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[contents] 4

VIEWPOINT

5

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

6

COMMUNITY EVENTS

7

YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12

NEWS CLIPS

14

INDUSTRY

16

COVER STORY

22

RECIPES

23

GARDENING

24

OUTDOORS

29

FUNNY STORIES

30

DISCOVERIES

SEPTEMBER 2017 Volume 48, Number 09

Photo credit: Vicky Seymour from Karval, a member of Mountain View Electric Association.

MORE WAYS TO CONNECT WITH US

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FACEBOOK CHATTER

[cover]

FACEBOOK CHATTER

Colorado is home to black bears. Read about one woman’s obsession with them on pages 16-18.

THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF: Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor; mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, Designer; cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant; kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING: Kris Wendtland, Ad Rep; advertising@coloradocountrylife.org Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Individual subscription rate: $9 per year for Colorado residents or $15 per year for out-of-state residents, taxes and postage included. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. © Copyright 2016, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. Subscribers: Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. EDITORIAL: Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216; Phone: 303-455-4111 | mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org |  coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife | Twitter.com/ COCountryLife | Pinterest.com/COCountryLife |  YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Advertising: advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative: National Country Market  |  611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504  |  Austin, TX 78704  |  800-626-1181

®

COCountryLife posted: Colorado’s electric co-ops raise a ton of moolah at the Colorado State Fair Jr. Livestock Sale on August 29.

INSTAGRAM PIC OF THE MONTH

COCountryLife posted: Tonight we’re using peach wine to make a hot ‘peach cobbler’ drink. And I have to say it’s not bad (as long as you sit in the AC!)

ColoradoREA posted: Read how one bus driver made the right choices for his students when a power line dropped on the bus.

PINTEREST SNEAK PEAK

COCountryLife pinned: Crockpot Spicy Chicken Tortilla Soup from Tieghan Gerard’s Half Baked Harvest website.

MONTHLY CONTEST Enter for your chance to win wine-based salsa and candies from Palisade’s very own Colorado Cellars. To enter our contest, agree to the contest rules and complete the online form at coloradocountrylife. coop under the Contests tab.


[viewpoint]

THIRST FOR ELECTRICITY

Choice is great for craft beers, not so great for electricity consumers BY KENT SINGER CREA EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR KSINGER@COLORADOREA.ORG We love Colorado for a variety of reasons: the great weather, the spectacular scenery, the friendly people, and yes, the craft beer. From our outpost here at the CREA offices in the north Denver area, we’re within a stone’s throw of small brewers offering everything from Gilpin Black Gold to Colorado Wild Sage. There’s no question that having a choice in adult Kent Singer beverages is, to quote Martha Stewart, “a good thing.” Does that mean that having a choice of electricity suppliers makes sense for Colorado’s electric co-ops? I don’t think so. I’m making this comparison because a recent article that appeared on the web page of the Independence Institute argued that Coloradans should be able to choose their electricity supplier because “we have tons of choices for craft beer.” Well, yes, but there are some pretty important differences between craft beer and electricity. Like the fact that pretty much anyone with a relatively small capital investment can start a craft brewery. Or the fact that if you’re out of craft beer your life won’t come to a screeching halt. The Independence Institute piece advocated for retail choice, that is, allowing electricity consumers to choose their power supplier. In Colorado today, we have a system of regulated monopoly. This means that electric utilities, like your local electric co-op, have exclusive service territories with both the right and the obligation to serve the customers who live in those areas. The facilities needed to do that 24/7 are incredibly expensive. Over the last 75 plus years, electric co-ops across Colorado spent billions of dollars to build networks of power plants, transmission lines, substations, distribution lines, transformers and all the associated equipment necessary to keep your lights on and your choice of beer cold. It’s frankly impossible to duplicate this system (deemed the greatest engineering achievement of the 20th century by the National Academy of Engineering) in any kind of cost-effective way. So, Colorado policy-makers decided over the years that electric utilities should be designated as monopolies and have the exclusive right to serve specific parts of the state. For electric co-op memberowners, this means that your locally-elected co-op board makes sure that you have affordable, reliable service. The investments made in the development of the electric grid were made by hardworking people across the state who have an interest in seeing these systems maintained and upgraded. If a third party sells power to you, the end use customer, those third parties will take advantage of a power grid that you paid for and it will diminish the ability of your electric co-op to keep that system up and

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running. Your co-op may be able to recover “wheeling” charges from the new power supplier, but those charges will not make up for the lost revenues from reduced sales of electricity. Under a retail choice scenario, third-party power suppliers will be able to “cherry pick” the biggest and best loads of an electric co-op or other utility, leaving the rest of the system’s customers to pay the fixed costs of operating the utility. Historically, the most vocal advocates of retail choice were the large commercial and industrial users of electricity. We appreciate those customers and we don’t want to see them exit our systems and leave our rural, small business and residential customers with higher electricity rates. The Independence Institute writer argues that Colorado is “one of 21 states across the country stuck in a regulated market dominated by monopoly utilities.” This statement implies that the other 29 states have retail choice. That’s not true. The fact is that only 13 states have some form of a retail choice market for electricity, and the remaining 37 states rejected retail choice in favor of traditional monopoly service. In several cases, states repealed their retail choice experiments because they turned out to be a bad deal for consumers. We’ve been down this road before in Colorado. As I mentioned in a column earlier this year, our legislature considered several retail choice proposals back in the late 1990s. When those bills failed, a study panel evaluated the pros and cons of retail choice. The panel concluded that retail choice was not in the best interests of Colorado ratepayers. There is no doubt that the electric industry is changing as the result of advances in technology and consumer interest in solar panels, electric cars, smart buildings and other innovative approaches to power generation and consumption. Colorado’s electric co-ops are at the forefront of innovation with our deployment of automated meters, community solar farms, small hydropower plants and other forward-looking solutions. None of this innovation can continue, however, unless co-ops continue to operate on a sound financial footing. Retail choice threatens that footing and that’s why we’re opposed to it. After all, while Colorado is a great place for a cold craft beer, it is also a place where we in the electric co-ops are doing our best to slake rural Colorado’s thirst for electricity as well.

Kent Singer, Executive Director

coloradocountrylife.coop


[letters]

Jammed Up on Canning Tips

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Pros and Cons of Electric Vehicles

Perhaps when some people buy an electric vehicle they have the mistaken impression that they’re not creating any pollution. However, that electricity is probably produced by burning coal, oil or natural gas. The internal combustion engine is probably still a better alternative for a vehicle than an electric motor. Paul Hatfield, Castle Rock

Got something to say? We welcome letters to the editor via mail or email. They must be signed and include the writer’s name and full address. Send your letter to Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@ coloradocountrylife.org. Letters may be edited for length. coloradocountrylife.coop

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Corrections: The berries used to illustrate the August story on chokecherries were, apparently, not chokecherries. Writer Rachel Turiel, who did not supply those particular photos, believes them to be hawthorns; others believe them to be Aronia melanocarpa or black Real chokecherries chokeberries. Either way, our apologies. We were the victim of misidentified photos from another source. Also of note in the August chokecherry story, herbalist Debra Swanson (not Reuben) of Dancing Willow Herbs uses gluten free, organic cane sugar alcohol, not grain, for chokecherry tinctures.

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The jam recipes (August ’17) seemed to be in order until they suggested the out-of-date canning method of inverting jars briefly for a quick vacuum seal. This could be a food safe method if the recipe noted that this method is only safe if the jars are then stored in the refrigerator. The recipe also suggested a boiling water bath method, but omitted the adjustment for all those preserving with water bath canning at any altitudes above sea level. These can be found at www.freshpreserving.com/altitudeadjusting.html. Nancy Mucklow Master food safety advisor, Routt County Yampa Valley Electric member

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877-202-0188 SEPTEMBER 2017

5


[community events] [September] September 2-30 La Veta “Michelangelo: Sketches in Clay” Exhibit Town Park 719-742-3074 spanishpeaksarts.org September 8-10 Yuma Old Threshers Show and Colorado Barbed Wire Collectors Show Various Yuma Locations yumaoldthreshers.org September 9 Durango Marathon Man 5K, 10K and Fun Run Durango Recreation Center 9:30 am • stanthemarathonman.org September 9 Fountain Pikes Peak Rose Show Spencer’s Nursery 12:30-5 pm • 951-834-2330 September 9 Grand Junction “Sweet Dreams” Concert Grand Junction High School 970-243-1979 communityconcertsgrandvalley.org September 9 Grand Lake Pancho & Lefty’s Charity Golf Tournament Grand Lake Golf Course 10 am • 970-627-8773 September 9 Meeker Meeker Farmers Market Downtown Meeker 8 am-12 pm • facebook.com/ meekerfarmersmarket September 9 New Raymer Car Show and Swap Meet City Park 9 am • friendsofraymer.com September 9-10 Tri-Lakes Region Front Range Open Studios Tour Weekend Various El Paso County Locations 10 am-5 pm • 719-488-0629 September 9 Westminster Gildan Esprit De She 5K/10K Life Time Fitness 9 am • espritdeshe.com/ westminster/register

