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Singing River Electric Power Association

Sydney Spradlin Moss Point

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

Harley Byrd Beaumont

leaders 2 Student tour Washington, D.C.

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Book recommendations for summertime reading

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Weekend getaway: Oxford’s unique offerings


2 I Today in Mississippi I August 2012

ELECTRIC POWER ASSOCIATIONS OF MISSISSIPPI

Participants in the 26th annual Youth Tour meet with Rep. Gregg Harper, left, at the U.S. Capitol.

Washington, D.C.

Fifty-eight of Mississippi’s finest high school juniors spent part of their summer Stewart, statewide coordinator for the program, said the program was established vacation exploring the nation’s capital and making new friends, courtesy of their elec- to transform lives and to equip young people to make good choices and take advantric power association. tage of opportunities. As participants in the 26th annual Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Youth “Thanks to the board and management of electric power associations, we have Tour, the students visited many of Washington’s most significant historic and cultural made a difference in the lives of more than 1,000 young people since the program sites during the week-long trip. They also took part in special events with more than began,” he said. 1,500 other Youth Tour participants from other states. 2012 Youth Tour delegates and their sponsoring electric power associations are A highlight was a visit to the U.S. Capitol, where Rep. Gregg Harper took the Missis- Alcorn County EPA: Rebecca Lee, Austin Powell; Central EPA: Whitney McCoy, Courtsippi students to the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives before the Congressmen ney Moore; Coast EPA: Teddi Brown, Raygan Necaise, Jessica Smith; Dixie EPA: R’tes convened. Each student also had the opportunity to meet his or her Congressman. Hayes, Alise Mathews, Lindsay Miller; East Mississippi EPA: Alona Doolittle, Joshua “This experience has not only impacted my life, but it will impact the lives that I Everett, Jessie Roeland, Taylor White; 4-County EPA: Alison Cooper, Leah Gibson; and everyone in this program touch,”said participant Alise Mathews of Laurel. “I will Magnolia EPA: Caroleah Brister, Sydney Stogner; Natchez Trace EPA: Sydney Harrell, treasure this experience forever.” Madison Smith; North East Mississippi EPA: Emily Gardner, Megan Wootten; NorthMathews was selected during the Youth Leadership Workshop in March to represent central EPA: Caleb Armour, Austin Baker, Anna Brewer, Meghan Galtelli, Hunter Mississippi on the national Youth Leadership Council. The workshop and Youth Tour are Gibbs, Hamza Mian, Wood Morris, Kim Neal; Pearl River Valley EPA: Eric Upton, Jon components of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Youth Leadership ProLuke Watts; Singing River EPA: Harley Byrd, Sydney Spradlin; South Mississippi EPA: gram. Participants are chosen through a competitive process sponsored Carleigh Roberts; Southern Pine EPA: Bethany Eubanks, Cady Jones, by their electric power association. Josh Vowell; Southwest Mississippi EPA: Aaliyah Cole, Michael “We want to challenge these young leaders to make a difHerring; Tallahatchie Valley EPA: Erika Chapman, Erin Chapference in their schools and communities,”said Ron Stewman, Hunt Howell, Caleb Kile, Colton Robison, Clayton Sibart, senior vice president of the Electric Power Associations ley, Jalen Taylor; Tombigbee EPA: Claire Cash, Prenetia of Mississippi. “In order to do this, they need proper trainClark, Mallory Clouse, Zack Hamm, Tanner Newman, Shayla ing. This program gives them the tools necessary to sharpen Peden, Chelsea Tucker; Twin County EPA: Keshia Brady, MISSISSIPPI their leadership skills.” Anthony Tate; Yazoo Valley EPA: Mia Fort, Taylor Neely.


August 2012 I Today in Mississippi

‘Move Over Law’ passed to protect utility workers he electric lineman faces real danger every time he works on a power line. But thanks to the knowledge he gains through extensive training and experience, he can take control of the situation to protect himself. One aspect of his safety he can not control, however, is the danger presented by the careless or inattentive driver. Fortunately for the lineman and the public alike, the Mississippi Legislature has taken an important step toward protecting utility workers from traffic accidents. First, a little background: In 2007 legislators passed a law to help protect law enforcement officers, firefighters and highway construction workers. The law required motorists to move at least one lane away or slow down when approaching emergency vehicles stopped on the side of the road with lights flashing. Drivers could get ticketed for not complying. This year, legislators passed a law to give electricity, water, gas and telecommunications workers and utility contractors the same protection while working from roadsides. To warrant move-overs by drivers, utility service vehicles must be parked with flashing lights to warn oncoming traffic. If changing lanes is not possible or unsafe, drivers should proceed with caution, slowing to a safe speed for the road conditions while keeping an eye out for workers. When drivers comply, the “Move Over Law” will save lives. Our electric linemen may be called out to repair a power line at any time of day or night, and in every kind of weather. Many times they work from a bucket truck on the side of a busy road, with cars zipping by in the dark of night. The inconvenience of slowing down a bit is a small price to pay if it makes the difference in whether a worker returns home safely at the end

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On the cover Fifty-eight high school juniors from across Mississippi took part in the annual Youth Tour of Washington, D.C., in June. The tour is part of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Youth Leadership Program, one of the most exciting and beneficial opportunities for students in the state. See story page 2.

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Our Homeplace

My Opinion Michael Callahan Executive Vice President/CEO EPAs of Mississippi

of the day. The “Move Over Law” is the most recent effort by the legislature, the Mississippi Department of Transportation and others to make Mississippi’s roads safer for everyone. Electric power associations supported the passage of the “Move Over Law,” and we are grateful for the support from legislators and the governor. (See photo on page 12.) ••• Electric power associations have cautioned members in recent weeks about several scams concerning the payment of utility bills. Some residents in Mississippi and other states have been contacted by phone or other means by scammers who ask for personal financial information, including their Social Security number. The caller instructs the victim to make a payment to what turns out to be a fake account number. Please, never give out personal information over the phone, by email or text message. If you receive a call from someone claiming to be from your electric power association and you feel pressured for immediate payment or personal information, hang up and report it to your electric power association. Always ask utility employees for proper identification, and never let anyone into your home to check electrical wiring unless you requested the inspection yourself.

