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K.C. ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION

APRIL 2020

Simply COLORADO Photo Contest Winners

PLUS DIG IN AND DEVOUR CAULIFLOWER

12

ADAPTIVE GARDENING: REMOVING LIMITATIONS

21

CO-OPS KEEP POWER FLOWING DESPITE COVID-19

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Advanced Technology Allows Macular Degeneration Patients To See Again And Allows Many Low Vision Patients To Drive Again While there is currently no cure, promising research is being done on many fronts. everything and anything possible to keep a person functioning,” says Dr. Stamm, “Even if it’s driving.” A scene as it might be viewed by a person with age-related macular degeneration

For many patients with macular degeneration and other visionrelated conditions, the loss of central visual detail also signals the end to one of the last bastions of independence driving. Colorado optometrist, Dr. Robert Stamm is using miniaturized telescopes which are mounted in glasses to help people who have lost vision from macular degeneration and other eye conditions. “Some of my patients consider me their last chance for people who have vision loss,” said Dr. Stamm, one of only a few doctors in the world who specializes in fitting bioptic

Same scene of rancher as viewed by a person without macular degeneration

telescopes to help those who have lost vision due to macular degeneration, diabetic retinopathy and other eye diseases. Imagine a pair of glasses that can improve your vision enough to change your life. Bioptic telescopes may be the breakthrough in optical technology that will give you back your independence. Patients with vision in the 20/200 range can many times be improved to 20/50. Bioptic telescopes treat both dry and wet forms of macular degeneration as well as other vision limiting conditions.

bioptic telescope is that the lens automatically focuses on whatever you’re looking at,” said Dr. Stamm. “It’s like a self-focusing camera, but much more precise.”

For more information and to schedule an appointment today, call:

Robert Stamm, O.D. Low Vision Optometrist Member IALVS Offices Throughout South Dakota, Colorado and Nebraska

Toll Free:

(877) 393-0025

www.LowVisionofColorado.com


Number 04

Volume 51

April 2020 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2020, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state. POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

On the

Cover

“Frozen in Springtime” by Jan Busby, a consumer-member of Empire Electric Association.

4 VIEWPOINT

5 LETTERS

6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12 RECIPES

14 NEWS CLIPS

16 COVER STORY SIMPLY COLORADO

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK COCountryLife pinned: Meat lovers pizza on a cauliflower crust gets rave reviews. Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop. MOST LIKED

21 GARDENING

22 INDUSTRY

24 OUTDOORS

26 MARKETPLACE

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS

29 YOUR STORIES

FACEBOOK CHATTER Colorado Country Life shared: Yep – definitely a Monday mood. Photo by Coleen Graybill, a consumermember of Sangre de Cristo Electric.

30 DISCOVERIES

APRIL 2020

Simply COLORADO Photo Contest Winners

Photo of a great horned owlet submitted by David Dahms, winner of the 2020 Photo Contest cover category. Dahms is a Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer- member.

coloradocountrylife.coop

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a copy of Cali’flour Kitchen. Visit our Contests page at coloradocountrylife. coop to learn how to enter.

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month cocountrylife posted: Love seeing the magazine in co-op lobbies. Here’s this month’s issue at @laplataelectric this morning. #magazines #coopreading #tellingthecoopstory

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

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VIEWPOINT

BENEFICIAL ELECTRIFICATION

Focusing on how electricity helps bottom line, environment BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

T

he electric industry is a complicated business and the vocabulary that we use to talk about it is full of mysterious acronyms, perplexing jargon and complex terminology. NERC, FERC, RTOs, ISOs, energy, capacity, kilowatts, megawatts, gigawatts — it’s been said that to understand the industry, you have to learn a second language. To make things more complicated, yet another new term has been added to the electric utility lexicon in the last couple of years: beneficial electrification. For those of us involved in the electric co-op program, the term “beneficial electrification,” at first blush, doesn’t make a lot of sense. We all know that there was a time when the farms and ranches of rural Colorado did not have access to the lifechanging commodity that is electric power. Before electric co-ops were founded in the late 1930s and early 1940s, although cities were electrified, much of rural Colorado was still literally in the dark. With the construction of rural electric systems by

cooperatives, the ability to apply motive power to the many backbreaking tasks that had previously been accomplished with manual labor vastly benefited the lives of countless Coloradans. So, it’s obvious that the “electrification” of rural Colorado was then and is today something that is “beneficial” to many people; it hardly seems necessary to modify the word “electrification” with the word “beneficial,” right? Today, however, “beneficial electrification” has a new meaning. It refers to the use of electricity in place of other fuels (e.g., natural gas, propane, heating oil, gasoline) where the substitution of electricity will accomplish certain goals. Among these are: saving consumers money, reducing environmental impacts, creating a more robust electric grid, and improving the quality of life for communities. One of the most important examples of beneficial electrification is the trend toward electrification in the automobile industry. Switching from the internal combustion

Beneficial Electrification It’s a win-win. A win for the environment and a win for electricity consumers.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

KENT SINGER

engine to a battery-powered vehicle results in lower overall greenhouse gas emissions and lower maintenance costs. Similarly, using electricity instead of propane for space and water heating and using heat pumps to heat and cool homes may also have environmental and economic benefits. Electric co-ops are working hard to integrate all of these technologies, and more, into their fleets and service offerings. To further the cause of beneficial electrification, CREA was one of the primary sponsors of a conference last summer in Denver called “Electrify Colorado! Beneficial Electrification in the 21st Century.” The conference focused on the benefits of using electricity and how that transition is consistent with Colorado’s evolving energy policy. Building on that experience, CREA has become a founding member of the Beneficial Electric League of Colorado and is working with other stakeholders to sponsor another conference this summer. For the last couple of years, CREA has sent Colorado co-op linemen to Guatemala (and is sending more to Bolivia this year) to bring electricity to remote villages. While we know that this is the original meaning of the term “beneficial electrification,” we also know that programs we implement to meet the new meaning will benefit rural communities across Colorado for years to come. Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.


