 ELECTRIC

179 99

MODEL: K2513-1

0.6 CFM @ 90 PSI

18 VOLT, 3/8" CORDLESS DRILL/DRIVER KIT WITH KEYLESS CHUCK Includes one 18V NiCd battery and charger.

$

1999

COMPARE TO

BLACK+ DECKER

$

5999

MODEL: GC1801

5999 OICE YOUR CH

HOT DOG

9 $399

PANCAKE

ITEM 69269 97080 shown

ITEM 61615/60637 95275 shown Customer Rati Cust Rating

$

COMPARE TO

PORTER-CABLE

9862

SAVE 59%

MODEL: PCFP02003

*97954661 * 97954661 LIMIT 2 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

TWO TIER EASY-STORE STEP LADDER

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

LIGHT & COMPACT

$

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

*97953978 * 97953978

Customer Rating

19999

*97953139 * 97953139

*97953148 * 97953148 SUPER COUPON

$

ITEM 56359/56355 shown

NOW

219

GRACO $

Customer Rating

15 LBS.

$

99

SAVE $ 134

POWERFUL & EFFICIENT 90 AMP @ 30% LONGER RUN TIME

Customer Rating

$1 6

NOW

99

ADVANCED INVERTER

SUPER 7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" COUPON ALL PURPOSE/WEATHER 3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE RESISTANT TARP AIR COMPRESSORS • Air delivery:

AUTOMATIC AIRLESS PAINT SPRAYER KIT Customer Rating BATTERY FLOAT CHARGER NOW

$ 99

DC

WEIGHT

99

*97951425 * 97951425

Customer Rating

EASY TO USE

CLEAN WELDS

90 AMP @ 20% DUTY CYCLE

COMPARE TO

SUPER COUPON

VARIABLE CONTROL

CONVENTIONAL TRANSFORMER TECHNOLOGY

$ SAVE 17999 $ 80 IRONTON

ITEM 37050, 64417, 64418, 61363, 68497, 61360, 61359, 68498, 68496 shown

Professional Performance

Standard Performance

FLUX 125 120 VOLT EASY FLUX 125 INPUT WELDER WELDER

ITEM 63583/63582 shown

SUPER COUPON

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, welders, Admiral, Ames, Atlas, Bauer, Central Machinery, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/1/20.

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 4/1/20 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

NOW

VENOM $ 97

*97949891 * 97949891

*97948763 * 97948763

• 5 mil thickness

Customer Rating

3

$

Snap-On

POWDER-FREE NITRILE GLOVES PACK OF 100

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT

99

SAVE $630

COMPARE TO

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

200 LUMEN LED SUPER BRIGHT FLIP LIGHT

$ 99

229

99

*97948159 * 97948159

Item 64031, 56429, 64033, 64059, 64721, 64722, 64720

$1 99

20% OFF

WITH ANY PURCHASE

SUPER BRIGHT LED/SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

• 15,000 cu. in. of storage • 700 lb. capacity • Heavy duty locking casters

SUPER COUPON

FREE

OVER 5,000 5 STAR REVIEWS Customer Rating

Customer Rating

• 225 lb. capacity

Customer Rating

NOW

NOW

$1 999

99

$1 6

$

SAVE 71%

SAVE 40%

ITEM 67514

ITEM 68239/69651/62868/62873 shown

COMPARE TO

WERNER

2999 $

3388

MODEL: S322A-1

*97954828 * 97954828

*97955498 * 97955498

*97957322 * 97957322

*97957825 * 97957825

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

SUPER COUPON

9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED COMBINATION WRENCH SETS

Customer Rating

Customer Rating

YOUR CHOICE

$5

99

7

COMPARE TO

HUSKY

$

3/8" x 14 FT., GRADE 43 18" x 12" TOWING CHAIN MOVER'S DOLLY • 5400 lb. capacity

Item 42305 shown

SAVE 66%

$ 99

17 97

MODEL: HCW10PCSAE

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

TYPE ITEM SAE 69043/63282/42304 METRIC 69044/63171/42305

COMPARE TO $

MIBRO

64

99

MODEL: 426920

SAVE 69%

ITEM 40462/60658/97711 shown

$1 9 $

3999

900 WATT MAX. STARTING 2 CYCLE GAS POWERED GENERATOR

• 1000 lb. capacity

• 5 hour run time

NOW

NOW

99

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

$799

COMPARE TO

BUFFALO TOOLS $ 99

22

MODEL: HDFDOLLY

SAVE 65%

$

1099

ITEM 60497/61899/63095/63096/63097/63098 shown

Customer Rating

COMPARE TO

POWERSMART

$

NOW

99 $1 09

12610 SAVE $ 16 $ 12499

MODEL: PS50

ITEM 63024/63025 shown

*97958847 * 97958847

*97961082 * 97961082

*97962049 * 97962049

*97963322 * 97963322

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 4/1/20*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 4/1/20.

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


Tune to ESPN

AMERICA’S TOP 120

190

Channels $59.99/mo.

Local channels included!

Smart HD DVR Included | 2-Year TV Price Guarantee All offers require credit qualification, 2-year commitment with early termination fee, and eAutoPay. Prices include Hopper Duo for qualifying customers. Hopper, Hopper w/Sling, or Hopper 3 $5/mo. more. Upfront fees may apply based on credit qualification. Fees apply for additional TVs: Hopper $15/mo., Joey $5/mo., Super Joey $10/mo.

FREE HD for Life®

FREE Standard Professional Installation

Profile for American MainStreet Publications

Colorado Country Life February 2020 Empire  

Colorado Country Life February 2020 Empire

Colorado Country Life February 2020 Empire  

Colorado Country Life February 2020 Empire