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September 16 Fort Collins Historic Homes Tour Various Fort Collins Locations 10 am-4 pm • 970-221-0533 September 21 Durango Kiwanis of Durango Pancake Day La Plata County Fairgrounds 7 am-7 pm • 720-254-3472 September 22-23 Durango The Art of Living Well With and Beyond Cancer Conference Various Durango Locations 970-403-3711 blueprintsofhope.org September 23 Calhan Alumni Homecoming Luncheon El Paso County Fairgrounds 11 am-1 pm • 719-659-5879 September 23-24 Denver “#GiveAFetch” Fundraiser Berkeley Park 10 am-4 pm • giveafetch.com September 23-24 Fruita National Alpaca Farm Days Open House 2034 J Road 10 am-3 pm • 970-858-8866 September 23 Meeker Coal Creek School Anniversary and Historic Preservation Celebration Coal Creek School 1-5 pm • wrmuseum@ rioblancocounty.org September 23 Monument Bines and Brews Beer Fest Limbach Park 1-5 pm • trilakeschamber.com September 24 Grand Lake Take Steps to End All Cancer 5K Race/Walk Pancho & Lefty’s 10 am • 303-386-2836 September 30 Bayfield Bayfield Heritage Day and Sheep Trailing Downtown Bayfield 8 am-3 pm • 970-442-0093 September 30 Fort Collins “Tour de Corgi” Costume Contest and Parade Civic Center Park 10 am • tourdecorgi.org

“Monarch Crest Crank” Bike Ride

September 17, 8 am-5 pm, starting at Absolute Bikes, 330 W. Sackett Ave., Salida Wrapping up the Salida Bike Fest is Monarch Crest Crank, an annual fundraiser where participants ride bikes on the Monarch Crest Trail and meet at Riverside Park for an after party that includes goodie bags, lunch and libations. Riders are shuttled to and from the trail, starting at Absolute Bikes. Funds help support the Alliance Against Domestic Abuse that provides emergency shelter, crisis intervention and support for survivors of domestic violence and sexual abuse. For more information, visit monarchcrestcrank.com. September 30 Haxtun Haxtun Corn Festival Quilt Show Haxtun Town Hall 11 am-4 pm • 970-520-0838 September 30 Westcliffe Art for the Sangres A Painted View Ranch 4-7 pm • 719-783-3018

[October] October 1 Denver “Free to Breathe” 5K Run/Walk Washington Park 7:30 am • freetobreathe.org/denver October 5-8 Durango Durango Cowboy Poetry Gathering Strater Hotel 970-749-2995 durangocowboypoetrygathering. org October 6-8 Boulder Adventure Film Festival Boulder Theater adventurefilm.org/boulder

October 7 Berthoud Berthoud’s Traditional Oktoberfest Fickel Park 11 am-6 pm berthoudoktoberfest.com October 7 Fort Morgan Craft Fair United Presbyterian Church 970-867-2914 October 7 Grand Junction Animal Care Fair Church of the Nativity 11 am-3 pm • facebook. com/2017animalcarefair

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS

TWO MONTHS IN ADVANCE TO:

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303455-2807; or email calendar@ coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information. coloradocountrylife.coop


WHITE RIVER ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

[White River] WREA’S 72nd Annual Meeting BY ALAN J. MICHALEWICZ | GENERAL MANAGER | AMICH@WREA.ORG

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September marks the turn to fall with the Meeker Classic Dog Trials, the commencement of hunting season and WREA’s most important event of the year: our annual meeting. Our strong member attendance each year confirms that our membership understands the importance of this meeting. Participation and local democratic control are essential for the cooperative business model to succeed. With membership comes privileges as well as responsibilities. When you participate, you are exercising your rights and filling your role as a member by helping guide this organization into the future. We invite you to join us again on September 13 and thank you for making this annual tradition a priority in your busy schedule. Your participation makes us a stronger organization. INDUSTRY TRENDS The fundamentals of electric generation and distribution remain similar, but our industry is going through a time of rapid change. Our days are now filled with analyzing emerging power and transmission markets, balancing the impacts of local renewable generation and analyzing state and national policy decisions that affect our core business. White River Electric Association works to remain current and informed on relevant industry issues that influence our ability to serve our membership. WREA is optimistic that these evolutions can be navigated with diligence, patience and a willingness to turn obstacles into solutions. I said before that WREA doesn’t chase the latest trends, but it will be prepared to optimize opportunities that best serve this cooperative. WREA RATES WREA’s core mission is to provide safe and reliable power to our membership. Unfortunately, the corresponding costs associated with our mission continue to rise. Over the last several years, WREA made a concerted effort to review and reduce internal costs through efficiencies and optimization. This is both a sound business strategy as well as a necessity due to the declining trend in our industrial loads and revenues. These efforts proved productive but have not offset the overall increasing cost of doing business. Maintaining our standards of excellence with enhanced efficiencies and the successful wholesale rate challenge resulted

in a bill credit in 2014, followed by a rate decrease and power rebate in 2015. In 2016 and 2017, WREA maintained its internal costs but passed along the 2017 wholesale rate increase from Tri-State Genera- Alan J. Michalewicz tion & Transmission Association, Inc. The initial budget and rate review for 2018 indicate that WREA will likely require internal rate adjustments. WREA will complete its rate process, keep the membership informed and present 2018 rates for board approval later this fall. A YEAR IN REVIEW A year in review reminds us just how much WREA accomplished in the last 12 months. The operations crew was busy with routine maintenance, which included an emphasis on tree trimming to ensure proper clearances and to reduce outages. WREA enhanced its online presence at www.wrea.org with the addition of the SmartHub program. SmartHub streamlines the online bill pay process and allows members to better track their usage. WREA also reviewed its policies and procedures related to capital credits. In this effort, WREA approved allocations and retirements for 1997 and 1998, which had not been allocated or retired due to data issues. WREA resolved the relevant data issues and combined the allocations and retirements for 1997 and 1998. Those capital credit checks were mailed in August. WREA allocates capital credits each year and will continue with its normal retirement rotation next year with 2003. LOCAL RENEWABLE GENERATION WREA is pleased to report that the Meeker Solar Garden remains fully leased and that it is achieving its production and financial targets. The WREA Miller Creek Ditch Hydro-electric Plant is also proving to be a great success. The WREA Miller Creek project uses existing Miller Creek Ditch irrigation water to generate power during the historical irrigation season. An annual production credit, which is based upon the total kilowatt-hours generated, will be returned to the Miller Creek Ditch. Drive by and [continued on page 8]

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[White River] [continued from page 7]

take a look as it is easily visible from RBC Road 13 on Flag Creek at mile marker 4. We are extremely proud of this collaborative project and thank the Miller Creek Ditch for all its efforts. We will continue to explore local renewable generation projects that make both electrical and financial sense for WREA and its membership. FINANCES AND AUDIT WREA is pleased that WREA’s loads have stabilized with a slight upward trend in 2017. With the board’s strong leadership, WREA remains a financially stable electric cooperative with a strong equity position. Sales revenue for the year 2016 equaled $59,433,722. Operating margins equaled $257,738 for 2016. Total plant utility equaled $40,616,484. Equities at the end of the 2016 were $59,914,274 with equity as a percent of assets ratio at 72 percent. The independent auditing firm of Kevin S. Kelso, CPA, PC completed the 2016 financial audit for White River Electric. In addition to strong finances, the 2016 audit confirmed that there were no irregularities or material weaknesses in the internal control structure or operations of the company. TRI-STATE GENERATION & TRANSMISSION As noted previously, Tri-State represents 86 percent of WREA’s total costs. As a member of Tri-State, WREA and its appointed director, Ron Hilkey, participate in Tri-State’s monthly board of director meetings. WREA’s management attends relevant Tri-State committee meetings and works closely with our member relations manager to ensure that WREA is engaged in Tri-State’s planning and member process. WREA SAFETY AND RELIABILITY Safe and reliable electric service is the focus of our core business. WREA was pleased to highlight decades of community safety training with our “Safe on the Bus” story at SafeElectricity.org. “Safe on the Bus” is a nationally recognized video that features recent events in which a downed WREA power line came in

contact with a school bus headed to a livestock judging contest in Rangely. Everyone stayed calm and followed the safety protocol, and no one was injured. It is a great reminder that safety education does help avoid disasters. We want to share our appreciation to everyone who participates in our annual safety awareness trainings. In addition to the highest levels of safety, WREA also has one of the highest levels of reliability. White River Electric’s system availability remains above the state and national average at 99 percent for 2016. MEMBER SERVICES AND OUR COMMUNITY With leaner budgets, WREA implemented innovative strategies to ensure that we can continue to sponsor and support the many worthy projects, events and, most importantly, the young people in this community. We also focused on sponsoring local events that promote economic development, such as the Chamber of Commerce Meeker TGIF program. We are proud to support our local businesses that help make Meeker a vibrant community. THANK YOU FOR ANOTHER GREAT YEAR Change and challenge can define a person, a community and a company. The changing economic landscape and industry inspired WREA to push itself to new levels of excellence. We hope in years to come that history defines WREA’s hard work, dedication and creativity as excellent. Most importantly, I want to thank our management team and employees for their efforts this year. Their innovation and hard work makes a difference and proves that WREA is one of the best electric cooperatives in the country. Thank you also to members of the board of directors for their leadership and support. Their steady guidance and vision set the tone for all of our efforts. We encourage you to join us for our annual meeting and thank you for your support throughout the year. We wish you all the best in the coming year.

