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MARCH 2019

Capturing Colorado at Play 2019 PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

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Volume 50

Number 03

March 2019 THE OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF THE COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION COMMUNICATIONS STAFF Mona Neeley, CCC, Publisher/Editor mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org Cassi Gloe, CCC, Production Manager/Designer cgloe@coloradocountrylife.org Kylee Coleman, Editorial/Admin. Assistant kcoleman@coloradocountrylife.org ADVERTISING Kris Wendtland, Ad Representative advertising@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-902-7276 National Advertising Representative, American MainStreet Publications 611 S. Congress Street, Suite 504, Austin, TX 78704 | 800-626-1181 Advertising Standards: Publication of an advertisement in Colorado Country Life does not imply endorsement by any Colorado rural electric cooperative or the Colorado Rural Electric Association. Colorado Country Life (USPS 469-400/ISSN 1090-2503) is published monthly by Colorado Rural Electric Association, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216-1731. Periodical postage paid at Denver, Colorado. ©Copyright 2019, Colorado Rural Electric Association. Call for reprint rights. EDITORIAL Denver Corporate Office, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216 mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org | 303-455-4111 coloradocountrylife.coop | facebook.com/COCountryLife Pinterest.com/COCountryLife | Instagram.com/cocountrylife Twitter.com/COCountryLife | YouTube.com/COCountryLife1 Editorial opinions published in Colorado Country Life magazine shall pertain to issues affecting rural electric cooperatives, rural communities and citizens. The opinion of CREA is not necessarily that of any particular cooperative or individual. SUBSCRIBERS Report change of address to your local cooperative. Do not send change of address to Colorado Country Life. Cost of subscription for members of participating electric cooperatives is $4.44 per year (37 cents per month), paid from equity accruing to the member. For nonmembers, a subscription is $9 per year in-state/$15 out-of-state.

2019 PHOTO CONTEST WINNERS

PLUS

CO-OPS EMBRACE RENEWABLE ENERGY

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CANNED GOOD COOKING

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EASY TO GROW GARDENS

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4 VIEWPOINT

5 LETTERS

6 ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT

7 YOUR CO-OP NEWS

12 RECIPES

14 NEWS CLIPS

16 COVER STORY

COCountryLife pinned: Pasta with Spinach Pesto: a delicious recipe that you can create with ease using canned goods from your pantry.

21 INDUSTRY

22 GARDENING

26 MARKETPLACE

28 COMMUNITY EVENTS

Cover

29 YOUR STORIES

Photo contest third place winner, Water at Play: “Gosling in the Pond” by Leslie Larson of Lyons, a Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumermember.

30 DISCOVERIES

FACEBOOK CHATTER CREA posted: Mountain View Electric Association recently brought electricity to a 149-year-old cabin built in what was once the town of Gwillimville. The cabin, which was falling down, was preserved and restored, and MVEA turned its lights on for the first time at the first of the year.

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a copy of Wildflowers of the Rocky Mountain Region by Denver Botanic Gardens or one of two other garden books. For the names of the books, official rules and how to enter, visit our contest page at coloradocountrylife.coop.

coloradocountrylife.coop

PINTEREST SNEAK PEEK

CAPTURING COLORADO AT PLAY

24 OUTDOORS

On the Capturing Colorado at Play

POSTMASTER Send address changes to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington Street, Denver, CO 80216

MARCH 2019

Photo by Shane Morrison of Colorado Springs, a member of Mountain View Electric Association.

INSTAGRAM PIC of the month cocountrylife posted: #winter has been in full force across much of Colorado for the last couple of days. What’s it been like where you are? Illustration by #cathymorrisonillustrates #winterday #snowstorm2019 COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

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VIEWPOINT

Co-ops Embrace Renewable Energy Exciting projects are under way at electric co-ops all over the state BY KENT SINGER

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

U

nprecedented. That’s the best word I can think of to describe the number of renewable energy projects that are being developed by Colorado’s electric cooperatives. Each of our 22 co-ops is finding new and innovative ways to add renewable projects to its system in ways that work for that co-op and its system. Here’s just a sampling: Tri-State Generation & Transmission Association, power supplier to 18 of Colorado’s 22 electric distribution co-ops, announced that it will add 104 megawatts of wind power to its power supply mix with the signing of a power purchase agreement for the output of the Crossing Trails Wind Farm. Tri-State has now invested in five utility-scale wind farms in Colorado, along with four utility-scale solar projects. Highline Electric Association in Holyoke recently approved a 1.5-megawatt solar project with construction slated to begin in 2019. The 5,700 single-track solar panels will follow the sun and generate enough electricity to power 400 to 500 homes. The Riverview Solar Project will generate 3.8 million kilowatt-hours per year and will provide power to the communities of Sterling, Atwood, West Plains, Iliff and Crook. Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association in Fort Collins continues to add renewable projects and now has six solar facilities spread throughout its service territory. It also explored the benefits of battery storage with a 10-kilowatt-hour system in its community room. The battery is part of a study on how local storage could help co-op members manage their energy use. White River Electric Association in Meeker recently celebrated the completion of

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

the Piceance Creek Solar Farm, a 5.4-megawatt system that will provide enough energy to power more than 830 single family homes each year. “WREA’s local renewables aren’t about trendy efforts but are projects that are designed to have a positive impact on our community and our rates,” said Trina Zagar-Brown, general counsel and manager of member services at WREA. WREA members will be able to lease solar panels from the solar farm later this year. Intermountain Rural Electric Association in Sedalia continues to expand its solar capacity with the recent approval of the Sundance Solar project, a 30-megawatt facility near Kiowa that will be energized in 2020. The Sundance project is in addition to an 80-megawatt solar project near the town of Bennett as well as the 13-megawatt Victory Solar farm in Adams County. Holy Cross Energy in Glenwood Springs, which buys its power from Xcel Energy, recently announced that it will acquire the output of a new 100-megawatt wind farm in 2021 as part of a plan to provide more of its consumers’ needs from clean energy. In 2018, Mountain Parks Electric Association in Granby paid rebates

KENT SINGER

totaling $34,260 to its consumer-members who installed renewable energy systems. Mountain Parks also purchases renewable energy from the Granby Dam and the town of Grand Lake’s micro hydropower recovery system and the co-op plans to purchase power from a 1-megawatt solar array that will be built in Jackson County in 2019. Although the integration of renewable energy into the co-op power supply mix is not new, the pace at which Colorado’s electric co-ops are integrating cost-effective renewable energy sources has never been seen before. There’s only one word for it: unprecedented.

Kent Singer, executive director

Kent Singer is the executive director of the Colorado Rural Electric Association and offers a statewide perspective on issues affecting electric cooperatives. CREA is the trade association for your electric co-op, the 21 other electric co-ops in Colorado and its power supply co-op.


