Page 1

MAY 2019

500 Miles Across Spain

A Journey of a Lifetime

PLUS SWEET SENTIMENTS FOR MOM

12

SHOWER YOUR GARDENING WITH SUNFLOWERS

21

BOBBING FOR BLUEGILLS

24


Better together We work all hours of the night so she can have her happily ever after. Together, Tri-State and our family of electric cooperatives power all the moments your life has to offer. We are brighter, stronger and better together. www.tristate.coop/together


Number 05

Volume 50

May 2019 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2019, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

On the MAY 2019

500 Miles Across Spain

A Journey of a Lifetime

PLUS SWEET SENTIMENTS FOR MOM

12

SHOWER YOUR GARDENING WITH SUNFLOWERS

21

BOBBING FOR BLUEGILLS

24

Cover Angie Zdunich stands with her trekking poles on the Camino de Santiago (the way of St. James) in Spain. Read about her journey on page 16. Photo courtesy of Angie Zdunich

“Good Morning” by Marcy Gruber, a member of Mountain Parks Electric.

4 VIEWPOINT

5 LETTERS

6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERTS

7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12 RECIPES

14 NEWS CLIPS

16 COVER STORY

COCountryLife pinned: Bake mom a sweet treat this Mother’s Day. Try Toffee Cake Enstrom style. Get the recipe on our Pinterest page.

A JOURNEY OF A LIFETIME 20 INDUSTRY

21 GARDENING

24 OUTDOORS

25 SAFETY

26 MARKETPLACE

27 CREATIVE CORNER

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS

29 YOUR STORIES

FACEBOOK CHATTER Colorado Rural Electric Association posted: Promoting #ruralelectric co-op territory at this morning’s Pedal The Plains get together at the Governor’s Mansion.

30 DISCOVERIES

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a beautiful hand dyed silk scarf by Grand Junction artist Olga Aslyozova.

For official rules and how to enter, visit Contests at coloradocountrylife.coop. coloradocountrylife.coop

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month cocountrylife posted: Each year, @cocountrylife recognizes #colorado electric co-op newsletter content. This year’s best overall award goes to #mountainparkselectric, an #electric co-op based in @granbyco. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

3


VIEWPOINT

2019 LEGISLATIVE WRAP-UP New laws, regulations affect electric cooperatives BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

W

hen the Colorado General Assembly adjourns sine die on May 3, one of the most significant recent legislative sessions for Colorado’s electric co-ops will come to a close. Among the many bills considered by the legislature this year were bills that promoted electric vehicles; encouraged solar gardens; required the collection of climate change data; created new energy efficiency standards; expanded the powers of the Colorado Public Utilities Commission; and authorized local governments to impose restrictions on oil and gas development. This list does not include perhaps the most impactful bill, H.B. 19-1261, which requires the reduction of carbon emissions from all sectors of the Colorado economy. If passed, H.B. 19-1261 will have a significant and lasting effect on Colorado’s electric co-ops. The bill requires that all electric utilities, including co-ops, reduce the level of carbon emissions that are related to power production. Colorado’s 22 electric distribution co-ops are at the end of a supply chain that includes many power plants and transmission lines owned by multiple entities. Eighteen of the state’s 22 co-ops have wholesale power contracts with Tri-State Generation & Transmission Association while the remaining four co-ops purchase their wholesale power from Public Service Company of Colorado, a subsidiary of Xcel Energy. So, bills that impact Tri-State and Xcel impact the distribution co-ops and their consumer-members.

4

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

H.B. 19-1261 would require that the carbon emissions of all industries in Colorado be reduced by 26% by 2025, 50% by 2030 and 90% by 2050. The bill does not state how much each industry has to reduce its emissions; instead, the legislature delegates broad authority to the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission in the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment to adopt rules to accomplish the targets. While the title and bill summary of H.B. 19-1261 says that the objective of the bill is to create “goals” for the reduction of statewide greenhouse gas emissions, it is clear that the bill contemplates that the Colorado Air Quality Control Commission will actually adopt standards, that is, legally enforceable requirements that will apply to many Colorado industries. While it is unclear how these standards will be enforced, it appears that the state will have the authority to impose a penalty on entities that fail to meet the standards that are created. I wrote many columns over the last several years describing how Colorado’s electric co-ops are rapidly incorporating carbon-free power sources into our power supply mix. Today, thousands of co-op consumer-members have installed net metered rooftop solar arrays, and the distribution co-ops and Tri-State have integrated utility-scale solar farms into their resource mix. In the last six months alone, Tri-State has announced power purchase agreements for another 104 megawatts of wind and another 100 MW of solar power supply.

KENT SINGER

Steps taken by the co-ops and other Colorado electric utilities will result in reduced carbon emissions from the electric sector regardless of H.B. 19-1261. Our concern with the bill as it was introduced is that it did not take into account the important differences between the investor-owned electric utilities and the electric co-ops. Whereas Xcel Energy has an incentive to retire existing generating resources and earn a rate of return on the replacement power, the co-ops can only pay for new power plants with money from our rural consumer-members. During the debate on H.B. 19-1261, the Colorado Rural Electric Association made it clear that electric co-ops support reductions in carbon emissions from the power sector, but that we oppose expanded state regulatory authority over electric co-ops. I’m hoping that by the time you read this we have been able to reach a compromise on H.B. 19-1261 that accomplishes the goals of the legislature but takes into account the cooperative difference.

Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.


LETTERS LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

FROM THE EDITOR

Rural Quandaries

Connecting with our readers

BY MONA NEELEY

EDITOR

I

Available 3 Sizes!

MONA NEELEY love hearing from you, our readers. I love the photos with the magazine, the letters to the editor filled with opinions and information, the notes from prize winners and the funny stories you keep sending. I learn new things from readers, see another point of view, laugh out loud at what your grandkids have said and so much more. And, last fall, I got this month’s cover story idea. Reader Angie Zdunich sent a photo of herself in front of the Cathedral de Santiago with her Grand Valley Power copy of Colorado Country Life. The Glade Park woman noted that she took the photo after walking 500 miles carrying a copy of her electric co-op magazine. I was intrigued. I wondered what makes someone walk for six weeks. What was this adventure like? I had so many questions. All of that led to the story that begins on page 16. My questions were answered and I learned a bit more about one of our readers.

Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative. Its goal is to provide information from your local electric co-op to you, its consumer-members.

with the Stainless Steel

PERFECT FOR:

STAINLESS STEEL CONSTRUCTION is lightweight, durable, and portable (it folds for easy storage). PERFORATED LID and sidewalls maximize airflow and trap embers. 1600° TEMPERATURES mean more thorough burning with less ash.

UNSAFE!

No more UNSAFE and UNSIGHTLY rusty barrel!

19F9DX © 2019

• Sensitive financial documents • All burnable household waste* • Old leaves and branches

* Always check local ordinances before burning.

Original

Go Online or Call for FREE Information Kit, Pricing and Factory Direct Offer! Now Available in 3 Sizes!

Kudos for Click

Solar Suggestions

BurnCage

MAX

How many people have moved to rural Colorado and discovered that they are not able to work due to poor internet connectivity? We built a home in the San Juan Mountains in 2004 and were able to run our company business from there for a number of years. However, our local internet connections are now not able to handle our data transfers so for the last several years, the amount of time we are able to spend there is minuscule. Carol Ward, Hinsdale County Gunnison County Electric consumer-member I’m a faithful reader of your publication. What inspired me to write today is the “Click to Comfort” article (February ’19). I did know a bit about Click Medical before I started the article. I knew so much more by the end. I was so impressed with the writer’s storytelling as well as what Click is doing. Marianne Capra, Steamboat Springs Yampa Valley Electric consumer-member

BURN SAFELY

XL

The Viewpoint column (February ’19) takes a straight forward news article about the current geographic distribution of economic opportunity and ideas on how to improve opportunity and sees insult and liberal bias against rural communities where there isn’t any. Rather than stoke more divisiveness in these divided times, it would have been better if Viewpoint was a positive article about how cooperatives are working to improve economic opportunity and strengthen rural communities. Kathleen McCormick via email Mountain View Electric consumer-member

BurnCage.com TOLL FREE

888-212-8579 DRfieldbrush.com

I question the ability of a solar electric installation where a 1.5-megawatt array can “power 400-500 homes” (Viewpoint, February ’19). The solar industry publishes more reasonable numbers — something closer to 250 homes per 1.5 MW. The article missed the opportunity to remind us where the megawatts come from at night or when the wind doesn’t blow. The local electric co-op must continue to supply energy from a constant source, generally fossil fuel powered. Jim Berg, Cuchara San Isabel Electric consumer-member

SEND US YOUR LETTERS Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Letters may be edited for length. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

5


ASK THE ENERGY EXPERTS

KEEP COOL FOR LESS BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN

R GROW MOREL MUSHROOMS

CREATE A PERENNIAL MOREL GARDEN IN YOUR OWN BACKYARD We provide the spawn and easy to use instructions for preparing an outdoor Morel Habitat. You just sow the seed, maintain the Morel Habitat, and pick & enjoy fresh Morel Mushrooms. $32.95 + $8.65 S/H (707) 829-7301

GOURMET MUSHROOMS

P.O. BOX 515 NC8 * GRATON, CA 95444

www.gmushrooms.org

KILL LAKE WEEDS Before

After

10 lb. bag treats up to 4,000 sq.ft. $91.00. 50 lb. bag treats up to 20,000 sq.ft. $344.00.

FREE SHIPPING! Certified and approved for use by state agencies. State permit may be required. Registered with the Federal E. P. A.

KillLakeWeeds.com Order online today, or request free information.

Our 64th year

6

AQUACIDE CO.

PO Box 10748, DEPT 530 White Bear Lake, MN 55110-0748

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

educing solar gains, insulating and ventilating the attic and sealing air leaks are easy ways to make your home more efficient, but if your air-conditioning bills were high last summer, you may need to focus on inefficiencies in your home’s cooling system. There could be some other potential problems: • Do you have a freezer or second refrigerator in the garage? This can be a major energy hog, especially if it’s old and you experience high temperatures in the summer months. • Do you have a well? Your pump may be draining your energy use as you rely on it more during the summer. Start by looking for leaks in the system and, if necessary, reduce irrigation. If you have an A/C or a heat pump, make sure the filters are changed or cleaned regularly. The next step is to call a heating and cooling contractor for a tuneup and a complete assessment of the system. A tuneup can improve the efficiency and extend the life of the unit. The tuneup includes cleaning the condenser coil, a check of the refrigerant levels and a good look at the pump and electrical contacts. Talk to the contractor about the efficiency of the A/C unit. If it’s old, it may be cost effective to replace it, even if it’s still functional. Ductwork is equally important, so make sure the contractor is capable and willing to provide an expert assessment. A real pro will know how to measure the airflow at each supply and return register. If you’re not getting cool air to the rooms that need it, the contractor may be able to make modifications to the ductwork.

