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EMPIRE ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC.

JULY 2019

EXPLORE

WESTERN SLOPE CREATIVITY

PLUS

REMEMBERING DAD

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S’MORE MORSELS OF TREATS

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COLOR IN THE GARDEN

22


Brighter together We prepare for the future while you plan for theirs. Together, Tri-State and our family of electric cooperatives are working together to power your tomorrows. We are brighter, stronger and better together. www.tristate.coop/together


Volume 50

Number 07

July 2019 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2019, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

On the JUNE 2019

EXPLORE

WESTERN SLOPE CREATIVITY

Cover Dawn Cohen paints downtown Crested Butte. Photo by Lydia Stern. See Dawn’s work at dawncohenfineart. com.

“Sunset Bales” by Gary Geisick, a consumer-member of Morgan County Rural Electric Association.

4 VIEWPOINT

5 LETTERS

6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12 RECIPES

14 NEWS CLIPS

16 COVER STORY

COCountryLife pinned: Banoffee pie is a British dessert of banana and toffee. Give this s’more a try. Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.

LET’S GET CREATIVE

20 INDUSTRY 22 GARDENING

24 OUTDOORS

26 MARKETPLACE

27 CREATIVE CORNER

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS

29 YOUR STORIES

30 DISCOVERIES

FACEBOOK CHATTER Colorado Rural Electric Association posted: Shout out to CREA member co-op Morgan County Rural Electric Association in this month’s Basin Electric newsletter for the good work during the bomb cyclone.

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a $100 VISA gift card to use toward a trip along Colorado’s Creative Corridor. Discover trip highlights on pages 16-19 of the magazine. For official rules and how to enter, visit our contest page at coloradocountrylife.coop.

coloradocountrylife.coop

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month colorado_electric_cooperatives posted: Bags for the 40 Colorado @nrecayouthtourdc delegates are ready to go!

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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VIEWPOINT

REMEMBERING DAD

D-Day commemorations, Father’s Day brings back pleasant memories BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

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hen my father passed away 20 years ago this month, my sister and I were heartbroken. Not only because we had lost our father but also, having lost our mother eight years earlier, we knew that our lives would never be quite the same without our folks. I thought about my father a lot the last month or so as we commemorated the 75th anniversary of D-Day and, of course, Father’s Day. Dad did not fight in Europe in World War II, but he enlisted in the U.S. Army Air Corps and became an officer. Like thousands of men and women of the Greatest Generation, after the war he raised a family, worked hard and enjoyed spending time on his small Kansas farm where he grew up. Dad was born in 1915 and the rural farmhouse where he was raised did not have electricity, indoor plumbing or a telephone. Although he worked fields behind a horse and plow as a kid, he lived to see a man walk on the moon. I have to chuckle when people suggest that our lives are changing faster than ever based on the development of new technology. I don’t think my dad would be all that impressed that the latest iPhone has facial recognition.

Dad was 43 when I was born, and KENT SINGER we had different tastes when it came to music, culture and, of course, politics. But while we did not see eye to eye on many things, we shared a love of fishing and baseball and that was enough to make our relationship work pretty well. Dad taught me to fish with a cane pole when I was about 5 years old, and I’ve had the bug ever since. Whenever we spent time at the farm, the first thing I wanted to do was head down to Blue Hole to catch Old Fighter, the largemouth bass that always seemed to get away. When I moved to Colorado, I learned how to fly fish and over the years I have acquired an embarrassing collection of fancy graphite fly rods and expensive reels. My dad’s fishing gear was not made by Scott, Winston or Sage, but rather ABU Garcia, Pflueger and Shakespeare. He did not own neoprene chest waders or polarized sunglasses; he made do with rubber hip boots and a Kansas City Royals ball cap. But boy, could he catch fish. He could throw a number 2 Mepps spinner a hundred feet and drop it on a dime. He had that sixth sense that all great fishermen have: He knew where the fish were likely to be and how to make the right cast and retrieve to entice them to bite. Dad loved fishing for largemouth bass back in Kansas, but he loved fishing for Colorado trout even more. And my goodness, was he tenacious. Like a hunting dog fixated on a running rooster, my dad would fight through all kinds of streamside trees and brush if it meant a better vantage point from which to cast a lure. It was not uncommon for him to come back from a fishing trip bruised and bloodied, the result of an encounter with a tree branch or a fall in a rushing mountain stream. Like most fishermen, he always needed to catch that one last fish of the day. And maybe one more. It seems impossible that my dad has been gone for 20 years. I open his old tackle box once in a while because it reminds me of him: I can still smell the distinctive combination of sweat, blood and reel oil. Henry Lyman Singer was the best fisherman I ever knew; we miss you, Dad. Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.

Hank Singer on one of his many fishing trips.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019


LETTERS

FROM THE EDITOR Exploring the artistic side

BY MONA NEELEY

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EDITOR

’ve always thought of myself as a little bit artistic, but, since my kids are grown and all of those endless school projects are behind me, I haven’t gotten crazy with the paints, glue, scissors or markers for a long time — until a few weeks ago. I was with a group of friends who also happen to be colleagues in the electric co-op business. We were in Gunnison for a conference and headed up to Crested Butte for some creative fun at the Red Room below the Secret Stash pizzeria. We spent the evening sipping cocktails, snacking on amazing, artistic pizzas and painting. It was fun to access my creative side as I splashed bright swaths of gloppy color on a blank canvas, trying to capture the concept

of “electricity” in MONA NEELEY paint. That was our assignment: to paint what electricity feels like. My canvas ended up an explosion of reds, blues, greens and yellows. Others had a different take on electricity. That difference in our creative views was part of the evening’s fun. Want to explore your artistic self? Visit the Colorado Creative Corridor (featured on pages 16-19) this summer and try something new. Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative. Its goal is to provide information from your local electric co-op to you, its consumer-members.