LETTERS

FROM THE EDITOR Thank a lineworker (and their family)

BY MONA NEELEY

EDITOR

E

lectric cooperatives across the country will show their appreciation to their lineworkers during April. It is well-deserved. I’ve seen the dedication these crews have. I know what it takes to get the poles repaired and the lines back up after (and often during) a major storm. Back in Iowa, my dad worked for our local electric co-op throughout my “growing-up” years. When I was young, I learned to hate storms. When a northern Iowa blizzard started blowing or heavy rains started pounding with their lightning and thunder, I was scared, especially at night. A storm meant that Dad would leave. I always felt so alone during those storms.

RENEW

Your Driveway...

My little MONA NEELEY brother and I would climb into bed with Mom so we would all be together while the storm raged. We were safe and warm as we listened to the winds howl. But Dad, and my friends’ dads, were out there in the storm. We didn’t know where and we didn’t know for how long. Eventually, the storm would subside and Dad would come home. We would know he was safe. So, this month, thank a lineworker for their service and dedication. Thank their family, too. Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

Respect for Brave Volunteers

The article in the February edition (Backcountry Heroes) is a reminder of those members of search and rescue all over, the many who take risks to help others in need in the mountains. I sent the article to my brother, a backcountry hero. Nineteen years ago on February 8, 2001, in Grand County, it was a turning point in his life as well as his wife’s. She was the recipient of the phone call informing her that Don Neumann (a longtime search and rescue team member) was stranded after going on a rescue mission. I wish that everyone knew the impact that comes with being a hero and would share in the respect for these brave volunteers. Theresa Heller, Durango La Plata Electric consumer-member

Protecting Wildlife

I couldn’t help taking the animals’ part when a recent article (February ’20) called rodents and gophers “offenders” that chew through the underground cables and cause interruptions in electrical service. I would have preferred a word such as “creatures.” After all, we could be called “offenders” since we are the ones bringing dangerous equipment into their homes. Every time a bird or squirrel causes shorts and power outages, they are much more than offended; they are electrocuted. Anne Bowler, Cortez Empire Electric consumer-member

Hipster Recipes

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I find it interesting that your magazine would have recipes for meatless meals when the majority of your customers in the Gunnison area are cattle ranchers or supporters of the cattle industry. I understand this magazine goes to other readers who may enjoy this information, but it seems to me you are trying to be politically correct to keep the hipsters happy. David Alley, Grand Junction Gunnison County Electric consumer-member

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Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Include full name and contact information. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

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Window Replacement BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN

I

f your home’s windows are old and you feel the chill when you stand near them when the weather is cold, you may want to consider replacing them. However, new windows are costly. To help you decide if replacement is the right move, consider a few factors.

Increased comfort The chill felt near windows when it is cold out is likely due to radiant heat loss. When near a cold surface, such as a window, you can feel chilled even if the temperature inside your home is more than 70 degrees. Your body is much warmer than the surface of the window, and heat radiates from warm to cold. The inside surface of an inefficient, single-pane window will be much colder on a winter night than that of a double- or triple-pane window. Curtains and blinds are extremely effective at reducing radiant heat loss in the winter and can block some unwanted heat gain in the summer. If you have cold winters but lots of winter sunshine, you might enjoy the comfort and warmth of the sun streaming through your windows on a cold, clear day. If that’s the case, take it into consideration as you ponder window replacement. Some windows are better at letting the sun’s heat into the home than others.

Appearance and function If your windows are older, new wood- or vinyl-framed windows can act as an exterior face-lift. Keep in mind, however, if you own an older home with classic wooden windows, vinyl replacements might look out of place. It’s possible to buy new windows that match the style of some older wooden windows, or you could decide to apply a little elbow grease to get them back into shape. Wooden windows, even if they were built before 1960, can last the life of the home. Windows can provide ventilation, which sometimes improves comfort more cost effectively than air-conditioning. Windows also need to be cleaned occasionally. If your existing windows don’t provide ventilation or they are hard to clean, replacing them could solve these problems. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Visit crea.coop for more information.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

Resale value and energy savings are two more factors to consider. Visit coloradocountrylife.coop and click on the Energy tab and then Energy Tips to read about these additional factors.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

REMEMBER TO THANK A LINEMAN ON APRIL 13

K.C.

ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION APRIL 2020

K.C. ELECTRIC STAFF David Churchwell General Manager dchurchwell@kcelectric.coop Bo Randolph Office Manager and CFO brandolph@kcelectric.coop Paul Norris Operations Manager pnorris@kcelectric.coop George Ehlers Member Services Specialist and IT Manager gehlers@kcelectric.coop

ph 719-743-2431 tf 800-700-3123 fax 719-743-2396 web www.kcelectric.coop

Our mission is to provide our members with safe, reliable service at the lowest cost, while maintaining an environmentally responsible, accountable and sustainable operation now and in the future.

BY DAVID CHURCHWELL GENER AL MANAGER

L

inemen serve on the frontlines of our nation’s energy needs, and on April 13, K.C. Electric Association, along with other electric cooperatives across the country, will honor the brave men and women who work hard to keep the lights on. Many of us have never had to live without electricity for an extended period of time and we have come to take it for granted. The electrons that make it possible for us to have electricity begin at a generation plant, sometimes traveling hundreds of miles over high-voltage transmission lines to our substations and then traveling more miles over our distribution lines, ultimately ending up at your home or business. There is a lot of infrastructure in place that makes it possible for us to have reliable electricity. We design our electrical grid to withstand the worst weather conditions possible, but sometimes Mother Nature wins, and when this happens we dispatch our linemen to repair the damage. Line crews work around the clock, many times in difficult and dangerous conditions, to keep power flowing to your home or business. Whether they’re restoring power after

DAVID CHURCHWELL

a major storm or maintaining critical infrastructure to our electric system, linemen are at the heart of our cooperative. When a storm hits, they set aside their personal priorities because Mother Nature doesn’t work around holidays, vacations, school events and birthdays. A service-oriented mentality is one of the many admirable characteristics of an electric lineman. K.C. Electric is proud to honor our linemen who maintain over 3,000 miles of transmission and distribution power lines in our service territory. K.C. Electric invites all co-op members to take a moment and thank a lineman for the important work they do to make sure the lights come on whenever we flip the switch.