LETTERS

FROM THE EDITOR

The advantages of small town living

BY MONA NEELEY

I

EDITOR

love small towns. I love that people know each other and care about each other and, most importantly, are there for each other. I was reminded of the amazing community of small towns this last month when the Midwest was deep in subzero temperatures. My mom lives in northern Iowa. She is 88 years old and lives by herself in the house I grew up in. The furnace went out when the temperature was minus 28 degrees. And, in the middle of us solving the heat problem, her phone went out. I’m 800 miles away. There’s not much I can do from here. I’m so thankful for her neighbors, people I grew up with, who went out in that awful weather and quickly solved the phone problem so she could communicate

with the outside MONA NEELEY world again. And it wasn’t long before her furnace was heating the house again, thanks to another guy I grew up with finding someone to fix the heat once he knew there was a problem. My mom does still live by herself, but because she lives in a small town, she is not alone.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

In Favor of Many Sources of Fuel

I just read “Net Metering: How it impacts electric cooperatives” (January ’19). Electric cooperatives buy their power from a variety of sources. They buy solar-generated electricity just like they buy wind- or coal-generated electricity. Solar is especially helpful in western Colorado since it generates the most electricity during times when air-conditioning demand is highest. That keeps the utility from having to buy extra electricity from newer, more expensive power plants. Having many sources of electricity is a good idea since it keeps us from being at the whim of unfriendly countries or changes in the world economy. Lee Casin, De Beque Grand Valley Power member

The Woodcarver Mona Neeley, Colorado Country Life editor Mona Neeley is the statewide editor of Colorado Country Life, which is published in coordination with your local electric cooperative. Its goal is to provide information from your local electric co-op to you, its consumer-members.

Magic happens in the wood shop when mom or dad or grandpa or grandma set to work on a little project. This beautifully written poem (“The Woodcarver,” January ’19) describes the ageless bond between man and wood. But, on my ranch, nothing goes unnoticed when my daughter or granddaughters are in my shop. If the girls don’t get to do what the boys do, I am in trouble. James Kenshalo, Collbran Grand Valley Power member

We Need to Come Together

The “us-versus-them” state of our country alarms me. Kent Singer’s Viewpoint (February ’19) just played the “those New York Times city slickers just don’t understand real people” card. I didn’t read the message as “them” thinking that folks don’t want to live in rural America with its clean air, neighbors, etc. Of course, we want to live here. The problem is we’re having trouble trying to be able to, which is a horrifying truth. The column is just shooting fish in a barrel and it’s divisive. Michael Walker, Bayfield La Plata Electric Association member

SEND US YOUR LETTERS Editor Mona Neeley at 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or at mneeley@coloradocountrylife.org. Letters may be edited. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

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ASK THE ENERGY EXPERT LEARN MORE ONLINE

PUSHING EFFICIENT WAYS TO MOW YOUR LAWN

Visit coloradocountrylife.coop to learn more about lawn care. Look under the Energy tab.

BY PAT KEEGAN AND BR AD THIESSEN | COLLABOR ATIVE EFFICIENCY

U

ntil recently, corded and cordless electric mowers tended to be underpowered. For cordless mowers, this fact was made worse by their subpar battery life. But today, with those problems largely solved, the best electric mowers have the power and battery life to keep pace with a gas mower, depending on the size of your lawn. A cordless, electric mower with a large

The fuel savings also depend on the size of your lot. A small lot uses less gas, so fuel cost savings are less significant. Electric mowers are much quieter than gas mowers and they start instantly. Electric mowers produce less “tailpipe” emissions, but the overall environmental impact depends on how the electricity you’re using to charge the mower is generated. The environmental

manual reel mower. Some models are more effective than you might think, are far less expensive and require little maintenance or storage space. The most dramatic step you could take is replacing your lawn completely, perhaps with water-efficient landscaping, a rock garden, a vegetable garden or even an artificial lawn. This could dramatically cut your water bill

56-volt battery can run for about one hour. And though quality electric mowers tend to cost twice as much as a new equivalent gas model, you can recoup some of the expense with cheaper operating costs. Electricity is a less expensive fuel than gas, and electric engines generally require less maintenance than gas engines.

benefits will be greater if the electricity is generated from renewable energy sources. If your goals are to save money and hassle while protecting the environment, you can minimize your need for a mower or get rid of the need completely. If you want to mow your lawn regularly and don’t mind breaking a sweat, consider a

and the environmental impact of a lawn. Any lawn care changes you make will require a little research, but it’s great to know the option of an electric mower is more viable than ever. This column was co-written by Pat Keegan and Brad Thiessen of Collaborative Efficiency.

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

DIRECTOR DUTIES & COMPENSATION A Local Viewpoint BY ROD MARTINEZ,

I

PRESIDENT, GR AND VALLEY POWER BOARD OF DIRECTORS

believe that Grand Valley Power’s hometown nature is a big reason for its success over the years. Everyone in the organization — members, directors and employees — has a connection to Mesa County. With local ownership, operation and governance, our cooperative structure encourages open lines of communication that build trust and accountability. If you have a question about something the co-op is doing, you can pick up the phone and talk to one of your directors. Since he or she lives and works in your community and faces the same kind of challenges you face, they are likely to understand your perspective and answer your question in a meaningful way. The hometown governance of electric co-ops is widely recognized as a good thing, but it presents its own set of challenges. Our cooperative has assets totaling about $90 million and takes in more than $30 million per year in revenue. This qualifies as big business in our neck of the woods. We must have directors on our governing board with financial literacy and competency in planning and other key areas. Expertise and experience in these areas is not always easy to find. With the pace of change in the world around us, it is critical for Grand Valley Power to have the ability to attract and develop qualified directors. A director is a person elected or appointed to the governing board of the organization. Collectively, directors are authorized to direct the affairs of Grand Valley Power. The board must ensure the long-term operational and fiscal health of the cooperative. It must provide guidance so that the direction of the organization is consistent with the wishes of its consumer-members. All the power

of the cooperative, except that explicitly reserved to the membership, resides in the board. In exercising this power, the directors cannot disregard obligations that the cooperative may have under state or federal laws or regulations, such as Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Environmental Protection Agency regulations or federal antitrust laws. With power comes responsibility and potential liabilities common to all corporate directors. A cooperative board of directors has three fundamental roles: 1. Representing members and advocating their interests. The board must prudently represent the interests of the cooperative and the interests of the members as a group in directing the business and affairs of the cooperative within the law. 2. Fiduciary oversight responsibility. A fiduciary is one who owes to another the duties of good faith, trust, confidence and candor; one who must exercise a high standard of care in managing another’s money or property. These duties are owed to all members. 3. Regulator-setting rates. R ates must be just, reasonable and defensible. They must be sufficient to cover necessary costs; and be nondiscriminatory regarding consumers, classes of consumers or locations. They must ensure that electric service is adequate, safe and dependable and be responsive or restored in a timely manner. GVP belongs to its consumer-members and is operated as a business for and in the best interest of GVP’s consumer-members. The board of directors has the power to determine the corporate mission; approve

ROD MARTINEZ, GUEST COLUMNIST

policies; allocate resources; decide what lines of business to be in (consistent with state law); hire, appraise and compensate the CEO; approve the auditor; approve the corporate attorney; and hire, select and retain other consultants as needed. For an electric co-op board of directors, proper management of these concerns would not be possible without training and education. This kind of training and education requires an investment by the co-op, and by the individual director. The co-op pays for instructors, materials and facilities used for training, and the individual director contributes his or her time and effort. Directors attend courses covering topics such as strategic planning, financial decision-making and energy risk management. Members of the Grand Valley Power board devote the time and attention necessary to go to school to learn what they need to know to carry out their duties for the members of the co-op. In order to ensure that it can engage qualified men and women to serve on its board, Grand Valley Power bylaws provide that directors should be compensated. In this context, it is fair for co-op members to want to know how much their directors are spending on themselves. Grand Valley Power compares favorably with other Colorado cooperatives. In 2018 cooperatives in the state expended an average of about $208,000 to compensate directors and pay for travel and tuition in connection with industry conferences and education. In comparison, Grand Valley Power incurred expenses totaling about $145,000 for its nine COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