Today in Mississippi

JOIN TODAY IN MISSISSIPPI

O N FAC E B O O K Vol. 65 No. 8

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi

OFFICERS

EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is 601-605-8600 published eleven times a year (Jan.Acceptance of advertising by Today in Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi does not imply endorsement Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeof the advertised product or services by land, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Power Associations. Product satisfaction Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical EDITORIAL STAFF and delivery responsibility lie solely with postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and Michael Callahan - Executive Vice President/CEO the advertiser. additional office. The publisher (and/or Ron Stewart - Senior Vice President, Co-op Services • National advertising representative: its agent) reserves the right to refuse or Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services National Country Market, 800-626-1181 edit all advertising. Jay Swindle - Manager, Advertising POSTMASTER: Send address changes Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Circulation of this issue: 432,860 to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS Abby Berry - Communications Specialist Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year 39158-3300 Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Visit us at: Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

Darrell Smith - President Kevin Doddridge - First Vice President Brad Robison - Second Vice President Wayne Henson - Secretary/Treasurer

www.todayinmississippi.com

Laurel’s Pinehurst Park was built on the site of the old Hotel Pinehurst, a downtown landmark built in 1914. The hotel was the first in Mississippi to have air conditioning. After the brick hotel and its fountain were demolished in 1989, the city built the park to commemorate its historical significance. In 2009 a group of Leadership Jones County participants added a gazebo, a historical marker and other enhancements to the park.

Mississippi is . . . The scent of sweet magnolia blossoms in the air, Family reunions and the country fair, Old Glory flown from every pole and ledge Where people salute and repeated the honored pledge. Where Sunday is for church and family dinner, Where every boy and girl can be a winner, Where people say excuse me, thank you and hello Whether your skin is black, white or yellow. Where we still can pray and say “Have a blessed day” To everyone as we thankfully go on our way. Where we can thank those in uniform for what they’ve done And where freedom of speech is for everyone. — Dell Magee Clawson, Kokomo Mississippi summer hot and dry Not a cloud to be seen in the western sky. As a youngster I remember I would bring cold water from the spring. Now the hill is much steeper and I’m a lot weaker. I just sit in the front porch swing and listen, and watch a mockingbird sing and feed her babies in a magnolia tree. That’s what Mississippi is to me. —Barney Morgan, Winona

What’s Mississippi to you? What makes you proud to be a Mississippian? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or email them to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing.

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Today in Mississippi

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August 2012

this summer, read

mississippi

By Debbie Stringer Summer afternoons are made for relaxing in the shade with a good book and an icy cold glass of tea. But which book to choose? We suggest bypassing the usual beach novels to explore some mindexpanding nonfiction titles with a Mississippi connection. With topics ranging from extreme weather to true crime to history, these books promise to be so engrossing, you’ll forget the heat—unless you want to read about it. Here are a few suggestions, available in bookstores and online: Mississippi Weather

and Climate

Kathleen Sherman-Morris, Charles L. Wax, Michael E. Brown; $26, hardback; University Press of Mississippi; www.upress.state.ms.us Weather nerds rejoice! Mississippi’s fickle weather finally gets a book of its own. Accessible and easy to read, “Mississippi Weather and Climate” presents explanations, stories, data and graphics on every aspect of the state’s weather. It’s all here, from routine cold fronts and fog to hurricanes and ice storms. The authors discuss factors affecting our weather and explain why both weather and climate change with the topography. They discuss historic weather events in detail, including catastrophic tornadoes, hurricanes, floods and ice storms. The final chapters reveal how the weather and climate affect people, from the way homes were built in Mississippi’s early days to the way weather information is collected and reported. Black-and-white photographs, charts, illustrations and more than 100 maps accompany the text. An index makes finding topics easy. The

Legs Murder Scandal

Hunter Cole, with postscript by Elizabeth Spencer; $38, hardback; $22 paperback; e-book $22; Univer-

sity Press of Mississippi; www.upress.state.ms.us On a dark winter morning in 1935, Laurel resident Daisy Keeton is murdered, her body mutilated and destroyed. Her 35-year-old daughter, Ouida, dumps a bundle containing thighs and a pelvis in a rural area north of Laurel. A few hours later, a hunter and his dogs discover the bundle. The “Legs Murder” case ensnared not only the unmarried Ouida but also her (married) employer/suitor, a prominent Laurel businessman whom Ouida fingered as the murderer. The case attracted intense national media coverage during two standingroom-only trials conducted in the Jones County Courthouse. Using legal records, medical files and newspaper accounts as primary sources, author Hunter Cole presents the entire story of the murder, the madness and its tragic aftermath. His engrossing narrative reconstructs events while debunking rumors and misinformation. “... The complicated story of Ouida Keeton and William Madison Carter, so highly charged by contradictions and by the ambiguities of love, crime, punishment and vengeance, deserves fair examination, a just recounting of the murder, the enormity and the shame,” Cole writes. As interesting as the story of the crime is the author’s vivid portrait of Depression-era life in a small lumber town in south Mississippi. Pieces

From the Past: Voices of Heroic Women in Civil Rights

Joan H. Sadoff, editor; Robert L. Sadoff, Linda Needleman, co-editors; $14.95 paperback; Tasora Books; www.itascabooks.com This collection of stories is unique in that it presents little known incidents, personal anecdotes and heroic behavior of 12 women, black and white, who became leaders in the civil rights movement in Mississippi.

These are stories of personal awakening, sacrifice and bravery in the segregated South of the 1960s. Among the subjects of the book are Unita Blackwell, Betty Pearson, Constance Iona Slaughter-Harvey, Fannie Lou Hamer and Hazel Brannon Smith. Some of the stories are first-person accounts. Others were written by prominent historians and writers such as Joanne Prichard Morris, Constance Curry, Bill Minor and Stanely Dearman. The volume includes black-and-white photos and a historical timeline of women in civil rights. Mississippi’s

American Indians

James F. Barnett Jr.; $40 hardback; University Press of Mississippi; www.upress.state.ms.us More than 20 different American Indian tribal groups once lived in the lands that became Mississippi. Today, Mississippi is home to only one tribe, the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. In “Mississippi’s American Indians,” author and historian James F. Barnett Jr. explores the causes of this sweeping change. Barnett begins his narrative with an overview of the hunter-gatherers that inhabited Mississippi’s oak forests around 10,000 B.C., and the mound builders the first European explorers encountered in the 16th century. European colonization in the New World brought profound change to the native peoples, including new trade relationships, infectious diseases, conflicts and wars. By the early 19th century, government treaties had ousted all but Choctaw and Chickasaw tribes from the state. Soon they too faced land cessions and removal.