Notice of Annual Meeting of Members of K.C. Electric Association June 4, 2020 In accordance with the order of the Board of Directors, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the regular 2020 Annual Meeting of the members of K.C. ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION will be held in Cheyenne Wells, Colorado, at the Cheyenne Wells School on Thursday, June 4, 2020. Registration will commence at 6 p.m. and the meeting will commence at 6:30 p.m. for the following purposes: • The presentation of reports covering the previous fiscal year. • The election of directors. • All other business which may properly come before a regular Annual Meeting of the members of K.C. Electric Association. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Claim Your Savings

E THANK YOU FROM K.C. ELECTRIC TO ALL OF YOU!

K.C. Electric employees want to thank all the consumer-members who brought

food and drinks to the Stratton office during and after the winter storm we experienced in late December. We appreciate your encouragement while our employees worked long hours in treacherous conditions restoring power and your understanding when you were told that your power may not be restored until the next day. This type of generosity and support helped our employees stay focused and to work safely until power was restored to every consumer-member.

ach month, members have a chance to claim a $10 credit on their next electric bill. All you must do is find your account number and call the Hugo office at 719-7432431 and ask for your credit. The account numbers are listed below. How simple is that? You must claim your credit during the month in which your name appears in the magazine (check the date on the front cover).

Jan Beek, Cheyenne Wells — 1105960001 Thomas Herman, Burlington — 1113770000 John Mohan, Hugo — 638500009 Arapahoe Water Co., Arapahoe — 105300000 In February, two consumer-members called to claim their savings: Steven Webb, Bethune; Heritage Baptist Church, Stratton.

7. They enjoy serving our community . 6. They aren’t afraid of heights. 5. They are willing to help other utilities with major outages at a moment’s notice. 4. They are willing to lend their talents to help other communities — even countries — with less established or damaged electrical distribution systems.

Top 10 Reasons We Appreciate Lineworkers Although we appreciate each and every employee at K.C. Electric, it takes a special kind of person to be an electric lineworker. April 13 is Lineworker Appreciation Day, so let’s take a look at the top 10 reasons we appreciate our lineworkers:

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

10. They are specially trained to work on power lines and related equipment. 9. They are dedicated to safely and efficiently restoring power when extreme weather or other conditions cause the power to go out. 8. They are willing to work overtime or get up in the middle of the night to help restore power.

3. They enjoy working with each other and have each other’s backs. 2. They are trained to work on both dead and live power lines, and must be dedicated to safety at all times. 1. We couldn’t provide excellent service without them or any of our other dedicated employees.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

K.C. Electric Donates iPads to Local Day Cares

K

.C. Electric Association recently donated six used iPads to local day care facilities within its service territory. The iPads were sitting on the shelf collecting dust after K.C. Electric upgraded to models that have more memory. Instead of the devices going to waste and not being utilized, the co-op decided that the best use for them would be to donate them to local child care facilities. These child care facilities will be able to put learning tools on them for the children to enhance their knowledge and technology skills.

Above: Averi Stum (left) and Emily Poss enjoy their iPad from K.C. Electric at the Country Living Learning Center in Hugo. Left: Linda Gibbs at her in-home child care in Cheyenne Wells. Bottom: K.C. Electric’s George Ehlers (center) presents Barb Rueb (left) and T.C. Herman with iPads at the Hi-Plains Preschool and Day Care in Seibert.

April 2020

Energy Efficiency Tip of the Month TIP This spring, consider using a rain barrel to save energy. Rain barrels capture rainwater from a roof that can be used later for watering your lawn, garden or indoor plants. Source: energy.gov

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

WE NEED YOUR HELP

O

ne of the many things that sets K.C. Electric apart from an investor-owned utility is the fact that consumer-members are owners and therefore are entitled to a capital credit refund if financial conditions are favorable. K.C. Electric is currently trying to locate consumer-members who have unclaimed capital credits. In many cases, refunds were returned because of insufficient or incorrect addresses. Please look through the following list of consumer-members with unclaimed capital credits. If there is anyone on this list you can help us locate, please contact Kristie Constance at the Hugo office during regular business hours, Monday through Thursday, from 7 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. at 719-743-2431 or 800-700-3123.

Ahlers, Donavon L. Allen, Alvin Arnold, Willard Baptist Fellowship Beezley, Brian and/or Tara Bell, Susan Beratto, Sonja Bowser, Carl Boydstun, Erin Brock, Bridget Brooks, Marvin K. Buchholz, Terri Busby, Ron Carpenter, Kenneth and Teresa Castro, Maxine Cesko, Dave Colvin, Jimmy L. Conklin, Patricia Conner, Lois Connolly, Bridget Conroy, William Coomes, Paul Corder, Larry Cox, James Crismon, David Davidson, Judy Davis, Brent or Leslie Delange, Grady W. Diecedue, Domenica Digital Teleport Inc. Domsch, Kevin Donaldson, Thomas Enron Communications Fast, Lucille C. Fowler, Terry Freeman, Curt and/or Tammy Freeman, Matt and Tonia

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

Fulton, Heath Gerky, Eric Gieser, Bill Grant, Leroy Gunderson, Dana Hair Gallery/Leisha A Witzel Hamilton, Jimmie L. Hauff, Leonard Havens, James Heartland Freightways Helka, Leon and/or Kimberly Hendrix, Leona Herring, Robert Heskett, Kenneth and/or Leota Hetherington, Mary Hile, Ryan Hillemeyer, Nancy Hines, Darcy Homm, Marilyn Hopkins, Richard Howell, Valeria Hubbard, Lana Hughes, Ted and Loreen Johnson, Joy Johnson, Nick Kasten, Mildred M. Kirby, John Langendoerfer, Judy Lateedah Lewis, Brian Lightle, Nathan and Jeanne Loutzenhiser, Doyle Mahaffey, Grace Miles, Bret and Nancy Mitten’s Interstate Restaurant Moats, Casey Morrell, E. E.

