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Y-W ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC.

NOVEMBER 2019

COLORADO BETWEEN THE PAGES

PLUS CAUTIONARY TALE OF BLACKOUTS

4

A TWIST ON TURKEY DAY

12

ELECTRIFYING THE WHITE HOUSE

21


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Volume 50

Number 11

November 2019 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2019, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

On the NOVEMBER 2019

COLORADO BETWEEN THE PAGES

Cover Books by Colorado authors printed by Colorado publishers on Colorado subjects are featured in this year’s book reviews. Illustration by Cassi Gloe.

“Snowshoeing in the San Juans” by Brad Weinmeister, a consumer-member of La Plata Electric Association, Durango.

4 VIEWPOINT

5 LETTERS

6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12 RECIPES

14 NEWS CLIPS

16 COVER STORY

COCountryLife pinned: Time to serve something healthy and diabetes-friendly for Thanksgiving. Try the broccoli and spinach salad with blueberries, quinoa and feta dressing. Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.

COLORADO BETWEEN THE PAGES

21 INDUSTRY

22 GARDENING

24 OUTDOORS

26 MARKETPLACE

27 CREATIVE CORNER

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS

29 YOUR STORIES

30 DISCOVERIES

FACEBOOK CHATTER Colorado Rural Electric Association shared: Mountain View Electric Association (MVEA) held a whole-home LED lighting giveaway, giving consumermembers an opportunity to win LED bulbs for their entire home.

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a copy of The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook by Amy Riolo. Try one of her recipes from the book on page 12 of the magazine. For official rules and how to enter, visit our contest page at coloradocountrylife.coop.

coloradocountrylife.coop

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month colorado_electric_cooperatives posted: #coloradoselectriccoops are excited to partner with #4H on an #energy trailer promoting #stemeducation across the state. #supportingeducation #supportingyouth COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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VIEWPOINT

Cautionary Tale of Blackouts Are you prepared to live without electricity? BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

A

s we have seen recently in California, whether or not you are ready to live without electricity is not a rhetorical question. On a Wednesday morning in early October, Pacific Gas and Electric Company shut off power to hundreds of thousands of its customers in northern California. PG&E took this extraordinary step to protect the public against the risk of fires that might have been ignited by the company’s equipment during extremely warm temperatures and high winds. Its “public safety power shut-off ” program imposed power outages across 22 northern California counties. PG&E took this action in the wake of several recent catastrophic fires caused by faulty equipment on the PG&E system. The resulting liability caused PG&E to declare bankruptcy earlier this year. Rather than risk additional fires in October, PG&E de-energized large portions of its power grid to reduce the likelihood that an energized line might be torn down by winds and cause a fire. Hundreds of thousands of California electricity customers were without power for up to three days. Businesses went dark; nursing homes and hospitals scrambled to find backup sources of power; and the state’s emergency system normally used for natural disasters was activated. While other utilities have imposed voluntary power shut-offs in limited circumstances, PG&E’s action is unprecedented in the history of the electric utility business in the United States in terms of the volume of customers impacted. And while the company attempted to communicate with its customers to give them advance notice of the power shut-off, the systems used to provide the notice largely failed.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

While PG&E has come under withering criticism for its actions in this case, its experience is a cautionary tale for all utilities, including Colorado’s electric co-ops. Clearly, the same conditions that were present in northern California, that is, high winds combined with warm temperatures and dry vegetation and fuel, are possible in many parts of Colorado. This is a situation that Colorado’s electric co-ops have taken seriously for many years. Colorado’s electric co-ops spend millions of dollars annually clearing trees and brush from under utility easements in an effort to prevent trees from falling into lines and starting fires. This work is complicated by the fact that we must work with many different state and federal governmental agencies to gain permission to clear the rights-of-way — as a Western state, hundreds of thousands of acres of Colorado are owned by the federal government and gaining permission to clear the rights-of-way can be difficult. These efforts are costly and just one more expense that co-ops must recover in the rates they charge their consumer-members. Colorado’s electric co-ops are doing everything they can to make Colorado policymakers aware of the extensive system of

KENT SINGER

transmission and distribution lines that co-ops own and operate in Colorado’s forests and plains. We have been fortunate that recent significant fires have not resulted in more property damage or loss of life. We need the assistance of the state and federal governments to help clear these rights-of way, both from a permitting standpoint and from a financial standpoint. When asked about the California power shut-off, the president of the state’s public utilities commission said: “We cannot accept it (the shut-off) as the new normal. And we won’t.” While we hope that Colorado’s electric co-ops never have to shut off the power to wide swaths of our systems in order to protect against the possibility of a fire, it remains a tool we have to consider in extreme circumstances. Colorado’s electric co-ops always take whatever steps are necessary to protect the safety of the communities we serve. Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.

“We hope that Colorado’s electric co-ops never have to shut off the power to wide swaths of our system …”


LETTERS

FROM THE EDITOR

Whipped cream memories of Thanksgiving

BY MONA NEELEY

EDITOR

I

love Thanksgiving. Our family always celebrated on the Sunday MONA NEELEY after. The whole Neeley clan — my family, my grandparents, my dad’s four brothers, their wives and what started as my 15 cousins (and later expanded as those cousins married and had kids) — gathered at noon in the rented community room of the local electric cooperative. It was a time of happy chaos. The little kids ran underfoot as the sisters-in-law set out the potluck meal. The brothers and Grandpa convened in a circle of chairs and swapped stories. Grandma oversaw the turkeys. Everyone else added their favorite dishes, including the all-important pumpkin pie. The pie was always the pièce de résistance for the meal, probably because it allowed access to the canned whipped cream. Those cans of Reddi-Wip invariably ended up sprayed everywhere during a food fight at the cousins’ table. I miss those laughter-filled holidays. After my grandparents died and the cousins scattered across the country, each of us created new Thanksgiving traditions. For the past 25 years my husband and I have hosted an “orphans” Thanksgiving at our church for those who, like us, don’t have family nearby. It’s a great way to celebrate the day … but, I do miss the food fights. Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative. Its goal is to provide information from your local electric co-op to you, its consumer-members. Morton_CoCountryLife_4.19.qxp_Layout 1 10/4/19 5:32 PM Page 1

BUILT STRONGER. LOOKS BETTER. LASTS LONGER. BUILT STRONGER. LOOKS BETTER. LASTS LONGER.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Not Wind, Solar Fans

I hope you don’t hurt yourself patting yourself on the back for partnering on these wind and solar energy projects. They aren’t worth anything when the wind doesn’t cooperate and the sun sets. We still need just as much electricity. How fast can the fossil fuel plants ramp up to replace what we had been drawing from renewables? How does anybody save money when they need just as much capacity day or night? Paul McKelvey, Bellvue Poudre Valley REA consumer-member In response to the August letter on wind turbines, I want to know what material was used to manufacture those graceful wind turbines. The polyester and epoxy resin used to make the blades is processed from oil. The steel that makes the wind turbine towers is made from products dug from the ground and transported by ships and trucks powered by oil. The mining of lithium used in the batteries of electric cars, laptops and smartphones is becoming increasingly hazardous to the environment. The destruction of our oil-based economy and lifestyle is not the answer. Kenneth McArthur, Beulah San Isabel Electric consumer-member

Preserving Bumper Crops

I am worried about your article on preserving zucchini (Gardening, October ’19). I have horrified visions of someone trying to can zucchini, maybe even actually doing it although the product would be mush. I wonder if it would even be safe since it is such a low-acid vegetable. Carolyn Brown, Bayfield La Plata Electric consumer-member

#4169

When you build with Morton, you build something that lasts. A Morton stands the test of

EDITOR’S NOTE: We apologize for any confusion caused by an omitted paragraph indent. The column should have noted that freezing surplus fruits and vegetables is convenient, but canning may be an option for some of that produce.

time—we’ve been at this for more than 110 years after all. What got us here is simple: our materials, our people and a warranty that beats all others.