7


YOUR CO-OP NEWS directors. The rate impact averages out to about $9.21 per meter annually. Breaking it down further, this equates to about 8 cents per director per month. It is important to note that the level of participation and engagement of each director impacts the amount of compensation he or she receives. If a director misses a board meeting or does not take advantage of educational opportunities, compensation will not be as great. The board president and GVP board members who serve as directors on the boards of associated cooperatives receive additional compensation. Members with questions about the details of Grand Valley Power’s director compensation

policies are encouraged to contact me or any member of our board of directors. Director email addresses can be located on gvp.org. When I look around the GVP boardroom, I see that what drives our directors is a commitment to the communities they call home. With their service, they are simply trying to improve the quality of life in these communities. Their real reward comes in knowing that they have helped our cooperative achieve this goal, for their friends and neighbors across the Grand Valley. COMMENTS TO THE CEO You are a member of a cooperative and your opinion does count. If you have any questions, concerns or comments, please

let Tom Walch know by writing to Ask the CEO, P.O. Box 190, Grand Junction, CO 81502, or send an email to twalch@gvp.org. Check out our website at gvp.org. BOARD MEETING NOTICE Grand Valley Power board meetings are open to the members, consumers and public. Regularly scheduled board meetings are held at 9 a.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at the headquarters building located at 845 22 Road, Grand Junction, The monthly agenda is posted in the lobby of the headquarters building 10 days before each meeting, and posted on the GVP website. If anyone desires to address the board of directors, please let us know in advance and you will be placed on the agenda.

FOUR DECADES OF SERVICE: Tom Holman Retires

Tom Holman retires on January 2 after 41 years of service at GVP.

Tom Holman is featured in the 1983 edition of the GVP Annual Report for five years of service.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

Tom Holman, one our talented service planners, has decided to retire from Grand Valley Power after 41 years of service. His last day was January 2. It’s hard for some to imagine four decades of a career at one company. For Tom, it was a simple answer. “I always wondered about where to work [when I was younger] and decided to go to school to be a lineman,” Tom said. “I started at GVP as an apprentice lineman in 1978 and never left. I stayed because we have really great people at GVP and I enjoyed working with our members. Thank you to all of GVP members, employees and the board of directors. I’ll miss working with all the different people.” Born and raised in Montrose, Tom decided to attend the lineworker school at Mesa College, known as Mesa College Hotline School. After school, he was hired on at Grand Valley Power in May 1978 as an apprentice lineman and eventually was named foreman. After 14 years of being in the field, he then moved to engineering as

a service planner. He was responsible for working with consumers directly, building new services or upgrading old ones to ensure their power demands were met. Tom’s dedication over the last four decades definitely deserves a little rest and relaxation. He plans on spending time with his wife, Theresia, and helping out with his granddaughter, Aubrey. In addition, he has some projects at home and golfing in his spare time. “It’s an amazing accomplishment to have an employee reach 40 years of service. We can’t give enough thanks to Tom for his dedication in serving our members all these years,” stated Tom Walch, chief executive officer of Grand Valley Power.

Remember to set your clocks forward Sunday, March 10 for daylight-saving time.


YOUR CO-OP NEWS

DON’T POST ON ME:

POWER POLES

M

ost jobs do not require you to climb 40 feet in the air and conduct business within a few feet of high-voltage power lines that carry 7,200 volts of electricity. However, for many utility workers, this is just another day at the office. Across the nation there are millions of utility poles that provide the electricity that powers everything in your daily life — including the brewing of your morning cup of coffee and the lighting you turn off before going to bed. The electricity we depend on would not be possible without the utility workers who maintain and repair these utility poles. While power poles may seem like a convenient place to advertise for a garage sale or business, they’re the last place you should be hanging anything on. By respecting utility poles, you can help keep your community powered and your local utility workers safe. Posters or other objects (like birdhouses, balloons, flags or décor) create hazards for the lineworkers who repair and maintain

UTILITY POLES ARE NOT BULLETIN BOARDS Staples, nails, tacks and screws used to hang signs and fliers create dangerous obstacles for electric lineworkers.

THINK BEFORE YOU POST THAT SIGN

utility poles and other electrical infrastructure. Utility workers use specialized climbing devices to perform regular maintenance and repair damaged power lines at the top of utility poles. Nails, tacks and other metal objects that are used to attach objects to utility poles can cause a lineworker to slip and can interfere with the safe operation of the climbing tools used by utility workers. Foreign objects that are embedded in utility poles can also snag or damage the protective clothing and gloves that keep

lineworkers safe from electrocution. These men and women already work in extremely hazardous conditions, so everyone who relies on electricity should take steps to make their job as safe as possible. Other items that have been found on utility poles include tree stands for hunting. If you plan on hunting, do not place tree stands or other objects on utility poles. Doing so not only creates a risk for utility workers, but it is also extremely dangerous for yourself or anyone who uses it. For your own safety, please keep as much distance between yourself and overhead power lines as possible. Because our employees work in a dangerous industry, we take safety seriously. We want each and every one of our employees FEWER VISITS TO to make it home safely each YOUR HOME OR BUSINESS night. We have a pretty good track record so far — we recently celebrated 365 days without a lost-time accident. But we need your help to keep it that way. We IMPROVED RELIABILITY SO YOU appreciate your help in keeping HAVE FEWER SERVICE utility poles clear and our lineINTERRUPTIONS workers safe.

ENHANCED METER CORNER BY MEMBER SERVICES

TOP 5 BENEFITS DAILY AND HOURLY ENERGY USE AVAILABLE METERS IDENTIFY SOURCE OF POWER OUTAGES MORE QUICKLY

USAGE DATA CAN HELP YOU MAKE SMARTER ENERGY CHOICES TO SAVE MONEY

GVP is continuing deployment of our enhanced metering project in the Grand Junction area. Visit gvp.org/EnhancedMeters for more information and FAQ's. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

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YOUR CO-OP NEWS

Three Easy DIY Projects to Save Energy

One of the best ways to seal air leaks is to weather strip exterior doors, which can keep out drafts and help you control energy costs. Applying caulk around windows, doors, electrical wiring and plumbing can save energy and money. Photo credit: Rare Form Properties.

BY ABBY BERRY

W

inter weather can have a big impact on your energy bills and pocketbook. Now that spring is just around the corner, it’s the perfect time to tackle a few DIY efficiency projects for your home. The good news: You don’t have to be an energy expert to do this. There are several easy ways to save energy, but if you’re willing to take a hands-on approach, here are three projects you can do now to start saving.

Make the most of your water heater Start with one of the easiest projects: insulating your water heater. Insulating a water heater can save 7 to 16 percent annually on your water heating bills. If your water heater is new, it is likely already insulated, but if your water heater is warm to the touch, it needs additional insulation. You can purchase a precut jacket or blanket for about $20. You’ll also need two people for this project. Before you start, turn off the water heater. Wrap the blanket around the water heater and tape it to temporarily keep it in place. If necessary, use a marker to note the areas where the controls are so you can cut them out. Once the blanket is positioned correctly,

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

tape it permanently in place and then turn the water heater back on. If you have an electric water heater, do not set the thermostat above 130 degrees, as it can cause overheating. Setting it at 120 degrees will save on heating costs.

Seal air leaks with caulk The average American family spends $2,000 annually on energy bills. Unfortunately, much of that money is wasted through air leaks in the home. Applying caulk around windows, doors, electrical wiring and plumbing saves energy and money. There are many different types of caulking compounds available, but the most popular choice is silicone. Silicone caulk is waterproof and flexible and won’t shrink or crack. Before applying new caulk, clean and remove any old caulk or paint with a putty knife, screwdriver, brush or solvent. The area should also be dry before you start. Apply the caulk in one continuous stream and make sure it sticks to both sides of the crack or seam. Afterward, use a putty knife to smooth out the caulk, then wipe the surface with a dry cloth.