Morton_CoCountryLife_7.19.qxp_Layout 1 6/3/19 11:13 AM Page 1

BE THE ENVY OF YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Guatemalan Memories

I have fond memories of my travels in Guatemala. Thank you for helping them get electricity. Pamela Kubly, Beulah San Isabel Electric consumer-member

Solar Savings

A couple of months ago our 10-kilowatt-hour solar panels were connected on our hay and cattle ranch in northwestern Colorado. Our $846 January bill for heat and electricity fell to $26 in February. It’s still too early to see the impact during our hot summer months, but net metering should help us recoup our investment. And just a few miles down the road is the new White River Electric Association’s Piceance Creek Solar Farm, which helps 830 single family homes save money and provides more resiliency. Applause to Kent Singer for his positive article highlighting the Colorado co-ops’ embrace of renewable energy (Viewpoint, March ’19). Solar is an economic win for those who are saving money and seeing new jobs appear. Be aware that 2019 is the last year purchasers can get the 30% federal tax credit. Deirdre Macnab, Meeker White River Electric consumer-member

Sky High Benefits

We have three skylights, side by side, in our upstairs. What we love about them and use the most is the cooling they offer in the summer. When the house is warm and it’s cooler outside, we open the skylights, open a few windows on the lower level and allow the chimney effect to pull the hot air out the skylights as it draws cool air in downstairs. We (then) close up the house and enjoy cool “free” air-conditioning. Energy Tips (September ’18) failed to mention this huge benefit. Tom Higgins, Durango La Plata Electric consumer-member

Correction ENTER TO WIN THIS AMAZING PRIZE PACKAGE OFFERED IN OUR 2019 “GIVING AWAY THE FARM” SWEEPSTAKES! • $75,000 credit towards a new Morton building • John Deere Crossover Utility Vehicle XUV835M with approximate retail value of $23,000 Don’t miss your chance to win! Enter online at mortonbuildings.com or at participating trade shows from July 15, 2019 to October 17, 2019!

800-447-7436 | MORTONBUILDINGS.COM NO PURCHASE OR PAYMENT NECESSARY TO ENTER OR WIN. Open to legal residents of the 48 contiguous United States and D.C., who are 21 years of age or older who own land within the Morton Buildings service area (excludes all of Arizona, California, Nevada and Washington). Sweepstakes starts at 12:00:01 a.m. CT on July 15, 2019 and ends at 11:59:59 p.m. CT on October 17, 2019. Void where prohibited. See official rules at www.MortonBuildingSweepstakes.com for details, including prize details. Sponsored by: Morton Buildings, Inc., Morton, IL. ©2019 Morton Buildings, Inc. A listing of GC licenses available at mortonbuildings.com/licenses. Ref Code 604 John Deere, the Leaping Deer logo, Gator, and color combination of green body and yellow accents are registered trademarks of Deere & Company, Inc.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The May ’19 cover story “A Journey of a Lifetime” claimed that “For thousands of years pilgrims have made the Camino journey….” It should have said “hundreds” of years. These pilgrimages, as amazing as they are, didn’t start until the 9th century.

SEND US YOUR LETTERS Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Letters may be edited for length. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

2020

CONTEST BEGINS AUGUST ISSUE

KEEPING PETS (AND ENERGY BILLS) COMFORTABLE BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN

PHOTO CONTEST SIMPLY COLORADO

*Watch for rules and categories*

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e love our pets and we love saving energy. This month, we’re answering some common energy efficiency questions from pet owners:

July 25-28, 2019

Q: We’ve thought about installing a pet door. Will this impact my energy bill?

Make your vacation plans now!

A: Pet doors are convenient for pet owners and pets, but they can impact energy bills. A pet door that is poorly made or improperly installed will create unwanted drafts that increase energy bills and reduce the overall comfort level of your home. The wrong type of door may also be pushed open during high winds. Consider installing a pet door that is certified by the Alliance to Save Energy or has a double or triple flap. These types of pet doors can reduce energy loss and make life easier for you and your furry friends. The best solution may be a high-quality electronic door that is activated by a chip on your pet’s collar. It’s difficult to undo a pet door installation, so do your homework before taking the leap. There may be other strategies that will give you and your pet some of the convenient benefits without the downsides.

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A: U.S. Department of Agriculture rules suggest this should be fine if your garage temperature stays between 50 and 85 degrees. Pets might be able to handle a lower temperature if they have a warm, insulated bed. Heating or cooling your garage for your pet could lead to extremely high energy bills, which makes sense because an uninsulated, heated garage could easily cost more to heat than a home. A better solution is a heated pet house, which you can purchase from multiple retailers. If you’re willing to

Cats love blankets, too. Photo Source: Patricia Hebert

This pup understands the comfort of an insulated bed to sleep on. Photo Source: Torsten Dettlaff

spend a little more, you can even find climate-controlled pet houses that include heating and cooling options. You can also purchase heated beds for cats and dogs. Some beds use as little as 4 watts of electricity, so they won’t drain your energy bill. We hope these tips will be helpful as you work at saving energy while caring for your favorite furry friend. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to find out how much hot and cold your pet can handle. Look under the Energy tab.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

EMPIRE

ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

Echoes of the Empire JULY 2019

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box K Cortez, CO 81321-0676 STREET ADDRESS 801 North Broadway Cortez, CO 81321

ph 970-565-4444 tf 800-709-3726 fax 970-564-4401 web www.eea.coop facebook.com/EEACortez

COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .COOP

EMPOWERING FUTURE LEADERS BY BOBBE JONES

MEMBER SERVICES

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pening big doors for our smalltown kids is part of Empire Electric Association’s commitment to the community. Educational opportunities that might not otherwise be available are financed with unclaimed capital credits. EEA believes that empowering future leaders through education is money well-spent. Two of these programs, the Youth Tour and Youth Leadership Camp, provide transformational experiences that show students the power of democracy and the importance of leadership. Both are offered at no cost to students or their families. For a week in June, EEA sponsors a student representative on the Youth Tour to Washington, D.C., for a close-up look at history, government and leadership. The Youth Tour idea originated with President Lyndon B. Johnson who advocated for rural electrification and youth development. In 1957, when he was still a U.S. senator, Johnson suggested “sending youngsters to the nation’s capital where they can actually see what the flag stands for and represents.” This notion evolved into a

BOBBE JONES

nationwide effort to send youth on an organized, fun and educational trip in the 1960s. Now, almost 60 years later, electric cooperatives from across the country send over 1,900 youth to the nation’s capital every summer. Colorado cooperative-sponsored students gather in Denver prior to heading to D.C. They learn about government, electric co-ops and electrical safety while visiting the state capitol, United Power (a Brighton-based electric cooperative) and Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association. While in D.C., students visit the capital’s memorials and museums, Mount Vernon, Arlington National Cemetery and the National Cathedral. Many other historical sites are visited before the students gather with delegates from other states for leadership training and to learn more about co-ops. They also meet with members of Colorado’s congressional delegation and continued on page 8