SEND US YOUR LETTERS 800-447-7436 | MORTONBUILDINGS.COM ©2019 Morton Buildings, Inc. A listing of GC licenses available at mortonbuildings.com/licenses. Ref Code 604

Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Letters may be edited for length. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

Efficient Holiday Gifts to Give (or Keep?) BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN

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s the holidays approach, you may be racking your brain about what gifts to buy for your loved ones. Whether the recipients are energy conscious or not, here are some ideas that are sure to make them joyful during this festive season. • Smart thermostat. Price: $30 to $600: A smart thermostat can adjust the temperature by learning energy use habits over time, which saves money and increases comfortableness. It can also be controlled through a smartphone app. Before you put a bow on it, make sure the recipient will use all of its functionality before taking the leap. • Solar backpack. Price: $30 to $325: Shopping for someone who enjoys walking or biking to the office, on a trail or to a mountain lake? They can actually make the most of the sun’s energy with a solar backpack, making those stints even more enjoyable. These handy devices collect and store enough electricity to power a phone, tablet or even a laptop. The solar panels stitched onto the back of the packs are flexible and waterproof. Best of all, they have all the features and functionality of their traditional nonsolar cousins. • E-bike. Price: $250 to $9,000: Electric bikes, or e-bikes, are regular bicycles with an electric motor that can be engaged as needed. E-bikes are becoming increasingly popular with people who face challenging terrain, bike to work and don’t want to work up a sweat,

An e-bike can make cycling easier on challenging terrain, when biking to work or when regular cycling is too physically challenging.

or perhaps find regular cycling too physically challenging. They even come in foldable versions. One downside is they are heavier than regular bicycles. • Energy-efficient tablets. Price: $40 to $4,000: The special someone on your holiday shopping list may already have a tablet, but how energy efficient is it? With an Energy Star-rated tablet, she can use seven times less power overindulging that new television show she loves. Simply look for the Energy Star label when you’re shopping for new tablets. After spending a little dough on your loved ones, try for yourself something that’s energy efficient and costs practically nothing: enjoying a good book and a cozy evening at home. Don’t forget to put on your favorite sweater and pair of fuzzy slippers so you can lower the thermostat a couple of degrees. Now that’s an energy-efficient evening worth repeating. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Y-W ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION NOVEMBER 2019

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box Y Akron, CO 80720-0570 STREET ADDRESS 250 Main Avenue Akron, CO 80720

ph 970-345-2291 tf 800-660-2291 fax 970-345-2154 web www.ywelectric.coop

Y-W Electric Association, Inc. is dedicated to providing highquality, reliable electric service and related products to our members at competitive prices. Our members deserve and shall receive quality service unexcelled in our industry. We are committed to maintaining an environment where the Board of Directors and employees can perform at maximum potential to benefit our Y-W community.

THERE IS A COOPERATIVE DIFFERENCE BY TRENT LOUTENSOCK GENER AL MANAGER

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n the United States, the vast majority of people receive their electricity from one of three types of utilities: investor owned, municipal owned or through an electric cooperative, which is owned and controlled by the people who use its services. Let’s take a closer look at these three types of ownership models and see why it matters to you. In the investor-owned model, the corporation is owned by a great number of stockholders who may or may not be customers of the utility. Investorowned utilities tend to be large corporations, such as Xcel Energy. They typically serve areas with high-load densities and many meters per mile, such as large cities, suburban areas and some rural areas, too. In most cases, investor-owned utilities have few employees in the communities where they operate. This, combined with the fact that they have outside investors whose sole motive is to make a profit on their investment, generally tends to lead to less personalized service. Consumer surveys confirm that IOUs have the lowest customer satisfaction ratings. About 72% of the U.S. population is served by investor-owned utilities. Municipal electric systems, as the name implies, are government owned. They can serve large cities, such as Loveland, Fort Collins or Colorado Springs, or smaller areas, such as Yuma or Wray. In municipal systems, typically the electric system is managed by employees who report to an elected board of trustees. About 16% of the market is served by municipal utilities. Rural electric cooperatives serve the smallest number of consumers, about 12% of the market, which equals 42 million

TRENT LOUTENSOCK

people. There are more than 800 electric co-ops in 48 states in addition to Y-W Electric Association, Inc. While co-ops serve the fewest number of people, our electric lines cover more than 75 percent of the U.S. landmass. This is because we provide power where others once refused to go because of the low population density and, in many cases, there are fewer electric meters per mile of line. Electric co-ops rank highest in member satisfaction among the three types of utilities. We believe this is because we serve member-owners, not customers. As the electric utility business continues to evolve, we are committed to being there for you, our consumer-members, to provide for your electric energy needs. Unlike large investor-owned utilities, we are rooted right here in northeastern Colorado. Over the years, we answered the call to provide additional benefits and services because it is extremely important to us that our community thrives and prospers. A few of the additional benefits that Y-W Electric Association, Inc., offers to consumer-members are energy efficiency rebates, energy usage audits, safety programs and scholarships to support our youth. Another important benefit to you, our consumer-members, is the return of margins in excess of expenses in the form of capital credits. There is a cooperative difference. You are the owners and we are here to serve you. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Decorate Safely This Holiday Season BY DERRILL HOLLY

T

he holiday season offers great moments for building memories, but when it comes to decorating it’s also the perfect time to think about safety. “There are about 200 decorating-related injuries each day during the busy holiday season,” said Ann Marie Buerkle, acting chairwoman of the Consumer Product Safety Commission. “Make safety a part of your family’s holiday decorating this year.” Between November 2016 and January 2017, holiday decorating injuries resulted in 18,400 emergency room visits nationwide. Local fire departments look to the holiday season as a time of increased vigilance, often tied to many of the activities that have become family traditions. “It’s important to use common sense when you’re dealing with holiday decorating, particularly with lighting, candles and electrical wiring,” said Bruce Bouch, a U.S. Fire Administration fire program specialist. “Holiday decorations are designed for temporary use, and that means they are essentially disposable.” According to the National Fire Protection Association, the top three days of the year for candle fires in the United States are Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day. NFPA statistics also indicate that one out of four Christmas tree fires are caused by electrical problems. The global safety certification company, Underwriters Laboratories, classifies holiday lighting as a seasonal product designed for no more than 90 days of use. While the actual holiday season runs about six weeks, weather and busy schedules mean outdoor holiday lighting displays are put up early and taken down late, exposed to the elements the entire time. “It’s always important to inspect holiday lights each year before you put them up,”

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

According to the National Fire Protection Association, burning candles start two out of five home fires every year. Consider battery-operated LED candles as safer alternatives. [Glenn D. & Andrea L. Davis, 5462008005]

Bouch said. “You may find that there are pinches or torn areas on the insulation.” Open, exposed wiring or any signs of fraying or pinching are indications of weakened wiring. Those flaws are prone to breakage and may raise the potential for heat buildup, which can cause a fire. Bouch recommends a thorough inspection of your holiday lights to identify potential hot spots and damage to the strings. “When you’re checking everything on the wiring and fixtures, make sure you check for chewing damage from wild animals or your own pets,” Bouch added. “Also look for signs that the insulation itself is wearing thin enough to expose wiring.” The U.S. Fire Administration, the CPSC and nongovernment safety organizations are also focused on reminding consumers that extension cords, whether labeled for indoors or outdoors, are also designed for temporary use. “Household wiring is a solid metal wire,” Bouch said. “Extension cords are strands of thin wires that are twisted together. That

pliability can allow them to break over time, increasing the chance that they could fail within so many years.” Experts also warn that candle use increases the risk of accidental fires and suggest that consumers consider battery-operated LED candles as safer alternatives. According to NFPA, candles start two out of every five home fires each year, and about 100 Christmas tree fires occur each holiday season, causing about $12 million in damage annually. You can reduce the risks by placing your Christmas tree away from heat sources, like vents or space heaters, and topping off the water reservoir daily. Colorado’s electric cooperatives join our local firefighters, the NFPA and the CPSC in urging you to consider safety as you decorate and enjoy the holiday season with family and friends. [Howard V. & Edith R. McGinnis, 1342801800] Derrill Holly writes on consumer and cooperative affairs for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.