Neether, James and/or Angelia Niemann, Laurel Pennington, Dale Pennington, Dan Poe, Jeff or Tanya Puls, Cynthia Riley, Ron Roan, Anna Robinson, Jay S B A Towers, Inc. Sapanaro, Michael and/or Margaret J. Showalter, Heath Sigco Sun Products Inc. Slack, Douglas and Elaine Smelker, Anna Belle Smith, Duane W. Smith, Kimberly E. Soto, Abel Stanton, Christy Stitzel, Richard or Heather Strang, Scott Taylor, William T. Thaxton, David Thelen, Monica Thielen, Francis J. Thierichen, Brandy and Gibbs, Mike Thomas, Clifton Thomas, Kimberly Trigg, Dennis Ulery, Debra Van Vleet, Dan or Cyndi Wahrman, Duane or Jennifer Werner, Joe T. White, Charles Wiedman, Garvin and/or Sherry Wilson, Jennifer


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RECIPES

Dig in and Devour Cauliflower

WIN

A crispy crust and mild flavor add pizazz to pizza BY AMY HIGGINS

A COPY

| RECIPES@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE.ORG

Delicious pizza to help you catch the cauliflower cravings.

Enter our contest to win a copy of Cali’flour Kitchen: 125 Cauliflower-Based Recipes for the Carbs You Crave. Visit Contests at coloradocountrylife.coop for details on how to enter.

H

ave you noticed? Cauliflower crust crept its way into mainstream pizza recipes. While traditional dough hasn’t lost its pizza power, many people are looking for ways to cook gluten- or grain-free recipes. But even those who are unconcerned about dietary restrictions need only flip through Amy Lacey’s cookbook Cali’flour Kitchen: 125 Cauliflower-Based Recipes for the Carbs You Crave to catch cauliflower cravings. Use the recipes on page 13 to create cauliflower meal and the delicious Cali’flour Pizza Crust. Then top it off using one of the recipes below or to the right. Before you know it, you’ll be perusing this cookbook for breakfast, soup and dessert ideas that will put a tingle in your taste buds.

Pepperoni Pizza For Marinara Sauce:

For Pizza:

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1 Cali’flour Pizza Crust

1 yellow onion, minced

1/4 cup marinara sauce

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 ounce pepperoni slices

1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

1/4 cup grated mozzarella cheese

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

1 tablespoon torn fresh basil or parsley leaves

1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes

Sprinkle of red pepper flakes (optional)

3/4 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

For Marinara Sauce:

It’s Magic “You’ll be amazed at the magic pepperoni, red sauce and cheese make atop a Cali’flour crust. My boys would happily eat this pizza all day long, and it’s a favorite of 6-year-old Gavin who, after a diagnosis of brain cancer, was put on a ketogenic diet limited to 10 net carbs a day. A serving contains few enough carbs that Gavin gets to enjoy pizza like any other little boy. Make sure the quality of your pepperoni matches that of your crust by choosing a brand that’s allnatural, nitrate-free and gluten-free.” — Amy Lacey

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened and starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the oregano and red pepper flakes and cook for 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, salt and pepper, and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook uncovered until slightly thickened, about 30 minutes. Add the basil and remove from heat. Use as directed in your recipe, or cool and store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to five days or in the freezer for up to two months.

For Pizza:

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or get out your pizza pan and put your crust on it.

If you’re looking for a great pizza loaded with meat, try the

Meatlovers Pizza

Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.

Spread the sauce over the crust and arrange the pepperoni on top. Add the cheese, covering part of the pepperoni to keep it from curling as it bakes. Place in the oven and bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the cheese is melted. Remove from the oven to a cutting board and add the basil and red pepper flakes, if using. Then slice and serve.


RECIPES Margherita Pizza

For Pizza

For Marinara Sauce

1 Cali’flour Pizza Crust (read below or visit coloradocountrylife.coop for recipe)

2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil

1/4 cup marinara sauce

1 yellow onion, minced

2 ounces mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1/2 small to medium tomato, thinly sliced

1/4 teaspoon dried oregano

Fresh basil leaves

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes 1 (28-ounce) can crushed tomatoes 3/4 teaspoon sea salt, or to taste 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 1 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

For Marinara Sauce:

Heat the oil in a medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the onion and cook until softened and starting to brown, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add the oregano and red pepper flakes and cook for 30 seconds. Add the tomatoes, salt and pepper, and bring to a simmer. Reduce the heat and cook uncovered until slightly thickened, about 30 minutes. Add the basil and remove from heat. Use as directed in your recipe, or cool and store in a covered container in the refrigerator for up to five days or in the freezer for up to two months. For Pizza: Preheat the oven to 425 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper or get out your pizza pan and put your crust on it. Spread the sauce over the crust and top with the cheese. Place the tomato slices over the cheese. Bake for 8 to 10 minutes, until the cheese is melted. Remove to a serving plate, top with the basil, then slice and serve.