Jessica Begay

Cassie Gatlin

Magdalena Halls

Brooklyn Holt

Maya Powell

Kasey Wallace

Denise Moore, chaperone

Clint Rapier, chaperone

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

PHOTO CONTEST WINNER FOR JULY

Blazin’ Trail by Kenzie Branson

EMPOWERING FUTURE LEADERS continued from page 7

their staff for question-and-answer sessions. Without a doubt, the Youth Tour has grown into an invaluable program that offers young Americans an experience that will stay with them for the rest of their lives. Another such experience takes place in July, at Glen Eden, north of Steamboat Springs. Over 90 high school students from Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma and Wyoming gather for the Youth Leadership Camp. Five local juniors are sponsored by EEA. During camp week, students form their own co-op and learn about the co-op business model. They watch safety demonstrations, tour a coal mine and power plant and improve their leadership skills. Two EEA employees volunteered to chaperone during youth trips this year. Clint Rapier attended the Youth Tour when he was a high school student and found the perfect opportunity to pay his experience forward by spending another week on the tour in a leadership role. Denise Moore attended Leadership Camp many years ago and volunteered to revisit this month. The students who attend youth trips or benefit from educational scholarships and events are our future leaders. EEA’s educational programs help participants develop a deeper understanding and skill set of what it means to be a leader and, as a result, they put these skills to use right here in our community. Perhaps you know of an exceptional student who would be a great candidate for one of these programs. If you do, please share this article with them. Educational organizations and events, scholarships and youth trip applications are reviewed each year by EEA’s board of directors or designated committees and application deadlines, requirements and qualifications are available at www.eea.coop.

MY CO-OP ADVANTAGE Home energy upgrade loans are available through NCB Home Energy Financing. Visit www.ncb.coop/homeenergy or call Brittney Baldwin at 866-499-3517.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019


2019 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS

YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Monticello High School

EEA awarded 32 scholarships in 2019. Students were selected by a scholarship committee based on a point system that includes extracurricular activities, scholastic standing, need and completed application criteria. Adults were selected on a point system that includes an essay, community activities, need and completed application criteria. Students and adults attending a college or university are awarded a $1,000 scholarship and those attending a trade school are awarded a $500 scholarship.

Basin Electric Power Cooperative Scholarship

Montezuma-Cortez High School

Britton Brewer

Shelly Lewis

Matthew Broughton

Kailey Case

Elise Thayn

Wyatt Fullmer

Marguerite Copeland

Brianna Dennison

Awarded to the student with the highest GPA.

Emily Cole, Mancos High School

Dolores High School

Aspen English, Tri-State Scholarship

Mancos High School Codi Archuleta

Tawnee Benavidez

Kale Hall

Tatum Majors

Summer Harris James Ayers

Taeylor Samora

Vassar Stephens

Scottie Sword

Morgan Rose

Phillip Hufman, Tri-State Scholarship

Cameron Schafer

Dove Creek High School Gage Petrose

Nanabah Sam

Madilyn Hankins

Amanda Sturman

Aryelle Wright

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS 2019 SCHOLARSHIP WINNERS continued from page 9

Adult Scholarships

Jacqueline Chittick

Elizabeth Edwards

Sarah Enriquez

Madison St. Hilaire

My Co-op Advantage

Congratulations! Empire Electric won books in a Colorado County Life magazine lottery and donated them to the Mancos Public Library. Pictured here is Director Lee Halberg as he accepts a variety of donated books valued at over $278. Most of the books are recent publications that will be of interest to library patrons. The books are a mix of fiction and nonfiction and include books by Colorado authors.

Know what’s underground before you dig. Call 811 to get underground public utilities located for free.

Shania Snow

Co-op Calendar July 1

Photo contest ends for the 2020 calendar

July 4

Independence Day, office closed

July 12

Empire’s board meeting begins at 8:30 a.m. at its headquarters in Cortez. The agenda is posted 10 days in advance of the meeting at eea.coop. Members are reminded that public comment is heard at the beginning of the meeting.

July 13–18

2019 Youth Leadership Camp in Steamboat Springs

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019


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RECIPES

S’MORE MORSELS OF DELICIOUSNESS, PLEASE!

A change of perspective on the sweet staple BY AMY HIGGINS

WIN A COPY

| RECIPES@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG Enter our contest to win a copy of S’MORES! GOOEY, MELTY, CRUNCHY RIFFS ON THE CAMPFIRE CLASSIC. Visit Contests at coloradocountrylife.coop for details on how to enter.

S’more options to try for summer marshmallow treats

I

t’s a common assumption that a campfire isn’t complete without graham crackers, chocolate and gooey marshmallows that have melded together over the open fire with the aid of a long stick. However, those billowy, milky marshmallows can take a sweet turn when they’re squeezed between other edibles. Dan Whalen’s cookbook S’MORE’S! GOOEY, MELTY, CRUNCHY RIFFS ON THE CAMPFIRE CLASSIC offers insight on how to create pseudo s’mores, with or without a campfire. Not convinced? Get creative in your kitchen and try this recipe out for size.

Excerpted from S’MORES! by Dan Whalen (Workman). Copyright ©2019

Potato Chip S’mores

Makes 12 S’mores

1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips 2 tablespoons heavy whipping cream Pinch of kosher salt Nonstick cooking spray 12 regular marshmallows 24 crinkle-cut wavy potato chips Combine the chocolate chips, cream and salt in a small microwave-safe bowl. Microwave on medium power for 15-second intervals, stirring after each interval, until the chocolate is just melted and the mixture is combined. Be careful not to overheat the ganache, as it can become grainy.

QUICK TIP Putting marshmallow and chocolate on a potato chip is just unusual enough to be surprising, but once you’ve tried it, the combination seems so obvious. These need ganache instead of the typical chocolate bar to adapt to the shape of the potato chip. Once you squeeze the melted chocolate and creamy marshmallow between two crunchy chips, you may not be able to go back to grahams. 