Attention High School Juniors

If you are interested in an intriguing, all-expense-paid experience this summer, please obtain and fill out an application for Leadership Camp and the Washington D.C. Youth Tour. The application deadline is January 6, 2020. Washington D.C. Youth Tour

Youth Leadership Camp

The winner will join other students from Colorado co-ops and co-ops across the United States June 18-25, 2020. A week of activities begins in Denver on June 18. Students will visit our state Capitol building before heading to Washington, D.C. Once in Washington, D.C., the youth will meet many of our Colorado congressional members and learn about electric cooperatives and the issues facing the electric industry today. There will plenty of time for fun and touring. The lucky student will visit Mount Vernon, National Cathedral, Holocaust museum, Arlington National Cemetery and Library of Congress; stroll through the Smithsonian museums; visit the monuments and memorials; and much more. There will be an opportunity to learn about electricity generation, transmission and distribution, while having the time of your life with over 1,900 other students. An evening at the theater, a cruise on the Potomac River, dancing and mingling are all a part of this once-in-a-lifetime experience with many memories to share.

On July 11-16, 2020, a total of about 100 students are chosen and sponsored by rural electric cooperatives from all over Colorado, Kansas, Wyoming and Oklahoma to attend the Youth Leadership Camp. The camp is designed to provide a better understanding of cooperatives, legislative processes, energy prices, power generation and the rural electric cooperative program. It also focuses on developing leadership skills to handle the challenges of the future. The camp, run by the students, is a lot of fun, but also provides an excellent learning experience. Field trips are planned to tour a large open-pit coal mine and an electric generation power plant. There is also time for fun and sightseeing. Free time is taken up with volleyball, swimming, whitewater rafting, dancing, a banquet and meeting many new friends. All expenses for the camp are covered by Y-W Electric. The parent or guardian of an applicant must be a member of Y-W and/ or directly receive electric power from Y-W Electric Association. The selection process is conducted similar to a job interview, so you will gain experience in that area.

Applications are available on our website, www.ywelectric.coop. For more information, please see your guidance counselor or call Andy Molt at Y-W Electric at 970-345-2291. He will be happy to answer any questions.

Billing Corner SMARTHUB CHANGES In the near future, the SmartHub app will be upgraded. You will be able to monitor your account quickly and easily since the details will be right up front. With the tap of a button, you can view and pay your bill, or contact us with questions or to report an outage. The app is compatible with iPhones and Androids. As of October 5, our billing department was no longer able to take a credit or debit card payment over the phone. We still have our automated service to take cards over the phone. The direct phone number for the automated service is 855-385-9911. This service is available 24/7. We can also transfer you directly to the automated service if you call our office during regular business hours. As always, you can walk into our office and use your card at the front counter or log on to our website and make the payment there. The ability to take a check payment over the phone has not changed. Check out our website at www.ywelectric.coop for more information or go to our Facebook page. [Kirk Cemetery Assn., 892305100]

YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Don’t Miss Out On College Scholarships

Available through Y-W Electric Association for 2020! Get your applications in prior to the deadline to compete for the following scholarships: • Y-W Electric* $1,000 per year scholarships, renewable up to $4,000 • Y-W Electric* $1,000 scholarships • Basin Electric $1,000 scholarships • Y-W Electric $500 scholarships • Y-W Electric* $500 continuing education scholarship • Tri-State Generation and Transmission $500 scholarships • Y-W Electric* $1,000 line technician training scholarship *Y-W Electric scholarships are funded by unclaimed capital credits account

To qualify for these scholarships: • Your parents or guardians must receive electric service from Y-W Electric • You must be a graduating student from a local high school or approved home schooling program, or be a continuing college student • You must maintain full-time resident student status • Semesters must be continuous excluding summer • You must provide copy of grade transcript to Y-W at the end of each semester to receive renewable funding for specific scholarships • You must maintain minimum GPA requirements • Applications are available on our website, www.ywelectric.coop. • Applications must be delivered to Y-W prior to 5 p.m. January 31, 2020 • Applications received after January 31, 2020, WILL NOT BE CONSIDERED, regardless of postmark! • For more information, please see your guidance counselor or call Andy Molt at Y-W Electric at 970-345-2291. He will be happy to answer any questions. [Ryan & Jennifer Koch, 321602901]

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Why Outdoor GFCIs Are Required

I

n 1975, the National Electrical Code began requiring ground fault circuit interrupter installation on all outdoor outlets. Today, that rule stands with one uncommon exception: when homeowners have what is called a dedicated branch circuit for outdoor outlets. GFCIs serve as important electrical system protection since they automatically trip as soon as anything goes wrong in a circuit. When working properly, they keep us from getting shocked or electrocuted. This is especially important around the home where water and electricity have the chance to mix, such as in bathrooms, basements, kitchens, garages and outdoors. If you are planning a new outdoor space that requires additional outlets, consult a licensed electrician. Outdoor outlets must be installed in outdoor-rated electrical boxes and must have special covers based on their type and location, among other requirements. If you are still not convinced about the importance of GFCIs, consider this easy-to-understand “This Old House” explanation:

A ground fault happens whenever electricity escapes the confines of the wiring in an appliance, light fixture or power tool and takes a shortcut to the ground. When that shortcut is through a human, the results can be deadly. About 200 people in the United States alone die of ground faults each year, accounting for two-thirds of all electrocutions occurring in homes. … The ground fault circuit interrupter (was invented) in 1961. Most of the time, (the)

invention does nothing; it just monitors the difference in the current flowing into and out of a tool or appliance. But when that difference exceeds 5 milliamps, an indication that a ground fault may be occurring, the GFCI shuts off the flow in an instant — as little as .025 seconds. So with the advent of the GFCI, how do people become electrocuted by ground faults? Probably for one of several reasons: • Their GFCIs are not working properly. Test GFCIs monthly to make sure they are working and have new ones installed if they are not. • They live in an older home built prior to GFCI requirements or in a dwelling that is not up to code. • They took on an electrical DIY project and were not qualified to do so. Energy Education Council board member Sam Adair said, “Take GFCIs seriously. Oftentimes, they are only as reliable as the person who installs, services and tests them.” For more information about electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org. [Darin & Michelle Corman, 632013700]

Claim Your Credit Each month, Y-W Electric offers members a chance to earn a $20 credit on their next electric bill. If you recognize your name and account number in this magazine, call 800-6602291 and ask for your credit. It couldn’t be easier. Get acquainted with your account number, read your Colorado Country Life magazine and pick up the phone. That’s all the energy you’ll need to claim your energy bucks. You must claim your credit during the month in which your name appears in the magazine. (Check the date on the front cover.) Winners claiming $20 from the September 2019 issue: • Thomas G. & Tamara Jackson • Double J Farms • John Ormanoski • Tom Kuntz

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

November 2019

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month Trim your holiday energy costs by choosing energy efficient LED lights. LED holiday lights use less energy and can last up to 40 seasons. Source: energy.gov


At Tri-State

Our cooperative approach to a clean grid starts now. Learn how we’re transforming with our Responsible Energy Plan. www.tristate.coop/responsibleenergyplan


RECIPES

A TWIST ON TURKEY DAY

Serve a diabetes-friendly Thanksgiving dinner BY AMY HIGGINS

| RECIPES@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

N

ovember is a time when folks say farewell to mild weather and welcome the colder temperatures with comfy sweaters, woolen socks and visions of turkey dancing in their heads. It’s also National Diabetes Month, a month that brings additional awareness, fundraising and research information to the forefront. One way to help manage diabetes is through a hearthealthy diet, and several American Diabetes Association-approved cookbooks are available to guide us, including The Mediterranean

Try something different for dessert:

MangoMisu (mango tiramisu).

Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.

Diabetes Cookbook by Amy Riolo. It features a wide range of healthy recipes you’ll be eager to eat. In honor of Diabetes Month and Thanksgiving, we gathered a group of delicious dishes you can dole out for a heart-friendly turkey day smorgasbord. (Find our other picks at coloradocountrylife.coop.) Excerpted from The Mediterranean Diabetes Cookbook, 2nd Edition: A Flavorful, Heart-Healthy Approach to Cooking (American Diabetes Association, May 2019, ISBN: 978-1-580-40702-1, $22.95).