A duct blaster test can identify air leaks in your home’s ductwork. Photo Credit: Ket555

Leaky ductwork could be a problem. If the ducts are in unconditioned areas like a crawl space or attic, it’s especially important to make sure they’re sealed and insulated. It will also help to seal ducts that are in conditioned spaces. Some heating and cooling contractors can do a duct blaster test to measure duct leakage. Discuss whether you should close any supply registers, although most experts recommend that supply registers should be always open. Of course, the simplest way to save money on your A/C is not to use it. Try spending more time cooking and eating outside, and retreat to your basement for cooling comfort. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to learn more ways to keep cool this summer. Look under the energy tab.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

EMPIRE

ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

Echoes of the Empire MAY 2019

MAILING ADDRESS P.O. Box K Cortez, CO 81321-0676 STREET ADDRESS 801 North Broadway Cortez, CO 81321

ph 970-565-4444 tf 800-709-3726 fax 970-564-4401 web www.eea.coop facebook.com/EEACortez

SAFETY STARTS WITH YOU

E

lectricity plays many roles in our lives, from powering baby monitors, cell phones and lighting, to running heating and cooling systems and appliances. It’s no wonder we’re so comfortable with this instant availability: When we flip a switch, we expect most systems or devices to do the job correctly. May is National Electrical Safety Month and we at Empire Electric Association think it’s a great time to look around your home and check for potential safety hazards to ensure your electric products are working properly. Remember, every electrical device has a purpose and a service lifespan. While we can extend their operations with maintenance and care, none of them are designed to last or work forever. When electricity is involved, failures can present electrical hazards that might be avoided with periodic inspections. GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS Outdoor outlets or those in potentially damp locations, such as a kitchen, bathroom or laundry room, often include GFCI features. They are designed to sense abnormal current flows, breaking the circuit to prevent potential electric shocks from devices plugged into the outlets. The average GFCI outlet is designed to last about 10 years, but in areas prone to electrical storms or power surges, they can wear out in five years or less. Check them frequently by pressing the red test button. Make sure you hit the black reset button when you are done. Contact a licensed electrician to replace any failing GFCI outlets. LOOSE OR DAMAGED OUTLETS OR SWITCHES Unstable electrical outlets or wall switches with signs of heat damage or discoloration can offer early warnings of potential shock

COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .COOP

or electrical fire hazards. Loose connections can allow electrical current arcing. If you see these warning signs, it may be time to contact an electrician. SURGE PROTECTORS Power strips with surge protectors can help safeguard expensive equipment like televisions, home entertainment systems and computer components from power spikes. Voltage spikes are measured in joules and surge protectors are rated for the number of joules they can effectively absorb. That means if your surge protector is rated at 1,000 joules, it should be replaced when it hits or passes that limit. When the limit is reached, protection ends and you’re left with a basic power strip. Some surge protectors include indicator lights that flicker to warn you when they stop working as designed, but many do not. If your electrical system takes a major hit or if you don’t remember when you bought your surge protector, replacement may be the best option. EXTENSION CORDS If you use extension cords regularly to connect devices and equipment to your wall outlets, you may live in a home that needs wiring revisions. With a growing number continued on page 9

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

7


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

POWERADVANTAGE EEA OFFERS A NEW PAYMENT OPTION

IT

has arrived!

What are the benefits of a prepay account? A prepay electric account allows members to actively monitor their usage and pay when and how they wish. Set up a free account online at www.eea.coop to easily manage your account from the comfort of your home or business. No monthly bill or due date. You will no longer receive a bill statement from EEA. No security deposit. No deposit is required. You pay only a modest fee of $50.00 that will be applied toward your future energy usage. No late fees. Payments are made ahead of time, so there is no risk of being penalized for late payments. No collection or reconnect fees. PowerAdvantage accounts are self-service. No EEA employees are dispatched when your account funds run low. Notifications are sent by email, text message, or automated phone call. If your account runs out of funds, your service is automatically disconnected by remote control from the office. Once a payment is made to establish a minimum balance, your service is automatically reconnected without additional fees. More payment flexibility. PowerAdvantage can be a great tool for those who struggle to pay their bill each month. With prepay, you can decide when you want to deposit funds into your account. 24-7 access. Check your electricity usage at anytime and see how daily energy choices directly affect your pocketbook. Lower your energy costs to free up the family budget for other expenses. Call EEA at (970) 565-4444 or (800) 709-3726 from Utah to explore the possibilities of a prepay account. Our representatives will walk you through the process and answer your questions about this new option.

8

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Photo Contest Winner for May

Co-op Calendar May 10

Empire’s board meeting begins at 8:30 a.m. at its headquarters in Cortez. The agenda is posted 10 days in advance of the meeting at eea.coop. Members are reminded that public comment is heard at the beginning of the meeting.

May 12

Mother’s Day

May 27

Memorial Day, EEA Office Closed

SAFETY STARTS WITH YOU continued from page 7

of electrical devices connecting your family to the electricity you get from EEA, having enough outlets in just the right spots can be challenging. Remember, extension cords are designed for temporary, occasional or periodic use. If an extension cord gets noticeably warm when in use, it could be undersized for the intended use. Always make sure extension cords used in outdoor or potentially damp locations are rated for exterior use. If they show any signs of frayed, cracked or heat-damaged insulation, they should be replaced. If the grounding prong is missing, crimped or loose, a grounded cord will not provide the protection designed into its performance. According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, approximately 51,000 electrical fires are reported each year in the United States, causing more than $1.3 billion in annual property damage. Electricity is a vital necessity for modern living and EEA is committed to providing safe, reliable and affordable power to all consumer-members. EEA hopes you keep these electrical safety tips in mind so that you can note any potential hazards before damage occurs.

Yellow Swallowtail by Chalana Wilson

NOTICE OF 2019 ANNUAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING EMPIRE ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION, INC. The Annual Meeting of the members of Empire Electric Association, Inc., will be held in Cortez, Colorado, at Empire’s Calvin Denton Room at 801 N. Broadway, beginning at 5:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 20, 2019, to transact the following business: I.

Election of directors submitted by written petition pursuant to Article III Section 4 of the cooperative’s bylaws. One director is to be elected from the following districts:

DISTRICT NO. 2 [Two years to fulfill remaining term] DISTRICT NO. 5 [Four-year term] DISTRICT NO. 6 [Four-year term]

(NOTE: Article III, Section 4 of Empire’s bylaws states, “Should there be only one nomination from each district open for election then no ballots will be mailed or cast and the candidate will be declared elected as a matter of law at the annual meeting or within five (5) days thereafter as provided by law.”)

II.

Voting upon proposed amendment to the bylaws and articles of incorporation, if necessary

III.

Reports of Officers, Directors and Committees and action thereon

IV.

Any other business transacted which may properly come before the meeting or any adjournment thereof.

Jerry Fetterman, Secretary-Treasurer Empire Electric Association, Inc. PO Box K Cortez, Colorado 81321

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

9


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

My Co-op Employees

Congratulations to Jake Thurman on his recent promotion to working foreman. Jake started with Empire Electric as a summer helper on May 27, 2008. He worked as a summer laborer and temporary storekeeper until January 16, 2010. At that time, he accepted a full-time position as storekeeper. On September 1, 2010, Jake was promoted to apprentice lineman and advanced to journeyman lineman on August 9, 2014. On March 13, 2019, Jake accepted the position of working foreman.

Did You Know? Electric cooperatives have retired $16 billion to members since 1988 – $1.1 billion in 2017 alone. Because electric co-ops operate at cost, any excess revenues (called margins) are allocated and retired to members in the form of capital credits. Source: National Rural Utilities Cooperative Finance Corporation

$1.1 BILLION IN 2017

$16 BILLION

SINCE 1988

10

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019


Advertisement

Enjoy the Ease of Showering Safely So You Can Stay in the Home You Love.

Make sure your bathroom ages as gracefully as you do. I

ntroducing a new safe shower that can usually be completed in as little as one day and looks amazing. It is difficult, treacherous and tiring to step over a tub and bathe yourself. It’s even more difficult and dangerous to try and get out of the tub. In fact, no room poses more threats to safety than the bathroom. But now you can reduce your fear of bathing and regain your independence, with a safe, comfortable walk-in shower. This shower was designed by experts, with you in mind, focusing on safety and convenience when it matters most. It’s available with barrier free entry, making it wheel chair accessible. The nearby safety grab bars provide support and help give you the strength to safely step onto the extra thick commercial grade non-slip shower floor.

Then you can stand and shower with the fixed shower head, or help remove the stress or pain from standing and ease into the sturdy chair or built in bench, allowing you to relax and enjoy the refreshing benefits of a shower again. In fact, the easy-to-reach handheld shower wand and grab bar are positioned perfectly for sitting while showering. This affordable walk in shower fits easily in your existing tub space. Installation is included and can be completed in as little as one day making it a simple process for you to transform your bathroom into a safer place. Experience incomparable service and quality and help

remove some of the dangers and fears of falling. It’s time to take your first step towards safety and help you stay in the home that you love so dearly.

Call Toll-Free Today for more information and to learn how a Walk-In Shower can change your life.

Call Now Toll-Free

1-800-778-6022 for more information and ask about our Senior Discounts.

Financing available with approved credit.

www.SafeStepShower.com COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

11


RECIPES

SWEET SENTIMENTS FOR MOM

DO YOU HAVE A GREAT RECIPE?

A Colorado staple turns ordinary recipes into something spectacular BY AMY HIGGINS

If you have a recipe you want us to try, send it our way to recipes@coloradocountrylife.org.

| RECIPES@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

Get your Enstrom toffee at one of their retail stores or visit enstrom.com to order online.