Cauliflower Meal 1 (3-pound) head cauliflower Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Cut the cauliflower into quarters through the core, then cut out the core and leaves from each quarter in one cut. Trim any remaining core and leaves (it’s OK to leave a little of the stems from the cauliflower attached to the florets). Break the cauliflower into approximately 2-inch florets. It’s OK if they are a little bigger or smaller — it’s more important that they be more or less equal in size. Put half of the cauliflower in a food processor and process, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl with a spatula a few times, until the cauliflower is uniformly broken down to the texture of wet sand. You might be tempted to stop here, but keep on going. Continue to process, stopping to scrape the sides of the bowl with a spatula a few times, until the blade easily moves the mixture around to create a wet, smooth, creamy mashed potato texture with little flecks. If any chunks larger than a green pea remain from the first batch (check by spreading the first batch over the baking sheet and running your fingers through it), add them to the second batch. Repeat with the remaining cauliflower. Spread the cauliflower on the prepared baking sheet in an even layer and bake for 15 minutes. The object of baking is to release moisture from the cauliflower without browning it. There won’t be much of a visual change — if it starts to brown, remove it from the oven immediately. Cool the cauliflower on the sheet completely. Put about 1/4 of the cauliflower meal in a nut milk bag or wrap it in four layers of cheesecloth. Twist, then wring the liquid out over a bowl or the sink. Break the soon-to-be meal apart, then twist again until it is as dry as you can get it. Repeat this four or five times, until you can’t squeeze out any more liquid. Expect to drain up to 2 cups liquid (the amount will vary for each batch). You should be able to form the final product into a smooth round that can crumble somewhat easily but still hold its form fairly well, like soft clay. Use as directed in your recipe, or cover and refrigerate immediately (cauliflower meal starts to turn very quickly when left out). It will keep in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Do not freeze.

Cali’flour Pizza Crust Ingredients

5 ounces (1 cup loosely crumbled) Cauliflower Meal 1/2 cup shredded low-moisture whole milk mozzarella cheese (not fresh) 1 large egg

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees and line a baking sheet with parchment paper. In a medium bowl, combine all the ingredients and mix with a rubber spatula to incorporate. Form the dough into a disc shape then, using your hands, press the dough out onto the prepared baking sheet to form an even 9-inch circle. Place in the oven and bake for about 30 minutes, until firm and lightly browned. Remove from the oven and use a metal spatula to slide the crust onto a wire rack to cool before adding your toppings. If you’re not using the crust right away, store in a zip-top freezer bag in the freezer for up to 9 months. Do not refrigerate. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

13


NEWS CLIPS

TELL US ABOUT YOUR PET Do you have a great story about your pet? Do you have a dog that found its way home after being lost? Have a cat that does fun tricks? Enter Colorado Country Life’s Pet Story Contest by May 22 and share what makes your pet special. Tell us how your dog learned to yodel or how a hamster taught your child responsibility. The best story will win $250, with second place earning $150 and third place $100. Visit our website at coloradocountrylife.coop and click on Contests and then Pet Stories for a full list of rules and a form to enter the contest. Those without a computer may send entries to Pet Stories, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216, but make sure to include a photo of your pet, your name, address, phone number, email and local electric co-op name.

STATEWIDE COOPERATIVE SUPPORT The Colorado Rural Electric Association is the statewide trade association for all of Colorado’s electric cooperatives. Following the sixth cooperative principle, the organization provides communication, education, safety and legislative services to local distribution cooperatives. Review those services and how they benefit you as a consumer-member of the electric co-op by reading the 2019 Year in Review. It was published for CREA’s recent annual meeting. The 24-page booklet highlights the value the statewide organization brings to its member co-ops through each department.

View the Year in Review at crea.coop/ about/crea-annual-meeting.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020


NEWS CLIPS

CO-OPS ASSEMBLE WATER FILTERS FOR BOLIVIA More than 100 water filters are ready for distribution to homes in a primitive village in Bolivia. Colorado’s electric cooperatives are sending another international team later this year to build power lines to a village without electricity, this time in South America. In preparation, co-op directors, managers and employees from around the state worked with Wine to Water to assemble this year’s water filters. The project was part of the Sunday, February 9 annual meeting banquet celebrating CREA’s 75th year of serving as the co-ops’ statewide association. Wine to Water is a nonprofit organization providing clean water around the globe. The organization digs wells, repairs well equipment and provides water filters in places where clean water is hard to find. CREA has also been dedicated to bringing clean water along with electricity to the Guatemalan communities where it has built power lines with NRECA International. In each village, the team left a water filter with each family. This year’s filters will be added to buckets once the team is in Bolivia to create a system that will last 10 years. Wine to Water founder Doc Hendley, also participated in the CREA event, telling the story of how, as a bartender, he launched an organization. He explained how he became passionate about clean water and wanted to do something to make a difference. Anyone wishing help make a difference by donating to fund these water filters and other humanitarian supplies that will be left behind for Bolivian villagers, can do so through crea. coop. Click on Community Outreach.

Cooperative leaders assemble filter kits with help from Wine to Water volunteers.

Board members carefully assemble water filters that will be given to Bolivian villagers.

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15


COVER STORY

SIMPLY COLORADO 2020 Photo Contest Winners

E

lliot Erwitt said, “The whole point of taking pictures is so you don’t have to explain things with words.” Colorado simply speaks for itself through the photos readers submitted to Colorado Country Life’s 2020 photo contest. More than 870 photos were entered into all categories of the contest: Sunrise, Sunset; Outdoor Activities; Wildlife; and Colorado Landscapes. And new this year, we set up specific parameters for a cover contest. The photos we received were impressive. Sunseekers in the golden hour captured stunning oranges, reds and pinks painting Colorado skies. Outdoor weekend warriors caught sleighride, hikes, ski days and ballooning adventures. Wildlife enthusiasts snapped bears, snakes, beautiful birds of all sizes, bees, bighorn sheep and even a spider spinning a web. Colorado landscapes, which never disappoint, were captured beautifully by readers. Shots of iconic snowy Maroon Bells, vast expanses of fall’s changing colors and unique points of view in obscure corners of the wilderness came together to tell a story of our state’s natural beauty in all seasons. We hope these winning photos capture your imagination like they did ours. We’re sure they will bring you an indescribable connection to this state we all proudly call home. The photos on the following pages are all the first- and second-place winners across the four categories. You can find all these photos and the third-place winners on our website at coloradocountrylife.coop. You’ll also find a video featuring the winners and other favorite photos on our YouTube channel at /COCountryLife1. Enjoy more of readers’ photos of Colorado all year on Facebook (/COCountryLife) and Instagram (@COCountryLife).