Spinach-Stuffed Bread Triangles 1 tablespoon active dry yeast 1/4 cup plus 1/3 cup lukewarm water, divided 2 cups unbleached, all-purpose flour, or barley flour, plus extra for work surface 2 teaspoons plus 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 3/4 teaspoon unrefined sea salt, divided 1 cup frozen chopped spinach, thawed and drained well 1 medium onion, grated and drained well Juice of 1 lemon 2 tablespoons fresh mint, chopped Combine yeast with 1/4 cup lukewarm water in a large mixing bowl. Add flour, 1 teaspoon olive oil and 1/2 teaspoon salt. Mix well until blended. Add remaining 1/3 cup water, a little at a time, until dough is smooth. Turn dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Knead dough until it is smooth and elastic, 5-10 minutes. Oil another large bowl with 1 teaspoon olive oil. Place dough in bowl and turn to coat. Cover with a towel and let rise in a warm place for 1 hour or until doubled in size. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line two cookie sheets with parchment paper or grease with oil. Take dough out of the bowl and place on a lightly floured work surface. Lightly dust the top of the dough and a rolling pin with flour. Roll out the dough to about 1/8-inch thickness. Cut out 24 3-inch circles from the dough. (The floured rim of a glass works fine.) Make the filling by combining spinach, onion, lemon juice, mint, remaining 2 tablespoons olive oil and remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt in a medium bowl. Stir well to incorporate.

AUTHOR’S TIP Make bread triangles in advance, let cool, place in an airtight container and freeze for up to a month

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

Fill a small bowl with water and keep it next to the dough. Fill each dough circle with 1 scant teaspoon of filling. Dip your fingers into the water and wet the outer edges of the dough circles. Fold the bottom half of the circle up to the middle. Pinch in the top two sides of the circle to form a triangle. If the dough does not seal easily, use more water to coat the edges. Repeat with remaining dough circles. Place 12 triangles on each cookie sheet, leaving space between them. Bake for 20-30 minutes until golden brown, making sure not to open the oven during the first 10 minutes of baking. Serve warm.


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NEWS CLIPS

TEACHERS: SPARK YOUR KNOWLEDGE OF ELECTRICITY

Co-ops’ Tax-Exempt Status Threatened Changes to federal tax law in 2017 unintentionally created a situation where electric co-ops could be required to pay taxes on grants received for storm repairs, economic development and broadband deployment. To maintain tax-exempt status, an electric cooperative must receive at least 85% of its revenue from its consumermembers. However, changes to federal tax law in 2017 modified the calculation for some contributions by a government entity or civic group so that those dollars must now be included. That means Federal Emergency Management Agency funds for storm repair must be included in nonmember

revenue calculations, along with grants from Colorado’s Broadband Deployment Board and funds from other entities. That was not Congress’s intention. Colorado’s electric co-ops, working with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, are encouraging Congress to fix the situation by passing the RURAL Act. Senate Bill 1032 and House Bill 2147 have been introduced, supported by bipartisan co-sponsors. Now Congress must act. Electric co-op consumer-members are asked to visit action.coop/ruralact and encourage their senators and representatives to support the RURAL Act.

This is Your Electric Co-op Magazine Do you know why you receive this copy of Colorado Country Life each month? It is sent to you by your local electric cooperative. The co-op uses this magazine to share important information with its consumermembers each month. Using the magazine is the most cost-effective way to send this information to consumer-members, as the cost is shared with other electric co-ops in the state that also use the magazine to communicate with their consumer-members.

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Elementary through high school educators interested in the electric industry can learn more about it next summer. Learn how electricity is generated and how it is supplied for today’s users during a three-day session June 23-25 in Westminster, courtesy of Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, the power supplier to 18 of Colorado’s 22 electric co-ops. The program is free to teachers who are electric cooperative members, teach at schools that are co-op members or teach students whose parents are co-op members in Tri-State’s ser vice area. (Educators outside of electric co-op territory are welcome to apply, and funding will be sought on their behalf.) Those attending the class receive the most up-to-date information on all aspects of energy including the science of energy, sources of energy, transportation, consumption, electricity, efficiency, and environmental and economic impacts. This conference will show teachers how to integrate energy curriculum materials into classrooms at every grade level and for those with all learning styles. Participants leave with the training and a hands-on energy kit for the classroom worth $300 including a full-color workbook with lesson plans, reproducible student activities, fascinating facts about electricity and student packets with pencils, stickers, safety checklists and energy efficiency checklists. For more information or to apply, contact Wendi Moss at The NEED Project, wmoss@need.org, or Michelle Pastor at mpastor@tristategt.org.


NEWS CLIPS

Co-op Consumer Satisfaction Up

Electric co-op consumer-members across the country are increasingly satisfied with the performance of their electric cooperatives, seeing them as trusted information sources and partners in keeping energy costs low. These are among the key findings of a recent national survey commissioned by the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, the trade association for the country’s electric co-ops. The survey found 5-point jumps over 2018 numbers from respondents who say their electric co-op keeps them informed about its actions (84%) and is a trusted source for information about energy use and devices, including solar (83%). It also recorded a 10-point boost over 2018 from consumer-members who say their co-op is a partner in understanding energy technologies and controlling electricity costs (83%). The telephone survey, which has been conducted annually for the past six years, polled 750 co-op consumer-members in mid-July. It has a margin of error of 3.6%. Other data shows co-ops holding steady with prior surveys on overall job performance (93% positive), providing reliable service (95% positive) and quickly restoring service after outages (92% positive). Most respondents (56%) say their household electric bills are “about right” or “a bit low” versus 41% who say their bills are “too high.” Fifty-seven percent say they would be loyal to their co-op even if allowed to choose a provider whose “price is slightly lower.” Even more (69%) would be loyal to the co-op over a competitor with no price difference. “There is lots of good news here for electric co-ops,” says Keith Frederick, owner of Frederick Polls, which conducted the survey. “They are trusted community pillars and appreciated for delivering quality services.”

Keep Pets Safe Indoors This Winter

Colder weather can mean safety hazards for pets indoors. There might be new, unfamiliar electrical devices — such as space heaters, heating pads, and electric blankets — in the home. Watch for potential hazards that can accompany these products and keep them away from curious pets. Pets are also attracted to the warmth of electronics and appliances and may try to sleep near or on them. Block these items so the animals can’t get to them and get hurt.

Hydropower Sales Mean Money for U.S. Government One of the few money-making arms of the federal government, the Western Area Power Administration returned $281 million to the U.S. Treasury in fiscal year 2019. Over the last five years, WAPA has returned $1.8 billion to the treasury. WAPA sells hydropower from 57 federal dams and distributes it using more than 17,000 miles of highvoltage transmission infrastructure. The electricity is distributed to utilities in Colorado and 14 other central and western states. Electric cooperatives in the Centennial State access this electricity generated by clean, renewable hydropower through their contract with power supply co-op Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association or directly through allocations from WAPA. This renewable power is purchased at cost-based rates and helps keep the cost of electricity down for consumer-owned utilities. The returns to the U.S. Treasury help repay the original investment in dams initially built to bring water to the parched lands across the western United States. Selling hydropower from these dams was secondary in the beginning, but today plays a large role in providing renewable resources for electricity generation. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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COVER STORY

2019 BOOK REVIEWS

COLORADO BETWEEN THE PAGES

REVIEWED BY JULIE SIMPSON We all love stories that highlight the strength of the human spirit, whether truth or fiction. The crash victim who survives and thrives despite injuries, the captive escaping an abductor or the pioneers who survive those first early years on an unforgiving prairie all serve to remind us of the power we might have in ourselves to persevere and overcome the obstacles we face.

FEATURED FAVORITES Freefall

By Jessica Barry It begins with a plane crash. A beautiful girl, Allison Carpenter, is the lone survivor and must trek through the Colorado Rockies toward rescue … and away from the dangerous men pursuing her. When Allison’s mother, Maggie Carpenter, receives the news that her daughter has been in a plane crash and is likely dead, she hadn’t spoken with Allison in over two years. A tragic loss tore them apart and now it seems she has no chance to reconcile with her only child. Maggie can’t stop thinking about the mysterious details surrounding the crash and the circumstances

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This year, in the pages of the Colorado books recommended here are stories, both fiction and true, focused on the power to keep going even when things look impossible. Enjoy turning the pages as you read through stories from across the state. And visit our website at coloradocountrylife.coop for even more book reviews.

that made her daughter the only passenger on an expensive private jet. Her attempt to learn who Ally had become leads her to the dangerous world in which her daughter was entangled … and convinces her that Ally must still be alive. An excellently crafted story featuring two believable and indomitable female characters, Freefall manages to be both an epic thriller and a deeper story about the unbreakable love between mother and daughter.