T

here are many ways to show mom your appreciation and you might be surprised to know, for many moms, one of those ways can be as simple as rolling up your sleeves and creating something special in the kitchen for her. If she has a sweet tooth, you can’t go wrong with recipes from Grand Junction-based Enstrom Toffee & Confectionery. These baked goods are takes on classic recipes, but amplified with crunch and the buttery goodness of Enstrom toffee, making them even more extraordinary — just like mom. Photos and recipes courtesy of Enstrom Candies, Inc.

Enstrom Almond Toffee Cookies 1 cup butter 1 cup sugar 1 cup brown sugar, lightly packed 2 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla 2 1/4 cups flour 1 teaspoon baking powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup old fashioned oats 3 cups Enstrom Almond Toffee, chopped, or 1 pound bag of toffee crumbs chocolate chips, if desired Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Cream together butter and sugars. Add eggs and vanilla and mix until fluffy. Stir together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt and add to creamed mixture. Blend well. Mix in oats and then stir in toffee, making sure there aren’t any pieces of toffee that are too large. Drop from teaspoon onto ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 10 to 12 minutes or until golden brown.

?

Did You Know There are only five ingredients used in Enstrom Almond Toffee: butter, sugar, almonds, chocolate and lecithin. Lecithin helps the ingredients mix more thoroughly.

12

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

Looking for something to serve mom for breakfast? Try Jessica Garlow’s Banana Toffee Crunch Bread. Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.


Advertisement

#

Clip this offer to apply for coverage!

Now, from United of Omaha Life Insurance Company and Companion Life Insurance Company...

Whole Life Insurance. Are you between the ages of 45 and 85*? Then this GUARANTEED ACCEPTANCE policy is for YOU! >> Choose from 4 benefit levels - up to $25,000! >> Rates “lock-in” at the age you apply - never go up again!

NO medical exam!

Plus... Proceeds paid directly to your beneficiary

>> Call for your FREE all-by-mail application packet! >> Call TOLL-FREE

Builds cash value and is renewable up to age 100!**... Then automatically pays YOU full benefit amount!***

1-866-295-3708

Or apply online at

Policy cannot be canceled – EVER – because of changes in health!

www.GetMutualDirect.com Why this policy? Why now? Our graded death benefit whole life insurance policy can be used to pay funeral costs, final medical expenses...or other monthly bills. You know how important it can be to help protect your family from unnecessary burdens after you pass away. Maybe your own parents or loved one did the same for you. OR, maybe they DIDN’T and you sure wish they would have! The important thing is that, right now, you can make a decision that could help make a difficult time a little easier for your loved ones. It’s a responsible, caring and affordable decision. And, right now, it’s something you can do with one simple phone call. You may have been putting off purchasing life insurance, but you don’t have to wait another day. This offer is a great opportunity to help start protecting your family today.

NO health questions!

Your affordable monthly rate will “lock-in” at your application age* ... $3,000.00 Benefit

Age 45-49 50-54 55-59 60-64 65-69 70-74 75-79 80-85

Male $10.45 $11.50 $14.20 $17.20 $20.50 $27.40 $37.00 $50.50

Female $8.80 $9.70 $11.95 $13.30 $16.00 $21.40 $30.10 $42.55

$5,000.00 Benefit

Male $16.75 $18.50 $23.00 $28.00 $33.50 $45.00 $61.00 $83.50

Female $14.00 $15.50 $19.25 $21.50 $26.00 $35.00 $49.50 $70.25

$10,000.00 $25,000.00 Benefit

Benefit

Male Female Male Female $32.50 $27.00 $79.75 $66.00 $36.00 $30.00 $88.50 $73.50 $45.00 $37.50 $111.00 $92.25 $55.00 $42.00 $136.00 $103.50 $66.00 $51.00 $163.50 $126.00 $89.00 $69.00 $221.00 $171.00 $121.00 $98.00 $301.00 $243.50 $166.00 $139.50 $413.50 $347.25

The rates above include a $12 annual policy fee.

This is a solicitation of individual insurance. A licensed insurance agent/producer may contact you by telephone. These

policies contain benefits, reductions, limitations, and exclusions to include a reduction in death benefits during the first two years of policy ownership. In NY, during the first two years,

110% of premiums will be paid. Whole Life Insurance is underwritten by United of Omaha Life Insurance Company, 3300 Mutual of Omaha Plaza, Omaha, NE 68175 which is licensed nationwide except NY. Life insurance policies issued in NY are underwritten by Companion Life Insurance Company, Hauppauge, NY 11788. Each company is responsible for its own financial and contractual obligations. Not available in all states. Benefit amounts vary by state. Policy Form ICC11L059P or state equivalent (7780L-0505 in FL, 828Y-0505 in NY). *Ages 50 to 75 in NY. **In FL policy is renewable until age 121. 452747 ***All benefits paid would be less any outstanding loan. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

13


NEWS CLIPS

CO-OPS SELECT TEAM TO ELECTRIFY GUATEMALA

T

DALE KISHBAUGH Director of Safety and Loss Control Colorado Rural Electric Association

JERID BRUNA Southeast Colorado Power Association, La Junta

KJ JOHNSON San Miguel Power Association Ridgway

AUSTIN MAIER Poudre Valley REA Fort Collins

JASON MATZKE Mountain View Electric Association Limon

KENNETH MURRAY Mountain View Electric Association Limon

JACE NOE Southeast Colorado Power Association, La Junta

ROD SHERMAN Holy Cross Energy Glenwood Springs

EN

E R GY T R A I L S

A

GU

LAHOM

AT E M A L A

OK

KELLY SNOW United Power Brighton

CHRIS STANWORTH White River Electric Association Meeker

Volunteers selected for the project include: Dale Kishbaugh, Colorado Rural Electric Association; Jerid Bruna, Southeast Colorado Power Association, La Junta; KJ Johnson, San Miguel Power Association, Ridgway; Austin Maier, Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association, Fort Collins; Jason Matzke, Mountain View Electric Association, Limon/Falcon; Kenneth Murray, Mountain View Electric Association, Limon/Falcon; Jace Noe, Southeast Colorado Power Association, La Junta; Rod Sherman, Holy

D

CO

I

N

N

A

he lights will come on later this summer at an isolated village in north-central Guatemala, thanks to the efforts of a just-named team of Colorado lineworkers. The Colorado Rural Electric Association selected 10 volunteer lineworkers and one alternate from its member electric cooperatives to prepare to electrify the mountainous village of Sillab, Guatemala, this August. The Colorado crew will join 10 lineworkers from electric co-ops in Oklahoma on a joint project coordinated through the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s philanthropic NRECA International Foundation. “We’re excited to return to Guatemala on another CREA-sponsored project,” said CREA Executive Director Kent Singer. “Last year was the first time Colorado co-ops came together to sponsor a team of linemen to bring electricity to an area that has never had access to electricity before. It was a good experience for our crew and we were able to electrify two remote villages.” The 2019 project site is in the department (state) of Alta Verapaz, near Guatemala’s border with Belize. The volunteers will spend three weeks building power lines along a 6 1/2-mile stretch of mountainous terrain where rainy weather, canyon crossings and steep hillsides will add to the challenge. Each of the 60 homes to be served will be equipped with four lightbulbs, four light switches and four electrical outlets.

LO RA D O

ALTERNATE: LUCAS SWOYER Mountain View Electric Association Limon

Cross Energy, Glenwood Springs; Kelly Snow, United Power, Brighton; and Chris Stanworth, White River Electric Association, Meeker. Lucas Swoyer, Mountain View Electric Association, Limon/Falcon, was selected as the team alternate. CREA is the statewide trade association for Colorado’s 22 electric distribution cooperatives and co-op power supplier Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association. NRECA International has been working in developing countries since 1962.

DOWNED AND DANGEROUS

Downed power lines are dangerous. Always assume the line is energized and avoid going near it or anything it is in contact with. You may see more electric lines down during the spring storm season so it is important to remember these safety tips: • Notify the local co-op or call 911 if you see a downed power line. • Never drive over a downed line. • Never drive through water that may be touching a downed power line.

14

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

• Never try to move a downed power line. A downed power line can energize the ground up to 35 feet away from it, so stay out of the danger zone and stay safe.


NEWS CLIPS

Take Control of Your Smart Devices

T

he number of internet-connected devices in homes seems to have jumped exponentially in recent years. These devices are everywhere including the kids’ rooms, the family room, the kitchen and the garage. This rise in internet-connected devices in homes has been growing for more than 30 years. In the 1980s, the integration of people, processes and technology with connectable devices and sensors began to enable remote monitoring of a growing number of devices. Today, some homes have upward of 25 or 30 connected devices. And once you have

a number of devices, they can start communicating with each other. This means more convenience and services for you, but it also leaves you vulnerable to cyberattacks. By taking control of your devices, you can reduce your risk of hackers hijacking your internet-connected devices, says Cynthia Hsu, cybersecurity program manager with the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association. “Understand what you are buying,” Hsu says. “If you have a choice between two vendors who are producing a product and one takes security seriously and the other doesn’t, use your money to buy a product

that takes security seriously.” She also reminds homeowners to keep their wireless internet software up to date, particularly when there are security updates. Install firewalls in your home network. Always change the default passwords that equipment comes with and then change those passwords regularly. Finally, unplug your electronics when they are not in use. Not everything has to be plugged into the internet all the time. Be smarter than your smart devices and stay in control of your security.