COLORADO LANDSCAPES - 2ND PLACE Dawn Lit Peaks by Shane Morrison, Colorado Springs Mountain View Electric Association consumer-member

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

SUNRISE SUNSET - 2ND PLACE The Golden Hour by Emilie Gunderson, Windsor Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer-member


COVER STORY

WILDLIFE - 2ND PLACE Cedar Waxwing by David Dahms, Windsor Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer-member

WILDLIFE - 1ST PLACE Reassurance by Donnell Allen, Colorado Springs Mountain View Electric Association consumer-member

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

17


COVER STORY

COLORADO LANDSCAPES - 1ST PLACE Old House on the Plains by J.R. Schnelzer, Millikin Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer-member

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020


COVER STORY

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES - 1ST PLACE Colorado Winter Fun by Jim Bommarito, Durango La Plata Electric Association consumer-member

SUNRISE SUNSET- 1ST PLACE Bear Lake Sunrise Submitted by Bob Toepfer, Walsenberg San Isabel Electric Association consumer-member

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

19


COVER STORY

OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES - 2ND PLACE Morning Float Over Hot Springs Submitted by Kimberlee Hutcherson, Pagosa Springs La Plata Electric Association consumer-member

20

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020


GARDENING

ACCUSTOM YOURSELF TO ADAPTIVE GARDENING Don’t let physical limitations halt your love of horticulture

BY VICKI SPENCER

A

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

daptive sports, which originated as a means of rehabilitating war veterans with permanent injuries, expanded over the past century to include people of all ages and abilities. Today, the development of specialized recreational equipment allows thousands to participate in activities ranging from basketball to skiing and rock climbing. I personally discovered the benefits of adaptive techniques after my physical therapist suggested the STARS program in Steamboat Springs. My snowboarding experience was so exhilarating I began to think about applying adaptive techniques to my other passion: gardening. Our bodies change throughout life and we are presented with challenges requiring us to change how we do things. If you have difficulty stooping, kneeling, sitting or maintaining balance on uneven ground; if you need to reduce joint stress; or if you need to rely on a wheelchair or walker for mobility, you don’t need to abandon activities you enjoy. After acknowledging limitations, there are ways to work around them. It took me awhile to learn this lesson, but fortunately I have a physical therapist who does not accept failure.

Each time I complained about limitations, she suggested solutions. When I could not prepare my garden bed, she said to ask for help or hire someone. This was hard as I’ve always been extremely independent. However, I found that I enjoyed companionship as friends and relatives dug weeds, turned soil and added compost. Removing pesky crabapple tree roots was going to take time, but it didn’t matter because I could only reach the garden edges from my walker. I only planted tomatoes, peppers and beets. Although modest in size, my garden was amazingly productive. The next year, I considered building raised garden beds surrounded by wide, smooth paths to make maneuvering easier with a wheelchair or walker. I discovered a variety of raised bed designs, but particularly liked my sister’s waist-high beds constructed of stacked bricks. (The bed needs to be lower for wheelchair access.) The wide bricks are perfect for resting garden tools and it’s safe to lean against the sturdy walls. Beds should not be too deep so you can reach across them to

plant, weed and harvest. Two to 3 feet works if you can only access from one side; double that if you can walk around the bed. You should also include an automatic drip system to make watering easier. A variety of ergonomic garden tools are available to alleviate stress or arthritic pain in shoulders, wrists and hands. I carry my tools in a sturdy apron with multiple pockets, but you could wear farm overalls like my grandfather did. I also carry a small, plastic bucket with a handle for weeding and harvesting. It rests comfortably on a walker. Adaptive techniques helped me garden again, but I lost track of time while enjoying myself and started having backaches. Again, my therapist had a solution. She said to pace myself, take frequent breaks and lengthen tight muscles by bending and stretching in the opposite direction. While I benefited from having a therapist as a coach, you can learn a lot about adaptive gardening on the internet. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

21


INDUSTRY

Co-ops Keep Power Flowing Despite COVID-19 Virus

C

olorado’s electric cooperatives, including their power suppliers, are in emergency mode, protecting critical personnel and making sure the lights stay on for consumermembers across the state during the new coronavirus pandemic. The state’s 22 electric cooperatives provide electricity to an estimated 1.75 million Coloradans living and working in all four corners of the state. Serving consumer-members along the edges of the Front Range population areas, as well as those who live down quiet country roads, the co-ops serve 70% of the state’s landmass. Co-op employees, including the CEOs and managers, the lineworkers and the office personnel, all understand how critical the electricity they provide is getting to everyone through the current situation. The co-ops are doing everything they can to make sure your electricity stays on and CREA, the statewide trade association for the co-ops, is working to support the co-ops in these efforts.

Keeping personnel safe Personnel at your electric co-op are meeting regularly to assess the situation as closures, restrictions and the status of the virus change. Protocols are in place to make sure that the staff, particularly the critical staff, including lineworkers and control room operators, are healthy and following procedures to maintain their health. Your co-op is also in contact with the other co-ops around the state and has made plans for assistance in case there is a need. Co-op employees are the ones who will make sure the lights stay on. With that in mind, each co-op has established protocols that are appropriate for the community they serve. Some, especially those serving the ski resort communities where early cases of COVID-19 were reported, immediately closed their facilities to public access. Other co-ops quickly followed to lessen the chances of staff contracting the virus.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

Co-op office lobbies have been closed to the public; employees who can are working from home. No outside travel is allowed. Meetings are conducted over the phone or internet. However, none of that means that co-op services for consumermembers has stopped. Member services representatives are still available to answer questions and resolve problems. The Colorado electric co-ops that utilize upgraded digital meters also have account information online for consumer-members that is available through your co-op’s app or website. These apps and websites allow consumers-members to view their usage and connect with auto-pay services. Information is updated regularly on each co-op’s website and Facebook page. Some co-ops also offer information through Twitter and Instagram. Check with your local electric cooperative about newly implemented procedures designed to keep you as a consumermember and staff members at the co-op safe and healthy.