August 2012

“Mississippi’s American Indians” offers detailed information on tribal culture, as well as stories of individual leaders, conflicts, treaties and removal to western lands. Barnett continues his narrative of tribal struggles in Mississippi through the 20th century, concluding with the 2011 election of Chief Phyliss Anderson, the first female chief of the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. Barnett is director of the Division of Historic Properties for the Mississippi Department of Archives and History. He is also the author of “The Natchez Indians: A History to 1735.” Wilder Ways

Donald C. Jackson; illustrated by Robert T. Jackson; $26 hardback; University Press of Mississippi; www.upress.state.ms.us This collection of essays will captivate anyone who shares Jackson’s deeply felt personal connection to the outdoors. A hunter, fisherman and rambler, Jackson shares personal experiences, observances, meanderings and perspectives— all deeply rooted in wild places. Since childhood, Jackson has yearned to be totally “melded with the spirits and rhythms of the earth in some wild place.” Although he may have legal title to his land, “I cannot possess it because I am actually part of it.” The wild places of which he writes range from his own woodland pond in north Mississippi to a crabbing hole in the Pascagoula River estuary to a Colorado sagebrush meadow. His stories are descriptive, harrowing, funny, reflective, moving, interesting. Above all, they are well told. Jackson, of Starkville, is the Sharp Distinguished Professor of Fisheries at Mississippi State University. He is also the author of “Tracks.” Mississippi

John Hurt: His Life, His Times, His Blues

Philip R. Ratcliffe; forward by Mary Frances Hurt Wright; $35 hardback; University Press of Mississippi; www.upress.state.ms.us The son of impoverished former slaves living in Carroll County, Mississippi John Hurt (18921966) became an icon known the world over for his southern folk music. How did this happen? The author sets out to find the answer in this new biography of Hurt, starting with his parents’ slavery. Using information obtained in part through personal interviews and correspondence, Ratcliffe

traces Hurt’s career beginning with his first recording session, in 1928 in Memphis, and sessions in New York where he recorded “Avalon Blues” and “Stack O’lee Blues.” Hurt’s music found a new audience with the rise of folk music in the 1960s. He performed at major folk festivals, in Carnegie Hall and on NBC’s “The Tonight Show.” But in late 1965 or early 1966, citing homesickness, Hurt moved back to Mississippi, where he lived in Grenada until his death in 1966. Ratcliffe’s biography includes a complete discography and black-and-white photos. Hogs,

Mules, and Yellow Dogs: Growing Up on a Mississippi Subsistence Farm

Jimmye Hillman; forward by Robert Hass; $19.95 paperback; The University of Arizona Press; www.uapress.arizona.edu Hardscrabble farming was once a way of life for many rural Mississippians living during the Great Depression. Yet few people today remember that vanished world with as much clarity as 88-yearold Jimmye Hillman. Hillman gathered accounts of his family and other people of Greene County to preserve memories of that long-ago time. He describes in detail a life of poverty, with personal observances of agriculture, food, trains, politics, religion, family, childhood and community. His tales are enriched by colorful characters, humor, wisdom and sympathy. The result is an entertaining, fascinating read but also a hard-nosed look at the realities of living on a dirt farm. Hillman survived the poverty of his childhood to become head of the University of Arizona Department of Agricultural Economics for 30 years while doing groundbreaking work in agricultural and trade policy. The

Battle of Brice’s Crossroads

Stewart L. Bennett; $21.99 paperback; The History Press; historypress.net An insignificant crossroads in Lee County, Mis-

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Today in Mississippi

sissippi, became on June 10, 1864, an unlikely battleground for one of the most spectacular Confederate victories in the western theater of the Civil War. The battle stemmed from Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s attempt to stop Confederate Brig. Gen. Nathan Bedford Forrest’s cavalry raids on Union supply lines in Tennessee. Sherman sent a cavalry commanded by Union Brig. Gen. Samuel D. Sturgis. For Sturgis, capturing or killing Forrest would boost his own career. Forrest, however, aimed to drive the Union out of Mississippi or die trying. Although the Confederate force was outnumbered almost two to one, the Union attack failed and Sturgis was demoted. Blue Mountain College assistant professor of history Stewart L. Bennett retells the Battle of Brice’s Crossroads through first-person soldier accounts, photographs and maps. The book is part of The History Press Civil War Sesquicentennial Series. Images

of America: Building the Natchez Trace Parkway

Natchez Trace Parkway Association; $21.99 paperback; Arcadia Publishing; www.arcadiapublishing.com Centuries of travel by foot, horse, carriage and wagon left a barren, rutted pathway spanning Mississippi from Natchez to the Nashville, Tenn., area. This primitive interstate highway, carved from a series of Indian trails, served as a major route for the settlement of the Southwest Territory in the 19th century, and gave rise to settlements that eventually became towns. The Natchez Trace Parkway Association formed in 1934 to promote the development of a federal parkway commemorating the old road. The last of the Natchez Trace Parkway was paved in 2005. “Building the Natchez Trace Parkway” presents a pictorial history relating the development of the 444-mile parkway over a 70-year period, as well as historic sites and communities along its route. Each of the black-and-white photos is accompanied by descriptive and historical details.