Listen to News From the Country’s Electric Co-ops Interested in important stories from electric co-ops across the United States? Then subscribe to the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association’s monthly podcast “Along Those Lines.” Using standard podcast apps, you can subscribe directly to the RSS feed by copying and pasting http:// alongthoselines.libsyn.com/rss into your preferred podcast player. When you open your desired podcast service or app, use the search bar to find Along Those Lines. When you find it, you’ll see all of the available episodes listed. Once you’ve subscribed, all new episodes of Along Those Lines will be downloaded to your library. You can listen to downloaded episodes anytime — with or without an internet or data connection. Podcast episodes can be downloaded or streamed through your computer or mobile device. When you’re done listening to an episode, it is automatically deleted. Old episodes won’t take up space on your device.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

15


A Journey of a Lifetime COVER STORY

BY SHARON SULLIVAN

I

wanted to do something spectacular for my 60th birthday,” Angie Zdunich says. So she did. On August 30 of last year, the western Colorado woman began a 500-mile trek across Spain along the Camino de Santiago (Way of St. James). It took her 39 days. For thousands of years pilgrims have made the Camino journey to pay tribute to the bibical apostle St. James, whose tomb lies in the cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, in northwestern Spain. “They say ‘the Camino is calling,’ that it’s a cleansing, spiritual journey,” says Zdunich, who lives on the Western Slope. “You can walk for any reason — old baggage on the soul that you want to purge, or if you want a religious experience. Some just want a good hike.” Zdunich, a devout Catholic, was looking for both adventure and healing after her son Jason was diagnosed three years ago with

stage three colorectal cancer at age 37. “So, I added that to my Camino purpose,” she says. “I needed some divine intervention. I was praying for a miracle.” Zdunich attended daily “pilgrim masses” led in Spanish in churches and cathedrals along the way. In every church she lit a candle for her son. Zdunich chuckles when people marvel at her courage for going alone. For nearly a quarter century she worked as a police officer in San Diego where her three sons are now policemen. Zdunich’s law enforcement career also included two years serving as an international police officer in Kosovo. In 2014, she retired from the police department and the following year moved to Glade Park, a rural community 16 miles west of Grand Junction where she lives with her elderly mother 3 miles up a dirt road on 35 acres of piñon-juniper forest. Zdunich trained for the trip by hiking the trails in the

nearby Colorado National Monument, as well as walking on the gravel, hilly road outside her home, elevation 7,500 feet. After arriving in Paris August 29, Zdunich caught a flight to southwestern France. A one-hour shuttle brought her to Saint-JeanPied-de-Port, the official starting point of Zdunich’s chosen route — the Camino Francés. There, officials at the pilgrim’s office stamped her “credential” (a pilgrim passport) with the first of many stamps collected along the way. (These are required to receive a certificate accrediting the journey.) Pilgrimages must be completed either on foot, bicycle or horseback. The following morning Zdunich walked the cobblestoned streets of Saint Jean-Piedde-Port until she reached the outskirts of town. There she began the rocky, uphill climb toward the misty Pyrenees Mountains, where, at the summit, the trail crosses into Spain.

START

16

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019


COVER STORY On the road The Camino de Santiago winds through towns and villages; parallels pastures of grazing sheep, horses and cattle; becomes a dirt trail through forests or a paved sidewalk next to vineyards. Pilgrims walk by fields of sunflowers, an occasional castle and statues of the Virgin Mary tucked away here and there. “It’s so intimate, so personal, walking through a country on foot,” Zdunich says. “You really do get to stop and smell the roses.” Zdunich foraged on wild blackberries that crowded the trail in some areas. There were also ripe apples and figs free to passing pilgrims. Yellow arrows painted on sides of buildings, fences or gates mark the way so pilgrims don’t wander in the wrong direction. Additionally, iconic scallop shell shapes mark the way. The scallop shell is an ancient symbol representing the various Camino routes that one can take, all leading to Santiago de Compostela. Locals and pilgrims alike call out to one another, “Buen Camino!” — the traditional

Zdunich on the cobblestone trail.

greeting heard everywhere. Church bells chiming throughout the day intermingle with the ever-present sounds of bells worn by farm animals to create a sort of music in the background, says Zdunich. “As we passed farms and villages, all livestock wore bells — horses, cows, sheep, goats — so people can keep track of their animals.” Though Zdunich planned to walk the Camino solo, she was seldom alone. That was also true for Juanita Solis, a 69-yearold fellow pilgrim originally from Austin, Texas, who accompanied Zdunich for about a week. “On the Camino, you tend to meet up with other pilgrims for a while, and then you go your separate ways” as you walk at your own pace and schedule, explains Solis, who currently resides in Bayonne, France. “Angie and I had an instant connection — that happens a lot on the Camino. I never felt alone. There’s always someone around — either in front, behind or beside you. I never felt afraid or threatened.”

Trailmarkers like this lead the way.

Zdunich also hiked with a woman from Canada and a woman from Scotland, as well as a man from Italy. Two sisters from Washington state became her companions for several days. Zdunich met an elderly Italian couple who held hands as they walked, who told her they return to Spain for two weeks each year to walk the Camino through Spain’s picturesque vineyard country. A Spaniard she met completed the Camino on 29 occasions; and there was a man from North Carolina who repeated the Camino 11 times. A German named Heiner told Zdunich he lives on the Camino full time. He walks from France through Spain to Santiago de Compostela, and on to Portugal where he spends the winter, living on 20 euros a day. Zdunich also met pilgrims from Ireland, Korea, Japan and Martinique. She saw children with their parents, and people in their 90s walking the Camino.

Zdunich with new found friends from the Camino.

The beautiful Spanish countryside. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

17


COVER STORY What to bring, where to stay Wearing a backpack for 30-plus days is a feat that requires careful planning. Zdunich brought one change of clothing, a down sleeping blanket, a small hand towel and shampoo that worked for cleaning her hair, body and clothes. She also carried rain gear, a digital guidebook, a lightweight down jacket and foot care supplies. Pilgrims seldom carry food, choosing instead to eat at the cafés in towns and villages along the way. Walking sticks are essential, as well as earplugs, for sleeping soundly in an albergue (hostel) full of people. “You might be sound asleep and then you hear a cell phone alarm, or a zipper” as someone inevitably prepared to leave before sunup to get an early start, Zdunich says. Eye masks also

Backpacks must be planned and packed carefully.

Zdunich’s well-used walking sticks.

18

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

come in handy to block the glare of people’s headlamps in the early morning darkness. One thing backpackers don’t have to carry are tents — albergues cater to pilgrims and are located all along the way, costing roughly $17 per night. Booking a room in an ancient stone monastery is also an option, which Zdunich did for three chilly, albeit quiet, nights. Pilgrims can also stay at hotels in town. Zdunich typically arrived to the albergue — which she booked in advance — by afternoon, where she immediately removed her boots and slipped on flip-flops (another essential item) to allow her feet to breathe. Then she would change into clean clothes, and wash by hand the shirt and hiking pants worn that day to hang on the clothesline

Meals on the Camino were delicious and colorful.

to dry by the next morning. Then it’s time to tour the town (more walking), and find a bar (cafés are called bars, though it’s true pilgrims’ meals automatically come with a glass of wine). Breakfast in Spain was typically café con leche and a pastry, or a slice of a baked egg and potato dish that Spaniards call “tortilla.” Lunch might consist of a baguette sandwich with a thin slice of ham and cheese. Dinner included either pork, chicken or fish with a salad and bread, water, dessert and glass of wine. The cost of Zdunich’s trip came to $3,000, including meals, lodging, her flight and a week in Paris afterward. “I allotted $50 a day and spent about $30-$35 a day,” she says.

The Camino terrain varied along the way.

The Spanish sunset.


COVER STORY

Zdunich with all of her gear.

Zdunich shares the trail with farm animals.

Wine for the Camino hills Toward the end of her journey, while dealing with painful shin splints, Zdunich met an especially exuberant man from Madrid named Arbaro who was walking the Camino carrying a bota bag of red wine. “Red wine is your gasoline for uphill, and water is for the downhill,” he told Zdunich. He explained how drinking wine along the Camino is an ancient tradition dating back to when fresh, clean water was scarce and pilgrims drank wine to stay fueled and hydrated. He lightly touched her back with his index finger to “push” her uphill, asking if it made the climb easier, which, somehow, she says, it did. “It’s all mental — you control getting up this hill with your mind,” Arbaro told her. “He was just a delightfully wonderful companion,” she recalls. That afternoon, after they reached the albergue where Zdunich had booked a bunk for that night, she and the Spaniard shared a tall, cold, local Galacian beer before he continued on to the next town. She never saw him again but received an email message back home in Colorado,

Drinking wine along the Camino is a tradition.

On day 39 of her trek, Zdunich reached her destination: Santiago. There, she attended three back-to-back masses at the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela.

wishing her a “happy new year,” which, she says, makes her smile, remembering the man who made her laugh as she labored uphill sipping red wine. On the morning of day 30, a chance encounter with a man from Croatia proved especially meaningful to Zdunich, whose grandparents emigrated to the United States from Croatia. She had traveled to Croatia on multiple occasions to visit family members who continue to live there. “It was great to hear the Croatian language again, as my grandmother lived with us and she always spoke Croatian,” Zdunich recalls. They shared a café table and stories of Croatia before heading out separately for their day’s walk. As he was leaving, the man turned around to give Zdunich a Croatian patch, saying he didn’t know until meeting her why he had felt compelled to bring it along. Zdunich believes it was her late father speaking to her. “I knew, just knew, this ‘Camino angel’ wanted me to know my father was with me.” Before sunrise, on day 39, Zdunich woke early, excited to be approaching the city of

On day 30, Zdunich meets a man from Croatian who turned out to be her ‘Camino angel.’

Santiago and the end of the road. Inside the famous Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela, Zdunich attended three back-to-back masses. “I didn’t want to leave,” she says. The botafumeiro (a huge incense burner) swung back and forth dispersing the fragrance of frankincense. Zdunich lit a candle. She passed the altar to climb the steps leading up to the enormous brass and gold statue of St. James. Following the pilgrimage tradition, Zdunich embraced the sculpture and thanked the saint for keeping her journey safe. The journey gave Zdunich both spiritual fulfillment and a huge sense of accomplishment, she says. “It’s amazing how you can take such a big task and, truly, you put one foot in front of the other and the next thing you know — you’ve completed it. Walking the Camino certainly makes you aware of yourself, and how little you need in life — as far as makeup, jewelry, perfume — even food habits. Plus, it’s fun to meet up with people from across the world with the same goals; you realize it’s a small world.” Sharon Sullivan is a freelance writer for Colorado Country Life from Colorado.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

19


INDUSTRY

ENERGY SAVINGS FOR SCHOOLS PROGRAM Engagement, support and savings for Colorado schools BY KATIE KERSHMAN

D

elivering cost-effective energy services and advancing innovative energy solutions is the mission of the Colorado Energy Office. This year, in support of its mission, CEO piloted a new approach for the Energy Savings for Schools (ESS) program. Up to four school districts will work with CEO’s program administrator, Brendle Group, to identify energy and water goals, educate staff and students on conservation and plan and implement projects that result in increased awareness and cost savings. Through the program, districts receive: • Free technical support, and energy and water conservation coaching • Fre e c ustomize d Res ource Management Plan that sets goals, identifies priorities and activities, helps gain district buy-in and creates a culture of conservation • Free electricity monitoring equipment and coaching to track electricity use in real time on a web-based dashboard • Free hands-on resources for engaging students, including printable educational materials and learning activities • Free recognition opportunities and connections to peer districts “We understand how limited resources are — especially staff time and money — for districts in Colorado, and we also know how important conservation is for the bottom line,” explains program manager Susan Bartlett. “CEO’s program aims to help each district understand its baseline, set conservation goals and make both operational and behavioral improvements that are tangible and teachable.”