EYE ON THE SKY

Farmers, ensure a safe harvest this year. Know the location of power lines and keep 10 feet from them.

STAY SAFE WHILE CLEANING UP

Cleaning up after a storm? Don’t use electric tools if it is raining, the ground is wet or you are standing in water.

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coloradocountrylife.coop


[White River]

Stay Safe After Storms

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Severe thunderstorms, tornadoes and flooding can leave more than damage in their wake — they can leave hidden dangers as well. Safe Electricity advises everyone to be mindful of the electrical hazards that storms and flooding can leave behind. Stay away from downed power lines and be alert to the possibility that tree limbs or debris may hide an electrical hazard. Treat all downed or hanging power lines as if they are energized and dangerous. Lines do not have to be arcing or sparking to be live. Warn others to stay away and contact White River Electric Association. Never step in to a flooded basement or other area if water is covering electrical outlets, appliances or cords. Be alert to any electrical equipment that could be energized and in contact with water. Never touch electrical appliances, cords or wires while you are wet or standing in water. Never turn off your breaker box if you must stand in water to do so. If you are cleaning up, do not use electric yard tools if it is raining, the ground is wet or you are standing in water. Keep

all electric tools and equipment at least 10 feet away from wet surfaces. Do not use water-damaged electronics or appliances until a professional verifies that they are safe. If you are driving and come upon a downed power line, stay in your vehicle, warn others to stay away and contact emergency personnel or White River Electric Association. Never drive over a downed line. A downed line causes other things around it to become potentially hazardous.

Climb the Rungs of Safety When Using a Ladder

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Whether hanging holiday lights, cleaning gutters or reaching high to hang a photo, ladders are a necessity for home projects. For jobs large and small, ladders provide the extra height to complete tasks that are otherwise out of reach. However, when climbing a ladder, use caution to avoid accidents and electrical injuries. In 2016, ladder accidents ranked among the top 10 causes of injury cited by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Although falls are most common, increased height can also increase the risk of electrical accidents, injuries and death. Safe Electricity urges everyone to keep themselves and equipment at least 10 feet away from overhead power lines and electrical equipment. In order to climb safely, take your time to select the optimal ladder and survey the area for electrical hazards. Safe Electricity provides these tips for enhancing electrical safety: • Opt for a fiberglass ladder rather than a wood or aluminum one when working near electricity. Although fiberglass is less durable and heavier than other materials, when clean and dry, fiberglass ladders are less conductive. • Remember that no ladder is safe around electricity. To stay

coloradocountrylife.coop

safe, take such precautions as wearing electrically insulated hand protection and footwear. • Before each use, inspect the ladder, paying attention to cracks or defects. Never use a damaged ladder or one coated with foreign matter, such as dirt or grease. This can provide a path for electrical currents. • Make sure that you are using the correct size ladder for the job, especially when completing tasks outside the home. • Always look up to make sure you will not make contact with any overhead power lines, building electrical service connections or other electrical equipment. Keep yourself, the ladder and all tools at least 10 feet from any energized equipment. Safe Electricity reminds consumers that the most important factor of ladder safety is keeping focus. Take time to remain stable on the ladder and avoid sudden movements. Never climb a ladder if you are dizzy or tired. In order to avoid falls, keep at least three points of contact with the ladder. Keep your body in the middle of the ladder and face inward when climbing. For more information on electrical safety, visit SafeElectricity.org.

SEPTEMBER 2017

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[White River]

Efficient Kitchen Lighting Comes with Options BY ANNE PRINCE

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Kitchen sizes, styles and configurations changed dramatically through the years. As consumer lifestyles and tastes changed, kitchen lighting evolved to reflect these shifts. In the past, a simple fluorescent ring placed in the center of the ceiling operated by a single switch was the norm for a typical American kitchen. Now, the proliferation of television networks and shows devoted to every aspect of home decorating, remodeling, building and sales reflect current consumers’ higher standards and expectations for a home’s appearance. Lighting, once considered an afterthought, is now an integral part of home décor and function, particularly in a focal area such as the kitchen.

LAYERING EFFECT

The effect of a single overhead light source can be too much light in one area and not enough in others. Layering different types of light from different sources is not only a smart plan, but it also makes good sense from an efficiency perspective. Task lighting, such as lighting under a counter, illuminates a particular work surface without a shadowing effect. Energy-efficient options typically feature LED-powered puck lights that can be 10

SEPTEMBER 2017

placed precisely where they are most needed under the cabinets. Another option is the thin-diameter fluorescent tubes that use about 25 percent of the electricity of halogen or incandescent bulbs and have a much greater life span. Regardless of the type of light selected, when installing the lights, place them toward the front of the cabinet so they illuminate the whole countertop rather than the wall. Most types of lights can be plugged into a standard outlet. Overhead lights, whether from a central fixture, track lights or recessed, can offer indirect illumination and complement the task lights. Where possible, utilize Energy Star and LED options.

SHINING A LIGHT ON FLEXIBILITY

Efficient lighting in the kitchen does not necessarily mean more lights, but rather more versatile lighting. Dimmer switches create more flexible lighting options for existing lights. There are times when maximum illumination is required for such tasks as food preparation or cleanup. At other times, it makes more sense to turn down the lights to create a cozier ambiance. By placing different sets of lights on dimmer switches, you increase your options, minimize the

energy used for lighting and thereby allow for greater energy efficiency. However, when installing dimmer switches, make sure they are compatible with LED lights. Lighting accounts for up to 15 percent of a home’s energy budget and, since the kitchen still remains the heart of the home and is a high-traffic hub, it makes good sense to focus here. For basic energy efficiency in the kitchen and elsewhere, sometimes small adjustments can make a big impact. The simplest area to focus on is on the light itself. LED lights use a small fraction of the energy of compact fluorescent, halogen or traditional incandescent bulbs and they are known for their longevity and efficiency. Energy Star-rated LED bulbs typically are the most energy efficient. At its best, a good kitchen lighting plan is functional, attractive and energy efficient. Whether your kitchen is large or small, old or new, one reliable recipe for energy savings is utilizing more efficient lighting in the heart of the home. Anne Prince writes on cooperative issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

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11


[news clips]

Electric Sector Adds $880 Billion to U.S. Economy

Bicyclists Ride, Raise $ for Those Struggling with Bills When representatives of Colorado electric cooperatives ride in the annual Pedal the Plains three-day bike tour of eastern Colorado September 15-17, they will be raising money for Energy Outreach Colorado. EOC was founded in 1989 as an independent, nonprofit organization to help low-income consumers with their home energy needs. Last year, the organization assisted with 19,177 home energy bills, distributing $8.2 million to keep low-income Coloradans warm in their homes. Funding was also used to make furnace repairs and provide weatherization services to help clients lower their energy bills. Visit poweringtheplains.coop for information on how to donate to the team.

Electric co-ops and other parts of the U.S. power industry support more than 7 million American jobs and power a healthy economy, according to a new study. The report, published by M.J. Bradley & Associates, estimates that the total economic benefit of the electric power industry to the nation is $880 billion annually — 5 percent of America’s gross domestic product. “Affordable and reliable electricity is the heartbeat of the American economy,” said Kent Singer, executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association, the trade association for Colorado’s electric co-ops. “For more than 75 years, electric co-ops have powered and empowered rural communities and their surrounding areas — providing jobs and creating economic opportunity throughout Colorado in the process. As not-for-profit utilities owned by our members, electric cooperatives are deeply invested in the communities that we serve. We’re proud to play a key role in shaping the local economy.” According to the study, one in every 20 American jobs is supported by the electric power sector. The industry directly provides nearly 2.7 million jobs across the nation through its employees, contractors and supply chain, and investments. It also supports an additional 4.4 million jobs indirectly. Learn more about the jobs available at Colorado electric co-ops at tinyurl.com/ colocoopjobs.

NATIONAL ENERGY SOURCE TRENDS The way your electricity is generated is changing. In the last 10 years, natural gas caught up with coal nationally as a preferred fuel, according to a recent report by the Energy Information Administration. The amount of renewable resources nearly tripled. Below is a comparison of energy sources for the United States between 2006 and 2015. That move away from coal and to natural gas is also happening in Colorado. The latest EIA statistics note that in 2015, 60 percent

2006 NATIONAL ENERGY SOURCES

of electricity generated by all utilities in Colorado came from coal; 22 percent from natural gas and 18 percent from renewable energy resources. Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, which supplies electricity to 18 of the 22 electric distribution coops in the state, reported 45 percent of its generation was from coal in 2015, 22 percent from natural gas and oil, 20 percent from renewable resources and 13 percent from other contract resources.