Weather strip exterior doors One of the best ways to seal air leaks is to

weather strip exterior doors, which keeps out drafts and helps you control energy costs. Weather stripping materials vary, so ask your local hardware or home store for assistance if you’re unsure about the supplies you need. When choosing weather stripping materials, make sure it can withstand temperature changes, friction and general wear and tear for the location of the door. Keep in mind, you will need separate materials for the door sweep (at the bottom of the door) and the top and sides. Before applying the new weather stripping, clean the moldings and let the area dry completely. Measure each side of the door, then cut the weather stripping to fit each section. Make sure the weather stripping fits snugly against both surfaces so it compresses when the door is closed. By completing these simple efficiency projects, you can save energy while increasing the comfort level of your home and impress your family and friends with your savvy energy-saving skills. Abby Berry writes on consumer and cooperative affairs for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association.


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RECIPES

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Delicious dishes for those everyday meals with the help of your pantry BY AMY HIGGINS

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Create great food with ease and convenience using canned goods.

DO YOU HAVE A GREAT RECIPE? If you have a recipe you want us to try, send it our way at recipes@coloradocountrylife.org.

S

ometimes simple is the best solution, but you don’t want to sacrifice nutrition and flavor for ease and convenience when it comes to feeding your family. By creating meals from canned goods — whether from the store or last year’s garden goods — you can get dinner done quickly with the added benefit of knowing your foods were canned at the peak of freshness. Next time you’re rushing to get dinner on the table, try this recipe that is ready to serve in less than 30 minutes.

Easy Weeknight Seafood Paella 1 tablespoon olive oil 1 medium yellow onion, diced 1 small green bell pepper, cored, seeded and diced 2 large garlic cloves, minced 1 box (8 ounces) yellow rice 1 can (14 ounces) vegetable broth 1 can (14 ounces) diced tomatoes 1 can (10 ounces) whole baby clams, drained 1 can (8.5 ounces) peas, drained 1 can (6 ounces) medium shrimp, drained 1 can (3.8 ounces) sliced ripe olives, drained In a 2-quart saucepan over medium heat, heat oil; add onion, green pepper and garlic. Cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add rice and vegetable broth. Over high heat, bring to boil. Reduce heat to low; cover and simmer 20 minutes. Stir in tomatoes, clams, peas, shrimp and olives; cook 5 minutes. Source: CMI

Pack Your Pantry During your next trip to the store, double- or triple-up your order of canned foods. And, if you aren’t already doing so, take the time to can your own fruits and vegetables from your garden to use next winter. Keeping your pantry stocked means less time waiting in checkout lines.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

Looking for a quick meal? Give the Chicken Burrito Salad a try. Get the recipe at coloradocountrylife.coop.


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NEWS CLIPS

Jim Lueck, president

Jeff Hauck, vice president

Ginny Buzcek, secretary

Joe Redetzke, treasurer

Statewide Cooperative Association Re-elects Officers

T

he officers for the Colorado Rural Electric Association Board of Directors were re-elected for a second term January 25. The officers serve on their respective electric cooperative boards and represent those individual co-ops on CREA’s board. Guiding CREA’s board as president is Jim Lueck of Iliff. Jim has served on the Highline Electric Association Board of Directors for over 25 years. Highline Electric serves northeastern Colorado and southwestern Nebraska. Jim has also been involved in his community and around Colorado in various board positions. He completed the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association director courses through the highest level of Director Gold. Vice President Jeff Hauck owns and operates an electrical contracting business in Grand Lake. He serves as president on the Mountain Parks Electric Board of Directors, is a Credentialed Cooperative Director and has earned his NRECA Board Leadership certificate. Mountain Parks Electric serves Grand, Jackson, Summit, Routt and Larimer counties.

Ginny Buzcek of Firestone represents the western district in United Power’s service territory. This includes Adams, Broomfield, Weld, Jefferson, Boulder and Gilpin counties. She serves as the CREA board secretary and has completed board certifications through NRECA’s Director Gold credential level. Ginny is involved in many community groups, including 4-H, Girl Scouts and Relay for Life. Treasurer Joe Redetzke lives in Buena Vista. He has his NRECA Credentialed Cooperative Director certificate and his Board Leadership certificate. Joe has served on Sangre de Cristo Electric Association’s board for four years and is involved in many aspects of his community in Chaffee County. The Colorado Rural Electric Association is the trade association for Colorado’s 22 electric cooperatives and the state’s generation and transmission association. The mission of the Colorado Rural Electric Association is to enhance and advance the interests of its member electric cooperatives through a united effort.

Energy Outreach Colorado Wins National Award A leading expert on issues impacting low-income energy consumers for 30 years, Energy Outreach Colorado recently received a national honor. The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy identified EOC’s Low-Income Program as one of America’s outstanding energy efficiency programs. It awarded the Denver-based nonprofit an Exemplary Program Award based on its effectiveness and innovation in energy efficiency efforts for its customers.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

ACEEE’s Utilities Program senior manager Rachel Gold recognizes EOC’s programs as helpful to customers by reducing their costs and by “maintaining comfortable, durable, safe homes and productive businesses.” Energy Outreach Colorado strives to be Colorado’s leading organization dedicated to efficient delivery of costeffective energy assistance. It achieves this by providing bill payment assistance to Coloradans who are behind on their

energy bills. It also provides emergency furnace repair, energy conservation, and energy education for low-income households as a way to help them maintain their well-being and attain selfsufficiency.


NEWS CLIPS

M

ore wind power will soon be part of the electricity supplied to electric co-ops buying their power from Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association. In mid-February, Tri-State G&T and EDP Renewables announced a 104-megawatt, 15-year power purchase agreement that will enable the continued development and eventual construction of the 104-MW Crossing Trails Wind Farm. The project, which is expected to be operational in 2020,

with this agreement, which is the second power purchase agreement the company announced following its request for proposals for renewable energy in June 2018. Nearly one-third of the energy consumed by Tri-State’s members comes from renewable energy. With the addition of the Crossing Trails Wind Farm, Tri-State has now invested in five utility-scale wind farms in Colorado, totaling 471 MW.

marks Tri-State’s fifth investment in a utility-scale wind energy project. The wind farm is approximately 20 miles south of Seibert within both Kit Carson and Cheyenne counties in K.C. Electric Association’s service territory. When operational, the wind farm will generate enough electricity to annually power more than 47,000 average rural Colorado homes. Tri-State further expands its emissions-free renewable energy portfolio

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Attention Teachers: Come Learn About Electricity Teachers of students in grades four-12 can attend a three-day learning session this summer and add to their curriculum. Tri-State Generation and Transmission Association, the power supplier to 18 of Colorado’s 22 electric co-ops, is providing this program free to all teachers who are electric cooperative members, teach at schools that are co-op members or teach students whose parents are co-op members in Tri-State’s service area. (Educators outside of electric co-op territory are welcome to apply, and funding will be sought on their behalf.) Those attending the June 18-20 class in Westminster will receive the most up-to-date information on all aspects of energy including the science of energy, sources of energy, transportation, consumption, electricity, efficiency and environmental and economic impacts. Participants leave with the training and a hands-on energy kit for the classroom worth $300. Thanks to the support of Tri-State’s member cooperatives, there is no cost to educators in the Tri-State service area who participate. Most expenses, including lodging, meals, transportation and conference materials, are provided. This conference will show teachers how to integrate energy curriculum materials into classrooms at every grade level. Attending teachers receive a full-color workbook with lesson plans, reproducible student activities, fascinating facts about electricity and student packets with pencils, stickers, safety checklists and energy efficiency checklists. For more information or to apply, contact Wendi Moss at the NEED Project, wmoss@ need.org, or Michelle Pastor at mpastor@tristategt.org.