20

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

Students and staff learn about energy and water conservation through the Colorado Energy Office’s Energy Savings for Schools program.

Operations and maintenance costs are the second highest operating costs for K-12 schools after instructional spending, according to the Financial Transparency for Colorado Schools website. It’s estimated that more than $2 billion could be saved nationwide by improving energy efficiency in school buildings, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. To reduce these costs, the EES program provides districts with: • A menu of easy-to-do efficiency projects and activities • Improved learning and leadership opportunities for students • Resource planning support and best practices for long-term energy, water and cost savings • Help identifying and pursuing potential funding sources • Tools to maintain momentum • Improved environment for students, teachers and administrators To date, two districts are testing the new pilot. In March and April, Gunnison Watershed School District took conservation to its classrooms to raise awareness about energy and water use. “The support for student engagement and classroom

activities has been the most exciting part of the program so far. Our teachers have been very enthusiastic about engaging both their classrooms and beyond, with the goal to not just teach in their classrooms but to engage the entire district,” explains Transportation and Facilities Manager Paul Morgan. “The engagement support ESS provides is helping us build more than just a one-year curriculum. Our aim is to continue engaging future students in conservation learning and activities for years to come.” Sheridan School District began student and staff engagement in April. As part of the program, both districts will complete a Resource Management Plan that identifies additional operational and behavioral activities they will undertake in the next school year and how they plan to share their progress with the broader school community. There are still two spots remaining for school districts interested in participating in the pilot this school year. You can learn more about the pilot on the program website: ColoradoESS.org. If you know of a school that might benefit from the program, contact Bartlett at 970-207-0058 or ess@ brendlegroup.com. Writer Katie Kershman is with the Brendle Group, an engineering and planning firm.


GARDENING

Shower Your Gardening With Sunflowers The hardy, handsome flower embodies the arrival of warm weather BY VICKI SPENCER

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

I

f I had to choose one flower to symbolize summer it would be the sunflower. Anyone who has driven across Colorado’s eastern plains when sunflowers are in full bloom understands why. Acres of bright yellow flowers turn their faces toward the sun. This phenomenon, known as phototropism, was recognized in Greek mythology. According to the tale, a nymph was buried alive as punishment for envying Apollo’s love for another, but Apollo, the sun god, felt pity and turned her into a flower. She has laid in the soil watching Apollo move across the sky in his chariot ever since.

Just as Greek mythology immortalized sunflowers, so have other cultures. For instance, some Native Americans use sunflowers to represent a bountiful harvest. Some Chinese use sunflowers to represent longevity and happiness. But sunflowers are not just symbolic; they add color to gardens, hide unsightly views and provide seeds and oils for consumption.

Sunflowers are among the easiest flowers to grow in Colorado because they are tough and drought tolerant. Their main requirement is ample sunshine: at least six hours daily. Although they seem able to grow almost anywhere, their long tap roots need space to spread out. This means they will do best in well-cultivated, good draining soil. For this reason, many gardeners plant sunflowers along their vegetable gardens. The common sunflower is an annual plant native to the central United States. Some giant forms, like the Mammoth Russian, grow up to 10 feet tall and 2 feet wide, and produce single head flowers up to 1 foot across. These magnificent flowers are beautiful to behold. They are perfect for hiding your neighbor’s clutter, and birds love their seeds. Gardeners who prefer perennial varieties have many choices. Autumn Beauty grows 7 feet tall and produces a 6-inch flower in sunset colors of yellow, bronze and mahogany. Maximilian and Lemon Queen are also popular choices. For cutting flowers, plant more compact, branching varieties, such as crimson red Velvet Queen, deep burgundy Moulin Rouge and Indian Blanket with deep red, yellow-tipped petals. Teddy Bear with soft, fluffy, cadmium yellow petals also makes good bouquets. Some people prefer hybrids without pollen as the bouquets

will not shed on their tabletops. Popular varieties include Sunbeam in varied yellows and oranges; pale yellow Moonshadow; and bronze-petaled Cinnamon Sun. Good bird seed varieties include Mammoth Grey Stripe, Paul Bunyan and Aztec Gold. Stagger planting from early spring to midsummer to extend seed availability. If you want sunflower seeds to eat yourself, plant Humongous or Skyscraper and stake stalks as they get heavy with seeds. When petals begin to fade, cover seed heads and flowers with gauze or cheesecloth to protect from birds and squirrels. After drying seeds on the plant, rub them off and separate from the chaff. Rinse seeds in a bowl and soak overnight in 1 gallon of water with 1 cup of salt. Dry again in a 250 degree oven for 4 to 5 hours, stirring occasionally. Cool before eating and store in sealed, dry containers. With their beauty and nutritional value, these seeds can allow you can get maximum enjoyment from your sunflowers this summer. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

21


PAID ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE

Colorado zip codes turn up silver for residents Sealed Vault Bags full of heavy silver bars are actually being handed over to the first Colorado residents who find their zip code listed in today’s publication and call before the 48 hour order deadline ends to claim the bags full of valuable silver NATIONWIDE – Operators at the National Silver Hotline are struggling to keep up with all the calls. That’s because Silver Vault Bags loaded with a small fortune of .999 pure Silver Bars are now being handed over to everyone who beats the 7-day order deadline. “It’s like a modern day Gold Rush. Colorado residents will be hoarding all the silver bars they can get their hands on for the next 7 days. This comes as no surprise after the standard State Minimum set by the Federated Mint dropped 42%, going from $50 per bar to just $29 making these Silver Vault Bags a real steal,” said Mary Ellen Withrow, the emeritus 40th Treasurer of the United States of America. “As executive advisor to the private Federated Mint, I get paid to deliver breaking news. And here’s the best part. This is great news for Colorado residents because it’s the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint,” said Withrow. The only thing residents need to do is find the first 3 digits of their zip code on the Distribution List printed in today’s publication. If their zip code is on the list, they need to immediately call the National Silver Hotline before the 7-day order deadline ends. Residents who do are cashing in on the record low State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. This is a real steal for residents because each Silver Vault Bag loaded with 10 Colorado State Silver Bars is normally set at $500 which is the standard $50 per heavy half ounce bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. But here’s the good news. Residents who call today get the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $290 for each Colorado Silver Vault Bag which is just $29 per bar as long as they call the National Silver Hotline at; 1-866-874-7770 EXT. FMM1588 before the deadline ends. Phone lines open at precisely 8:30 A.M. this morning and (Continued on next page)

22

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

■ COLORADO RESIDENTS CASH IN: It’s like a modern day Gold Rush. Everyone’s scrambling to get their hands on the heavy, Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags pictured above before they’re all gone. That’s because residents who find the first 3 digits of their zip code printed in today’s publication are cashing in on the lowest ever State Minimum price set for the next 7 days by the Federated Mint.

Who gets the Silver Vault Bags: Listed below are the Colorado zip codes that get the Silver Vault Bags. If you find the first 3 digits of your zip code below immediately call: 1-866-874-7770 EXT. FMM1588

800 801 802

803 804 805

806 807 808

809 810 811

812 813 814

815 816


PAID ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE (Continued from previous page)

are expected to be f looded by residents looking to cash in on the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint to date. That’s why Colorado residents who find their zip code on the distribution list today are being urged to call immediately. Since this special advertising announcement can’t stop dealers and collectors from hoarding all the new 2019 Edition Colorado State Silver Bars they can get their hands on, the Federated Mint had to set a strict limit of three Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags per resident – these are the bags everyone’s trying to get because they contain 10 individual Silver Vault Bags each. Everyone who gets these will feel like they just hit the jackpot. “Residents who wa nt to cash in on the lowest ever State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint better hurry. That’s because in 7 days, the State Minimum for these heav y half ounce Colorado State Silver Bars returns to the normal State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of $50 per bar,” Withrow said. “We’re bracing for all the calls and doing the best we can, but with just hours left before the deadline ends, residents lucky enough to find the first 3 digits of their zip code listed in today’s publication need to immediately call the National Silver Hotline," Withrow said. ■

IMPORTANT INFORMATION: If you find your zip code on the distribution list printed in today’s publication read below then immediately call: 1-866-874-7770 EXT. FMM1588 I keep calling and can’t get through: Keep trying. Right now everyone’s looking to cash in on the lowest State Minimum ever set by the Federated Mint. In fact, tens of thousands of residents are expected to order up as many Silver Vault Bags as they can get their hands on before the deadline ends. That’s because the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint has been slashed from $50 per heavy half ounce to just $29 for the next 7 days. And since each Silver Vault Bag contains 10 valuable State Silver Bars for just $290 nearly everyone is taking at least three bags before they’re all gone. But all those who really want to cash in are taking the Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bags containing 100 State Silver Bars before the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint goes back up to $500 per Vault Bag. So if lines are busy keep trying. How much are the Silver Vault Bags worth: It’s hard to tell how much these Silver Vault Bags could be worth since they are highly collectible, but those who get in on this now will be the really smart ones. That’s because the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint goes back up to $500 per bag after the deadline ends. So you better believe that at just $290 the Silver Vault bags are a real steal for everyone who beats the deadline. Can I buy one State Silver Bar: Yes. But, the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $29 per bar applies only to residents who purchase a Silver Vault Bag(s). That means only those residents who order a Silver Vault Bag(s) or the heavy, Jumbo Silver Ballistic Bag(s) get the $29 per bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. All single bar purchases, orders placed after the 7-day deadline and all non-state residents must pay the standard $50 per heavy half ounce Bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint. Why is the State Minimum set by the Federated Mint so low now: Thousands of U.S. residents stand to miss the deadline to get the silver at the lowest ever State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint. Now all residents who find the first 3 digits of their zip code on the Distribution List printed in today’s publication are getting the Silver Vault Bags for themselves and all the solid .999 pure State Silver Bars found inside. The price for each Silver Vault Bag is normally set at $500 which is the standard $50 per bar State Minimum set by the Federated Mint, but residents who beat the 7-day deadline only cover the lowest ever State Minimum set by the Federated Mint of just $290 for each State Silver Vault Bag which is just $29 per bar as long as they call the National Silver Hotline before the deadline ends at: 1-866-874-7770 EXT. FMM1588. Hotlines open at 8:30 A.M.