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Grand monument honors man’s benevolent legacy here is a joke that I use sometimes when I speak about a fellow who stood up to give a talk, cleared his throat and said, “Well, I don’t really know where to start.” And someone in the back shouts, “Start toward the end!” Well, on the subject of Prospect Hill Plantation, I have to start toward the end to fit the story in this issue of Today in Mississippi. It would take a book to tell the whole story. And besides, Alan Huffman has already written it in his book, “Mississippi in Africa.” So I’ll start where I came in. The first time I saw Prospect Hill Plantation was while I was flying to Natchez in the WLBT helicopter back in 1997. Pilot Coyte Bailey made a wide circle east of Lorman and told me he wanted to show me this old house he had spotted from the air many times. Rising up from the forest was an expansive roof in poor repair over a house that looked as if it were coming and going at the same time. Some of it looked to be fixed up while other parts of it looked to be falling in. It appeared to have been deserted for maybe a hundred years, except for a tall television antenna. But what attracted my attention more than the house was a huge monument in the side yard in a cemetery. It even looked impressive from 1,500 feet up in the air with its marble columns rising from a solid block base, supporting a circular marble roof. It really seemed out of place just sitting out in the yard of a fast-fading relic in the deep woods somewhere east of Lorman. I really wanted to find out about the house and whose grave that was. After a few years of describing what I had seen from the air, Al Hollingsworth and Doug Lum of Port Gibson told me the house was Prospect Hill Plantation

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and the monument marked the grave of Isaac Ross. Ross stipulated in his will that his slaves be freed and Prospect Hill be sold to pay their passage to Liberia in West Africa (specifically, to a place called “Mississippi in Africa” I recently discovered from Huffman’s book). Ross’ grandson, Isaac Ross Wade, protested the will all the way to the Mississippi Supreme Court, which upheld it. However, Mr. Wade somehow managed to hang onto the land and the house. But 300 slaves went to Africa, this after a slave revolt and the burning of the original house and a 6-year-old niece being killed in the fire—and a lot more that I can’t fit in. That fancy monument I had seen was commissioned in honor of Isaac Ross by the Mississippi Branch of The AmeriMississippi can Colonization Society, pushing for the freedom of slaves Seen and their deportation to Africa. by Walt Grayson Now, to come in at the end of the story, just in the past few weeks I finally got to see Prospect Hill Plantation up close thanks to Jessica Crawford, Southeast regional director of the Archeological Conservancy. The group recently acquired the house and some of the property with the hope of stabilizing the deterioration until a buyer willing to restore the house can be found. Cosmetically, Prospect Hill is in sad shape. But it has good “bones.” But time is really short for it to be saved. The next year will tell if we actually did come in at the end of the story, or if this is just the beginning of the next chapter.

Isaac Ross' monument cost $25,000 in the mid 1800s. I went to a website that suggests modern equivalents for values from past years. If I read the information correctly, that would be about $700,000 today. Looking at the workmanship, I don't know if you could order one for even that amount. Photo: Walt Grayson

Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh!That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” To contact Grayson, send email to walt@waltgrayson.com.


August 2012 I Today in Mississippi I 7

Sweet potato vine adds unique colors f you’re looking for a vigorous and unique ground cover for your landscape, consider a popular ornamental that I really enjoy, the colorful sweet potato vine. Longtime favorites include Margarita, which is lime green with large leaves; Blackie, a cut-leaf variety with dark purple to black foliage; and Tricolor, which has leaves of green, pink and white. New selections have introduced amazing color selections and leaf shapes. The Sweet Caroline series offers a wide selection for the landscape. The series has two leaf shapes, cut-leaf and

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from raisin’ cane to raisin’ crops

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heart-shaped. The colors available in the cut-leaf form include bronze, green-yellow, light green, purple and red. The Sweetheart Southern series has heartshaped leaves in Gardening colors that include by Dr. Gary Bachman light green, purple, red and black. I really like the darker colors available in sweet potato vines, especially those with the reddish hues. Red foliage is a great way to add color contrast with the primary green foliage of our ornamental plants. Illusion Garnet Lace has deeply cut foliage, and new leaves emerge light green before turning an attractive burgundy. Illusion Midnight has foliage that is a deep, almost black purple. I love using sweet potato vines in combination container plantings. The vines cascade out over the container edges and work their way around, between and sometimes over the other plants in the container. Coleus plants have a wide variety of foliage colors and make good planting partners for ornamental sweet potatoes, especially for

Ornamental sweet potato plants produce a flower that is hidden by the foliage. The flower on this Illusion Midnight resembles a morning glory. Photos: MSU Extension Service/Gary Bachman

those combos placed in full sun. Since ornamental sweet potatoes are vigorous growers, they can become a little unruly and overrun less vigorous plants. Simply prune back to keep them in bounds. The pruning will not impact plant health and will help maintain good, dense growth. About the only serious pest ornamental sweet potatoes have is the flea beetle. Check with your local Mississippi State University Extension office for the best control measures for these pests. Plant your sweet potato vines in full sun for the best color development. When planted in the shade, the colors tend to fade with green tints. The plants also benefit from well-drained, highquality organic soil. When preparing the planting bed, mix in about 2 pounds of a slow-release fertilizer per 100 square feet of bed. This may be a bit wasteful since the ornamental sweet potatoes spread out quite a bit. Alternatively, drop a tablespoon of slow-release fertilizer into each planting

hole to supply nutrients throughout the season. Ornamental sweet potatoes need consistent moisture. Be sure to irrigate, especially in dry periods, to help maintain good plant health. Ornamental sweet potatoes are real sweet potatoes that breeders have selected for their vivid colors and attractive leaves. The plants produce a flower that is hidden by the foliage. The flower resembles a morning glory, which is not surprising since the two are closely related. Ornamental sweet potatoes are annuals in Mississippi, except in the coastal counties where the vines will come back unless the winter was extremely cold. In other areas, vines may overwinter in protected microclimates. Ornamental sweet potatoes add annual color to landscapes, so why not enjoy them in yours? Dr. Gary Bachman is MSU horticulturist at the Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi.