Electric cooperatives in Colorado and Oklahoma are joining forces to bring first-time electricity to a remote village in rural Guatemala later this year. Beyond providing the gift of light, the volunteer linemen going on this mission want to present each household with a 5-gallon water filter that lasts for two years. Will you be a part of this mission by sponsoring a water filter for $35? For more information and to donate, visit: crea.coop/community-outreach/current-causes

Monthly Contest Enter for your chance to win a copy of The Colorful Dry Garden by Maureen Glimer. For official rules and how to enter, visit our contest page at coloradocountrylife.coop. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

15


COVER STORY

First place, Settings for Play: “King of His Domain” by Karen Mason of Gateway, a Grand Valley Power consumer-member.

T

he Centennial State is known as a great place to play, whether it is in the snow, on the water, in the mountains, on the eastern plains or wherever your wanderlust takes you. This past year, we asked electric co-op consumers to capture that play for the annual photo contest. We received 477 entries in four categories: Settings for Play, People and/or Pets at Play, Water at Play and Active Play. The photos entered in the contest captured Colorado’s beautiful scenery, fun and funky animals, water in all of its forms and a variety of activities and adventures. Entries came from consumer-members of all of our electric co-ops and all four corners of the state. First place winners in the contest are Karen Mason, a member of Grand Valley Power, for Settings for Play; Zach Chapman,

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

a member of Highline Electric Association, for People and/or Pets at Play; Randy Osga, a member of La Plata Electric Association, for Water at Play; and Brad Weinmeister, a member of La Plata Electric Association, for Active Play. You’ll find their photos, as well as the second and third place winners on the following pages. You can also find all of these photos and more on our website at coloradocountrylife. coop. You’ll also find a video featuring the winners and other favorite photos on our YouTube channel at /COCountryLife1. Enjoy more of these photos of Colorado all year on our Facebook (/COCountryLife) and Instagram (@COCountryLife) pages.

Mona Neeley, editor


COVER STORY

First place, Active Play: “Sloppy Kiss” by Brad Weinmeister of Bayfield, a La Plata Electric Association consumer-member.

First place, People and/or Pets at Play: “Curious Cow” by Zach Chapman of Yuma, a Highline Electric Association consumer-member.


COVER STORY

F irst place, Water at Play: “Yoga on the San Juan” by Randy Osga of West Warwick, Rhode Island, a La Plata Electric Association consumer-member. Second place, People and/or Pets at Play: “Ultimate Sledding” by Elizabeth Chang of Berthoud, a Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer-member.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019


COVER STORY

Second place, Active Play: “Horseplay” by William Kapfer of Colorado Springs, a Mountain View Electric Association consumer-member.

Second place, Settings for Play: “A Quiet Fishing Spot” by Donnell Allen of Colorado Springs, a Mountain View Electric Association consumer-member. Second place, Water at Play: “Pure Colorado” by Kimberlee Hutcherson of Pagosa Springs, a La Plata Electric Association consumer-member.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

19


COVER STORY

Third place, Active Play: “Gotta Run” by Natalie Heller of Ridgway, a San Miguel Power Association consumer-member. Right center: Third place, People and/or Pets at Play: “A man, a dog, a journey” by Yvonee Cochrane of Durango, a La Plata Electric Association consumer-member. Third place, Water at Play: “Gosling in the Pond” by Leslie Larson of Lyons, a Poudre Valley Rural Electric Association consumer-member.

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

Third place, Settings for Play: “Colorado River” by Linda Snodgrass of Loma, a Grand Valley Power consumer-member.


INDUSTRY

A New Intensity NRECA’s Essence tool endures strenuous test to guard grid BY CATHY CASH

| NATIONAL RUR AL ELECTRIC COOPER ATIVE ASSOCIATION

I

t was the perfect setup: remote, rustic and with a real electric grid ripped by sabotage. The question for the National Rural Electric Cooperative Association was how Essence, a tool it developed to monitor the

November’s RADICS exercise was a key test of the technology. “DARPA is very interested in Essence as part of the solution to deal with catastrophic failure of the grid across a large region of the country,” Miller said. “This exercise focused

grid, would facilitate a so-called “blackstart,”

on how Essence can help restore a massive

restoring power amid a ruined transmission

outage.”

network where cyber mayhem lurks.

Essence provides a constant monitor of

To find out, NRECA’s chief scientist

activity on the electric grid. Sensors gather

Craig Miller and senior research engineer

thousands of data points and anything

Stan McHann, along with other electric

abnormal shows up quickly.

utility technology experts, participated in

“Essence tells us what’s up and what’s

a drill organized by the Defense Advanced

not and what’s behaving accurately or atypi-

Research Projects Agency (DARPA) on

cally. It monitors voltage for stability and the

Plum Island, New York.

physics of the grid. ‘Malware’ could show up

The 840-acre island, about three miles off Long Island’s coast, has its own utili-

and it detects it instantly on the network,” he said.

ties and a dozen high-voltage substations.

NRECA plans to release Essence to

It holds shuttered federal defense facilities

potential commercialization customers

dating back 100 years and a midcentury

for evaluation in April, Miller said. Before

laboratory to test diseases in farm animals.

that, adjustments will be made to make the

“It was not a tabletop exercise. It was a

tool more “utility-friendly” by delivering

physical problem with small substations

only the most salient information to utility

and utility control centers. We needed to

staff, enabling them to respond faster to grid

restore power to them and synchronize

incidents.

them to the grid,” Miller said. DARPA created Rapid Attack Detection, Isolation and Characterization Systems (RADICS) to explore ways to resolve prolonged outages wrought by disasters like earthquakes, floods, fires, hurricanes or cyberattacks, where networks are destroyed and utility crews are gone.

BATTLING UNDER A NEW INTENSITY NRECA has been working with electric co-ops in developing Essence to provide “situational awareness on both the electrical and the cyberfront of the grid,” Miller said. Through tests with co-ops, the tool has prevented cyberattacks, overloading of

transformers and possible fires. That’s what co-ops face every day: the reality of keeping the lights on while keeping threats at bay. NRECA was involved in each of RADICS’s four exercises, but Miller said the recent Plum Island test brought “a new intensity. “It tasked us with learning what the utility people want to know and when. There were no coffee breaks. You did not get lunch. You were under pressure,” he said. Pummeled with wind and rain, McHann, the only member of the NRECA team on Plum Island, arrived by ferry and hiked the island to install Essence equipment on substations and perform local analysis of devices and sensors. He had to pack enough gear and food in case inclement weather kept him on the test site overnight. On top of the sheer physical reconstruction of the grid, participants also had to battle cyberattacks that pushed misinformation and fouled communications. “Whatever DARPA threw at us, we had to keep that critical asset electrified,” McHann said. “Our job is to take those hard problems, break them down and design technology to solve them. It was not a simulated environment. It was a very real environment.” As part of the exercise, one goal was to maintain power to a building that had previously been used for government research. “The building had been abandoned and sealed for over 50 years. Our job was to ‘restore power’ to it,” said Miller, who worked from a control center in Long Island. Red, yellow and green “air dancers,” often seen flailing at car dealerships, puddled beside buildings targeted for power restoration. “When power came on, they stood up,” said Miller. “It was fun.” Cathy Cash is a staff writer at NRECA.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

21


GARDENING

Let it Blossom, Let it Flow Grow gorgeous plants with minimal effort BY VICKI SPENCER