2015 NATIONAL ENERGY SOURCES

Renewable 2% (excluding hydro) Other 3% Hydro 7% Hydro 6% Nuclear 19% Natural Gas 20%

Coal 49%

Renewable 7% (excluding hydro) Other 1%

Nuclear 20% Natural Gas 33% Coal 33%

Source: Energy Information Administration (national data) 12

SEPTEMBER 2017

coloradocountrylife.coop


Co-ops Take Power Around the World Electrification is crucial to improving quality of life in the poorest parts of the world, but those efforts must go beyond poles and wires, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association CEO Jim Matheson told the U.S. Global Leadership Coalition State Leaders Summit in Washington, D.C., recently. “Electricity is fundamental. It creates better health outcomes, better economic opportunities, better education opportunities. That’s something that is tried and true. The relationship between electricity and quality of life holds true over the course of decades,” Matheson told the national gathering of leaders. During a panel on Driving Development in Africa this summer, he noted that NRECA International has brought electricity to more than 43 million people in 126 countries since its founding in 1962. And, as Matheson put it, the organization learned, “It’s not enough to just go and build infrastructure. “You need to create something that can be sustained, and that effort includes creating mechanisms to maintain and operate the system over time — governance rules, oper-

ating systems, the capacity of the workforce to maintain the system,” Matheson said. Enter the electric cooperative business model that’s served the United States for 80 years. “When the community owns an asset, it’s invested in that asset. We’ve found it to be a very powerful model,” Matheson said. Still, he said that every nation has its own characteristics that present unique challenges. “For each project, we’ve got to figure out how the pieces fit together,” he said. “What is the level of interest and the specific approach of the government? What are the partnership opportunities? Where does the power supply come from?” Matheson noted that of the 1.2 billion people in the world without access to electricity, half are in Africa. “If we really want to make a difference in terms of giving people the crucial opportunity to participate in the modern world, it really starts with access to electricity,” Matheson said. “That’s the primary building block for most every other development effort to have success.”

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Register Now for Energy Innovations Summit Learn what’s new in the electric industry at the annual CREA Energy Innovations Summit Monday, October 30 in downtown Denver. Join others from the electric industry as you listen to and interact with high-caliber speakers on regional transmission organizations, net metering and electric vehicles, distributed energy resources, carbon capture, energy storage and more. The day will be highlighted by Dr. Martin Keller, director of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, who will share information on the exciting projects the lab is working on in Golden. Registration is open at crea.coop for this sixth annual event.

A team of representatives from local electric co-ops will ride in the 2017 Pedal the Plains bicycle tour of the eastern plains of Colorado. This three-day tour will take riders on a 177mile adventure highlighting three unique and quaint communities in Weld and Morgan counties: Kersey, Keenesburg and Brush. If you want to sponsor the team and help raise money for Energy Outreach Colorado, fill out the form here and send it with your check. Make check payable to CEEI.

To send your tax-deductible Powering the Plains donation, fill out this form and send it with a check to: CEEI, c/o CREA/PTP, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216. Name:

[ news clips]

For more information or to make a donation via PayPal, visit poweringtheplains.coop

DONATE TODAY SEPTEMBER 2017

13


[industry]

Ted Case

Not Your Average Business Model

Q&A with co-op historian Ted Case BY PAUL WESSLUND

T

Ted Case spent the past several years diving deeply into unexplored parts of electric co-op history. He described how co-ops have affected national policy since the 1930s in his first book, Power Plays: The U.S. Presidency, Electric Cooperatives, and the Transformation of Rural America. His second, just-released book title describes

Q: How did you end up writing about electric co-ops in the Vietnam War?

A: It came out of my first book and the

chapter on President Lyndon Johnson. In 1965, he received a letter from the general manager of the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Clyde Ellis, saying that NRECA could help win the war by putting electric co-ops in Vietnam. I was intrigued by that bold claim. Since Johnson was such an early and strong supporter of rural electrification in Texas, he embraced Ellis’s proposal fully. Learning about that story led me on this quest to track down some of the men and women who had worked on it.

Q: Did NRECA start co-ops in Vietnam? A: It was a really good effort. Just 20 men

went over there in a five-year period. These were the most difficult co-ops to establish in the history of the electric co-op program. The Viet Cong soldiers that were fighting against the South Vietnamese tried to cut down the co-op lines and chop down their poles and blow up their dams, and they did all those things. The people trying to start the co-ops faced rampant corruption and an inability to get poles and other materials. They got three co-ops up and 14

SEPTEMBER 2017

itself: Poles, Wires and War: The Remarkable Untold Story of Rural Electrification and the Vietnam War. Case is executive director of the Oregon Rural Electric Cooperative Association. He recently talked about what the history of electric co-ops means for co-op member-owners everywhere.

running and brought light to thousands of villagers. But the program ended and they had to leave, and the communists overtook the country.

Q: What lessons did you learn from researching the book?

A: The support the U.S. co-op workers

got from the Vietnamese villagers was not unlike the support from the farmers who started electric co-ops in the United States in the 1930s. The Vietnamese villagers wanted a radio. They wanted an iron and lights to read. Toward the end of the war when the communists were rolling through the country in 1975, they came to a town that was one of the co-ops’ headquarters. The militia in the town rose up and fought against the communists in one of the most heroic battles of the war. They were fighting for their electricity. They were fighting for what they had built.

Q: Has researching these books changed your view of electric co-ops?

A: I have a greater appreciation. Our

heritage is so much a part of who we are, and there’s not many people who remember when the lights came on anymore, so that’s different. But the core values of what co-ops do are the same as in 1936 when the Rural

Electrification Act became law.

Q: What are those values? A: I think of one particular co-op, about

medium-sized and close to an urban area. It has several thousand people who come to the office to pay their bills. They don’t need to do that. It’s a lot easier to just toss the bill in the mail or pay online, but they go in because the co-op has this value beyond just electric service. It really is the center of everything in the town and an economic driver. That sums up how the co-op is not just a power company. It’s the center of their world.

Q: Does that kind of relationship really

apply in this increasingly high-tech world in a high-tech industry?

A:

As I travel the country, I’m blown away by the technical acumen and the vision and the strategic abilities of co-op leaders to see into the future. Electric co-ops are getting involved in providing broadband internet connections at a time when nobody else will do it. It’s the same innovation that brought electricity to rural areas.

Q: Can a co-op be successful providing

technologies as different as electricity and broadband? coloradocountrylife.coop


A: Co-ops will embrace new technologies A: Co-ops continue to be very when that’s what their members want. Members say they’re interested in solar energy and other utility innovations, like developing advanced batteries that could increase reliability and store renewable energy for times when the sun isn’t shining or the wind isn’t blowing. Co-ops never strayed from that business model that listens and responds to their members, their customers, their owners.

A: That they have the ability to influence

Q: One characteristic of electric co-ops is

risky?

their not-for-profit nature. How does that affect the co-op members?

their co-op more than they ever imagined. Co-op board members that I know are really interested in hearing from folks and getting feedback. One person can really make a huge difference. When somebody shows up at a co-op annual meeting and has a point to make, the boards take it seriously. The co-op’s management takes it seriously. That’s the value. It’s pretty hard to get heard these days. But at a co-op, your voice makes a difference.

A: Definitely. And that brings out

A: A lot. Increasingly, institutions have

Paul Wesslund writes on cooperative issues for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.

Q: Can’t some of these new ventures be another strength of member ownership: The control is local. Providing internet and other services won’t make sense for all of the more than 900 co-ops across the country. There are very difficult decisions being made in co-op boardrooms, and history shows there is tremendous wisdom that comes out of the discussions among the local co-ops and their members.

Q: How does that member-owned

business model relate to the basic mission of keeping electricity reliable and affordable?

coloradocountrylife.coop

competitive, in rates, service and reliability. And there are so many other things they do for their members. It comes back to that local connection. Members know the folks who work at the co-op. They know the directors. There’s terrific customer service getting the lights back on after an outage. Electric reliability is very important, and co-ops do that as well as anyone.

[ industry]

fallen from grace because everybody believes there’s this profit motive that’s just out to milk you and there’s such a lack of trust in a lot of the large institutions. Being not-for-profit is an attractive feature that means decisions are based on the best interest of the co-op and the consumer.

Q: So what should members know about their electric co-op?

For more information on Ted Case’s new book Poles, Wires and War: The Remarkable Untold Story of Rural Electrification and the Vietnam War, visit coloradocountrylife.coop.