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August 2012

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Today in Mississippi

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9

Our excursion starts where the Delta begins:

for a guide at the park’s Visitors Center. He’ll drive your car or either ride with you for three hours and explain the battle sites, plus drive you around town. We had an awesome experience and the cost was very reasonable. Mr. Roy and I completed a perfect day by toddling precious gems scattered throughout our (Australian for “walking”) state. So this year we chose Vicksburg, through the Old Court House Greenwood and Indianola. It had only Museum, the Biedenharn been 40 years since our last visit to the Coca-Cola Museum and the Vicksburg National Military Park. Mr. old downtown area. Roy is a Civil War buff and has read The next day we rolled off tons of books on that period of history. So when he began planning our trip, he toward the Delta and Greenwood. What a treat! Much reread Winston Groom’s book, better than we had hoped. “Vicksburg, 1863.” He tutored me on the battle strategies Greenwood is the home of the famous Alluvian Hotel and Spa, and as we drove. Even though I taught high school American history six years (speech Viking Corp. (cookware, kitchen applitherapy for the last 22), his tutoring pre- ances and cooking school). Many of the scenes of the recent hit movie “The pared me for Help” were filmed in Greenwood, so I battle; it made took that tour while Mr. Roy toured a the tour more large catfish farm. Both are a must-see. enjoyable. The Another highlight of our trip was visMilitary Park has iting Indianola, just a few miles from more monuGreenwood, and the new B.B. King ments and works Museum. The facility includes an old of art than any cotton warehouse that was renovated. If battlefield in the Grin ‘n’ you are a blues fan as I am, you would country. More Bare It agree this is a great museum and a fine than 1,300 monby Kay Grafe tribute to this Mississippi legend. We uments pay tribpurchased B.B.’s “Greatest Hits Album” ute to the brave soldiers, both and also Robert Johnson’s “King of the Confederate and Union, who fought Delta Blues Singers.” Johnson played there. If you go, my suggestion is to arrange authentic Delta Blues in the 1930s.

Vicksburg here’s our house up yonder! And look how the grass has grown. Thank you, Lord, for a safe trip." Folks in Mississippi like to travel—and the proof is in the puddin’. My readers write by Postal Deliveries and Email Rocket Express; that keeps me clued in to their druthers. I’m downright happy to receive suggestions, dear readers, regarding your favorite topics. Travel and pets are in the top five. Therefore, madams and sirs, I aim to please. As you know, my stories come straight from the horse’s mouth, and I’m the horse! Last summer I wrote that high fuel prices influenced Pops and me to stay fairly close to home. We parked the motor home in our favorite RV campground in Tupelo. Our youngest daughter’s family has a home in Saltillo, only eight miles away. We hung out with them, inspected our granddaughter Lealand’s college, UNA, and went to the Shiloh National Military Park and the Amish community in Ethridge, just across the line in Tennessee. We’re intensely partial to Mississippi’s

“T

Little Zion M.B. Church, near Greenwood, was one of the local sites chosen for the filming of “The Help.”

Back home in Lucedale I’m in the kitchen frying okra and squash, cooking fresh corn that I cut off the cob, cooking green butterbeans and tomato pie, and chopping green onions for a cucumber salad—while buttering cornbread and slicing watermelon for dessert. No meat needed. Sweet tea is optional. Aren’t you glad we live in rural Mississippi? If you’re coming for supper let me know, ‘cause it’s almost ready. Traveling is like Sweet ‘n’ Low, but home is bona fide sugar. Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.

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10 I Today in Mississippi

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August 2012

Lee Hedegaard, General Manager & CEO Lorri Freeman, Manager of Communications Amanda Parker, Communications Specialist For more information, call 601-947-4211/228-497-1313 x 2251 or visit our website at www.singingriver.com

Churches eligible for tax exemption Lee Hedegaard, General Manager and CEO, Singing River Electric

Singing River Electric would like to notify all of our local churches about a change. Effective July 1, 2012, state representatives passed House Bill 582 providing an exemption from state sales tax on certain utility services sold to churches that are exempt from certain federal income taxation. Qualified utility services, including electricity, must be sold to, billed to and paid for directly by the exempt church. The law specifies churches provide a copy of their individual IRS determination letter certifying the

church named on the letter is exempt from federal income taxation under IRC Section 501(c)3 to qualify for exemption. If the church has not obtained a 501(c)3 determination letter from the IRS, the church may complete an Affidavit of Church Purchasing Utilities form and provide a copy of the notarized affidavit to Singing River Electric to support the exemption claim. This affidavit will expire on December 31 of the current year, and a new affidavit must be completed each year. The affidavit and additional information about the tax is available at www.dor.ms.gov. Commercial businesses operated by churches such as bakeries, thrift stores, etc. do not qualify for the exemption. Please contact any Singing River Electric office for more information or to submit information for the exemption.

Updatceell / phonem ! l i a e and It’s storm season. Email us at contactus@singingriver.com or call any Singing River Electric office to update your phone/cell number and email. This ensures our outage management system is able to get crews en route to your home or business as quickly as possible in the event of a power outage. Call or email today!

W Wee ’ r e g o n e m o s t o f t h e d a yy,, s o i t d i d n ’ t make sense to keep an empty house comfortable. But now when we get h o m e , i t ’’ss r e a d y. y. I’m saving money on my electricity bill just by programming a thermostat. W h a t c a n y o u d o ? Fi Find out ho w the little changes add up at www w.. s i n g i n g r i v e rr.. c o m / e n e r g y g u i d e . h t m l .

FEELS BETTER SINCE I SET OUR THERMOSTAT TO CHEAP.

www.singingriver.com

www.singingriver.com www.singingriver..ccom

Air ventilation key during heat

Member Services Rep. Jeff Gray gray@singingriver.com

Attic ventilation is important during the summer. The average attic temperature should register between 100 and 120 degrees. The air needs to be warm enough to keep the attic dry, but not too hot because built-up heat will move down to the conditioned area. Hot air rises and should escape through attic ridge vents and/or ventilators. Soffit vents are located on the roof overhang eves. These allow cooler air to enter the attic and allow hot air to escape through the ridge vents. Natural ventilation is recommended. This is simply allowing air to flow in from the soffit vents and out through ridge vents or wind turbines. When heat builds in the attic, it will escape out the wind turbines causing them to turn, pulling more air out of the attic. This is done at no cost to the homeowner. Power ventilation may be used if there are limited ridge vents or no existing ridge vents. This type should be used as a last resort. Electric fan units usually run during daytime hours and have the potential to pull humidity into the attic which could cause moisture problems. When purchasing a power ventilator, make sure it contains a thermostat and humidistat and is sized for the square footage of your home.