MASTER GARDENER | GARDENING@COLOR ADOCOUNTRYLIFE .ORG

I

can’t think of any gardener who doesn’t long for an easy-to-grow garden. What a pleasure it is to have flowers flourish year after year without much maintenance. I learned this from my mother who worked full time, raised three daughters and helped my father care for two households — all before today’s modern conveniences. No matter how busy she was, her garden was always beautiful. Her secret was to grow plants that were not too particular about sun, water and soil conditions; were not prone to disease or pests; and spread abundantly. To begin cultivating an easy-to-grow garden, try incorporating flowering shrubs into your beds. They can serve as borders, focal points or fillers. Titan boxwood is a hardy dwarf shrub reaching 3 to 6 feet at maturity, with dense branches and small leaves that often stay green year-round. Boxwood can be shaped to any form. Some people enjoy its natural rounded shape in borders, others creatively sculpt whimsical shapes into interesting focal points. Flowering quince is another beautiful shrub. It is wide spreading and tolerant of wind and dry soil. Its red, pink or orange flowers begin to bloom in early spring and the colors seem to brighten with age. Snowball Bush is a fun shrub with pompomshaped flowers that emerge lime green in spring and turn to snowy white in May. Some popular filler shrubs include spiraea with its cascading white blossoms

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

and clethra with its fragrant pink flowers. The Mini Man dwarf viburnum recently became popular with its compact white flowers that provide a wonderful contrast in any Colorado garden. In addition to shrubs, there are many easy-to-grow flowers, such as larkspur, cosmos, black-eyed Susan, day lilies and snapdragons. They all add splashes of color throughout your garden.

Colorful snapdragons Larkspur is a lovely spring flower that comes in blues, pinks and whites. It loves cool weather, which means it is a great choice for our consumer-members who live in the mountains. It also grows well on the Front Range as long as you start seeds indoors and then transplant them in April or May. Cosmos is a hardy plant that grows well under differing conditions. If you remove dead flowers, you will enjoy blossoms all summer long. My sister gave me transplants decades ago and they grew well on the south side of my house where heat was intensified by the adjacent asphalt driveway.

WIN A COPY

Enter our contest to win a copy of Ground Rules: 100 Easy Lessons for Growing a More Glorious Garden. Click on Contests at coloradocountrylife.coop for details on how to enter.

Last summer when my garden seemed to be losing its colorful palette, another sister suggested filling it in with zinnias. I didn’t follow up at first because it was so hot and I thought it might be too late in the season, but wandering through my garden store I found a closeout sale on dwarf zinnias filled with buds and couldn’t resist. Not only did the plants spread out to fill empty spaces, the bright yellow zinnias were also the perfect accent to a predominately pink and purple garden. Regular deadheading kept the plants blooming all the way through October when everything else had faded away. These are just a handful of suggestions to beautify your garden that require minimal maintenance, so you can just sit back and enjoy their magnificence. Gardener Vicki Spencer has an eclectic background in conservation, water, natural resources and more.

LEARN MORE ONLINE Read previous gardening columns at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Gardening under Living in Colorado.


ADVERTISEMENT

Good News for Americans, Bad News for Pain Drugs Millions are expected to benefit from a new technology that could relieve years of severe joint discomfort; reprograms the body to block slow burning inflammation instead of creating it By Casey Law, Health News Correspondent NATION- Several of the major drug companies behind popular pain relievers may take a financial hit as manufacturing of a new pill is now complete. Using a new technology, the pill could be safer and more effective than many store bought brands. The pill, VeraFlex, was developed in May of this year by a private company in Seattle. Functioning primarily as an immune modulator, the pill targets the body’s immune system which can decrease pain in the body. The Science Behind Relief Research shows that the joint stiffness, soreness and discomfort associated with arthritis is caused by inflammation which attacks healthy cartilage and protective tissue. And according to leading medical scientists, this inflammation is caused by two inflammatory enzymes released by the body’s immune system. Remarkably, the active ingredients in VeraFlex help to block the production of both these enzymes, resulting in a dramatic decreasing in swelling, inflammation, and discomfort. Right now, the leading over-the-counter pills are only able to block one of these enzymes! It’s why so many sufferers fail to ever find relief. Years of Discomfort Relieved in 5 Days “VeraFlex users can generally expect more flexibility in three days...their joint pain alleviated in five days...and in just seven days, a tremendous improvement in overall joint function that may help them move like they did years prior” explains Dr. Liza Leal, developer and spokesperson for VeraFlex. “It’s an incredibly powerful little pill. And with the addition of a patented absorption enhancer, it packs an even greater punch. That’s why I’m so excited to be the first to share these results. It’s giving sufferers their life back.” A Safer, More Effective Avenue to Amazing Relief Its widely accepted through the medical community that inflammatory enzymes are the primary cause of pain and suffering in millions of Americans. It’s why most prescriptions and even nonprescription pills are designed to block them.

However, what most people don’t know is that even the most advanced ones can’t block both! And yet, that’s exactly what VeraFlex is designed to do and why it works so well. “Top pharma companies have struggled to create a drug that blocks COX and LOX; the medical names for the two inflammatory enzymes in the body. Consider the top seller Celebrex, it only blocks one variation of the COX enzyme” explains Leal. “And that’s because they have focused on using chemicals instead of natural substances like VeraFlex.” “Every VeraFlex capsule contains an ultra-high dose of a patented plant extract which has been clinically shown to block both enzymes, bringing relief to every joint that hurts! “The kind of relief most people have never experienced. I often say two enzymes, twice the relief. People think I’m kidding until they try it.” Piling on the Clinical Research Remarkably, the key ingredient in VeraFlex is protected by 8 patents that spread from the US into Canada. And as would one guess, it’s backed by an enormous amount of research, including two patient clinical trials. In the first, 60 participants with rheumatoid arthritis and/or osteoarthritis were randomly placed into four groups. Two groups were given the patented ingredient in VeraFlex, one was given the drug Celecoxib, and the last group a placebo. The results were monitored at 30, 60, and 90 days. The data collected by researchers was stunning. The groups taking the VeraFlex ingredient saw staggering improvements in arthritis symptoms such as flexibility, discomfort and function. And even more astonishing they experienced a dramatic reduction in pain by the 30-day mark that was even better than Celecoxib, a powerful drug! A second study was conducted to ensure the data was accurate and again the results participants experienced taking the VeraFlex compound blew away researchers. This time it beat out the drug Naproxen. Shockingly, both men and women experienced a reduction in joint stiffness two days faster than when using Naproxen. “I have to admit I was surprised when I

read the initial findings” explains Leal. “But when you look at the science it just makes sense. It’s going to change everything.” Faster Delivery, Maximum Absorption VeraFlex is mainly comprised of two patented ingredients: Univestin, a powerful immune modulator which blocks the enzymes which cause your joints to hurt and BiAloe, an absorption enhancer (accelerator) that ensures maximum potency. Research shows that severe joint discomfort arises when the immune system goes haywire and releases COX and LOX into your blood stream, two enzymes that causes tremendous swelling and inflammation around cartilage and protective tissue. Over time, this inflammation overwhelms the joint and it begins to deteriorate resulting in a daily battle with chronic pain. Unfortunately, modern day pain pills are only able block only one of these enzymes, resulting in marginal relief and continued suffering. The Univestin in VeraFlex is one of the only known substances which has been proven successful in blocking both enzymes, resulting in phenomenal relief from the worst kinds of discomfort. The addition of BiAloe, a unique aloe vera extra, maximizes the delivery of the plant based Univestin extract to every joint in the body because it is proven to improve nutrient absorption for maximum results. Aloe Vera also is proven to support the body’s immune system which manages inflammation, further supporting relief. How to Claim a Free 3-Month Supply Of VeraFlex Due to the enormous interest consumers have shown in VeraFlex, the company has decided to extend their nationwide savings event for a little while longer. Here’s how it works... Call the VeraFlex number and speak to a live person in the US. Callers will be greeted by a knowledgeable and friendly person approved to offer up to 3 FREE bottles of VeraFlex with your order. VeraFlex’s Toll-Free number is 1-800-924-7063. Only a limited discounted supply of Veraflex is currently available. Consumers who miss out on the current product inventory will have to wait until more becomes available and that could take weeks. They will also not be guaranteed any additional savings. The company advises not to wait. Call 1-800-924-7063 today.