SEPTEMBER 2017

15


[feature]

A LOVE AFFAIR GONE WILD An essay of one author’s obsession with Colorado’s bears BY LAURA PRITCHETT

A

A few years ago, I fell in love. Not the vague kind of fondness, but rather, the obsessive, zealous kind of love affair; the kind that affects your dreams at night and your activities in the day. I fell for bears, of all things, and I’ve never lost my heart for an animal like that before, or since. The love affair started simply enough: A bear kept me up one night, banging on my neighbor’s trash can, and I got up to watch it from the deck of my house, which was far enough away to be safe. I suppose that in my mind, I told myself it was to keep an eye on my chickens, which were nervously cackling. And perhaps that is true. But mostly, I wanted to watch an active bear, uninterrupted, for a long time, which is not something I’d ever experienced before in my life, despite being a Colorado native and an outdoorsy gal. I watched it try the Dumpster a few more times (my neighbor, intelligently, had bear-proofed it), then watched it stroll around, sniffing here and there, unhurried and unfettered. It moved to the ditch bank, where the wild plums grow. I watched it sit on its haunches and eat, then rustle around for a better spot. It did not even bother approaching my chickens. Perhaps the smell of my dog’s markings was enough, or perhaps it was too close to a house for its comfort or perhaps, even, it noticed me. It was happy enough along the ditch, and it was a warm fall night, and the stars were out and, simply put, I fell in love. I knew it would be heading into hibernation soon, and I knew it was a black bear and not a grizzly. Grizzlies were purposefully exterminated in Colorado, with the last one being killed by a bowhunter in the 1970s. But that is all I 16

SEPTEMBER 2017

knew about bears, really. But that evening, something changed, the way love suddenly changes us. Soon I was reading books about bears; and then bears started appearing in my own fiction. I searched for evidence of them everywhere, for there’s truth in that adage that once you start looking, the more, well, you see. I started to notice claw marks on aspens, and claw marks on my yard swing. I would look up, into the cottonwoods, scanning the crooks and big branches, just checking. I looked for scat, knowing that this time of year, there was bound to be a pile or two of apple-seed-laden stuff, crumbly and pleasant. I would pause on my quiet morning walks to gaze up at the foothill. Somewhere in the mountain mahogany, willows, wild plums and rock outcroppings, a bear was hanging out, preparing itself for winter, and I decided I wanted to meet it. Maybe not it in particular, but I knew I wanted to be close to some bear. It was then that I decided I wanted to climb into a bear den. It sounds crazy, I know, but this is what weird love does to us. I made some calls, made some promises and made my way up a mountain on a long, long snowshoe trek — the hardest physical day of my life. I had found a group of scientists who needed to cut off the global positioning system collar on a hibernating bear. They’d concluded a study, the goal of which was to help the bears — or, to be more specific, to help humans know how to live with bears, which ultimately helps us both. In any case, the collar needed to come off I was told, and yes, I could come along. There were 11 of us who willingly snowshoed 1,200 feet up a mountainside coloradocountrylife.coop


[ feature]

Black bears range in color from black to cinnamon to blonde.

Berries are a staple for bears. coloradocountrylife.coop

near the town of Aspen, a trip that involved several hours of grunting, whispering, crashing through undergrowth, cussing the rotten snow. The trip included several researchers from Colorado State University, two veterinarians and a couple of Colorado Parks and Wildlife folks. They were all carrying heavy backpacks laden with heavy equipment: tranquilizer guns, medical equipment, avalanche shovels, antenna for receiving signals. There were also a couple of onlookers, such as myself, full of the buoyant respect that accompanies traveling with people who know their stuff. The experts among us had located this den with two hibernating black bears, a sow and her yearling, with the aid of the GPS collar. When we got there, several of the gang removed the underbrush from the den and tranquilized the two bears with long poles (with the utmost care and grace and gentleness, I observed from far away). While we waited for the drug to take effect, stomping our SEPTEMBER 2017

17


[feature]

Bears have the ability to change their habits.

feet and eating almonds to stay warm, I stood with CPW District Wildlife Manager Kevin Wright, who taught me about Colorado’s bears. Black bears are native; there are approximately 10,000 to 12,000 in the state; they are many colors ranging from black to blonde; they’ve got a sense of smell that is 100 times better than what people have; and they’ve lost much of their habitat as human population increases. Bear-human conflicts are sharply on the rise, accounting for about one-third of all bear deaths in the state. I jogged in place and swung my arms around, nearly crying from the cold. “What would help?” Three basic things, he said, would solve about 95 percent of bearhuman conflicts: bear-proofing garbage, locking doors at night and closing accessible windows. “It’s so simple,” Wright added. “People need to take responsibility for where they choose to live.” “It seems pretty common sense,” I said. “Yes,” he said. “Not rocket science.” But this study was pretty complex. The science of what to do with “nuisance bears” was exactly what they’d been studying. The researchers, in fact, have been able to partially dispel the notion that “a fed bear is a dead bear.” Most bears in this mountain town do not become habituated to human food sources as much as we think they do. They will go back to natural food as soon as those food sources are available. In other words, bears are opportunists, but take away the “opportune” part and they won’t be “ists.” I learned that bears exhibit “behavior plasticity,” a fancy way of saying that bears have the ability to change their habits. Bears will return to their preferred Colorado diet of chokecherries, gamble oak and serviceberry, the three main readily available berries for bears in Colorado, once those foods are available. When the tranquilizer had taken hold, I marveled at the team’s quick and sure work with the bears. They worked with speed and grace as they drew blood, administered eye drops and ointments, cut off the collar. They had covered the sow’s face with a soft ski hat, in order to protect her face from getting scratched, and had pulled her out to the rocky outcropping. Since there wasn’t room for both bears on the ledge, the yearling was left inside the den. From outside the den, I was able to study the sow — her feet pads

(so soft) and teeth (so yellow) and fur (so surprisingly thick). I also watched as her radio collar was cut off. She seemed a little freer, a little wilder. That’s when I got to climb in. I got on my hands and knees and inched forward. Then inched forward some more. Then I was on my stomach, squirming forward. On one side of me, the mother bear’s hind legs, on the other side, the yearling’s face. I couldn’t see, it was dark, but I closed my eyes and dug my fingers into their fur. I breathed in. It did not smell sour and dank, as I had expected. Since they don’t defecate or urinate in a den, they smelled of duff, of earth, of fur. I listened. There was the sound of their huffing noise, of breath, of the swoosh of life. I stayed for as long as they let me, sandwiched between two good-smelling Ursus americanus. Then someone whacked my foot and told me it was time to get out. Tranquilizers don’t last forever, after all, and we needed to get back down the mountain before dark. With a lot of care, the bear was put back into her den, next to her yearling, the opening was covered and the bears left in solitude once more. As we quietly picked up our gear and prepared to leave, I regarded the bear claw marks on the aspen trees. I’d seen bearscars before, arcs of five claws in beautiful patterns, healed over by the aspen. But these trees were tremendous, scarred nearly from top to bottom, as if the whole tree was a bear’s canvas. These aspens will be among the first things the bears feed on. The first blooms, called aspen catkins, are what will help coax the bears awake come spring. I remember this now as one of the best moments of my life. It was up there with the birth of my children, the publication of my first book, so hard-won, and those rare moments of pure joy. And I’ve worked on protecting bears since, because once you start to know a creature, once you fall in love, you want to protect. This great state has the great gift of bears, and thus the deep responsibility of keeping them safe and their habitat wild. I still see bear claw marks from time to time, and I always have this thought: I’m so glad to have fallen in love that one fall evening, and I hope we humans can mark our homes with such grace and beauty. Laura Pritchett is an American author from Colorado; one of her books is entitled Great Colorado Bear Stories. Read more at www. laurapritchett.com.

For more information on Colorado’s black bears, visit www.coloradocountrylife.coop. 18

SEPTEMBER 2017

coloradocountrylife.coop


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If all lines are busy call this special toll free overflow hotline: 1-888-414-3758 Ext.FMS2382 residents who find their state on the Distribution List to the left in bold and beat the deadline are authorized to get individual State Silver Bars at just state minimum of $59 set by the Lincoln Treasury. That’s why everyone should be taking full Vault Bricks loaded with five State Silver Bars before they’re all gone. And here’s the best part. Every CO, UT, WY, NE, KS, OK, NM and AZ resident who gets at least two Vault Bricks is also getting free shipping and free handling. that's a real steal because all other state residents must pay over six hundred dollars for each State Vault Brick.

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MUST REMIT $134 PER STATE SILVER BAR 1. No State Silver Bars will be issued to any resident living outside of CO, UT, WY, NE, KS, OK, NM or AZ at state resident minimum set by the Lincoln Treasury. 2. Call the Non-Resident Toll Free Hotline beginning at 11:00am at: 1-888-414-3761 Ext.FMS2382 3. If you are a u.s. resident living outside of the states of CO, UT, WY, NE, KS, OK, NM or AZ you are required to pay $134 for each State Silver Bar for a total of six hundred seventy dollars plus shipping and handling for each sealed State Vault Brick loaded with five u.s. State Silver Bars. This same offer may be made at a later date or in a different geographic location.

FEDERATED MINT, LLC AND LINCOLN TREASURY, LLC ARE NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE U.S. GOVERNMENT, A BANK OR ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM SHIPMENT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. DUE TO THE FLUCTUATING PRICE IN THE WORLD GOLD AND SILVER MARKETS, ORDERS MAY BE CANCELLED OR PRICES WILL CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE AND STATE MINIMUMS ARE SUBJECT TO AN ADDITIONAL FEE OF NO MORE THAN 2% FOR EVERY $1 INCREASE IN THE NEW YORK SPOT SILVER PRICE PER OUNCE WHEN EXCEEDING $18 PER OUNCE AND SHALL BE APPLIED AT THE TIME THE ORDER IS PROCESSED FOR SHIPMENT. THIS SAME OFFER MAY BE MADE AVAILABLE AT A LATER DATE OR IN A DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION. FEDERATED MINT P7086A OF20288R-1 7600 SUPREME AVE. NW, NORTH CANTON, OH 44720 ©2017 LINCOLN TREASURY

■ A SNEAK PEAK INSIDE SILVER VAULT BRICKS: Pictured left reveals the valuable .999 pure fine silver bars inside each State Silver Vault Brick. Pictured right are the State Silver Vault Bricks containing the only U.S. State Silver Bars known to exist with the double forged state proclamation. CO, UT, WY, NE, KS, OK, NM and AZ residents are authorized to get individual State Silver Bars at just $59 state resident minimum set by the Lincoln Treasury. That’s why everyone should be taking full Vault Bricks loaded with five State Silver Bars before they’re all gone. And here’s the best part. Every resident who gets at least two Vault Bricks is also getting free shipping and free handling. That’s a real steal because all other state residents must pay over six hundred dollars for each State Vault Brick. coloradocountrylife.coop

SEPTEMBER 2017

21


[recipes]

HARVESTING HEAVENLY HOME COOKING COLORADO BLOGGER BRINGS HER LOVE OF COOKING TO BOOKSHELVES BY AMY HIGGINS RECIPES@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

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TIP

Tip From the Author for Roasted Spaghetti Squash featured on our website: “Spaghetti squash is hard to cut, especially if the squash is large,” Gerard says. “If cutting your squash in half proves too difficult, place the whole thing in the microwave and cook on high for 3 to 5 minutes to soften, then try again.” Food With Flexibility “[This is] a versatile recipe; you can eat the wild rice stuffing on its own too, but the brown butter bread crumbs really make the dish,” Gerard says.