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

Place a rack in the upper third of the oven and turn the broiler to its highest setting. Preheat for 5 to 10 minutes. Spray a baking sheet with cooking spray. Place 12 chips on a serving dish. Top each chip with 1 teaspoon of ganache. (You should have just enough for all the chips.) Place the marshmallows on the prepared baking sheet. Broil them until they’re golden brown on top, about 3 minutes. Keep a close eye on them. Place 1 toasted marshmallow on each s’more. Top the s’mores with the remaining chips. Serve immediately. Heat up the grill and try

Grilled Peach and Basil S’mores.

Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.


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NEWS CLIPS

Co-ops Support Energy Efficiency

Theodore Duarte is this year’s winner in the junior division. He is an eighth grade student from Dacono.

State Science Fair finalists invited to attend Colorado Rural Electric Association’s Energy Innovations Summit

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ibbons, financial rewards and recognition for top Colorado science students are part of the Colorado Rural Electric Association’s Colorado State University Science & Engineering Fair sponsorship. This year the multiple electricity-related presentations focused on energy efficiency. Finalists’ projects covered anaerobic digestion of food waste, testing lithium ion batteries, wind energy, the effects of air pollution on solar panel yield, the energy implications of smart devices, LED lighting and the savings gained through using electricity efficiently.

This year’s winner in the junior division was Theodore Duarte, an eighth grade student from Dacono whose presentation was on wind energy. The senior division winner was Sophia Markuson DiPrince, a 12th-grade student from Pueblo. Both of these students are invited to participate in CREA’s Energy Innovations Summit October 28.

Sophia Markuson DiPrince is the winner of the senior division. She is a 12th-grade student from Pueblo.

Congratulations, Theodore and Sophia, on your winning projects at this year’s Colorado Science Fair.

Pedal the Plains, Provide Heat Help

Conservation Award Goes to K.C. Electric Consumer-Members Mike and Julie Livingston of Kit Carson County received the 2019 Colorado Leopold Conservation Award®. In Colorado, the award is presented annually by Sand County Foundation, Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association and several other ag-related groups. The Livingstons were presented with their award in June at the Colorado Cattlemen’s Association’s 2019 Annual Convention. The Livingstons have demonstrated strong conservation practices after attending a ranching for profit school where they learned conservation practices like using cover crops, no-till and planned grazing. They now share what they have learned with others.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

C

olorado’s electric cooperatives are again joining forces to help sponsor the annual Pedal the Plains bike tour of eastern Colorado September 13-15. Over three days, riders will bike from Lamar to Holly to Springfield and back to Lamar in Southeast Colorado Power Association’s territory. For those who want a few more miles, Saturday’s Centennial Ride will loop into a bit of Kansas before coming back to Colorado and on to Springfield. The electric co-ops also sponsor a bike team that raises money for Energy Outreach Colorado, which helps struggling Coloradans pay their heat bills each winter. You are invited to join the team. Magazine readers, electric co-op consumer-members, co-op managers, board members, employees and friends and family of the co-op community are invited to participate. Helping sponsor the electric co-op team this year are the Colorado Rural Electric Association, Colorado Country Life, Touchstone Energy, Gunnison County Electric in Gunnison, Highline Electric in Holyoke, Holy Cross Energy in Glenwood Springs, K.C. Electric in Hugo, Intermountain REA in Sedalia, Morgan County REA in Fort Morgan, Mountain View Electric in Limon and Falcon, Poudre Valley REA in Fort Collins, Southeast Colorado Power in La Junta, United Power in Brighton, White River Electric in Meeker and CREA’s law firm, Lewis Roca Rothgerber Christie LLP. Register to ride with the team at pedaltheplains.com and choose Colorado’s Electric Cooperatives from the “Join a team” drop down menu. More information is available from team captain Cassi Gloe at 720-407-0712 or cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org.


COVER STORY

LET’S GET CREATIVE

TAKE AN ART-THEMED TRIP THROUGH COLORADO’S WESTERN SLOPE

BY HEIDI KERR-SCHLAEFER

W

ine festivals, art gallery openings, farmers markets, rodeos, film festivals, studio tours — the list of can’t-miss events along the Colorado Creative Corridor is long. Featuring five state-certified Creative Districts nestled in the mountains of western Colorado, the creative corridor offers visitors “art-centric” destinations along a 331-mile trail that links five of the Western Slope’s most charming communities. The towns on the Colorado Creative Corridor — Carbondale, Paonia, Crested Butte, Ridgway and Salida — are similar but also different. Each town offers an array of recreational and artistic experiences that make for a memorable vacation. But how did they end up pooling their resources to create the Colorado Creative Corridor? It started with Creative Districts. While there are a number of places with designated creative areas around Colorado, 23 are officially certified through Colorado Creative Industries, an arm of the state Office of Economic Development. The certification program started five years ago.

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Christy Costello is the program manager of Colorado Creative Industries, and she defines Creative Districts as “specific geographic areas with a high concentration of creative things happening.” She says that this is typically a downtown main street area, but there are exceptions. Art is often interpreted as putting brush to canvas, but these Creative Districts include numerous activities that stimulate minds and hearts, including culinary arts, graphic design, woodworking, metalworking, crafting spirits and even drawings on the top of lattes. If the endeavor requires creativity, it is part of the arts scene in a Creative District. The most recent data, gathered in 2017, shows that there are 28,000 creative jobs in Colorado’s certified Creative Districts, a 3% increase over 2016. Creative industry earnings were $1.6 billion, which represents a 4% gain in one year. Every Creative District wants to attract cultural tourists, but, for the most part, these are tiny, rural towns with small budgets. The trick is finding a way to pool resources in order to entice these types of visitors into artistic, bucolic communities.

CREATING THE CORRIDOR With this in mind, the Colorado Creative Corridor was founded on the back of a napkin by forward-thinking people involved in Carbondale tourism. Sara-Jane Johnson is a tourism consultant for Carbondale, and she had been eyeing the marketing matching grant offered by the Destination Development Program, part of the Colorado Tourism Office. Johnson knew that $50,000 would be extremely helpful to the Carbondale Creative District, but there was the issue of how to raise the required $25,000 matching money. “We wanted to package the idea of a visitor-ready road trip idea,” says Johnson, who says that the corridor was inspired, in part, by the Colorado Hot Springs Loop. That collaboration between multiple hot springs towns in Colorado had previously received the grant. So, Carbondale reached out to its neighbors Crested Butte, Paonia, Ridgway and Salida, and each district chipped in $5,000 to reach the $25,000 goal. They received the grant in 2018 and again in 2019.