THESE STATEMENTS HAVE NOT BEEN EVALUATED BY THE FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION. THIS PRODUCT IS NOT INTENDED TO DIAGNOSE, TREAT, CURE OR PREVENT ANY DISEASE. RESULTS MAY VARY.

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

23


OUTDOORS

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know it’s cliché, but big surprises do sometimes come in small packages. There’s a little headwater creek I know of that holds a mix of brook, brown and rainbow trout in its upper reaches. It’s one of the first small creeks I ever fished when I moved to Colorado more than 40 years ago and where I hooked the first Colorado greenback cutthroat trout I ever saw. That was a pleasant surprise. Unfortunately, several years later, genetic studies proved the greenbacks in that creek to be hybrids. That was a surprise, too — albeit a sad one. Pure-strain greenbacks or not, it remains my favorite small stream to this day. When I first started fishing the little creek, it was unusual to see another fly fisherman and I always wondered why. After all, it wasn’t as if it required a gut busting hike into a remote backcountry valley. Heck, it wasn’t even hidden from view. It was in a National Forest for crying out loud, within plain sight of a well-maintained forest service road and a year-round parade of hunters, hikers, trail riders, campers and sightseers. I suspect any “serious” fly fishermen among them probably blew it off as just another little mountain creek with a bunch of little fish in it. Freestone creeks are seldom as fertile as spring-fed or tailwater rivers and, consequently, don’t normally grow large trout. Mature brookies in this creek probably average 7- or 8-inches long. A 12-incher is a big one. The browns and rainbows run a bit larger on average, but they certainly don’t compare to the famously huge trout of the South Platte, Frying Pan or Colorado’s other celebrity

rivers. In any case, the creek got precious little attention from other anglers back then, so I usually had the place to myself. I found that pleasantly surprising, too. Of course, that all changed. The popularity of fly fishing exploded in the late ’70s and ’80s and eventually I began seeing other fishermen up there. Before long, guides and outfitters were showing up with clients — mostly tourist types, it seemed. Apparently, it didn’t matter to these folks that the fish were small; they just wanted a Rocky Mountain fly fishing experience. The increased traffic put a lot of pressure on the little creek, but it’s a catch-and-release fishery so the fish are still in there — they’ve just become extremely spooky, secretive and much more difficult to catch. Last spring, my friend Pat and I were up there fishing dry flies when I hooked a rainbow that slopped over the 21-inch mark on Pat’s tape measure. We were rightfully surprised, but later learned that trout weighing more than 4 pounds have been recorded in that stream by wildlife biologists during their electro-shocking surveys. One of them told us, “Just because a stream is small, doesn’t mean it can’t hold some big trout.” Dennis Smith is a freelance outdoors writer and photographer whose work appears nationally. He lives in Loveland.

MISS AN ISSUE? Catch up at coloradocountrylife.coop. Click on Outdoors.


Brighter together We prepare for the future while you plan for theirs. Together, Tri-State and our family of electric cooperatives are working together to power your tomorrows. We are brighter, stronger and better together. www.tristate.coop/together

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

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COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

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Want to buy cast-iron cookware (Wagner & Oxygen concentrators Griswold). Pyrex. Old toys in good condition. $400 with warranty Vintage signs. Anything cowboy and Indian — Also sell portable concentrators and oxygen hats, boots, spurs, rugs, etc. Antiques, collectibles, supplies. Repair and service of equipment. furniture, glassware, etc. We come to 1you! DonRunnells01_2019.qxp_Layout 12/1/18 7:08 PMAspen Concentrator Repair Service

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Springtime in the Rockies Have you ever been to the Rockies in March or April or May? Springtime in the Rockies can take your breath away.

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The beauty of the mountains with the sunlight on the snow, can bring a tear to your eye, and so can the winds that blow. The temperature is amazing as it bounces to and fro, from 80 degrees in sunlight to nights of 30 below.

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2019 COLORADO LEGISLATIVE DIRECTORY

The mud is 3 feet deep when snows melt in the hills. The sun comes out so warmly; up pop the daffodils.

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A cold, wet, windy storm comes from the northwest side. The temperature drops so low, the budding plants will hide.

COLORADO LEGISLATURE

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CREA COLORADO LEGISLATIVE DIRECTORY APP COLORADO’S ELECTRIC CO-OPS

Colorado’s General Assembly Convened January 4 Printed copies of the directory are available for only $1. To get your copy, email crea@coloradocountrylife.org or call 303-455-4111.

COLORADO RURAL ELECTRIC ASSOCIATION 5400 WASHINGTON ST. • DENVER, CO 80216 • CREA.COOP

Here comes the sun again. The plants are wary now. The snows can still come swiftly to bend and break their boughs. Springtime in the Rockies — warm and clear and bright. But bring your winter coat; it just may freeze tonight! Submitted by M. Elaine Jordan, a consumermember of White River Electric in Meeker. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

27


COMMUNITY EVENTS March 16 Copper

March 28-31 Johnstown

March 16-17 Glenwood Springs

March 28 Colorado Springs

Copper Uncorked Copper Mountain coppercolorado.com

Spring Music Series and Yard Sale Sunlight Mountain Resort sunlightmtn.com

March 8-10 Monte Vista Crane Festival At various Monte Vista locations At the Monte Vista Crane Festival, guests can feast their eyes on an immense number of sandhill cranes as they migrate to the San Luis Valley. Take a guided sunrise or sunset tour and watch these graceful birds settle in for the spring and find out some interesting facts along the way. You will also enjoy the presentations, archaeological and cultural heritage tours, the craft and nature fair and more. Registration deadline is March 7. For more information, visit mvcranefest.org.

March 2019 Through March 24 Aurora

“A Gentleman’s Guide to Love & Murder” Broadway Musical Vintage Theatre 303-856-7830 • vintagetheatre.org

Through May 26 Longmont

“Ansel Adams: Early Works” Exhibit Longmont Museum visitlongmont.org

Through May 26 Pueblo

“Representing the West” Exhibit Sangre de Cristo Arts Center 719-295-7200 • sdc-arts.org

Through June 9 Colorado Springs

“Underground Mine Lighting” Exhibit Western Museum of Mining & Industry 719-488-0880 • wmmi.org

March 7-10

Colorado Springs Women’s Weekend of Wellness The Broadmoor 855-634-7711 • broadmoor.com

March 8 Greeley

“One Night of Queen” Concert Union Colony Civic Center 7:30 pm • 970-356-5000

28

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

March 8 Keystone

Bow Wow Film Fest Warren Station 6-9 pm • 970-423-8997

March 8-9 Louisville

“Blessed Assurance: A Civil Rights Play” Coal Creek Theater of Louisville 7:30 pm • 303-665-0055