No Exit

By Taylor Adams Darby Thorne is just another Colorado college student, trying to drive home to see her dying mother, when a mountain blizzard strands her at a highway rest stop. The biggest concern on her mind is making it home before her mom goes into surgery.

But then she sees the girl, trapped in a cage in the back of a van in the parking lot. Only four other people are also trapped at the rest stop by the blizzard. Which one of them is the kidnapper? With the highway shut down and plows not predicted to come through until morning, Darby knows she’s on her own. It’s up to her to identify the criminal, rescue the girl and somehow escape. If only it were that simple. In the course of a single, terrifying night, Darby’s rescue mission becomes a mission just to survive. Brutal, twisted and original, No Exit is a gore-filled, realistic thriller that will keep you from sleeping until you’ve read the last page.


The Healer’s Daughter By Charlotte Hinger

For recently freed slaves in the Reconstruction South, Nicodemus, Kansas, sounds like the Promised Land, a place where black people no longer have to suffer under the rage of their defeated former masters and now neighbors. It is this chance to start anew that takes beautiful healer Bethany Herbert to the plains of Kansas. Once she arrives, Bethany is dismayed to see that Nicodemus is just another white man’s trick to take advantage of desperate former slaves. The promised resources are nowhere to be seen, and Kansas is an unforgiving place to scratch out a living. Still, with grit and determination, the people of Nicodemus manage to create a stable settlement … only to have their success become a lightning rod for the schemes of the jealous neighboring white communities. Can the handsome lawyer Jed Talbot help Bethany keep Nicodemus from falling apart? And if the town survives, can the people move from mere survival into true freedom? Fort Collins author Charlotte Hinger has written a moving story of perseverance with both historical significance and narrative interest filled with romance, mystery and inspiration.

Spearhead

By Adam Makos When it comes to World War II history, many people know about D-Day and the great victory it achieved by establishing an Allied foothold in Axis territory. Fewer people know the details of how the war was won after Americans landed, at great cost, on

the coast of France. A pivotal component in the march across Europe was Spearhead: the heavily armored tank units that battled their way through enemy-held land at the expense of many of their lives. Colorado author Adam Makos spent years researching, traveling and interviewing the remaining veterans who were a part of those armored divisions. His extensive collection of knowledge and firsthand accounts allows him to put readers right in the tank and on the battlefield of those soldiers’ collective memories, complete with the smells, feelings, weather, landscapes and gory images of their war. The result is an inspiring, fascinating and utterly human true story of the boys who won the war by fighting for each other and their own survival.

But My Brain Had Other Ideas: A Memoir of Recovery from Brain Injury By Deb Brandon

Deb Brandon’s life was just as she wanted it, with a successful career as a math professor, a stable marriage and two teenage kids. All that changed the day she was diagnosed with cavernous angiomas: ma lfor me d blo o d vessels in her brain that had the tendency to leak and could cause strokes and even death. Even when they weren’t leaking, the list of debilitating symptoms was long: dizziness, loss of balance, vertigo and the terrifying “shut downs” that happened when Deb’s senses were overwhelmed by too much sensory input. Multiple brain surgeries were conducted to extend her life but left their own medical complications in their wake. In this movingly honest and bitingly humorous memoir, Deb Brandon articulately captures what it looks like to have your life turned upside down by a permanent disability.

FICTION

COVER STORY

The Art of Inheriting Secrets By Barbara O’Neal

Reeling from the death of her beloved mother and struggling to balance a successf u l c are er with her personal life, Olivia Shaw is thrown even more off-balance when she inherits a centuries-old English estate. Despite her already-complicated life, Olivia travels to England in order to unravel the mysteries of her mother’s past. Though she knew her mother was from England, Olivia had no idea she was the heir of an ancient and troubled history stretching back hundreds of years. Rosemere Priory may have once been grand, but it has since fallen under the shadow of rumors and time’s decay. Despite the challenges and the secrets, Olivia finds herself falling in love with the house, the village and the person who was her mother. But can she juggle all these complicated parts of her life and decide what she really wants before it’s too late? A beautifully written tale of family, love, secrets and self-discovery, The Art of Inheriting Secrets by Colorado Springs author Barbara O’Neal is a perfect read for lovers of mystery and romance alike.

The Glass Forest

By Cynthia Swanson Mrs. Angie Glass doesn’t know much about her husband, Paul, when she marries him — only that he is handsome, that she loves him and she is pregnant with his baby. Their life, to her, seems idyllic: just him, her and their son living in a small Wisconsin cottage on the shores of Lake Michigan. Then they receive the call telling them that Paul’s brother, Henry, committed suicide, his wife, Silja, is missing and their teenage daughter, Ruby, is alone.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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COVER STORY Angie and Paul travel to New York to sort things out. To Angie, it seems a straightforward task of managing Henry’s funeral and nurturing Ruby as a new mother figure. But within the walls of their curious glass house, Angie starts to uncover the truth of the real Glass brothers. What she learns undermines everything she thought she knew of her husband’s family, and even her own marriage. With The Glass Forest, Colorado author Cynthia Swanson has crafted a disturbing novel about the broken lives that sometimes hide behind attractive faces and suburban normalcy.

Church of the Graveyard Saints By C. Joseph Greaves

Addie Decker once swore never to return to her family ranch outside of Cortez, Colorado. She’s had enough of small towns and small town thinking since she’s been “enlightened” by her California professor and boyfriend, Bradley. But her grandmother died, and she has to attend her funeral. Besides, Bradley has work in the area with his environmental protection group. What Addie doesn’t know is that she’s walked right into a war between landowners, townspeople desperate for jobs, and oil and gas operations. Her ex-boyfriend is in the middle of it all, and Addie finds herself torn between who she used to be and the person she has tried to become. If she’s not careful, whatever choice she makes may turn out to be deadly. Colorado author C. Joseph Greaves has written a timely novel in the burgeoning eco-thriller genre, addressing through fiction the real clash between small towns,

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large business interests and environmental protection organizations. This book can be ordered at torreyhouse.org.

Girls On the Line

By Aimie K. Runyan Ruby Wagner has been groomed her whole life to be one thing: a Philadelphia society lady. But when World War I breaks out and her beloved older brother is killed in action, a fire is lit in Ruby to do something more valuable with her life than just look pretty and act polite. She becomes one of the “Hello Girls,” the invaluable female radio operators deployed to France to manage the all-important communications array of the Allied forces. But even with her sharp wit and extensive skill, Ruby must struggle to earn respect in the male-dominated Army sphere. Not only that, but she must also struggle against her growing feelings for a certain medic named Andrew Carrigan, feelings that contradict her status as an engaged, high-society woman. An enjoyable novel based on the true story of the Allied “Hello Girls,” this historical fiction by Colorado author Aimie K. Runyan is a great weekend read.

Arches Enemy

By Scott Graham In the morning calm of Arches National Park, one of the famed arches collapses, crushing a woman under a huge chunk of stone. Was the woman’s weight atop the arch enough to make it crumble? Or did a nearby oil survey seismic truck cause the arch to break? Chuck Bender and his family are camping at the park as he works at uncovering a newly-discovered archaeological marvel. Against his will, Chuck finds himself tangled in the investigation of the arch collapse while also trying to complete his contract and navigate the troubled waters of

introducing his family to his mother. Then when another death occurs, he knows there is more going on than a string of terrible accidents. Can Chuck avoid becoming the next victim of an unknown killer on the loose? A well-written whodunit by Durango author Scott Graham, Arches Enemy also includes a wealth of interesting information about the oil industry, the native peoples, the national park system and the town of Moab, Utah.

The Mad Hatter’s Son By Helen Starbuck

The last thing Annie Collins expected was a call from her old college friend Libby Crowder. Though they were once close, artist Libby had married a rich husband while nurse Annie had stayed decidedly independent. But then Libby reaches out because of poor health, begging Annie to come work as her personal nurse. Libby’s doctors are convinced that she is suffering from simple grief after a miscarriage, but Annie finds her friend’s symptoms odd and more serious than expected. Is Libby crazy or is there something more going on? Annie’s investigations, instead of turning up nothing, lead her first to a suspicious beating, then one death, then another. Are these events connected, or just coincidences? And can Annie hold herself together long enough to uncover the truth? Colorado author Helen Starbuck won a National Indie Excellence Award with this debut novel. Mystery lovers will thoroughly enjoy the twists and turns of her classic whodunit story.