COVER STORY

“We wanted to package the idea of a visitor-ready road trip idea.” —Sara-Jane Johnson, tourism consultant The mission of the Colorado Creative Corridor is simple: Bring more visitors to all of its towns. The creative corridor worked to achieve this goal by creating a brochure that outlines a road trip itinerary that offers all kinds of fun in each community along the route. The options include things like bike trails, cooking classes, concerts, water sports, walking tours and more. This year, the brochure is available in all the communities on the corridor as well as at Colorado’s 10 Welcome Centers. In addition, it’s available online at Colorado.com. They also utilize social media to spread the

word about what’s happening in the towns along the Colorado Creative Corridor. “We all have small budgets so you have to be creative on this type of collaboration, no pun intended,” says Andrea Steward, Carbondale chamber president. “The fee for using social media is only our time, so we allow each participating entity to access the Colorado Creative Corridor Facebook page and Instagram page. We can then promote what we are doing and support the other entities by sharing their information as well.” A monthly meeting helps to keep the mission on track, but it has evolved into an idea-sharing opportunity as well. Ten organizations are represented in the

Visitors find all kinds of artistic objects at the shops and festivals in the creative corridor towns.

30-minute meeting, and the conversations here have become priceless to everyone involved. The opportunity to meet face to face comes only twice a year at conferences, so this monthly connection is vital to the success of the Colorado Creative Corridor.

Here’s a look at what’s happening along the corridor this summer:

CARBONDALE In the shadow of Mount Sopris, Carbondale stands as a testament to art and agriculture. The two industries have coexisted here for years. A big draw to the area is the Rio Grande ARTway along the Rio Grande Trail. The trail is used by more than 14,000 cyclists every year and the 1-mile ARTway stretch includes an array of approachable art. In addition to public art, the thriving downtown features local culinary delights at restaurants such as Allegria, which sources food through local farms. Craft spirits and lodging coexist at Marble Distilling Co. & Distillery Inn, also downtown. A short distance away is Dolores Way, a collection of creative industries, such as potters, soap makers and beer brewers. The town is also home to Powers Art Center, a showcase of work by American artist Jasper Johns. More than 200 creative organizations exist in Carbondale, and visitors benefit from the long-lasting relationships that have developed between farmers and chefs and nature and artists.

CRESTED BUTTE Perhaps best known as a ski destination, Crested Butte offers visitors small-town charms beyond the slopes. This postcardperfect town is a magnet for those seeking COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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COVER STORY recreational activities. As a result, in the summer the town comes alive with hikers and bikers. The region’s rivers brim with anglers looking to hook a splendid trout, and its meadows and scenic trails see wildflower hunters gather in droves. Downtown Crested Butte is sprinkled with creative businesses, such as art galleries, custom ski shops, a worldrenowned rum distillery and more. The town-managed public art program creates a lively atmosphere filled with ephemeral temporary installations and permanent displays that blend into the picturesque landscape. Whether it’s a visit to a well-maintained Crested Butte museum, a dance class with locals or taking in a musical performance at the Center for the Arts, a trip to this quintessential Colorado mountain town is one for the memory books. Artists in the corridor communities love to interact with visitors and share their art. Photo by Renee Ramge Photography.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

PAONIA Surrounded by the North Fork Valley, Paonia is home to more sheep than humans. In the summer, the green countryside is reminiscent of the rolling hills of France. Grapevines are prevalent and wild fruit trees grow on the side of quaint, country roads. In addition to farm visits, cheese making, winery tastings and bike outings, the arts are palpable here. The tiny village of Paonia has long embraced artistic expression. Spontaneous drum circles seemingly erupt from nowhere and live music flows from local pubs, parks and traditional venues such as Paradise Theatre. Since 2006, Paonia’s Elsewhere Studio has hosted the Inspired Art at Work Project, a residency program featuring socially-engaged works that explore and

address issues vital to preserving the natural world, quality of life and sense of place in the North Fork Valley. The best time to experience the essence of Paonia is during the town’s two signature events: Cherry Days in July and Mountain Harvest Festival at the end of September.

RIDGWAY The tiniest town on the Colorado Creative Corridor, Ridgway is doing big things when it comes to art. Perhaps having a population of fewer than 1,000 people has forced Ridgway to be artistically innovative. Or perhaps it is its location, 15 minutes from Ouray and less than an hour from Telluride, that compelled a higher level of creative thinking. Whatever the reason, the residents want to give people a reason to stop in their community.


COVER STORY

Theatrical productions, musical performances, poetry readings and more grace the stage in corridor towns. Photo by Renee Ramge Photography.

The little downtown is brimming with creative industries, such as art galleries and unique gift shops like Lupita’s Bizarre Bazaar. Even local restaurants have gotten into the game. Several local haunts are often named as Colorado favorites by visitors who stop in town for tacos at Taco del Gnar or pizza at Colorado Boy. Known as a destination for hot springs lovers, whether visitors stay at Chipeta Solar Springs Resort or soak for the day at Orvis Hot Springs, a getaway in Ridgway is downright enchanting. Some of this magic is provided by the Alley Poems Program. The program has Ridgway poets and visitors putting pen to paper; poetry appears around town, on walls, fences and other surfaces throughout the year.

SALIDA One of the original Colorado art communities, Salida is where artists and art appreciators have been coming for years. Many of the artists who visited stayed in town and opened galleries. Salida is literally brimming with art and it’s everywhere, including on the sides of buildings. Located along the panoramic Arkansas River, the SteamPlant Event Center is a draw for locals and visitors to the area. Built in 1887, the SteamPlant is a poster child for repurposed space. The plant was retired in 1963 but brought back to life in 1989 when it was converted into a theater. Today, the SteamPlant has expanded into a conference center and hosts everything from weddings to musical events.

In many ways, Salida is an example of a community where the arts are driving the economy. This isn’t to say each town along the Colorado Creative Corridor doesn’t struggle with its own set of issues, but by creating this creative corridor, these communities are striving together toward a common goal of local economic success through art while providing a great road trip worthy route for visitors through western Colorado. The fact is, whether a person travels specifically to seek art or for some other purpose, art has been shown to increase our happiness, and each town along the Colorado Creative Corridor has art in spades. Therefore, these towns enhance the enjoyment of all of their visitors.