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Annual Meeting attendees hear of co-op efforts and successes in 2011 SRE member services representative Stan Mills (right) displays the benefits of energy-efficient lighting.

Singing River Electric held its Annual Meeting on Thursday, June 28, at the headquarters office located in Lucedale. General manager and CEO Lee Hedegaard discussed how Singing River Electric has felt the downturn of the

Hedegaard went on to explain how the loans did not affect the electric bills and are guaranteed either by the counties they help or the participating entity. Singing River Electric also took advantage of falling interest rates in 2011. The co-op refinanced $9,300,000 in debt.

“An important accomplishment of 2011 was our continued participation in USDA’s Rural Development Agency loans which foster local business development and create local jobs.” L e e H e de g a a r d S i n g i n g R i v e r El e c t r i c G e n e r a l M an a ge r an d C E O economy. Kilowatt-hour sales were down 4 percent and although the cooperative did add 329 new meters, it was the smallest net gain in more than 25 years. “An important accomplishment of 2011 was our continued participation in USDA’s Rural Development Agency loans which foster local business development and create local jobs,” said Hedegaard. Over the past ten years, these loans have helped secure $5.3 million for local community projects.

“This will result in a savings of more than $153,000 per year for the next 18 years,” he commented. Another great accomplishment in 2011 was returning capital credits to members. Board president Ralph Hicks explained how if margins are made beyond needs, they are assigned to members in the form of capital credits. When appropriate cash is available, Singing River Electric’s board can approve returning a portion

of the member’s capital credit in the form of a check or credit. In October 2011, Singing River Electric's board of directors approved a return of $1,506,076 to the members for capital credits allocated from 1953-1964. In addition to the waning economy, your cooperative faces challenges in federal regulations and changes in the electric industry. Singing River Electric is working with South Mississippi Electric to ensure compliance with new regulations, while keeping costs to consumers as low as possible. Hedegaard wrapped up his comments by stating that Singing River Electric remains in good financial condition. The meeting concluded after a question and answer session and the election of a new board member, Gautier resident Eddie Thornton.

Above, SRE CEO Lee Hedegaard presents the $500 proxy/online vote grand prize to Ann Howard of Lucedale. Ann voted online for the annual meeting director election this year. Proxy/ online prizes were also awarded to select Singing River Electric members who returned their completed proxy by mail or voted online at www.singingriver.com. 2012 Annual Meeting proxy prize winners: Ann Howard of Lucedale ($500) Roy Holcomb, Jr. of State Line ($250) Trilla Paulk of Moss Point ($250) John B. McMaster of Vancleave ($250) Lawrence Rumsey of Ocean Springs ($250) A.Y. Cowart of McLain($250) and Marilyn York of Biloxi ($250) Thank you for returning your proxies , voting online and participating in your annual meeting!

Download your copy of the annual report at www.singingriver.com

YOUR ANNUAL MEETING HELD JUNE 28, 2012


10b I Today in Mississippi I August 2012

Youth Tour

#

2012

A glimpse of our nation’s past and courage for the future

Harley Byrd (left) and Sydney Spradlin represented Singing River Electric on the 2012 Youth Tour. Here they get an up-close view of the White House while visiting Lafayette Park.

“I am so thankful for this amazing opportunity. I will never forget this experience!” - Harley Byrd

“After spending a week in D.C., I have a new appreciation for my country. This trip has changed my life!” - Sydney Spradlin

highlighted the 26th Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Youth Tour. Fifty-eight Mississippi high school students recently participated in the annual visit to our nation’s capital. Harley Byrd and Sydney Spradlin represented Singing River Electric Power Association on the Youth Tour. Harley, daughter of Jason and Deborah Byrd of Beaumont, will be a senior at Perry Central High School this fall. Sydney will be a senior at East Central High School and is the daughter of Michael and Luci Knotts of Moss Point. The seven-day trip featured visits to the major monuments and memorials, including the Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial, which is D.C.’s newest memorial. Students also visited the World War II Memorial, the Lincoln Memorial and the Vietnam Veterans Wall, to name a few. A trip to the Kennedy Center was one of the first stops on the tour. While there, the students enjoyed a breathtaking view of the Potomac River from the balcony level, followed by the theatrical production Shear Madness, one of the longest running nonmusicals of all time. “This has been an incredible experience,” said Harley.“I “We are proud to take am so thankful for this opportunity!” part in this outstanding The students were taken on a guided tour of the program.” Washington National Cathedral, the second largest cathedral Lee Hedegaard general manager and CEO in the U.S. Later in the week, the students toured Mt. Vernon, Singing River Electric the historic home of George Washington. The students also attended the popular Sunset Parade at the Marine Corps War Memorial and enjoyed a performance by the U.S. Marine Forces Reserve Band. While visiting Arlington Cemetery, the students reverently watched the changing of the guard and visited the gravesite of President John F. Kennedy. “Youth Tour has been a life-changing experience for me,” said Sydney.“I have gained a new appreciation for my country.” The students spent a day touring the Smithsonian Museums. Two popular events of the tour were a stop by Madame Tussauds Wax Museum and an evening cruise on the Potomac River. In addition, the students attended a youth day event with more than 1,500 students representing electric cooperatives from across the nation. At this event, Mike Schlappi, an Olympic gold medal winner in wheelchair basketball, delivered an inspiring message. He challenged the young people to make a difference in the lives of others, no matter the problems encountered. The students spent a day at the Capitol, which began with a special tour of the Congressional House Floor, graciously hosted by Rep. Gregg Harper. After a tour of the Capitol, Harley and Sydney joined a group of students who visited with Rep. Steven Palazzo in his D.C. office. He spoke to the students about the meaning of true leadership and encouraged them to set high goals for themselves. While visiting on Capitol Hill, students also had the opportunity to meet with Sen. Roger Wicker and Sen. Thad Cochran. The Youth Tour is part of an extensive youth leadership program supported by Singing River Electric Power Association. “We are proud to take part in this outstanding program,” said Lee Hedegaard, general manager and CEO of Singing River Electric.“These students will hopefully take the leadership skills they have learned back to their schools and communities, and that’s what it’s all about.”