Read the blog Half Baked Harvest (halfbakedharvest.com) and you’ll drool over the vast selection of recipes created by Tieghan Gerard, a recipe developer, photographer and food stylist who lives and works out of her beautiful, recently renovated barn in the Colorado Rockies, about 65 miles outside of Denver. Now, Gerard is taking her love of cooking to new heights with the Half Baked Harvest Cookbook, which hits the shelves on September 12. The Colorado Country Life staff was honored with an opportunity to thumb through the manuscript ahead of time, and what we found was a delightful assortment of brilliant bites, from breakfast to main courses and desserts. So, harvest your garden’s squash and get a taste for yourself with this prerelease recipe.

Wild Rice and Havarti-Stuffed Acorn Squash SQUASH 2 medium acorn squash, halved through the stem and seeded 2 tablespoons salted butter, melted 1/4 cup packed light brown sugar 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper WILD RICE 2 cups water 1 cup uncooked wild rice 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil 6 cups fresh spinach 1 canned chipotle in adobo, chopped 1 tablespoon chopped fresh dill 1 cup roasted pistachios, chopped 1 cup dried cranberries Kosher salt and freshly ground pepper

on) and brush the liquid from the baking dish around the flesh of the squash, coating the squash well and trying to use all the liquid. Meanwhile, make the rice. Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a medium saucepan over high heat. Add the rice, cover and reduce the heat to low. Simmer for 35 to 45 minutes, or until all the water has been absorbed and the rice is tender. Add the olive oil and spinach and toss to combine. Cover the pot again and allow the spinach to wilt, about 10 minutes. Remove the pot from the heat and stir in the chipotle in adobo, dill, pistachios and cranberries. Season BROWN BUTTER BREAD CRUMBS with salt and pepper. 2 tablespoons salted butter While the squash and rice cook, make the bread 1 cup panko bread crumbs crumbs. In a medium skillet, melt the butter over medium 2 tablespoons roasted pistachios, finely chopped heat. Cook until it is browned and smells nutty, about 5 1 cup shredded Havarti cheese minutes. Remove the skillet from the heat and whisk the Chopped fresh parsley or cilantro, for topping butter for about 30 seconds more. Stir in the bread crumbs and pistachios. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Brush the cut sides of the Stuff the roasted squash halves with wild rice and top squash with the melted butter and sprinkle with the brown with Havarti. Return to the oven and bake for 10 to 15 sugar and cinnamon. Season with salt and pepper. Place in minutes, or until the cheese has melted and the squash is a baking dish and bake for 45 to 50 minutes, or until the crisp. Remove from the oven and top with bread crumbs flesh is fork-tender. Remove from the oven (leave the oven and fresh parsley before serving.

For more great recipes from Half Baked Harvest and to find out how to win the featured cookbook, visit coloradocountrylife.coop. 22

SEPTEMBER 2017

coloradocountrylife.coop


[ gardening]

Happiness Harvesting Homegrown Tomatoes Squeeze out the remaining of the season’s garden goodies

BY VICKI SPENCER MASTER GARDENER GARDENING@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG Although gardening season is winding down, September is possibly one of the busiest times of the year. Flower beds need to be tidied up and many vegetables are still waiting to be harvested. This month’s article provides a few tips for fall gardening, with a focus on ways to extend your tomato harvest because we all miss fresh garden tomatoes when winter arrives. In September, as you enjoy cooler evenings, you are also reminded that it’s time to winterize your garden. Since fertilization is no longer necessary, turn your attention to cutting back flowers that finished blooming and removing plants that look diseased. Weeds tend to be less pervasive in autumn, so aerate the soil by giving it a good turn. If you have a compost pile, give it a good turn, too. If your perennials are overcrowded, divide and replant them to fill in bare spots. Tender bulbs like dahlias, cannas and tuberous begonias can be dug up and stored for the winter, and you can plant spring bulbs. By now, your vegetable harvest should be coming to an end. If you have a lot of green tomatoes left on the vine, pinch off any new flowers to let the plant focus its energy on the existing fruit. If light frost is predicted, take precautions to protect the remaining harvest. This means covering your plants at night and uncovering them during the daytime. If you have a good-sized garden, this can be a lot of work.

Since most tomato plants need temperatures above 60 degrees to ripen, you probably won’t see any new fruits forming after nighttime temperatures dip into the low 70s. So, you may as well pick all your tomatoes, including the green ones. Now you won’t worry about rushing out at night in response to the weatherman reporting sudden frost. If a tomato plant only has green tomatoes on it, dig up the entire plant, shake off the loose soil, and hang it in the dry shelter of your garage or basement until the tomatoes ripen. It’s better to keep the plant out of direct sunlight or total darkness. Unfortunately, I don’t have a convenient place to hang the plants, so I found this process to be rather messy. Instead, I usually follow my mother’s method: Simply pick the green tomatoes and set them on the kitchen counter out of direct sunlight to ripen. If she wanted some tomatoes to ripen right away, she placed them stem-side up in a sunny windowsill. Another way to hasten ripening is to place the tomatoes in a paper bag with a ripe apple. The apple gives off ethylene gas, which helps the tomato turn red. When our family had a large vegetable garden, our harvest was so big that we spent days canning tomatoes and other vegetables in pint and quart jars. These were perfect for making spaghetti, stew, soup, chili and casseroles in the winter.

After many years, we tired of canning and happily discovered that it was faster and easier to simply wash the vegetables, seal them in freezer bags and place them in the freezer. Even though we had enough canned and frozen tomatoes to last until the next year’s harvest, we wanted to keep as many tomatoes fresh as long as possible to enjoy them in our salads. We did this by wrapping each tomato in newspaper and layering them in a bushel basket or cardboard box. Then we placed the containers in our cellar for safekeeping. (If you don’t have a cellar, place them in an unheated garage or cool, dark closet in your basement.) Each week we unwrapped a few tomatoes to check their progress and removed the few that rotted so as not to spoil all the others. Most of our tomatoes ripened after three to four weeks, so we enjoyed fresh tomatoes a month longer than if we had not followed this practice. Of course, you don’t have to ripen all your tomatoes. I particularly enjoy fried green tomatoes, but there are many more creative green tomato recipes available on the internet. Either way, red or green, there is no comparison between fresh garden tomatoes and those you buy in the store. Clearly, this is why proud vegetable gardeners can spend hours discussing the trials and tribulations of growing tomatoes and the merits of their tomato harvests.

More Online: Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado. coloradocountrylife.coop

SEPTEMBER 2017

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[outdoors] ONLINE REGISTRATION & A DETAILED EVENT SCHEDULE AT CREA.COOP

OCTOBER 30, 2017 Westin Denver Downtown Hotel 1672 Lawrence Street Denver, CO 80202 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. $125 registration fee includes

conference, expo and lunch OPENING SESSION

How are Electric Co-ops Managing an Industry in Transition?