COVER STORY Forgiveness Road

By Mandy Mikulencak One bright, sunny morning, 16-year-old Cissy Pickering takes a loaded handgun from her parents’ bedroom and shoots her father dead in the driveway. The motives brought to light reveal that Cissy was sexually abused by her father for years and killed him out of a desire to protect her sisters from the same fate. With consideration for the circumstances, the judge sends Cissy to a mental hospital instead of prison, but to Cissy’s grandmother Janelle Clayton, the situation remains horrendously unthinkable. Her daughter, Cissy’s mother, refuses to forgive Cissy for killing her husband, so it falls on the terminally ill Janelle to try to help Cissy as best she can. It is this love for her granddaughter that drives her to kidnap Cissy from the hospital and attempt to take her somewhere safe. But will a road trip be enough to heal them, or only send them closer to the darkness? Though the plot promises more emotional weight than it delivers, this novel by Colorado author Mandy Mikulencak is still a compelling read about healing and family ties.

Raining Love in Hermosa Valley By Sharon McAnear

When Addie Gist receives her f irst teaching post in rural H e r m o s a Va l l e y, Colorado, she is determined to start off her career on the right foot. Unfortunately, that means strictly following the antiquated requirements of the school board: no wearing colors, no riding in a wagon with a man not your relative, and certainly, absolutely, no courting.

Addie has no interest in derailing the job she worked so hard to get because of a man. That is, until she meets the kind and handsome Emory Hall on the train to Hermosa Valley. Can Addie keep her feelings from jeopardizing her work? For a light and fun romantic read, find this third installment of the Waiting For You series online or at your local bookstore.

Mann in the Crossfire By R. Weir

Private investigator Jarvis Mann has faced down some pretty bad guys in the past and managed to make it through in one piece. Mostly. But when he gets word that an old friend was murdered in San Diego, a man he thought was close to impossible to kill, Jarvis wonders if this case might be the one to take him down. Still, Jarvis flies from Denver to sunny California to find out what happened and who is responsible. Along the way, he comes up against a violent gang, a wealthy arms dealer, international assassins and a rival detective agency (or is it?). Will Jarvis be able to survive and unravel the mystery? A sort of less-cultured James Bond, Jarvis Mann’s devil-may-care attitude makes another appearance in this book, Colorado author R. Weir’s eighth novel.

Kill Zone

By Kevin J. Anderson and Doug Beason This high-tech thriller by two prolific C ol or a d o Spr i ng s authors creates a plausible but dangerous scenario that the government is secretly holding high-level nuclear material deep inside a mountain in New Mexico. When a

small plane crashes at a nearby military base causing a lockdown throughout the facility, an inspection team gets trapped in the midst of their work. Their only way out is deeper in the mountain, through a perilous, secretive area no one was ever supposed to discover.

Tracking Game

By Margaret Mizushima When a local landowner is found thrown from a burning van, the questions start with why did he have two gunshots through the heart. Local deputy Mattie Cobb and her faithful canine partner, Robo, are quick to search for answers. The investigation leads to a local ranch where nothing is as it seems. Everyone is hiding connections and affections. Before an arrest can be made there is another shooting and this time Mattie and Robo are confronted by an ominous growl. What is it? Did it play a role in the murders? What danger really lurks in the mountains around Timber Creek, Colorado? Tracking Game is part of the Timber Creek K-9 Mysteries written by award-winning Colorado author Margaret Mizushima.

Unforsaken

By John Dwaine McKenna The year is 1901 and the Old West is only a memory as the new century starts full of promise … for some. Others are still hooked to the past, including Ella Stringfellow, who is searching for her missing brother. She’s not the only one looking. Boyd Pirtle, a Texas Ranger with a score to settle from an old unsolved case, is trying to solve a 20-year-old murder. The two paths cross as it becomes obvious that they are looking for the same man. The trail to him twists through a conspiracy that could affect the entire nation. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

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For those who love westerns filled with gritty characters and don’t mind graphic violence, this tightly-written book by a southern Colorado award-winning author makes a good read.

NONFICTION Deep Creek: Finding Hope in the High Country By Pam Houston

A restless wanderer with a broken past, Pam Houston stumbled on the ranch for sale near Creede, Colorado. She was a budding writer with all her belongings in the back of her lemon yellow Toyota Corolla. The ranch has had a hold on her heart for the last 26 years, despite her struggle to make the payments, the extensive travel requirements of her job, the challenge of ranch-sitters and the threat of violent wildfires. In Deep Creek, Houston’s summation of her relationship with the land touches on the idea of home, stewardship of our natural resources and how communion with a particular landscape can change the landscape of a soul. Though some readers might not appreciate some of Houston’s political asides, most would agree this book is timely in an age where natural spaces are disappearing and people are spending less time outside.

Nighthawk Rising: A Biography of Accused Cattle Rustler Queen Ann Bassett By Diana Allen Kouris

Few people demonstrate the sheer grit of early Colorado settlers more than Ann Bassett, the lady rancher nicknamed “Queen” for her elegance and imperious

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demeanor. The first white baby born in the area close to Utah known as Brown’s Park, Ann was raised wild and fearless on the back of a horse as she helped her family ranch. Though her life included tragedy and heartbreak, her determination made her a force to be reckoned with by the big cattle barons, and a story not to be forgotten by those who came after her. Diana Allen Kouris is a distant relative of Ann Bassett and has compiled the most detailed, accurate and well-written history of the Bassett family to date.

Poker Alice Tubbs: The Straight Story By Liz Morton Duckworth

When it comes to tales of the Wild West, it is to separate legend from fact. This is especially true in the story of Poker Alice. Did she really have seven kids? How old was she, really? Author Liz Duckworth does her best to track down the truth about the life of this fascinating woman. Even without tall tales, Poker Alice led an interesting and unconventional life as a female gambler. Following gold rush fever from boomtown to boomtown, she made her own independent living off the losses of the men at her table. Duckworth, a Colorado author, has provided an almost-unbelievable glimpse into the past with this book published by Colorado’s Filter Press.

HEALTH The Younger Next Year Back Book

ways of moving the body can all contribute to back pain. This book, under the guidance of Aspen chiropractor Jeremy James, offers solutions to 80% of back pain through illustrated exercises, stretches and tips.

Mountain States Medicinal Plants By Briana Wiles

Ever been curious about the medicinal uses of Rocky Mountain plants? Then this comprehensive guide is a great place to start learning. Organized alphabetically by plant with beautiful, fullcolor pictures, this book makes it easy to identify medicinal species. The author also includes tips for avoiding poisonous plants, which plants to collect in which season and how to prepare the plants into salves, teas and tinctures.

Wellness Toolbox

By Don Roberts Don Roberts, a fitness and nutrition specialist in Durango, offers readers what he offers his in-office clients: a clear and concise guide to reaching their fitness and weight goals. Including sections debunking fitness and nutrition myths, sharing exercise tips, and looking inside Don’s fridge and pantry, this book is a resource for those looking to improve their health. Julie Simpson, a former Colorado Country Life intern, reviews books and writes articles while raising two book-loving kids.

By Chris Crowley and Jeremy James, DC, CSCS Millions of Americans suffer from back pain, but the causes are usually pretty simple. Poor posture, lack of core strength, and improper

WANT A FREE BOOK? Enter to win a copy of one of the books reviewed. Visit our Contests page at coloradocountrylife.coop to learn how.


INDUSTRY

FLIPPING THE SWITCH AT THE PRESIDENTIAL PALACE Colorado author spotlights electrifying the White House in 1891 BY AMY HIGGINS

I

n 1891, the White House flipped a switch that shined new light on President Benjamin Harrison’s provisional home. In Cynthia Simmelink Becker’s book Lights On! Ike Hoover Electrifies the White House, young Ike Hoover navigates the White House rafters and walls to install the wiring for electric lights, replacing the conventional candles and lamps that the bulk of Americans were accustomed to.