FRONT VIEW

BACK VIEW INDEPENDENCE: 1776 signifies the year America declared independence proclaiming inalienable rights including life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

SIGNIFICANT: Numbered in the order of which the state ratified the Constitution and was admitted into the Union.

HISTORIC 13 STARS: Each star represents one of the original 13 Colonies arranged in a circle to symbolize the perpetuity of the union as depicted in the “Betsy Ross” flag.

■ SILVER HITS ROCK BOTTOM:

Everyone’s scrambling to get the Silver Vault Bags each loaded with 10 solid .999 pure Silver State Bars before they are all gone. That’s because the standard State Minimum set by the private Federated Mint dropped 42%, going from $50 per bar to just $29, which is a real steal.

ONLY EXISTING: Silver bars struck with the double forged state proclamation.

LOWEST EVER: State minimum set by the Federated Mint drops to just $29.

VALUABLE: Solid .999 pure fine silver. PHOTO ENLARGEMENT SHOWS ENGRAVING DETAIL OF SOLID HALF OUNCE STATE SILVER BARS

FEDERATED MINT, LLC IS NOT AFFILIATED WITH THE COLORADO GOVERNMENT, A BANK OR ANY GOVERNMENT AGENCY. IF FOR ANY REASON WITHIN 30 DAYS FROM SHIPMENT YOU ARE DISSATISFIED, RETURN THE PRODUCT FOR A REFUND LESS SHIPPING AND RETURN POSTAGE. THIS SAME OFFER MAY BE MADE AVAILABLE AT A LATER DATE OR IN A DIFFERENT GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION. OH RESIDENTS ADD 6.5% SALES TAX. FEDERATED MINT 7600 SUPREME AVE. NW, NORTH CANP7172A-OF21224R-1 TON, OH 44720 ©2019 FEDERATED MINT

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

23


OUTDOORS

BOBBING FOR BLUEGILLS BY DENNIS SMITH

| OUTDOORS@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

I

t’s no secret to anyone who reads this column that I’m kind of a bluegill junkie. I’m fairly certain the first fish I ever caught was a bluegill. I don’t remember the exact fish or circumstances, but I have little doubt it was a bluegill. It would have been in the summer of 1949 or ’50. I would have been 5 or 6 years old and would have caught the thing on a cut willow stick fitted with a hank of braided linen line. A short nylon leader, a bobber and a long-shanked hook would have been attached — standard barefoot-boy fishing gear at the time. And I would have caught it on a worm. We lived across the road from a wide, slow-moving, warm-water creek that emptied directly into the Hudson River 5 miles downstream. Near our house, the creek was about 100 yards across and varied in depth from 2 to 3 feet in the shallows, and was maybe 20 to 30 feet deep in the narrow gorge a mile down the road. Bass, bullheads, catfish and carp were year-round residents in the creek, but the big bluegills got all our attention as kids. The weedy, sand-bottomed shoals in front of our house were prime bluegill habitat and grew some giants (bear in mind, a 10-inch bluegill is a giant).

We don’t have the abundance of good bluegill habitat in the Rocky Mountain West that’s common back East, but you can find big bluegills here if you look hard enough. Most farm ponds, gravel pits and low-elevation irrigation reservoirs hold them and their cousins: pumpkinseeds, green sunfish, long-eared sunfish, crappies, etc. You can catch them with a pole and worms, but these days you’ll see a lot of anglers chasing them with a fly rod. Fishing on the surface with goofy-looking cork and foam poppers or dry flies that mimic crickets and grasshoppers is lots of fun and extremely productive, but in my experience, you’ll catch bigger ones if you go deep. The big ones prefer submerged weed beds where there’s plenty of food and ready access to deep water. It’s a security thing. Mature bluegills can be surprisingly selective about what they eat, so use fly patterns that suggest their natural food sources. They’ll go for the gaudy stuff, but caddis pupae, mayfly nymphs, aquatic beetles, dragonfly nymphs and similar imitations are more reliable. Midges can be effective during a hatch. Bluegills eat small minnows, too, so try streamers as well. Just make sure they’re

THE TEAM IS RAISING MONEY TO HELP THOSE WHO STRUGGLE TO PAY THEIR HEATING BILLS. A team of representatives from local electric co-ops will ride in the 2019 Pedal the Plains bicycle tour of the eastern plains of Colorado. This three-day tour takes riders on over a 160-mile adventure highlighting three unique, small communities: Lamar, Holly and Springfield. Help sponsor the team and raise money for Energy Outreach Colorado. Send your check to CEEI/PTP, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216.

24

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

A couple of bluegill flies: somber colors, a bit of flash and soft, wiggly hackles.

small. Size 8, 10 or 12 hooks are ideal. I like to fish for bluegills from a float tube or belly boat. I use a sinking line and one or two wet flies in drab colors. They seem to favor flies with a touch of flash and wiggly, lifelike movement. Soft-hackled wet flies in shades of brown, black, olive or tan are just about perfect. Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors.

For more information and to make an online donation, visit poweringtheplains.coop


SAFETY

Stay Safe After the Storm Tips to help you avoid hazards left behind

5. If you see frayed wiring or sparks or smell something burning, shut off the electrical system at the main circuit breaker if you know how and can do so safely. 6. If you smell gas, or suspect a leak, get out of the house and call 911. 7. Do not travel on roads after a storm unless you have to. If you are driving and come along a downed power line, stay away and warn others to stay away. Contact your local electric co-op. If your vehicle comes in contact with a downed power line, do not leave the car. Wait for utility and emergency professionals to make sure the power line is de-energized before exiting the car. 8. When it comes time to clean up after the storm, do not use waterdamaged electronics before properly restoring them. Electric motors in appliances should be cleaned and reconditioned before use. Have your water-damaged items inspected and approved by a professional before using them.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Get other great tips to keep you and your family safe this summer at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Safety Tips.

Yard Cleanup is EASY with a

DR® CHIPPER SHREDDER! • Chip big branches up to 5" in diameter. • Shred yard & garden waste up to 1.5" thick.

Yard & Garden Waste Branches 19F9EX © 2019

C

olorado is prone to severe weather. Tornadoes, hail, high winds, and flooding can all put life, home and property in danger. We tend to breathe a sigh of relief after a storm moves on. However, just because the storm passed does not mean that the danger has. There could be many hazards left behind. We want you to know how to continue to stay safe after the storm passes: 1. Do not touch a downed line or something it has fallen over, like a fence or a tree limb. It could get you injured or killed. A downed power line does not have to be arcing or smoking to be deadly. Stay away and instruct others to do the same. If you come across downed power lines, call 911 and your utility immediately. 2. Make sure electricity and gas are turned off before entering stormdamaged buildings. 3. When inspecting your home in the dark, use a flashlight rather than a candle or another open flame to avoid the risk of fire or explosion. 4. Never enter a flooded basement if electrical outlets are under water. Do not turn power off if you must stand in water to do so. Call your electric co-op and have them turn off power at the meter.

• Powerful engines spin massive flywheels to reduce everything FAST. Check out the full DR® lineup!

FREE SHIPPING 6 MONTH TRIAL SOME LIMITATIONS APPLY

Go Online or Call for FREE DVD & Info Kit!

DRchipper.com TOLL FREE

888-212-8579 COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

25


MARKETPLACE Want to buy cast-iron cookware (Wagner & Griswold). Pyrex. Old toys in good condition. Vintage signs. Anything cowboy and Indian — hats, boots, spurs, rugs, etc. Antiques, collectibles, furniture, glassware, etc. We come to you!

970-759-3455 or 970-565-1256

I want to purchase mineral and other oil/gas interests. Send details to: PO Box 13557, Denver, CO 80201

Oxygen concentrators $400 with warranty

Also sell portable concentrators and oxygen supplies. Repair and service of equipment.

Aspen Concentrator Repair Service

719-471-9895

Want to buy old gas pumps, advertising signs, globes, etc. Pieces, parts, etc. considered. Also 1932-34 Ford cars & trucks, parts & pieces. Any condition. Brandon, 719-250-5721

Financing Available Easy Online Application Serving the Entire State of Colorado

Wanted: Jeep CJ or Wrangler. Reasonably priced. No rust buckets.

888-735-5337

Healthy & 55 or younger? Get up to $1,000,000 of term life insurance with no medical exam. Call (720) 223-7523 or www.rurallifeinsurance.com/colorado for a free quote. James C Kesl CO Lic #474736

25 Year Warranty • Easy Bolt-Together Design Engineered Stamp Blueprints

Farm • Industrial • Commercial

RHINO.BUILDERS/CO 940-304-8064 info@rhinobldg.com

Protective Sleeves: 100% Guaranteed

protect what matters looks like

mother nature

• Prevents Cuts & Scratches • Durable Soft Leather • Adjustable Air-Flow

armchaps.com • 651-492-4830

Check out our new 3D designer on our website!

Visit our website at WorldwideSteelBuildings.com for more information.

26

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

Congratulations to The Mountain Life Companies on receiving the 2019 Green Home of the Year Award for their “Epic on French Development” in Breckenridge, Colorado! The Better Way to Build Heritage Homes is proud to have been their modular builder. 1-800-759-2782 | www.hhofne.com


CHICKS FOR SALE

CREATIVE CORNER

Stop feeding prairie dogs. We’ll rent hunting rights from you.

READER POETRY

Seriously looking for duck & goose habitat.

Encourage young sportsmen by providing safe, private CarrieYounger01_2019.qxp_Layout 1 12/1/18 6:46 PM access. You make the rules.

303-460-0273

Want to work from home? Tired of the scams?

We are a legitimate work from home company Call Carrie 303-579-4207 www.WorkAtHomeUnited.com/OurAbundance

WE PAY CASH

for minerals and oil/gas interests, producing and non-producing.