LUNCH WITH Dr. Martin Keller Director, National Renewable Energy Laboratory

CLOSING SESSION Energy Storage

BREAKOUT SESSION TOPICS INCLUDE RTO: Right for Colorado? Net Metering and EVs Distributed Energy Resources Carbon Capture Technology Wind Generation Update Natural Gas Markets

EXHIBIT SPACE AVAILABLE

CONTACT JEN HIGHT 303-455-2700 JENHIGHT@COLORADOREA.ORG 24

SEPTEMBER 2017

Pioneering the Plains for Pronghorns Hunting the swift mammals requires prowess, patience BY DENNIS SMITH OUTDOORS@COLORADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

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Big-game hunters have been intrigued by pronghorns for centuries, and I suspect some of that fascination has as much to do with where they live as it does with the animal itself. Unlike deer, elk or moose, pronghorns prefer the high plains and wide-open expanses of short-grass prairies to the timbered shelter of mountain forests or the dense understory of river bottoms. Occasionally you will find herds on sage flats that rub up against the foothills, but they will always be where they can see danger coming from a long way off. While commonly called antelope and euphemistically referred to as “speed goats” by some, pronghorns are neither goat nor antelope. Oddly enough, they are more closely related to giraffes and okapis and quite unlike any other big game mammal here in the West, or in the world for that matter. Hunting them on Colorado’s vast windswept grasslands is an infinitely different proposition from stalking elk or mule deer in the high country or whitetails in the bottomlands. Rather than burning shoe leather humping steep slopes with your bow or rifle and a heavy pack on your back, you will be most successful if you scout the flatlands from backcountry dirt roads in a vehicle armed with binoculars and spotting scopes. Once game is spotted — usually far off — you hide the truck in a dry creek or coulee and make a stalk on foot. It’s not difficult to see how this closely approximates the same technique used in hunting African plains game on the Serengeti: The professional

hunter navigates across the African veldt in his trusty Land Rover until he or his scouts spot game, then they hustle off on foot to set up a shot for their client. Not that we ever went to Africa, but this is exactly how the boys and I approach pronghorn hunting: safari style. Having secured the proper licenses and permission from property owners if necessary, we load the bed of our truck with a couple of coolers and a chop box. One cooler keeps drinks and sandwiches cold, another is kept iced but empty to hold pronghorn quarters should we be lucky enough to make a kill. The chop box holds miscellaneous dry foods, extra clothing and supplies. We keep binoculars, spotting scopes, topographic maps, property maps and handheld GPS devices in the cab. Though we dearly love the meat and we do our level best to make a kill, the magic in pronghorn hunting for us lies in watching the sun come up over the prairie, where the view stretches for untold miles from one horizon to the other across low rolling hills of ochre-colored prairie grasses and cactusstudded ravines, and the sweetened scent of silver sage rides on the cool morning air. If we get to see a herd of pronghorns racing across the veldt, then our trip is a success.

Miss an issue?

Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors. coloradocountrylife.coop


[ energy tips]

HOW HEAT PUMPS WORK BY PAT KEEGAN AND BRAD THIESSEN

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2018 Photo Contest

4 categories • 4 chances to win 1st, 2nd or 3rd Find a full list of official rules online at coloradocountrylife.coop

Categories are: • Classic Colorado Photos that convey the feel, the look that is Colorado • Cute Critters Animals of all kinds • Seasonal Salute Capture spring, summer, fall or winter • Water Wonders Water in all of its wonderful forms: creeks, rivers, waterfalls, water sports, fountains, etc.

Send entries to: Photo Contest, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or info@coloradocountrylife.org.

Prizes: 1st – $175, 2nd – $75, 3rd – $50

Deadline: December 15, 2017

Winners will be published in March 2018

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PLUS!

An electric air source heat pump can be a good alternative to a furnace system that runs on propane or fuel oil. It is also a costeffective alternative to electric resistance heat that is used in electric furnaces and in baseboard and wall units. In the summer, an air source heat pump acts as an air conditioner that draws heat from your home’s air and transfers it outside. In the winter, the system’s direction is reversed so that heat is pulled from the outside air and moved into your home. The heat pump has two major components: the condenser (also called the compressor) that circulates refrigerant through the system, and an air handler that distributes the conditioned air. Most heat pumps are split systems with the condenser located outside and the air handler In recent years, technology has advanced to make heat pumps inside. Heat viable in climates with long periods pumps usually of subfreezing temperatures. Photo Credit: Rays Heating, Plumbing and distribute the Electric hot or cold air through the duct system. Heat pumps not only reduce energy costs, they can also eliminate the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning and problems that can occur with on-site storage of propane or heating oil. Heat pumps must work harder to extract heat as the outside temperature drops. At some point the heat pump switches to resistance mode, which operates the same way a toaster or an electric baseboard heater works. If your area has extremely cold winters, you should consider a dual fuel system, which utilizes a heat pump along with a gas or propane furnace. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to learn more about heat pumps. Look under the Energy tab.

SEPTEMBER 2017

25


We’re seeing sunshine in a whole new light Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, power supplier to 18 electric cooperatives in Colorado, delivers more solar energy to its members than any other G&T in the country. That’s un-renew-a-believable! #generatepossibilities

Visit Randy at www.tristate.coop/renewables 26

SEPTEMBER 2017

coloradocountrylife.coop


[ marketplace]

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[classifieds] TO PLACE A CLASSIFIED AD

Please type or print your ad on a separate paper. Indicate how many months you would like your ad to run and which month to start. There is a minimum of 12 words at $1.63 per word/month. Be sure to include your full name and address for our records. Check MUST accompany this order or call to pay by credit card. Send your ad to: mail: Colorado Country Life 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 phone: 303-902-7276 fax: 303-455-2807 email: classifieds@coloradocountrylife.org

ANTIQUE RESTORATION CHAIR CANING — Hand caning, machine caning, fiber rush caning. Pueblo West, 719-547-0723. chaanita@q.com. (858-10-17)

ANTLERS

ANTLER CHANDELIERS made only from REAL antlers. We are the manufacturer and we sell all of our products at wholesale prices; save as much as 60% from store prices. Many other antler products and mounts, including 56” elk mount, giant moose paddles, and elk antlers. Showroom now open year ’round in Granby, CO. 18 years at this location, over 900 satisfied customers! Designers: We can provide you a single item or a whole houseful. Call (970) 627-3053. (085-09-17)

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES

(These opportunities have not been investigated by Colorado Country Life.) FULL SERVICE, FULLY EQUIPPED auto repair workshop in SW Colorado. 6 service bays & paint booth, upper & entry level offices. Owner will carry with substantial down payment. Good terms. Ph 970-563-4500, 8 am – 4 pm, Monday – Friday. (356-10-17) HEALTH FOOD STORE & DELI: 2 turnkey businesses in one. Strong income/customer base. Colorado mountains (970-641-5175), leave name & number. (252-12-17)

CLOCK REPAIR & RESTORATION

www.clockrepairandrestoration. com DURANGO AREA. CLOCKS of all kinds repaired. Antique and modern. Clocks bought and sold. bob.scott@usa.net. Call Robert 970-247-7729. (109-10-17)

ENERGY

SOLAR WATER SYSTEMS — livestock or any remote location. 3-10 gpm. Variable speed. Call Peterson High Reach for free quote, 719-688-0081. Windmills available. (316-09-17)

EVENTS

DYNAMIC GUIDED TOURS, interactive exhibits, educational events at the Western Museum of Mining and Industry. Check us out www.wmmi.org, 225 N. Gate Blvd., Colorado Springs, 80921, 719-488-0880. (346-09-17) LA VETA OKTOBERFEST 5K Fun Run, 8:30 am, Oct. 7, La Veta Town Park. Registration information at http://tinyurl.com/ Oktoberfest5K. (360-09-17) POLKA LOVERS Klub of America — Dance to a live band Sundays, 3-7 pm. Denver Kickers Sport Club, 16776 W. 50th Ave., Golden, CO. $5.00/members, $10.00/ nonmembers. polkadenver.com for information / band schedule. Leo, 720-232-0953. (345-09-17)

FINE ART

CALL TO ARTISTS—3rd Annual Miniature Art Show—Bella Art & Frame, 183 Washington St., Monument, CO 80132. Deadline for entries and art: Oct. 4, 2017. For details: BellaArtAndFrame. com. (357-09-17)

FOOD

FREE BUTCHER SUPPLY CATALOG — Meat grinders, saws, slicers, cutlery, seasonings — Everything for the home butcher. Pioneer Butcher Supplies in Loveland, CO, since 1975. 1-888-891-7057. (349-12-17)

FOR SALE

OXYGEN CONCENTRATORS — $400 with warranty. Also sell portable concentrators and oxygen supplies. Repair and service of equipment. Aspen Concentrator Repair Service. 719-471-9895. (040-12-17) POLAR BEAR & ARCTIC SEAL. Full live mounts on 4’x6’ block of ice. Kodiak brown bear standing. Wonderful for Great Room or business. 970-627-0074. (306-10-17)

FREE

LEARN HOW ROGER BANNISTER, the Wright brothers, & Neil Armstrong accomplish the impossible by training their belief system! Visit our website to get your Free Course and more information! www.LifeGoals4Me.com. (350-09-17) SOON CHURCH AND GOVERNMENT UNITING will suppress “Religious Liberty,” enforcing a “National Sunday Law,” leading to the “Mark of the Beast.” Be informed / Be forewarned! Need mailing address for FREE materials. TBSM, Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771. thebiblesaystruth@yahoo. com, 1-888-211-1715. (814-12-17)

GRASS

The August classified ads contest winner is Bill Gollam of Walsenburg. He correctly counted 31 ads. 28

SEPTEMBER 2017

TICKETS

REAL ESTATE

VACATION RENTALS

QUILT SHOW Sept. 30, 11 am - 4 pm. Community Center in Haxtun, Colorado. Details: Call & leave message at 970-774-7001. (358-09-17)

DISCOVER BEAVER LAKES! 10 miles south of Leadville. New custom 2-story with 4 br, 3.5 ba. Breathtaking mountain, lake, aspen grove views from every room. Reduced $150,000 to $449,000. Call Joe Arnold at 303-550-3794. (351-10-17) FSBO: OAK CREEK/STEAMBOAT SPRINGS — 3 corner lots centrally located above park – great views. Scrape off & build. $75k OBO, 719-890-4488. (348-10-17) MOUNTAIN CABIN BY STREAM — 10 minutes from Westcliffe — beautifully renovated summer cabin, fully furnished, 3 bdrm, loft, 2.5 ba, stone fireplace, great kitchen, near Rainbow Trail. $189,000, 719-783-2234. (354-09-17) READY TO RETIRE? +-13 acres near Mancos, CO. Trout-stocked canyon lake, commercial greenhouse, gardens, lots of water, passive solar timber frame home. $525,000. Jim, 970-769-1391, for pictures. (282-10-17)