Illustrator Benjamin Hummel captures the wonder of the White House’s first electric lights.

To write the book, Becker, a Pueblo resident, researched early electricity, Thomas Edison, Harrison and his family and administration and, of course, Hoover (not to be confused with President Herbert Hoover), who chronicled his story in 42 Years in the White House. Additional research was done to ensure the illustrations were true to the era, including the clothing, White House architecture and interior design, and the Edison turbines. Illustrator, 3-D chalk artist and native Coloradan Benjamin Hummel captured

the essence of the era beautifully, from the Tiffany glass wall to the chandeliers, White House living quarters and the ever-affable Hoover. A two-time liver transplant recipient, Hummel finds joy with his artistic talent despite the chronic pain caused by his autoimmune disorder. In his drawings you can find a bit of Hummel hidden in the scenery — the German translation of his last name is “bumblebee” and he sometimes conceals the insect in his artworks. Lights On! is one of those examples. Locating drawings of the turbines was particularly challenging, until Doris Baker, publisher at Palmer Lake-based Filter Press, contacted a knowledgeable librarian at Rutgers University Library who supplied links to the Edison catalogs that the salesmen used as visual aids when selling to municipalities and companies. “After all the online work and phone calls, I attended a program at the Western Museum of Mining and Industry in Colorado Springs and there spotted a working, 1890s Edison turbine on display,” Baker explained. “All along, a wonderful example was waiting for me to discover in my own backyard.” Sadly, Becker passed away in 2016, so she never saw her book come to fruition, but with the ongoing efforts of her family, friends and Filter Press, she knew the story was moving forward and would eventually get published. What resulted was a

A Colorado author and an illustrator shine a light on electricity coming to the White House.

wonderfully illustrated and charming story about Hoover fitting the White House with electric lights and his relationships with Harrison and his staff. (Hoover would become a mainstay at the White House, starting as an electrician and eventually becoming what he called “Executive with the U.S. Government.”) Lights On! was intended for thirdthrough fifth-graders, but is a fun, educational read for all. Find it at filterpressbooks.com, hummelillustration. com and several other online stores.

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GARDENING

GROWING ORCHIDS IN COLORADO The glamorous beauties aren’t just for the rain forest BY VICKI SPENCER

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

P

eople think orchids are difficult to grow simply because they are such an exotic looking plant. Coloradans are even more skeptical about growing orchids in our semiarid climate. However, orchids, which are extremely diverse with more than 30,000 different species and 200,000 hybrids, don’t just grow in rain forests —they can be found anywhere from the tropics to high-altitude tundra. With a little effort you can find a variety that will adapt to the conditions in your home. Orchids that originate in the southern hemisphere typically bloom in the winter, which is why you see so many in stores this time of the year. The moth orchid (Phalaenopsis) is one of the most common varieties for sale because it is easy to grow in Colorado. It comes in a wide range of colors, patterns and sizes. Others that aren’t too difficult to grow include Dactylorhiza, Epipactis, Platanthera and Calanthe.

If you admire orchids in the store, you may notice they are not planted in soil. They come in small pots with a special mixture of bark, lava and other materials that don’t absorb water readily. Most orchids are epiphytes that get their nutrients from windblown leaves, bird droppings and grains of soil that become lodged between their tangled roots. So the small pot allows the thick, silvery roots to stick into the air where the orchid expects to gather moisture and nutrients. However, your home is not a rain forest, so you need to provide the missing nutrients. Fertilizing provides nutrients for optimal health and long-lasting blossoms. Use a liquid fertilizer (more diluted than what you apply to other plants) during active growth periods — typically midwinter. Take caution not to overfertilize as it can be deadly. Thin leaf varieties, such as Cymbidium and Miltonia, are particularly susceptible to

over-fertilization. If you see signs of burnt leaf tips, flush the pot with water and let it drain out. If the burning is severe, you may need to repot the plant. Since epiphytes obtain moisture from the air, they don’t need to be watered often. Once per week is usually enough. I’ve always thought it odd that some instructions say to place three ice cubes in the pot. Someone must have decided this would prevent overwatering, but I imagine the orchid being shocked by chilly ice cubes. Besides, it’s easier to use a small spouted watering can for all my plants and just pour an amount of water (estimated to be equivalent to 3 teaspoons) on the orchid. Orchids kept in a location with indirect sunlight, away from drafts and watered consistently, will last a long time. When the blossoms wither and die, don’t assume your orchid is dead. Cut the spike off above the second node and keep water, light and humidity consistent throughout the summer. In the fall, move the plant to a cooler location and apply a light amount of fertilizer regularly. With luck, it won’t be long before a new blooming spike appears. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado.

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OUTDOORS

CITY-DWELLING CRITTERS Wildlife in our backyards can be a blessing or a bane BY DENNIS SMITH

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24

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

| OUTDOORS@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

rban wildlife can be a blessing or a bane depending on who you are, where you live and what you do. Every town has its share of city-dwelling critters — from mice to moose — and ours is no different. Most of us probably have squirrels, cottontail rabbits and songbirds in our backyards with the occasional fox, coyote or family of raccoons making a random appearance. Deer, elk, black bears and, more rarely, mountain lions, may show up on the fringes of some towns. Many of these sightings are temporary, seasonal in nature or short-lived and, for the most part, provide us with a bit of spontaneous excitement and enjoyment. But if some of these animals take up full-time residence in a neighborhood, conflict can result. A gorgeous red fox hung around our neighborhood for nearly three years. We have photos of him eating a rabbit on our front lawn, snoozing on our compost pile and curled up under the clothes dryer vent one bitter winter day. Most of us in the neighborhood thought of him as a kind of pet, but the lady down the street who kept a backyard flock of laying hens didn’t see things that way, nor did her neighbor who raised rabbits. It’s not unusual this time of year to see a few letters in the local paper from people complaining that some “evil hunter” just shot an elk at the southwest edge of town. Nearly 300 elk migrate through that area each year and many have taken up permanent

residence. Some folks have understandably come to view them as neighborhood pets and derive hours of enjoyment from watching them, but there are just as many others who suffer extensive losses to their yards, vegetable gardens, livestock, fruit trees and fences. My son’s neighbor spent several thousands of dollars erecting a 9-foot-high fence around his property to keep the big deer from destroying his rare ornamentals and flower gardens. A horse was gored to death by a rutting bull elk out there a while back. Those who are quick to criticize hunters for culling these urban elk herds probably don’t realize that they do so legally with permission from — and at the request of — the landowner. It’s definitely not hunting in the traditional sense, but then again these aren’t your usual wild elk. They’re urban elk, acclimated to human presence. OK, they’re fascinating, but they can also be unpredictable, destructive and potentially dangerous. Some of us see them as pets, others as pests. It just depends on who you are and where you live. Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors under Living in Colorado.


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CREATIVE CORNER

READER POETRY Winter Song My garden lies asleep for now Under a cold white blanket. The blooms that graced my summer just A mem’ry ‘neath the snows. Hurrying from my mailbox I glance briefly at its slumber. The roses’ stubby branches The only life that shows. And even though I dimly think Of summer’s sweating labor, My garden strangely pleases and Fulfills my every need, For as I slip inside, I’m breathing Songs of benediction On my marvelous winter garden With not one single weed. Harriet Wolford, Grand Junction Grand Valley Power consumer-member

DO DOYOU YOUWRITE WRITEPOETRY? POETRY? Send Sendus usyour yourbest bestwork; work; we’d we’dlove loveto toread readit. it. Submission: Submission: Submit Submityour yourpoetry, poetryname via email and to: address via email mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org to: mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org orormail by mail poem, to: name and address to: Colorado ColoradoCountry CountryLife Life magazine 5400 5400Washington WashingtonSt.Street Denver, Denver,CO CO80216 80216 COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

27


COMMUNITY EVENTS November 16 Alamosa

Wine Train Colorado Champagne Brunch Rio Grande Scenic Railroad 12:30 pm • 877-726-7245

November 17 Colorado Springs

November 23 Thanksgiving Farmers Market 9 am-1 pm La Plata County Fairgrounds, Durango

Shop local for your Thanksgiving feast and get a jump start on your holiday gift shopping. This Thanksgiving-themed farmers market will have lots of veggies, cheeses, meats and more to help make the most of your meal. Local artisans will also have their works on display to peruse and purchase for gift items or to keep for yourself. For more information, visit durangofarmersmarket.com.