Learn more at Colorado.com/fieldguide/ colorado-creative-corridor. Heidi Kerr-Schlaefer is a Colorado freelance writer specializing in festivals, travel and the West. She is the founder of HeidiTown.com and author of The Heidi Guide. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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INDUSTRY

Lighting the Way for Sillab Oklahoma and Colorado electric cooperatives to bring first-time electricity to isolated village in Guatemala BY ANNA POLITANO

OKLAHOMA LIVING MAGAZINE EDITOR

S

itting at 2,700 feet altitude atop a towering mountain surrounded by scenic and lush elevation ranges, is the small village of Sillab (pronounced “si-yap”) in north central Guatemala, near the border with Belize. Visitors coming to explore the Guatemalan beauty would likely never go up on this mountain — the area is far from tourist attractions and is nearly a 10-hour drive from the capital city of Guatemala City. Residents of Sillab live away from civilization. Most villagers don’t speak the official language of the country: Spanish. Instead, they speak an ancient, Mayan-based dialect called Q’eqchi’ or “kek-chi.” Earlier this year, representatives from Colorado’s and Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives — in partnership with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s

This Sillab family is looking forward to putting away their flashlights and flipping on a light switch.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

philanthropic arm, NRECA International — conducted a scouting trip to plan an electrification project for Sillab that will take place later in August and September. What they found was not only a primitive community lacking access to electricity, running water and plumbing, but also a dwelling of joyful, hospitable people. The purpose of the trip was to assess the local conditions, see the project site, meet the villagers and utility representatives, and evaluate the staking design for power lines. With a total of 60 homes, one elementary school and four churches, the villagers of Sillab grow corn for self-consumption and generate most of their income from the production of cardamom seeds, peppers and coffee, as well as a variety of other spices. Stricken by scarce resources and poverty,

most villagers made Sillab their home after receiving a plot of land from the Guatemalan government, a result of a peace agreement following the Guatemalan Civil War from 1963 to 1996. In August 2019, 20 volunteers from Colorado’s and Oklahoma’s electric cooperatives will build power lines on a stretch of 6.5 miles, wire 60 poles and install four transformers. The power lines will belong to a local utility: ADECORK (Associación Para Desarollo Communitario Rax Kiche), or the Association for Community Development Rax Kiche. ADECORK will carry the responsibility of generating and distributing electric power to Sillab. The utility operates a small hydropower plant with a capacity of 75 kilowatts. ADECORK currently provides power to

The children of Sillab are excited about the arrival of electricity.


INDUSTRY

Colorado and Oklahoma planning team visits Guatemala.

275 consumers in nearby villages, with an average of 4 kW per home. ADECORK officials are actively seeking funds to increase their capacity for more water in order to power additional surrounding villages. The utility is currently not structured as an electric cooperative, but its leaders aspire to adopt the electric cooperative business model. Colorado and Oklahoma volunteers will also wire each home with four lightbulbs (kitchen, living room, front porch and back of the home) and four electrical outlets. The estimated electric rate will be 14 cents per kilowatt-hour. As a reference, the average per kWh rate in Colorado is 12.2 cents. Although the villagers will incur another bill, their energy consumption is considerably lower compared to the United States. Most of the villagers do not own or cannot afford electrical appliances. Access to electricity should empower the villagers with economic prosperity, safety and a better quality of life.

Children learn without electricity at the school in Sillab, Guatemala. That will change by mid-September.

Included in the planning trip were Safety and Loss Control Director Dale Kishbaugh and Director of Member Services Liz Fiddes, both with the Colorado Rural Electric Association; Team Leader Mike Wolfe with Southwest Rural Electric Association based in Tipton, Oklahoma; and me, the editor of Oklahoma Living magazine, which is part of the Oklahoma Association of Electric Cooperatives. We were accompanied by NRECA International Engineer Erick Berganza.

Electric cooperatives in Colorado and Oklahoma are joining forces to bring firsttime electricity to a remote village in rural Guatemala later this year. Beyond providing the gift of light, the volunteer linemen going on this mission want to present each household with a 5-gallon water filter that lasts for two years.

“It is an honor and privilege to serve as team leader for this electrification project,” Wolfe said. He was also a volunteer in the 2018 Guatemala electrification project. “I’m eager to work alongside a great team to bring electricity to the villagers in Sillab. On projects like this, you receive more than you give. It will be a life-changing experience.” Editor’s Note: Colorado Country Life Editor Mona Neeley will travel to Guatemala the first week of September as part of the team helping celebrate when the lights come on for the first time in Sillab.

CREDIT CARD DONATIONS NOW AVAILABLE, VISIT crea.coop/communityoutreach/current-causes

To give online, visit: crea.coop/community-outreach/current-causes. To send a check: Make it payable to Colorado Electric Educational Institute (CEEI) with Clean Water Fund in the memo line. Mail it to: Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216.

Will you be a part of this mission by sponsoring a water filter for $35? COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

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GARDENING

A CACHE OF COLOR Add vibrancy to your garden with annuals BY VICKI SPENCER

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

I

t wasn’t long ago that our early season perennials, such as crocuses, hyacinths and tulips, were poking through the soil in Colorado. While perennials are valued for blooming year after year, it’s hard to deny the benefit of adding instant color with annuals. If your shade garden consists primarily of green foliage, impatiens are a lovely way to add color. Their nonstop blooms spread quickly and require little care. In spite of their need for moisture, I find them to be reliable when planted under shade trees and bushes. You can choose from a wide variety of colors to brighten up beds and borders, or you can choose a mixture of colors to design interesting patio containers. Four-o’clocks are another annual that are perfect for patio areas where you like to spend your evenings. They earned their name because their trumpet-shaped blooms respond to changes in light and temperature. They open in the cool of the evening and tend to stay open until dusk. The main reason I like to plant them near the patio is that they are wonderfully fragrant and attract hummingbirds. They are available in magenta, yellow, pink and white, and sometimes you can find several different colors on the same plant. Zinnias are a sun loving annual that are guaranteed not to disappoint. They come in different sizes and three different flower forms: single petal, double petal and dahlia

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

petal. Their blooms are amazingly bright and colors typically range from yellow to red. One of the benefits of zinnias is that the more you cut them, the more they bloom. This means you can have beautiful bouquets in your house and lavish flowering plants outside. Vincas are a reliable border plant with delicate looking flowers ranging from white to pink and red. They thrive in poor soil and don’t require a lot of water. This makes them ideal for adding color to a Colorado Xeriscape. Some old standbys for summer gardens are petunias and marigolds. My mother’s gardens always were the most colorful in the neighborhood, partly because her petunias spread abundantly. I haven’t forgotten their visual impact and always rely on petunias wherever color is lacking. One

year, I alternated red, white and purple for a wonderful Fourth of July display that earned many compliments.