STOP FEEDING PRAIRIE DOGS. We’ll rent hunting rights from you. Seriously looking for duck & goose habitat. Encourage young sportsmen by providing safe, private access. You make the rules. 303-460-0273. (069-12-17)

TIN CUP, COLORADO — 1600 sf log home, attached 30x90 workshed, 3-car building for storage. Willow Creek runs through adjacent BLM land. Seasonal access or snowmobile. Matt, Monarch Realty, 970-641-1900. (340-10-17)

HELP WANTED

WE BUY LAND and/or mineral rights. CO, TX, NM, KS. 1-800316-5337 (099-04-18)

LEGITIMATE WORK AT HOME opportunity. No sales, investment, risk. Training/website provided. Monthly income plus bonuses, benefits. Call Carrie 303-579-4207, www.WorkAtHomeUnited.com/ OurAbundance. (932-02-18)

IMPROVEMENTS & REPAIRS

SEPTIC PROBLEMS: DON’T REPLACE IT, REJUVENATE IT! Standing water on your drain field? Septic drain slow? I have an alternative — warrantied — to avoid installing a new septic system! Call Septic Rejuvenating Specialists LLC, toll free, 855-797-6072. (352-11-17)

Find hidden treasure in the CLASSIFIEDS Read through the ads and FIND the CCL classified explaining how to WIN $25. It’s easy. You could WIN.

QUILTS

TICKETS

LOOKING FOR A WINNER. WIN $25 by emailing the number of classified ads on this page to classifieds@coloradocountrylife. org with WIN $25 as the subject. Include name/address/ phone. Deadline 9/15/17.

NFR & PBR RODEO TICKETS — Las Vegas. Call 1-888-NFR-Rodeo (1-888637-7633). www.NFR-rodeo.com. A+ rated BBB Member. (912-04-18)

3 BDR, 2 BA, HOT TUB, open year around, pet friendly, redfeatherlakescabin.com 970-286-9028, $195/nt. (344-09-17)

WANTED TO BUY

CAST-IRON COOKWARE (Wagner & Griswold). Pyrex. Old toys in good condition. Vintage signs. Anything cowboy and Indian – hats, boots, spurs, rugs, etc. After family gets what they want, we’ll buy the rest. Antiques, collectibles, furniture, glassware, etc. We come to you! 970759-3455 or 970-565-1256. (871-02-18) NAVAJO RUGS, old and recent, native baskets, pottery. Tribal Rugs, Salida. 719-539-5363, b_inaz@ hotmail.com. (817-12-17) OLD COLORADO LIVESTOCK brand books prior to 1925. Call Wes, 303-757-8553. (889-02-18) OLD GAS AND OIL items: Gas pumps, advertising signs, globes, etc. Pieces, parts, etc. considered. Also 1932-34 Ford cars and trucks, parts and pieces, too. Any condition. Brandon, 719-250-5721. (519-11-17) OLD POCKET WATCHES — working or nonworking and old repair material. Bob 719-859-4209. (870-06-18) WANT TO PURCHASE mineral and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201. (402-03-18) WANTED: JEEP CJ OR WRANGLER. Reasonably priced. No rust buckets. 888-735-5337. (099-04-18) WE PAY CASH for mineral and oil/gas interests, producing and nonproducing. 800733-8122. (099-02-18)

JANUARY CONTEST WINNER Congratulations to Shawn Kerby of Peyton and Brenda Mross of Fort Collins! Shawn is the winner of the Artisanal Preserves: Small Batch Jams, Jellies, Marmalades, and More cookbook. Brenda is the winner of a H.E.C. Studio hat.

coloradocountrylife.coop


[ funny stories]

READERS PHOTOS

Colorado Country Life travels to North Carolina to pose for family photos with Wayne and Ellen Clausen and daughters.

My son was setting up a new audio system for us and noticed the cabinet was quite dusty. He said he needed some Pledge. My granddaughter, who was 4 at the time, stood up and put her hand over her heart and said, “I pledge allegiance to the flag. …” Arlene Fickel, Gunnison

CCL travels to Holden Beach, North Carolina, with Sarah Heckel and Jimmy Thielen of Steamboat Springs.

Wanda Patrick of Elbert kayaks with CCL in Roche Harbor, San Juan Island, Washington.

Kersey’s Wendi Oster and Tara Stradley visit Venice, Italy with CCL.

Jeff Hilburn of Buena Vista and Denver summits Mount Princeton with Colorado Country Life.

Our 3-year-old granddaughter, Reagan, was having a rough morning. She did a couple things that I told her not to, so I decided it was time for a “little talk.” We sat down and I reminded her that God tells us to obey. My phone rang just then and before I answered I asked her to play quietly while I was on the phone. She picked up her pretend cell phone and told her pretend friend, “We have to be quiet. Grandma is talking to God on the phone. He’s telling her to obey.” Lynell Darrah, Fort Collins My 5-year-old grandson, Colin, asked me one day, “Grandma, why are you so short?” I told him it’s probably because my mom was short, too. He said, “Do you think your mom was short because she took the pill they advertise on TV that says if you take it you will lose inches?” Anne L. Cole, Greeley Little Sister seems to get more mosquito bites than anyone else in the family. One day Mom asked her, “What special kind of blood do you have?” With a funny little grin she answered, “Unsweetened.” Carrie Lehman, Mack

WINNER: Penny Hamilton of Granby poses with Colorado Country Life at the 101st Middle Park Fair & Rodeo where she won the grand champion award for her Key Lime pie.

Westcliffe’s Jan Clayton cruises the Baltic Seas and stops in Riga, Latvia with Colorado Country Life.

TAKE YOUR PHOTO WITH YOUR MAGAZINE AND WIN! It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo and your name and address to info@coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Friday, September 15. This month’s winner is Penny Hamilton of Granby. Penny is a Mountain Parks Electric member. coloradocountrylife.coop

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2017 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@ coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check.

$15 SEPTEMBER 2017

29


[discoveries]

Colorado Wine With a Twist Colorado Cellars

On the Western Slope sits a wonderful winery that’s pleased palates for nearly 40 years: Colorado Cellars. Formerly Colorado Mountain Vineyards, the Palisade-based winery was the first winery to make wines from Colorado grapes. Today, they also are known for some amazing wine-based food products, including salsas, candies, mustards, fudges and cooking oils. We tried the salsas (mild zinfandel garlic, medium artichoke and extra hot zinfandel garlic). They will fire the taste buds with flavor. The candies’ wine flavors are subtler, but from the cabernet to the champagne, they were all perfect for the sweet tooth. Colorado Cellars is also known for its famous Roadkill Red, a staple since 1990 in the family-owned operation. For more information, call 800-848-2821 or visit coloradocellars.com.

The Winery at Holy Cross Abbey In Cañon City you can find a little winery with big fanfare: The Winery at Holy Cross Abbey. Located on the grounds of the Holy Cross Abbey, a former monastery, the winery boasts an assortment of wines that you can sample seven days a week. The winery uses grapes from a variety of vineyards, including a nearby state prison where grapes are maintained by the inmates. Another point of interest is the winery’s Wild Cañon Harvest, a community wine that is created at the annual Harvest Fest using the grapes of Colorado grape growers. This year’s Harvest Fest is September 23-24. For more information, call 719-276-5191 or visit abbeywinery.com.

Balistreri Vineyards

LOST PRAIRIE WINERY As the only winery in Old Town Fort Collins, Lost Prairie Winery owner and winemaker Kate McMahon keeps busy. “I sell faster than I can make it,” she says jokingly yet seriously. “That’s my biggest challenge. I make everything small batch.” But McMahon is rolling with the punches. Initially she made wine using 6-gallon buckets and carboys, but recently graduated to small stainless steel fermenters that hold 20 gallons. And as demand increases, so will her winemaking equipment. Lost Prairie Winery shows up at special wine events throughout the year, including the Wine and Cheese Festival in Erie this October 14. The winery also features local music onsite every Friday, 7-9 p.m., from March through September. Be sure to sample some of what McMahon says are a few of her bestsellers: Tempranillo, Malbec and Peach Chardonnay. For information, call 970-407-9463 or visit lostprairiewinery.com.

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SEPTEMBER 2017

The Balistreri family emigrated from Sicily in the early 1900s and came to the United States where they soon called Colorado home. In 1998, John Balistreri, his daughter Julie and wife Birdie opened the doors to Balistreri Vineyards. The Denver-based winery is known for its red wines, but its whites and dessert wines have a good share of enthusiasts. Of significance is the vineyard’s Little Feet Merlot, a delicious red wine stomped by the children who attend the annual Harvest Party. This year’s Harvest Party is October 1 and will feature 20 newly released wines, a pig roast, live music and more. Tickets cost $70. For more information, call 303-287-5156 or visit balistrerivineyards.com. coloradocountrylife.coop


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Colorado Country Life September 2017 White River  

Colorado Country Life September 2017 White River