Singing River Electric congratulates these students on their accomplishments.


August 2012 I Today in Mississippi I 10c

Been there... Done that... D.C.!

One of our first stops on Youth Tour was the Thomas Jefferson Memorial (upper right). We also stopped by the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial (upper left). We spent an entire day on Capitol Hill, visiting with our senators and congressmen. Rep. Gregg Harper gave our group a personal tour of the Capitol, and later, we met with Rep. Steven Palazzo in his D.C. office (lower left). Many thanks to Rep. Palazzo for graciously hosting our group! During the tour, we also stopped by the Marine Corps War Memorial (lower right). We stopped by the memorial later in the week to watch the Sunset Parade, featuring a performance by the U.S. Marine Forces Reserve Band.


10d I Today in Mississippi I August 2012

Be Alert to Avoid Lightning Did you know lightning can strike even if it’s not raining? Lightning strikes kill 55 to 60 people every year, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). More than 400 people are hit by a bolt each year. But if you prepare before an outdoor event and know how to protect yourself, you can keep your family safe from lightning.

Follow these tips from NOAA to protect yourself from lightning: • Plan ahead. Just as you have an emergency plan for fires and weather events like tornadoes and hurricanes, form an action plan for lightning. Choose a safe shelter, and time how long it takes to get there. • Check the weather. A simple forecast can tell you whether you should delay outdoor activities, such as golfing or fishing, to avoid a dangerous situation. • Look to the sky. Dark skies, whipping winds and lightning flashes are all signs that you should seek shelter. • Seek shelter. As soon as you hear a rumble of thunder, head for a safe place—an

enclosed structure, one with plumbing and wiring is best, or a car. Open-air shelters, sheds and covered porches are often not safe places. Avoid tall trees that stand alone, towers and poles, as well as metal fences and other conductors of electricity. And keep out of open areas, so that you’re not the tallest object in a field. • Wait it out. Leaving safe shelter too quickly makes you vulnerable to lightning strikes. Wait at least 30 minutes after the last rumble of thunder before you head back outdoors. • Avoid corded phones and appliances. If you’re indoors when a storm hits, do not use corded phones or appliances. Lightning can

travel through your home’s wiring. Also, water is a great conductor of electricity, so don’t take a bath or shower. If someone near you has been struck by lightning, call 911 immediately. A certified person should begin CPR right away if necessary— the victim will not have an electric charge and is safe to touch. For more information on how to stay safe in a lightning storm, visit www.lightningsafety.noaa.gov. Sources: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


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Watts Happening AUGUST 4 SATURDAY ART MARKET AT THE MARY C. Enjoy an open-air market where you can browse and shop for art, pottery, sculpture and more from artists across the coast. Spectators free. Time: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Location: Mary C. O’Keefe Cultural Center, 1600 Government Street, Ocean Springs Contact: 228-818-2878 or www.themaryc.org

AUGUST 31 WATERFRONT CAFE Enjoy an evening of music and food that brings locals and visitors to the downtown boardwalk. Sponsored by the River City Cultural Foundation. Free admission. Time: 6-10 p.m. Location: Riverfront Park in downtown Moss Point Contact: 228-990-5860 or www.mosspointmainstreet.com

AUGUST 4 & SEPTEMBER 8 DEEP SOUTH TEAM ROPING See Southern team roping at its best in a partnership between horses and riders where the fastest time counts. Free admission. Time: Events start at 10 a.m. Location: Harrison County Fairgrounds, 15321 County Farm Road, Gulfport Contact: 601-736-0318 or http://co.harrison.ms.us/departments/fairgrounds/calendar.asp

SEPTEMBER 1-2 GULF COAST STAMP CLUB Buy, sell and trade all your special stamps. Free admission. Time: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. both days Location: St. Martin Community Center, 15004 Lemoyne Blvd., Ocean Springs Contact: 228-864-3601

AUGUST 10 BLUES AT THE BEACH Come out for an evening of music, food and fun. Bring yourself, your chair or blanket. The Beach Park concession stand has food and drinks available for purchase. Hosted by Emerge Pascagoula. Free admission. Time: 6-8 p.m. Location: Pascagoula Beach Park Contact: 228-762-3391 or www.jcchamber.com AUGUST 11 2ND SATURDAYS AT THE SQUARE Join the shops of Anchor Square as they host a fun event with live music. Time: Noon - 2 p.m. Location: Anchor Square, 303 Delmas Avenue, Pascagoula Contact: 228-938-2352 or www.cityofpascagoula.com AUGUST 11 & 25 NATIONAL BARREL HORSE ASSOCIATION COMPETITIONS Bring the family to this rodeo event in which a horse and rider attempt to complete a cloverleaf pattern around preset barrels in the fastest time. Free admission. Time: Events start at 3 p.m. Location: Harrison County Fairgrounds, 15321 County Farm Road, Gulfport Contact: 228-861-3530 or www.nbha.com AUGUST 17 MOSS POINT MOVIE NIGHT This family-friendly event presents a movie along with free popcorn while it lasts. Bring your blankets or lawn chairs. Sponsored by Moss Point Main Street Association. Free admission. Time: Movie begins at dusk Location: Riverfront Park in downtown Moss Point Contact: 228-623-0994 or www.mosspointmainstreet.com AUGUST 25 & 26 CLASSIC ARMS GUN AND KNIFE SHOW Buy, sell, trade and see hundreds of displays and vendors with new and old guns, ammo, books, knives, coins, camouflage and more. Admission charged. Time: Saturday: 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. - Sunday: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Location: Mississippi Coast Coliseum, 2350 Beach Blvd., Biloxi Contact: 985-624-8577 or www.mscoastcoliseum.com