November 2019 November 8-10 Colorado Springs

Colorado Country Christmas Gift Show Colorado Springs Event Center coloradochristmasgiftshow.com

November 8 Keystone

Get Stoked Music and Movies Series Warren Station Center for the Arts 7-11 pm • warrenstation.com

November 9 Buena Vista

Gingerbread House Bazaar Faith Lutheran Church 8 am-2 pm • 719-395-2039

November 9 Buena Vista

Heart of the Rockies Wedding Show The Barn at Sunset Ranch 11 am-4 pm heartoftherockieswedding.com

November 9 Durango

Bark & Wine Fundraiser Fort Lewis College 6-9 pm • lpchumanesociety.org

November 9 Longmont

Turkey Trot 10K and 2 Mile Altona Middle School 9 am • longmontcolorado.gov

28

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

November 9 Monument

Holiday Boutique St. Peter Catholic School 9 am-3 pm petertherockschool.org

November 10 Colorado Springs

Craft Sale and Fireman’s Breakfast Hanover Volunteer Fire Department 7-10 am • 719-683-2995

November 10 Greeley

Conversation with Author Garth Stein and Book Signing University of Northern Colorado 2 pm • mylibrary.us/racingintherain

November 12-January 4 Pueblo

Winter Wonderland: Holiday Traditions Buell Children’s Museum 719-295-7200 • sdc-arts.org

November 15-16 Durango

Trans-Siberian Orchestra: Christmas Eve and Other Stories World Arena 3 and 7:30 pm • trans-siberian.com

November 21-23 Denver

Winter Gift Market Denver Botanic Gardens botanicgardens.org

November 22-23 Stoneham

Holiday Show Primitive Junk Market 970-520-5377

November 23 Buena Vista

Rocky Mountain Christmas Fair Buena Vista High School PE Complex 9 am-3 pm • 719-966-9534

November 23 Pueblo

“Nutcracker in a Nutshell” Theater Performance Sangre de Cristo Art Center’s Children’s Playhouse Theatre 1 pm • 719-295-7200

Rocky Mountain Train Show The Ranch Events Complex rockymountaintrainshow.com

December 2019 December 3 Greeley

Holiday Festival Greeley Active Adult Center 1:30-4 pm • 970-350-9440

December 5-7 Pagosa Springs

Main Street Bethlehem Centerpoint Church 6-7:30 pm • 970-731-2205

December 6-7 Durango

Christmas Bazaar Animas City Schoolhouse 970-259-2402 animasmuseum@frontier.net

December 6-8 Durango

16th Annual Festival of Trees Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad Grange Hall community.connectionsco.org

December 6-8 Pagosa Springs

Christmas Concert Pagosa Springs High School 970-880-2497

November 28 Durango

December 7 Las Animas

Community Thanksgiving Dinner La Plata County Fairgrounds 11 am-1 pm • 970-259-4061

Community Center Craft Show Bent County Community Center 8 am-3 pm • 719-469-9219

November 29-30 Creede

December 7 Loveland

Creede Chocolate Festival Main Street 11 am-4 pm • 719-658-2374

“Tree for All” Christmas Tree Raffle The Ranch 11 am • 970-541-0716

November 29 Greeley

December 7 Wiggins

Skate Your Turkey Off Greeley Ice Haus 12-5 pm • 970-350-9402

Friends of the Library Book Sale Durango Public Library 9:30 am-5 pm • durangogov.org

November 15 Loveland

Winter Wonderlights Opening Night Chapungu Sculpture Park visitlovelandco.org

November 30-December 1 Loveland

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS 3 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

Wiggins School Holiday Craft Show 415 Main Street 10 am-3 pm donaghyt@wiggins50.k12.co.us

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303-455-2807; or email calendar@coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information.


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES We were out doing some Thanksgiving

food shopping and had a full load of groceries in the Yukon. We were on our way to the last store and my daughter Emma said, “Mom! You forgot to leave a space for the hamster!” Thinking she was playing pretend, as she often does, I assured her that hamsters can fit in very small spaces. She looked confused and said, “But, if it’s a small one, how will everyone get enough to eat on Thanksgiving?” Now I was confused. The confusion was cleared up a bit when we picked up our 26-pound frozen ham at our last stop. Wide eyed, she said, “That must be the biggest hamster ever!” Cindy Rohde, Rifle

Sangre de Cristo Electric consumer-members Linda and Jim Sawyer visit the medieval town of Annecy, France, with their copy of Colorado Country Life.

It was late one fall and we were

James Cheek stops by the Y-W Electric shop in Wray for a safety demonstration conducted by Y-W Electric linemen.

planning our Christmas decorations, but we were behind schedule raking fall leaves. I was scooping leaves into a trash bag when 4-yearold Travis asked me what I was doing. I told him I was gathering the leaves. “Oh,” he said. “So you can put them up again next year!” Granny Bobbie, Ignacio

When my 3 year old was happily taking a walk with me one very cold day, his eyes started to water. He glanced up at me with a teardrop rolling down his cheek and, with some confusion, said, “Look! I’m sad!” Denise Alexander, Durango

Divers Scotty Mcdonald and Grace Gaubatz, a consumer-member of Yampa Valley Electric Association, take CCL underwater to the “Turtle Tomb” dive site in Sipadan, Borneo.

Seeing my 6 year old dressed up, I

told her she was as cute as a button. My 3-year old, standing there and wanting to be cute too, said, “And I’m as cute as a long string!” Michelle Stevens, Colorado Springs

WINNER: CCL travels to Stockholm, Sweden, and the ABBA Museum with Kathie and Bob Seedroff, consumer-members of both Mountain Parks Electric and Grand Valley Power. Holly Dobbins, a Highline Electric Association consumer-member, takes her copy of Colorado Country Life to Paris.

It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo, your name and address to info@coloradocountrylife. org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Friday, November 15. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2019 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019

29


DISCOVERIES

Must Read Children’s Books

The Little i Who Lost His Dot By Kimberlee Gard, Illustrated by Sandie Sonke

Little i is excited to join his alphabet friends at school, but when they stare and gasp, he realizes he lost his dot! They try to help him replace it with an acorn, a balloon, a clock and so on, but nothing seems right. Then Little i’s dad comes to school and shows him that he can still be an i, even without his dot. This cute and brightly illustrated book perfect for kids ages 3 to 6 can be found online or in bookstores.

An Inconvenient Alphabet: Ben Franklin & Noah Webster’s Spelling Revolution

Can Princesses Become Astronauts?

By Beth Anderson, Illustrated by Elizabeth Baddeley

This cute read features short, rhyming sentences and adorably hilarious illustrations, all encouraging both princesses and princes to dream big when it comes to what they might want to do with their lives. Most of all, it teaches that no matter who you are, the most important thing is just being yourself. Perfect for kids of all ages, this book by Colorado author Carmela LaVigna Coyle can be purchased online or at your local bookstore.

After the United States became a nation, Benjamin Franklin and Noah Webster worked together to try to make sense of English, the most nonsense language ever. Silent letters, double letters, two letters together that make a new sound? It was all too complicated to make sense of, much less teach to American citizens coming from all over the world. Their endeavors eventually resulted in many spelling changes and an important book: Webster’s Dictionary of the English Language. Find it online or in bookstores.

By Carmela LaVigna Coyle, Illustrated by Mike Gordon

Nadya Skylung and the Cloudship Rescue By Jeff Seymour, Illustrated by Brett Helquist

Ships traveling from port to port carrying precious goods, avoiding pirates and battling through storms may sound like a familiar story, but this adventure isn’t set on the open sea. Instead, it takes place in the sky with the plucky Nadya Skylung, one of several orphans rescued by Captain Nic of the cloudship. An engaging and creative story for kids and adults alike, this book is most appropriate for readers ages 8 and up. Find it online or in bookstores.

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE NOVEMBER 2019


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Profile for American MainStreet Publications

Colorado Country Life November 2019 Y-W  

Colorado Country Life November 2019 Y-W

Colorado Country Life November 2019 Y-W  

Colorado Country Life November 2019 Y-W