800-733-8122

Dr. Seuss® Solitude

Up the mountain At the lake On a rock Near the waterfall In the high alpine Under the Engelmann By the krummholz Around the lake To the cirque Down the rocky slope Across the stream Over the log To the car Then you are home again. Carol Fortino, Beulah San Isabel Electric Association consumer-member

Parade

Crocus, tulip, daffodil Hyacinth, forsythia, lilac The waking of flies The singing of frogs The stirring of worms The darting of birds The dandelions bob and dance The green blades wave, All spit and shine

CREDIT CARD DONATIONS NOW AVAILABLE, VISIT CREA.COOP/communityoutreach/current-causes

Electric cooperatives in Colorado and Oklahoma are joining forces to bring firsttime electricity to a remote village in rural Guatemala later this year. Beyond providing the gift of light, the volunteer linemen going on this mission want to present each household with a 5-gallon water filter that lasts for two years. To give online, visit: crea.coop/community-outreach/current-causes To send a check: Make it payable to Colorado Electric Educational Institute (CEEI) with Clean Water Fund in the memo. Mail it to: Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

Will you be a part of this mission by sponsoring a water filter for $35?

Oh, the finery, the fashion, the gladness of spring. Pat Maslowski, Drake Poudre Valley REA consumer-member

DO YOU WRITE POETRY? Send us your best work; we’d love to read it. Submission: Submit your poetry, name and address via email to: mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org or mail poem, name and address to: Colorado Country Life 5400 Washington St. Denver, CO 80216 COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

27


COMMUNITY EVENTS May 18 Hesperus

Driving Tour of Hesperus, May Day and La Plata City Hesperus Baptist Church 9 am-3 pm • 970-385-4500

May 18 Steamboat Springs

May 2019 Walk MS®

May 20 Granby

Multiple locations Gather your friends and family, get some exercise and have fun at an event that helps fund an important cause: multiple sclerosis. Walk MS® raises money to help find a cure for a disease that, according to the National MS Society, affects nearly 1 million people in the United States. There is currently no cure for this disease that attacks the central nervous system and is oftentimes debilitating. In May, there are Walk MS® events in Grand Junction (May 4), Glenwood Springs (May 11), Colorado Springs (May 18), Windsor (May 11), Boulder (May 18) and Denver (May 4). Call 855-372-1331 or visit walkms.org for details about the walk in your neck of the woods.

May 2019 May 3-June 2 Salida

Valley Visions Art Exhibition SteamPlant Annex salidacouncilforthearts.org

May 10-11 Denver

Spring Plant Sale Denver Botanic Gardens botanicgardens.org

May 11 Colorado Springs

Nature Quest Scavenger Hunt Bear Creek Nature Center 10 am-1 pm • 719-520-6388

May 11 Fountain

Free Youth Fishing Derby Willow Springs Ponds at Fountain Creek Regional Park 9:30 am-12 pm • 719-520-6977

May 11 Littleton

AirLife Memorial 5K/10K Walk/Run Hudson Gardens and Event Center 8 am-3 pm • friendsofairlife.org

Rotary Cornhole Tournament Preregistration Required The Tennis Center at Steamboat Springs steamboatrotary.com

May 11 Loveland

Plant Sale and Antique and Artisan Market All Saints Episcopal Church 9 am-2 pm • linda@hollingsed.com

May 12 Durango

Mother’s Day Train Adventure Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad 877-872-4607 • durangotrain.com

May 17-19 Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak Birding & Nature Festival Various Pikes Peak Locations pikespeakbirdingandnaturefestival. org

May 18 Denver

“Learn From Lindbergh” Presentation Emily Warner Field Aviation Museum 11 am-1 pm • 970-725-3939

May 21 Dolores

“Reconstructing Ancient Pueblo Communities” Lecture Canyons of the Ancients National Monument Visitor Center & Museum 7 pm • 970-882-5635

May 23 Boggsville

Cemetery Tours Boggsville Cemetery 4 pm • 719-456-6066

May 25 Durango

Durango Botanical Society Garage Sale Durango Public Library 9 am-2 pm • 970-799-4817

May 25 Lake City

“Run for Your Life” Survival 5K Town Park 1 pm • lakecity.com

May 25 Limon

Season Opening Limon Heritage Museum 719-740-0782 • limonmuseum.com

May 18 Durango

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS 2 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

28

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

BOLDERBoulder 10K CU Stadium bb10k.bolderboulder.com

May 27 Collbran

Memorial Day Celebration Collbran Auditorium 8 am • 970-487-3402

May 27 Howard

Memorial Day Pancake Breakfast Howard Fire Station 7:30-10:30 am • 719-942-4213

May 31-June 1 Colorado Springs

“These Boots Are Made for Wading” Fly-Fishing Workshop for Women The Broadmoor 719-387-6699 broadmoor.com/boots

May 31-June 1 Durango

Adopt-A-Thon La Plata County Humane Society lpchumanesociety.org

May 31 Pueblo

“Birds of Prey” Presentation Rawlings Library 4 pm • hikeandlearn.org

June 2019 June 1 Granada

Dinner, Bronc Riding and Trick Riders End of the Line Arena 719-734-5226

June 1 Granby

Granby Rodeo Flying Heels Arena 970-531-5465 • granbyrodeo.com

June 1 Windsor

Windsor Lions Reverse Raffle Windsor American Legion Hall 6 pm • 970-686-9191

Seedling Plant Sale Sister Gardens 9 am-1 pm • frontlinefarming.org

Farmers Market TBK Bank Parking Lot 8 am-12 pm • 970-749-1653

May 27 Boulder

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303-455-2807; or email calendar@coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information.


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES One day I was driving our two

grandsons out to our house to spend the weekend. The 4-year-old asked, “Grandma, are you going to have kids of your own some day?” Needless to say, that took some explaining! Connie Brown, Pierce

My daughter shared with me this

Mountain View Electric consumer-member Ann Gustafson Oakes visits Bluff, New Zealand, with CCL.

Laguna Beach gets a visit from Steve and Sally Williams and Colorado Country Life. Steve and Sally are consumer-members of Mountain Parks Electric.

story about my quippy grandson. Dillon brought home Smiley, the class stuffed animal. He told Mom to hug it. She asked, “Do you know how germ infested that thing is?” His reply: “Hey, he’s not German. He’s American.” Grandma Jane, Bayfield

Our 4-year-old asked, “If we take

the glass off of the TV, will the people fall out?” Teri Biedermann, Colorado Springs

During a visit, my 6-year-old niece

Keith Linney and family visit Sydney, Australia and pose with CCL in front of the iconic Sydney Opera House. The Linneys are consumer-members of La Plata Electric.

Ron and Glenda Hartmann pose with CCL on Bloody Nose Ridge on the island of Peleliu in Palau. They are consumer-members of Poudre Valley REA.

Dustin, Cara and Kimber Heid visit the island Harvest Caye in Belize during a Caribbean cruise, and CCL was lucky to join the fun. The Heids are consumer-members of Morgan County REA.

WINNER: Vicki Burns and friends take CCL to visit Canterbury Castle in England near the site of the Battle of Hastings. They are all from Craig and are Yampa Valley Electric consumer-members.

Take Your Photo With Your Magazine and Win! It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo and your name and address to info@ coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo each month to win $25. The next deadline is Wednesday, May 15. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. This month’s winner is Vicki Burns. She and some friends visited Canterbury Castle in England. They are all from Craig and are Yampa Valley Electric consumer-members. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

informed me that she read a chapter book on dogs and now knew all about them. My little dog is not too kid-friendly, so I worried that, armed with her newfound knowledge, my niece might overstep and receive a growl from her. I only briefly stepped out of the room when my niece came running out and urgently told me that my dog was panicking. Believing my little dog was getting agitated with all the attention and causing trouble, I raced back to the room, only to find her lazing in the sun, slowing panting. “See,” my niece said. “The book said when they panic like that it means they’re thirsty and you need to give her a drink of water.” Joan Cunningham, Monument

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2019 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

29


DISCOVERIES

A Special Gift for Mom Pamper her with something from Colorado

A Passion for Fashion Grand Junction denizen Olga Aslyozova always liked silk and painting, so she recently started an Etsy page — SilkPassionEtc — where she could put her hobby to good use: selling handpainted scarfs directly to the consumer. From delicate floral patterns to swirls and geometric shapes, the handdesigned scarfs are a beautiful addition to your wardrobe. For more information and to order, visit etsy.com/shop/ SilkPassionEtc.

Hip Chick

A Rural Delight

Need your ID, keys and wallet but don’t want them in your pocket or in a big handbag? Get a hip bag. Hip bags attach to your belt loops for handsfree transportation of your personal items. For 15 years, Eaton-based Hip Bag Company has designed hip bags that suit the buyer’s individual style as no two are exactly alike. Call 970-475-4045 or email hipbagco@gmail.com to find a store where these hip bags are sold or for custom orders.

Mouse’s Chocolates and Coffee has been a staple in Ouray for nearly 20 years. The small-town shop beckons people from all over Colorado and beyond as that charming place to purchase delicious truffles, caramels, fudge and more. Support a cool Colorado shop and get bonus points with mom this Mother’s Day with an assortment of Mouse’s chocolates. For more information, call 970-325-7285 or visit mouseschocolates.com.

Mother Knows Best In the early 1980s, Motherlove® founder Kathryn Higgins was using wild plants from northern Colorado’s Rist Canyon to create herbal products for her personal pregnancy and birthing experiences. Soon, Motherlove® products found their way into other women’s homes locally and eventually went international. Motherlove® now creates these organic products for breast-feeding, pregnancy, birth and baby from a 120-acre farm in Fort Collins. For more information, call 970-493-2892 or visit motherlove.com.

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MAY 2019

Where to find these Colorado companies we recommend 2 3

1

1 Hip Bag Company

Eaton | 970-475-4045 hipbagco@gmail.com

2 Motherlove®

Rist Canyon | 970-493-2892 motherlove.com

3 SilkPassionEtc

Grand Junction etsy.com/shop/SilkPassionEtc

4

4 Mouse’s Chocolates and Coffee Ouray | 970-325-7285 mouseschocolates.com


SUPER COUPON

1,000+ Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com

NEW

SUPER COUPON

BIGGER • STRONGER • MORE STABLE

BLUE

• 15,000 cu. in. of storage Customer Rating • 700 lb. capacity • • ALL CABINETS ALL SIZES ALL COLORS • Weighs 139 lbs.