March 9 Colorado Springs

Meat 101 Workshop Black Forest Community Center 9 am-12 pm tinyurl.com/Meat101WS

March 9 Colorado Springs

St. Patrick’s Day Walk Modern Woodmen of America 8:30 am • 719-591-8193

March 16 Keystone

Rocky Mountain Country Fest Warren Station 6-11 pm • warrenstation.com

March 17 Durango

Shamrock Express Durango & Silverton Narrow Gauge Railroad durangotrain.com

March 19-22 Fort Collins

Geek Week Museum of Discovery fcmod.org

March 20 Colorado Springs

Full Moon Photography Hike and Workshop Prepaid Registration Required Bear Creek Nature Center 6-8 pm • 719-520-6388

March 22-24 Nederland

Subaru Winterfest Eldora Mountain eldora.com

March 23 Boulder

Pixar in Concert Macky Auditorium 7:30 pm • boulderphil.org

March 23-24 Colorado Springs

Spring Sustainability Expo Mitchell High School gardenofthecats.com

March 15-25 Aspen

Introduction to Wilderness Survival Prepaid Registration Required Bear Creek Nature Center 6-8:30 pm • 719-520-6977

March 29-April 10 Copper

Snowboard and Freeski National Championships Copper Mountain coppercolorado.com

March 30 Pueblo

Service Academy Information Day Pueblo Centennial High School 1 pm • outreach.navy.mil

April 2019 April 2 Littleton

Free Admission Day Denver Botanic Gardens at Chatfield botanicgardens.org

April 3 Boulder

“Ghost Towns of the American West” Presentation Chautauqua Community House 7 pm • chautauqua.com

April 5 Durango

“Southwest Journeys” Art Opening Reception Sorrel Sky Gallery 5-7 pm • 970-247-3555

April 5 Fort Collins

Wine Fest Marriott Hotel winefestfc.org

April 6 Colorado City

Business Expo Craver Middle School 10 am-3 pm • 719-676-3000

Bud Light Spring Jam Various Aspen Locations aspenchamber.org

March 15-17 Denver

National Alpaca Show National Western Complex cindy@alpacainfo.com

“Oliver!” Theater Performance Candlelight Dinner Playhouse 970-744-3747

SEND CALENDAR ITEMS 2 MONTHS IN ADVANCE

Calendar, Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216; fax to 303-455-2807; or email calendar@coloradocountrylife.org. Please send name of event, date, time, venue, brief description, phone number, a photo, if you have one, and email and/or website for more information.


YOUR STORIES

READERS’ PHOTOS

FUNNY STORIES My son had to go out of town on

business, so he asked me if his mother and I would stay with his children, Halle and Sawyer, while they were gone. Of course, I said yes. Because Halle takes advanced courses and always has a lot of homework, my son asked if I would help her if need be. I said yes. Testing me, my son asked if I still remembered how to figure the circumference of a circle. I said yes. He then asked, “How about a triangle?” I said no. Halle, listening in on the conversation, said, “Did they have triangles in Grandpa’s day?” Burt Hablutzel, Berthoud

Dan and Tracy Cuvala visit Tahiti in the French Polynesia with their copy of Colorado Country Life magazine. They are members of Mountain View Electric Association.

Our 3-year-old grandson was visit-

The Hartenstine family takes CCL for a trip to a local Buddhist temple, where they met a friendly monk who was keen to show them around. They are La Plata Electric Association members.

My son and daughter-in-law were

Tim and Deb Menger, members of Grand Valley Power, meet Olympic Gold medalist curling skipper John Shuster in Las Vegas.

San Isabel Electric member Bernie VanGorden photographs her sister Ann Marie Cerame in Cancun, Mexico.

ing. One morning while I was brushing my teeth, he walked into the bathroom with a small guitar in hand and said, “This song doesn’t have any words,” and proceeded to strum the guitar strings a few times. He then informed me that his next song has words. After strumming the strings a few more times he stopped and looked up at me as the toothpaste foamed in my mouth. “You’re not singing!” he said. Michael Plaster, Kiowa

swinging my 3-year-old grandson in his swing trying to get him to sleep. He was in his onesie pjs and my son noticed them getting small on him, so he said to his wife, “I think we need to cut his feet off.” My grandson, shocked, said “If you cut my feet off, how am I going to walk?” Patricia Busa, Peyton

WINNER: Polly Hoover visits the Hoover Dam. She is a member of Poudre Valley REA.

Take Your Photo with Your Magazine and Win! It’s easy to win with Colorado Country Life. Simply take a photo of someone (or a selfie!) with the magazine and email the photo and your name and address to info@ coloradocountrylife.org. We’ll draw one photo to win $25 each month. The next deadline is Friday, March 15. Name, address and co-op must accompany photo. This month’s winner is Polly Hoover of Loveland. She took her copy of Colorado Country Life to the Hoover Dam. See all of the submitted photos on Facebook at facebook.com/COCountryLife.

We pay $15 to each person who submits a funny story that’s printed in the magazine. At the end of the year we will draw one name from those submitting funny stories and that person will receive $200. Send your 2019 stories to Colorado Country Life, 5400 Washington St., Denver, CO 80216 or email funnystories@coloradocountrylife.org. Don’t forget to include your mailing address, so we can send you a check. COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019

29


DISCOVERIES

Brighten Your March with Colorado Art Creative artists craft original designs

Remarkable Metal-Making In 2014, Steve and Andrea Keenan opened Prairie Metalworks in their hometown of Springfield. They serve area farms and ranches with their portable welding rig, doing maintenance, repairs and construction. These days they also use their artistic skills to create cool custom and prefabricated pieces of metal artwork. For more information, call 719-5631014 or visit prairiemetalworks.com.

Fine Furniture From Fort Collins Want to add a conversation piece to your home or office? At Fort Collinsbased Baldwin Custom Woodworking, Ryan Baldwin creates beautiful custom wood furniture with the help of northern Colorado’s “urban forest.” In other words, trees or other wood structures that would otherwise be sent to the landfill are reclaimed and milled until their beauty shines through. Baldwin then crafts a highquality piece of furniture that will stand out in any room. For more information, call 970-2138608 or visit baldwinwoodworking.com.

A Display of Attention Whether you’re looking for an original gift or an attractive art piece for your home, Timco Art Pottery in Colorado Springs could be your answer. Lance Timco has more than 40 years’ experience as an artistic potter. Each piece he creates comes from the heart and is brought to life through his hands, whether it is baking dish, pie plate or vase. For more information, call 719-3020702 or visit timco.com. 1 4 3

The Sky’s the Limit If you’re in Fruita, check the corner of Aspen and Peach and view the grand sculpture of a horse made out of 1,000 horseshoes. While you’re at it, take a rest on one of the dozens of original park benches, like the car bumper bench. These spectacular pieces of art were created by Jeff Bates of Sky River Ranch. Bates uses metal, wood, copper, antlers and more to construct artwork that’s one of a kind. For more information, call 970-858-1394 or visit skyriverranch.com.

2

1 Baldwin Custom Woodworking Fort Collins | 970-213-8608 baldwinwoodworking.com

2 Prairie Metalworks

Springfield | 719-563-1014 prairiemetalworks.com

3 Timco Art Pottery

Colorado Springs | 719-302-0702 | timco.com

4 Sky River Ranch

Fruita | 970-858-1394 | skyriverranch.com

30

COLOR ADO COUNTRY LIFE MARCH 2019


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Profile for American MainStreet Publications

Colorado Country Life March 2019 Grand Valley  

Colorado Country Life March 2019 Grand Valley

Colorado Country Life March 2019 Grand Valley  

Colorado Country Life March 2019 Grand Valley