Marigolds

Marigolds are a favorite because they are hardy and grow rapidly. You can find them in yellow, orange, red or a delightful mixture of these colors. They have a distinct odor that some find distasteful, but to me it is a familiar summer scent. Although stores start stocking annuals as early as April, seasoned Colorado gardeners know it is too early to set out annuals. In July, annuals go on sale and you can plant them wherever you want color for the rest of the summer. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado. Zinnias


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f you knock around the Colorado boonies long enough, you’re bound to run into one of its big, hairy creatures: an elk, moose, cougar or bear. Big game hunters, fishermen, backpackers, avid wildlife watchers and photographers come across wild animals quite often but are usually smart enough to give them wide berth. Sometimes, though, an unexpected wildlife encounter can turn spooky — or worse. My buddy Andy was bow hunting elk in the Medicine Bow Mountains a few years ago when a mountain lion came to his cow calls instead of the bull elk he was expecting. He’d been calling softly for about 15 minutes when something – a sixth sense? – made him turn around slowly whereupon he found himself staring directly into the piercing yellow eyes of a crouching cougar. A blinding jolt of adrenaline shot through his body, but as he raised his bow to shield himself against an almost certain attack, the big cat just turned and slunk off into the timber. Scared witless, Andy crept nervously back to camp, his heart pounding so hard he thought it was going to explode in his chest like a grenade. The cat was probably discouraged at finding only a scrawny human where a big cow elk should have been, but if Andy panicked and ran, things could have turned out differently. Two friends and I were stalked by a mountain lion once while fly fishing the Poudre River one summer evening, but we didn’t know it until later. We had crossed a wide, wet sandbar on the way into the river. On the way back out, we found where a cougar followed our tracks across the sand bar, then sat on its haunches and, unbeknownst to us, watched us while we fished. The clearly-defined paw prints and fan-shaped depression in the soft sand made

by the cat’s twitching tail left no doubt it had been studying us. Whether it was just curious or considering one of us for dinner is moot; it was still a hair-raising experience. That same summer we were hiking into a backcountry cutthroat lake near Cameron Pass when we inadvertently walked smack between a bull moose feeding in the willows on one side of the trail and a cow with her calf on the other. We stopped in our tracks, stunned. All three moose raised their heads and stared at us like we had just barged into the family dining room, which, now that I think about it…

The cow laid her ears back and flared her neck hackles straight up. And it was evident from the bull’s posturing that if we didn’t leave immediately he would pound us into a bloody pile of mud pudding. Having no desire to tangle with three angry moose, we backed away slowly until they were well out of sight. Then we took off like a pack of 20-year-old track stars. Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors under Living in Colorado.


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The Science Behind Relief Research shows that the joint stiffness, soreness and discomfort associated with arthritis is caused by inflammation which attacks healthy cartilage and protective tissue. And according to top medical professionals, this inflammation is caused by two inflammatory enzymes released by the body’s immune system. The active ingredients in VeraFlex help to block the production of these enzymes, resulting in a dramatic decreasing in swelling, inflammation, and discomfort. Right now, the leading over-thecounter pills are only able to block one of these enzymes! “VeraFlex users can generally expect more flexibility in three days...their joint pain alleviated in five days... and in just seven days, a tremendous improvement in overall joint function that may help them move like they did years prior” explains Dr. Liza Leal, developer and spokesperson for VeraFlex.

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Courage Classic Bicycle Tour Copper Mountain 720-777-7499 childrenscoloradofoundation.org

July 20 Fort Morgan

July 6 to August 17 High Country Stampede Rodeo Saturdays, July 6-August 17. At the John Work Arena, Fraser Saturdays are bustling with bull riding, mutton bustin’, barrel racing, trick riding, clown acts, roping, western barbecue and more at the High Country Stampede Rodeo. Junior rodeos begin at 3 pm and the main performances start at 7 pm, rain or shine. For more information, call 970-449-9040 or visit highcountrystampede.com.

July 2019 Wednesdays, Beginning July 10 Colorado Springs Concerts in the Park Bear Creek Regional Park 6-8 pm • 719-520-6977

Saturdays Salida

Salida-Aspen Concert Series 26 Jones Avenue salidaconcerts.org

July 6 Bayfield

Music in the Mountains Bayfield Performing Arts Center 6-9 pm • mary@prlibrary.org

July 6-7 La Veta

Art in the Park La Veta Town Park 719-742-3074 • spanishpeaksarts.org

July 6 La Veta

Independence Day Parade Main Street 10 am • paradelaveta@gmail.com

July 10 Walden

Culpepper Merrieweather Circus Jackson County Fairgrounds 970-723-4600 northparkchamber.net

July 12 Calhan

Calhan SummerFest Town Park 3 pm-12 am • 719-347-2586

July 13-14 Winter Park

Alpine ArtAffair Rendezvous Events Center winterparkalpineartaffair.com

July 15-August 11 Craig

Moffat County Fair Moffat County Fairgrounds visitmoffatcounty.com

July 18-20 Meeker

Wagon Wheel OHV Rendezvous Registration Required White River National Forest wagonwheeltrails.org

July 19-21 Greeley

Greeley Old Time Farm Show Greeley RV Park & Campground 970-302-0929

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

July 20-21 Grand Lake

Mt. Aire Festival Brush Canyon Ranch 4 pm • 719-489-3478

July 28 Bayfield

Stillwater Musical BBQ Bayfield Library Park 1-4 pm • mary@prlibrary.org

July 31 Nathrop

Peaks ‘n Pines Quilt Show Grand Lake Center Commons 10 am-4 pm peaksnpinesquiltguild.org