ITEM 64031

30", 5 DRAWER MECHANIC'S CARTS

BLACK

ITEM 64030 64032 64033 shown

RED

ITEM 64059 64061 64060 shown

GREEN

SAVE 640 $

*61933246 * 61933246 LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

HEAVY DUTY FOLDABLE ALUMINUM SPORTS CHAIR NOW

$1 9

COMPARE TO

Snap-on BLUE-POINT

$

830

MODEL: KRBC10TBPES

E YOUR CHOIC OF COLOR

$1 89 $

$

99

ITEM 56238 64722 shown

YELLOW

219

ITEM 56239 64720 shown

A

OVER 5,000

WITH

• Super-Strong, Ultra-Lightweight Composite Plastic • Magnetic Base & 360° Swivel Hook for Hands-Free Operation • 3- AAA Batteries (included) • 144 Lumens

ANY SINGLE ITEM*

ALL IN A SINGLE SUPER POWERFUL LIGHT COMPARE TO

13

PERFORMANCE $ 52 MODEL: W2364 TOOL

*61996162 * 61996162

3999

98

ITEM 62314/63066/66383 shown

$

57

99

• Weighs 34 lbs.

NOW $

COMPARE TO

DEWALT

68

14

MODEL: DW1369

SAVE 85% $

ITEM 5889/62281/61637 shown

K TOOL $ 42

151

$999

MODEL: KTI63094

17

ITEM 64545/64552/64832 64980/62160/62516/60569 shown

99

SAVE $91 $7999

*61950819 * 61950819

*61955973 * 61955973

*61958781 * 61958781

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

3500 WATT SUPER QUIET INVERTER GENERATOR

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" SWIVEL/TILT TV WALL MOUNT ALL PURPOSE/WEATHER RESISTANT TARP $ 99

Customer Rating

$699 COMPARE TO

HONDA

$

2,019

MODEL: EU3000iS1A

$

769

99

NOW

99

ITEM 63584

SAVE $1,319

Customer Rating

4-1/2" ANGLE GRINDER

16

• 11 hour run time

NOW

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

99

$2

8

$ 78

COMPARE TO

BLUE HAWK

MODEL: BG8X10-Y

$999

SAVE 44% COMPARE TO

COMPARE TO

4

SAVE 65%

NOW

$ 99

ITEM 69115/69121/69129/69137/69249/877 shown

PEERLESS Customer Rating $ 98

PERFORMAX $ 99

MODEL: ETP2X2

MODEL: 2411-1

29

17

SAVE 66% ITEM 64238

$

NOW

$999

1499

ITEM 69645/95578/60625 shown

*61962747 * 61962747

*61983049 * 61983049

*61984108 * 61984108

*61984847 * 61984847

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

3100 PSI, 2.8 GPM 6.5 HP (212 CC) GAS PRESSURE WASHER Customer Rating NOW

10" PNEUMATIC TIRE $ 99 NOW

$3 99

$349

Customer Rating

$

8

$ 09

COMPARE TO

FARM & RANCH

COMPARE TO

MODEL: FR1055

HONDA

ITEM 69385/62388/62409/62698/30900 shown

9 PIECE, 1/4", 3/8" 4 CHANNEL WIRELESS AND 1/2" DRIVE SYSTEM WOBBLE SOCKET SURVEILLANCE EXTENSION SET WITH 2 CAMERAS Customer Rating

99

369$99

SAVE 56%

NOW

$9

COMPARE TO

599 SAVE $ 249

MODEL: GX200

ITEM 62200 shown ITEM 62214 CALIFORNIA ONLY

KLUTCH $ 99

22

MODEL: 40033

ITEM 61278/67971 shown

$

*61991357 * 61991357

*61992572 * 61992572

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON Customer Rating

• 5400 lb. capacity

Tools sold separately.

$

99

14999

SAVE ITEM 63395/93454 GRIZZLY MODEL: H7723 $279 69054/62603 shown *61992720 * 61992720 COMPARE TO

$

399

95

LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

NOW

COMPARE TO $

MIBRO

6499 SAVE 69%

MODEL: 426920

ITEM 40462/60658/97711 shown

$1 9 $

99

39

99

*61995541 * 61995541 LIMIT 4 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

*Original coupon only. No use on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase or without original receipt. Valid through 9/1/19.

NOW

$49

• Night vision

NOW

SAVE $ 30

99 $229 $

24999

259

$ 99 ITEM COMPARE TO MODEL: ALC-AWS3266 63842 ALC

*61992667 * 61992667 LIMIT 1 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

SUPER COUPON

Customer Rating

3/8" x 14 FT., GRADE 43 2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH TOWING CHAIN WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

NOW

$1 1 9

SUPER COUPON

99

1499

*61986809 * 61986809

60" HARDWOOD WORKBENCH WITH 4 DRAWERS Customer Rating

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

SAVE 50%

NOW

9 $599

COMPARE TO

*61933284 * 61933284 SUPER COUPON

5

®

Customer Rating • Lifts from 3-1/2" to 14-1/8"

YOUR CHOICE

9 $399

SUPER Customer Rating COUPON

29 PIECE RAPID PUMP 1.5 TON TITANIUM LIGHTWEIGHT ALUMINUM JACK DRILL BIT SET FLOOR • 3-1/2 pumps lifts most vehicles

ITEM 61615/60637 95275 shown

SAVE • Air delivery: 0.6 CFM @ 90 PSI 59% $ 62 COMPARE TO PORTER-CABLE MODEL: PCFP02003

Limit 1 coupon per customer per day. Save 20% on any 1 item purchased. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or any of the following items or brands: Inside Track Club membership, Extended Service Plan, gift card, open box item, 3 day Parking Lot Sale item, compressors, floor jacks, safes, saw mills, storage cabinets, chests or carts, trailers, trencher/backhoe, welders, Admiral, Ames, Bauer, Cobra, CoverPro, Daytona, Diamondback, Earthquake, Fischer, Hercules, Icon, Jupiter, Lynxx, Poulan, Predator, Tailgator, Viking, Vulcan, Zurich. Not valid on prior purchases. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/19.

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

B. PANCAKE

MODEL: 2000020293

*61932109 * 61932109

Cannot be used with other discounts or prior purchases. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/19 while supplies last. Limit 1 FREE GIFT per customer per day.

ITEM 69269/97080 shown

Customer Rating

ANY PURCHASE

SUPER BRIGHT LED /SMD WORK LIGHT/FLASHLIGHT

A. HOT DOG

B

20% OFF

FREE

5 STAR REVIEWS Customer Rating

3 GALLON, 100 PSI OIL-FREE AIR COMPRESSORS

Customer Rating

SAVE $ 2999 50%

COMPARE TO

ORANGE

99

99

COLEMAN

ITEM 56237 64721 shown

SUPER COUPON

4 PIECE, 1" x 15 FT. RATCHETING TIE DOWNS

Customer Rating

• 400 lb. working load

$699

99

$

6999 • Weighs 14.3 lbs. $

• 11-1/8" L x 4-1/2" H COMPARE TO $ 99 SUPERWINCH MODEL: 1125220

ITEM 68146 SAVE $ 140 61258/61297 63476/61840 shown *61995699 * 61995699

189

LIMIT 3 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

NOW

1199

22

ITEM 63094/90984 COMPARE TO $ 80 60405/63056/63057 MODEL: 5505 63150/61524 shown KEEPER

SAVE 69%

*61996156 * 61996156 LIMIT 5 - Coupon valid through 9/1/19*

At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


TV packages built for you. FREE Voice Remote, and Smart HD DVR Included “Tune to ESPN”

Voice Remote requires internet-connected Hopper.

190 CHANNELS

190+ CHANNELS

240+ CHANNELS

AMERICA'S TOP 120

AMERICA'S TOP 120 PLUS

AMERICA'S TOP 200

All-Time Favorites and Locals

Everything Sports

Everything Sports and Entertainment

Plus More!

Plus More!

2-Year TV Price Guarantee

5999

$

/mo.

FREE Standard Professional Installation

6999

$

/mo.

Plus More!

FREE HD for Life®

7999

$

/mo.

Hopper, Hopper w/Sling, or Hopper 3 $5/mo. more. Upfront fees may apply based on credit qualification. Fees apply for additional TVs: Hopper $15/mo., Joey $5/mo., Super Joey $10/mo.

A Better TV Experience DISH is ranked #1 in Customer Satisfaction nationally by J.D. Power and our customers.*

Call Today

You could be watching DISH tomorrow!

855-530-2013 or visit your local Authorized Retailer

*DISH Network received the highest score in the Nation in the J.D. Power 2018 U.S. Television Service Provider Satisfaction Study of customers’ satisfaction with their current television provider. Visit jdpower.com/awards Important Terms and Conditions: Qualification: Advertised price requires credit qualification and eAutoPay. Upfront activation and/or receiver upgrade fees may apply based on credit qualification. 7/10/19. 2-year commitment: Early termination fee of $20/mo. remaining applies if you cancel early. Included in 2-year price guarantee at $59.99 advertised price: America’s Top 120 programming package, local channels, HD service fees, and Hopper Duo for 1 TV. Available with 2-year price guarantee for additional cost: Programming package upgrades ($69.99 for AT120+, $79.99 for AT200, $89.99 for AT250), monthly fees for upgraded or additional receivers ($5-$7 per additional TV, receivers with additional functionality may be $10-$15). NOT included in 2-year price guarantee or advertised price (and subject to change): Taxes & surcharges, add-on programming (including premium channels), DISH Protect, and transactional fees. Other: All packages, programming, features, and functionality and all prices and fees not included in price guarantee are subject to change without notice. After 6 mos., if selected you will be billed $9.99/mo. for DISH Protect Silver unless you call to cancel. After 2 years, then-current everyday prices for all services apply. For business customers, additional monthly fees may apply. © 2019 DISH Network L.L.C. All rights reserved. MX_23971

Profile for American MainStreet Publications

Colorado Country Life May 2019 Empire  

Colorado Country Life May 2019 Empire

Colorado Country Life May 2019 Empire  

Colorado Country Life May 2019 Empire