Sharing information The co-ops are also benefiting from their connection to other co-ops across the country. Weekly phone calls with co-ops in other states and the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association allow Colorado’s co-ops to learn from others, discuss ways to keep employees safe and share alternate ways to provide specific services to consumer-members. Colorado’s electric cooperatives are committed to maintaining reliable electric service for all of their consumer-members during this crisis and will do everything in their power to serve their communities.


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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

BAIT AND TACKLE TALK

Adjusting to modern-day fishing techniques BY DENNIS SMITH

M

OUTDOORS@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

ore than any other month, April triggers my sense of nostalgia — at least where trout fishing is concerned. Having been raised in the Catskills, I’m conditioned to think of April as the month fishing season officially opens, even if that’s not really the case here in Colorado. Though I seldom fish with them anymore, worms are what I think of in April and the warm, rainy nights we spent doubled over in the backyard with kerosene lanterns and tin cans catching night crawlers. We could have used flashlights, but the soft, diffused glow of a lantern didn’t alarm crawlers like the intense, concentrated beam of a D-cell flashlight. Oddly enough, we valued the little night crawlers most, and saved the big, juicy ones for bass and catfish. Small crawlers and garden worms were reserved specifically for trout. Using worms for trout today is seen as a bit primitive and actually forbidden on our “catch-and-release, flies-and-lures-only” trout streams, but in the ’50s and ’60s it was considered something of an acquired art and my father was an acknowledged master at it. The hot outfit of the day was a soft-action, 9-foot, fiberglass fly rod and an “automatic” fly reel spooled with heavy monofilament line, usually 20- or 30-pound test. A small bait hook was knotted to the terminal end of a 6-foot leader made of 4-pound test monofilament and weighted with strips of “wrap-around” lead ribbon as water conditions dictated. Lead strips were preferred to split shot because they could easily slide up and down the leader as needed. The entire rig was lobbed upstream and allowed to drift back down at the same speed as the current while the angler watched the line for any suspicious wiggles, bumps or taps that might signal a

A real worm and some fly fishing counterparts: aquatic annelid flies.

trout taking the bait. Today, of course, fly fishermen use fake worms made of chenille, wool, thread and wire, and call them aquatic annelid “flies” because it sounds more socially acceptable than “worms.” Back in the day, my father used to tie a 1-inch patch of white cloth to his leader so he could trace every fickle movement of the line as he nursed the worm carefully through the currents. In effect, he was the first person I ever saw use what we commonly think of today as a strike indicator. More interesting, perhaps, is that the technique he used to dredge up the biggest fish in the river with his worms is the precisely same technique modern-day, high-tech fly fishermen refer to as “dead-drift, high sticking,” or “short-line nymphing.” That style of fly fishing was reportedly developed on our own South Platte River by some highly respected fly fishermen not so long ago. I often wonder if any of them recognized that they were really just bait fishing — but with a fly instead of a worm. Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors under Living in Colorado.


As a cooperative we are taking bold steps to change how your energy is produced. That means fewer emissions and 50 percent of your electricity coming from renewable energy by 2024. Because whatever the future holds, we’ll power it.

To learn more about our Responsible Energy Plan, visit www.tristate.coop COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

25


MARKETPLACE

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COMMUNITY EVENTS Due to COVID-19, some of these events may be canceled or rescheduled. Please contact the host of the event if you have any questions.

April 2020 April 11 Colorado Springs

Chocolate Bunny Egg Hunt Prepaid Registration Required 719-520-6388 • elpasoco.com/ naturecenters

April 12-May 22 Mesa Verde

Hourly Cliff Palace Ranger-Guided Tours Mesa Verde National Park 9 am-5 pm • nps.gov

April 18 Durango

“Pollinators at Work in Your Garden” Class Durango Recreation Center 9 am-12 pm • durangobotanicgardens.org

April 18 Mesa Verde

Free Admission Day Mesa Verde National Park nps.gov

April 24-26 Karval

Mountain Plover Festival Karval Community Building 719-892-0864 • mountainploverfestival.com

April 17 Fort Collins

Wine Fest Hilton Fort Collins winefestfc.org

April 24 Loveland

April 17-19 Loveland

Spring Used Book Sale McKee Community Building at The Ranch 970-962-2712 • friendsofthelovelandlibrary.rog

Governor’s Art Show Opening Night Gala Loveland Museum 6-8:30 pm • governorsartshow.org

April 24-25 Stoneham

Primitive Junk Spring Market Sale Primitive Junk Market 970-522-6858

April 25 Colorado Springs

Spring Fling 5K Poker Ride/Run Bear Creek Regional Park equestrianskillscourse.org

April 25-26 Greeley

Spring Ice Show Greeley Ice Haus 970-350-9402 • greeleyicehaus.com

April 25 Greeley

The Colorado Dance Collective’s “Wanderlust” Union Colony Civic Center 7:30 pm • ucstars.com

April 29-May 3 Cañon City

Cañon City Music & Blossom Festival Various Cañon City Locations ccblossomfestival.com