Habitat for Humanity Mac & Cheese Bake-Off/ Silent Auction Fundraiser Mount Princeton Hot Springs Resort 5:30-7:30 pm • 719-395-0482

July 20 La Veta

August 2019

Francisco Fort Day 5K Fun Run/10K Capps Building 9 am • twopeaksfitness.org

July 25 Lake City

Ducky Derby Memorial Park Gazebo lakecity.com

July 26 La Veta

4th Friday Art Walk Downtown 5-8 pm • 719-742-3453

July 26-28 Mancos

Mancos Days Downtown Mancos and Boyle Park mancosdays.com

July 27 Ignacio

Book Sale Ignacio Community Library 10 am-4 pm • 970-563-4060

July 27 Limon

Limon Heritage Day Limon Heritage Museum 719-740-0782 • limonmuseum.com

August 1-2 Durango

Bow Wow Film Fest Durango Arts Center lpchumanesociety.org

August 1-10 Ouray

“Artists’ Alpine Holiday” Juried Fine Art Exhibit Ouray Community Center ourayarts.org

August 3 Gardner

Gardner Chuckwagon Gardner Methodist Church Grounds 2-5 pm • 719-746-2945

August 3 Glade Park

Glade Park Cowboy Poetry and Music Festival Glade Park Community Center Grounds 5-8 pm • 970-241-0775

August 3-11 Kremmling

Middle Park Fair and Rodeo Various Kremmling Locations 970-410-6737 middleparkfairandrodeo.com

July 19-20 Monticello, Utah

Pioneer Days Various Monticello Locations monticelloutah.org

July 20-21 Buena Vista

RailFest Weekend BV Heritage Museum 719-395-5758 • bvheritage.org

28

Common Ground Woman’s Conference Life Fellowship Church 1-5 pm • 970-483-5171

July 27 Rye

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS 3 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303-455-2807; or email calendar@coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information.


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES My daughter and son-in-law took

a family vacation in Florida. One of the vacation events was watching a rocket launch of the SpaceX shuttle to the space station. When they returned home, my 4-year-old grandson, Nolan, talked about the launch with his Aunty Brenna. The conversation went like this: Aunty Brenna: “Nolan, did you watch the space shuttle?” Nolan: “Yeah, we went on one, too!” Aunty Brenna: “You went on a space shuttle into outer space?” Nolan: “No, we went on the shuttle from the airport to the hotel!”

Grand Valley Power consumer-member Paul Silzell takes a photo with CCL at Kalia Beach on the Dead Sea in Israel.

James Tyler, Hayden

Poudre Valley REA consumer-members Mike and Julie Maxwell celebrate their 45th anniversary in Quebec City, Canada.

Years ago I lived in Pasadena,

Cindy Olmstead poses with Colorado Country Life at Chicago’s Navy Pier Ferris wheel. Cindy is a consumer-member of Mountain View Electric.

Ned Giles, a Mountain Parks Electric consumermember, takes the magazine to the Temple of Zeus in Olympia, Greece.

WINNER: Muire Jones and son Marshal Jones of Beulah share a moment with Colorado Country Life. They are consumer-members of San Isabel Electric.

Take Your Photo with Your Magazine and Win! It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo and your name and address to info@ coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Friday, July 12. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. This month’s winner is Muire Jones, a San Isabel Electric consumer-member. She posed with her son and Colorado Country Life at their home in Beulah. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

California. Early one evening, I just walked out of a Spokesman Club meeting and, looking up, spotted what I thought was a UFO. The next day at work, I told everyone what I saw, but my UFO sighting was slighted when an article was published in the Pasadena Star-News revealing it was just another Cal Tech prank: a weather balloon with a lit candle beneath it. Through the years, other pranks these geniuses pulled off, as I remember, were rigging the Rose Bowl scoreboard during the game to read Cal Tech-99 and MIT-0; stopping the action during another Rose Bowl game by releasing a mechanical rabbit through a trap door on the playing field; and somehow managing the heist of a street sweeper from the city of Pasadena and shipping it by flatbed truck to a city on the East Coast. I often wonder whether these stunts were from clever pranksters or just bored geniuses — perhaps both! Jerry L. Baker, Colorado Springs

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2019 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

29


DISCOVERIES

Staycation Destinations

Photo by Meg Ranegar

Amigo Motor Lodge When planning your stay in Salida, get a gander at Amigo Motor Lodge. This motel had a magnificent makeover and opened in 2016 with a new vibe and fresh, modern look. Book a room or stay in an equally attractive Airstream — also on the Amigo property — this summer and enjoy all the outdoorsy adventures the area has to offer. For more information, call 719-539-6733 or visit stayamigo.com.

Nestle In In Fort Collins, a hidden gem on 2-acres of land awaits: Solarium International Hostel. Opened in 2014, Solarium offers solidarity as well as a community experience where a living tropical atrium brings guests together in a serene setting. Rent a bike to tour the town, get your “ohm” on at the FOCO Yoga Co-op and enjoy complimentary waffles every day. Private rooms, suites and dorm rooms are available to rent. For more information, call 970-599-3817 or visit solariumhostel.com.

Overnight in an Historic Mansion The Victorian era surrounds guests at the Edgar Olin House Bed & Breakfast in old Pueblo. Originally built by Olin, a business leader in early Pueblo, the home at 727 W. 13th St. has had many owners and even more residents through the years. Now it and manager John Dunn welcome overnight guests who enjoy something more unique than a cookie-cutter hotel room. The large, Italianate-style building offers four spacious, wellappointed rooms complete with Wi-Fi and flat-screen TVs. And each stay includes a delicious breakfast. Find out more at olin-house.com or call 719-544-5727.

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE JULY 2019

Colorado Lodging Spots We Recommend

1 The Edgar Olin House B&B Pueblo | 719-544-5727 olin-house.com

2 Solarium International Hostel Fort Collins | 970-599-3817 solariumhostel.com

2

3 Amigo Motor Lodge Salida | 719-539-6733 stayamigo.com

3 1


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Colorado Country Life July 2019 Empire  

Colorado Country Life July 2019 Empire

Colorado Country Life July 2019 Empire  

Colorado Country Life July 2019 Empire