April 30-May 3 Black Forest

Arts and Crafts Spring Show and Sale Black Forest Community Center bfacg.org

RULES: Colorado Country Life is looking for pet stories explaining what makes your pet special or what amazing things your pet has done. 1st, 2nd and 3rd place and runners up published in the magazine will be awarded cash. Stories will be published in the September magazine. RULES FOR THE CONTEST ARE AS FOLLOWS: 1. Story must be told in no more than 300 words. 2. Deadline to enter is May 22. Entry must be received in the office by 4:30 p.m. 3. Entries may be typed or handwritten. 4. Photo of the pet must be included with the entry. If the photo is sent digitally, it must be at least 4X5 inches in size at 300 dpi. 5. For digital entries, complete the form at: www.coloradocountrylife.coop/2020-pet-story-contest-entry-form-and-rules/ 6. Mailed entries must be sent to Pet Story Contest, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216. 7. All mailed entries must include name, address, phone, email address and local electric co-op with story and photo. 1st Place wins $250 2nd Place wins $150 3rd Place wins $100 Runners up published in the magazine receive $75

Questions may be sent to info@coloradocountrylife.org.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

May 2020 May 1-2 Cortez

Sell and Sale: Consignment Horse Tack and Equipment Montezuma County Fairgrounds 970-529-3486

May 1 Fraser

Free Local History Open House Cozens Ranch Museum 10:30 am-12 pm • 970-726-5488

May 2-3 Mancos

“The Blacksmith” A Comic Opera Historic Mancos Opera House mancoscreativedistrict.com

May 3 Mancos

Spring Chorus Concert Mancos United Methodist Church 3:30 pm • 970-533-9165


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES A grandmother did not know if her

Volunteer firefighters in rural Picton, NSW, Australia, get a visit from Colorado Country Life. This photo was taken by Deby Merriam, a consumer-member of White River Electric Association.

Empire Electric Association consumer-member Joel Gamache travels to the Great Pyramids of Giza and poses with Colorado Country Life magazine.

little granddaughter had learned her colors yet, so she decided to test her. The grandmother would point out something and ask her granddaughter, “What color it that?” The granddaughter always answered correctly. It was so much fun, the grandmother continued with the game. Finally, the little girl threw her hands up and said, “Grandma, I am done. I think you should try to figure out some of these colors yourself without my help!” Penny Hamilton, Granby

My grandson had just started

kindergarten and, at the end of the day, my daughter and 3-year-old granddaughter went to pick him up at school. She saw his classroom and playground, and on the way home she asked him, “So, where was the garden?” Margi Barnhart, Grand Lake

My great-granddaughter’s mom

WINNER: Mountain Parks Electric consumer-members Elizabeth Sanjuan and Ken Brown travel to the frozen shoreline of the Sea of Okhotsk near Abashiri, Hokkaido, Japan, with Colorado Country Life.

It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and (even while at home) email the photo, your name and address to info@coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Wednesday, April 15. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

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1AE2AX © 2020

Towable and PTO models too!

was getting dressed when Elaina asked her mommy, “Where are you going?” Mommy answered, “To the gym.” Elaina then asked, “Why?” Mommy answered, “I want to stay pretty.” Elaina had a much easier solution: “If you change your shirt you’ll be pretty.” Anthony Abeyta, Trinidad

We were babysitting our 3-yearold grandson and, as we were to eat, he was standing on a chair. He was asked to “please sit on his hiney” so he wouldn’t fall. He said something we didn’t understand, so we asked him to repeat himself. He tapped his knee and said, “I don’t have a ‘high knee’ I have a ‘low knee.’” We burst out laughing. Pat Busa, Peyton

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2020 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@ coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check.

888-213-0339 COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020

29


DISCOVERIES

GREAT FOR YOUR GARDEN Colorado products to help plants grow

photo courtesy of BuildASoil

Boost Your Garden’s Health BuildASoil in Montrose was born after owner Jeremy Silva’s personal garden became the talk amongst his friends. His secret? A worm bin, aged compost and earthworm castings – and loads of information building along the way. Today, Silva sells soils, supplements, seeds, amendments, minerals, worms and more. You can even purchase your own worm inn, making it easy to create your own vermicompost for your gardening endeavors. For more information, call 855-877-7645 or visit buildasoil.com.

Sow Sensational Seeds

Room to Grow

Watch as your veiled seeds sprout through the soil and transform to stunning, mature flowers and vegetables. Choose local with these Colorado companies whose seeds you can purchase at nearby nurseries or by contacting them directly.

Come rain, snow, sleet or hail, you can grow a garden worthy of envy all year long. Growing Spaces, a 30-year-old Pagosa Springs company, manufactures the Growing Dome®, a geodesic greenhouse that can help your family grow goodness from your own backyard 365 days per year. The geodesic shape allows sunshine to reach your produce in every direction while keeping the harsh outdoor elements out. Prices start at $8,450 for a 175-square-foot greenhouse. For more information, visit growingspaces.com.

High Ground Gardens, Crestone highgroundgardens.com Botanical Interests, Broomfield 877-821-4340 • botanicalinterests.com

Feed Your Garden Go local with your garden nutrients from Rocky Mountain Organic Supply. The Colorado Springs-based worm farmers can help your garden grow gorgeously and organically with worm castings, soil amendments and additional supplies. If your gardening thumb isn’t quite green yet, RMOS offers consultations and planning services to help foster a healthy soil environment for a vigorous garden. For more information, call 719-445-7135 or visit rockymountainorganicsupply.com.

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE APRIL 2020


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grounded receptacle

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$1 9

$

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29

BLUE

ITEM 37050, 64417, 61363, 68496, 68497, 61360, 61359, 68498, 64418 shown

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22999YOOFUR7 COCHLOOIRSCE SAVE 630 $1 9999

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830

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9 $279

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9 $399

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15

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$5 99

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9

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At Harbor Freight Tools, the “Compare to” price means that the specified comparison, which is an item with the same or similar function, was advertised for sale at or above the “Compare to” price by another national retailer in the U.S. within the past 90 days. Prices advertised by others may vary by location. No other meaning of “Compare to” should be implied. For more information, go to HarborFreight.com or see store associate.


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Colorado Country Life April 2020 K.C.