SEPTEMBER 6-9 AKC DOG SHOW See more than 100 dog breeds from Singing River Kennel Club and Mobile Kennel Club compete in many categories. Free admission. Time: Gates open at 9 a.m. Location: Mississippi Coast Coliseum, 2350 Beach Blvd, Biloxi Contact: 800-726-2781, 228-594-3707 or www.akc.org SEPTEMBER 8 21ST ANNUAL MISSISSIPPI GULF COAST BLUES & HERITAGE FESTIVAL Blues fans flock to this fun filled, rain or shine event as blues and soul entertainers perform. Also enjoy food and arts and crafts. Admission charged. Time: Begins at 11 a.m. Location: Jackson County Fairgrounds, 2902 Shortcut Road, Pascagoula Contact: 228-497-5493, 228-497-5615 or www.msgulfcoastbluesfest.com SEPTEMBER 8 & 9 31ST ANNUAL BILOXI SEAFOOD FESTIVAL This huge festival features seafood dishes, arts and crafts, kids village and activities, gumbo championship, live entertainment and more. Sponsored by the Biloxi Chamber of Commerce. Admission charged. Time: Saturday: 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. - Sunday: 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Location: Biloxi Town Green, 710 Beach Blvd., Biloxi Contact: 228-604-0014 or www.biloxi.org SEPTEMBER 15 & 16 28TH ANNUAL DIAMONDHEAD ARTS AND CRAFTS FAIR Visit with more than 150 vendors with items to sell. Food and drinks available. Free admission and free shuttle bus transportation from the Diamondhead Shopping Center parking lot. Time: Saturday: 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m. - Sunday: 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Location: Diamondhead Country Club, 7600 Country Club Circle, Diamondhead Contact: 228-255-6922 SEPTEMBER 22 FAMILY FUN DAY ON MAIN STREET Visit downtown Lucedale for this event to celebrate Habitat for Humanity’s World Habitat Day 2012. Enjoy arts and crafts, face painting, a BBQ cook off, live music and take advantage of specials from Main Street businesses. Free admission. Time: 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Location: Main Street in downtown Lucedale Contact: 601-766-0730 or www.georgecountyhabitat.org


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Today in Mississippi I August 2012

PictureThis: Candid photos Share an unforgettable moment for our next Picture This theme, “Gotcha—Great Moments in Candid Photos.” Photos selected for publication will appear in the October issue of Today in Mississippi. Submissions must be postmarked or emailed by Sept. 17. Photographers whose work is selected for publication are eligible for a drawing for a $200 cash prize, to be awarded in December.

• Please do not send a photo with a date on the image. • Photos must be accompanied by identifying information, including photographer’s name, address, phone and electric power association (if applicable). Include the name(s) of any recognizable people in the picture. • Prints will be returned if accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. We cannot, however, guarantee their safe return through the mail, so please do not send irreplaceable photos.

Requirements for eligibility

How to submit your work

• Photos must be the original work of an amateur photographer (of any age). • Photos eligible for publication may be either color or black and white, print or digital. • Photos must be in sharp focus. • Digital photos should be high-resolution JPG files. Please do not use photoediting software to adjust colors or tones. (We prefer to do it ourselves, if necessary, according to our printer’s standards.)

Mail prints or a photo CD to Picture This, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 391583300. Or, email photos (as an attachment to your email message) to news@ epaofms.com. If submitting more than one photo, please attach all photos to only one e-mail message, if possible. Questions? Call Debbie Stringer, editor, at 601-605-8600 or email your questions to news@epaofms.com.

State ‘Move Over Law’ protects utility workers Gov. Phil Bryant signs the “Move Over Law,” designed to improve safety for utility crews working alongside highways and local roads. The law requires motorists to move at least one lane away or, if that is not possible, to slow down as they approach utility or emergency vehicles parked on the roadside with lights flashing. Standing from left are Rep. Scott Bounds, of Philadelphia, co-author of the bill; Rep. Jim Beckett, of Bruce, chairman of the House Public Utilities Committee and author of the bill; and Rep. Robert Johnson, of Natchez, chairman of the House Transportation Committee. “I believe this legislation is a win-win. The traveling public will be safer and the utility crews will be much safer,” Rep. Beckett said. “Also, this could allow utility crews to respond quicker and more efficiently to emergency situations. My primary concern was the safety of the utility crews.” Sen. Hob Bryan, of Amory, chairman of Senate Judiciary B, was instrumental in the passage of the bill in the Senate.


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Turn August miseries into summer delight ome will argue that the only purpose for August in Mississippi as the month relates to outdoor activities is to fill the space between July and September. There is an element of truth in such thinking. To make the point, look at some familiar outdoor pursuits that fit quite well into a host of other months. Tent camping: Miserable and sweltering in August. Hunting: Not available. Hiking: Tolerable if done early in the morning or on rare occasions, late in the afternoon. But a full day of it in August is just about more fun than most folks are allowed to have! Biking: See hiking. The list goes on. The reader will note, however, that fishing was not included in the above. That is because it is an exception. August is the month when one unique fishing experience begins Mississippi to blossom. Outdoors Specifically, this is fishing for bass on by Tony Kinton low-water creeks and rivers. Let’s break this activity down into various parts and see what ingredients are required for some outstanding summer fishing across the state. August streams are traditionally low. Heavy rains can change this, but such rains are rare. And if they come and don’t stay for long periods, the streams will reform quickly and become productive again almost overnight. What we are

S

looking for are shallow runs broken by deeper holes in bends and spots where the water runs through log jams and downed timber. There the bass will be. Anglers visiting most Mississippi streams will encounter two types of bass: the largemouth and the Kentucky, also called spotted bass or redeyes. The latter is not generally as hefty as its largemouth cousins, but what it lacks in size is made up for in spunk. There is, however, one major glitch facing most anglers who want to do this low-water fishing. And that glitch is the low water itself, that perfect condition for finding and locating stream bass. This always creates an access problem. Even where there is public access, seldom will anglers be able to put a motor boat in and navigate up or down stream. That leaves only the canoe or kayak as a viable craft to use at public-access points in an effort to move about the stream. But regardless of what you must do to get to the streams, the effort will likely be rewarded. Early mornings and late afternoons are generally the best times to fish, but bass will often bite all day. Slower at some times and enhanced at others, but all day just the same. Of course, the sun will be high and pouring down into otherwise shaded streams at midday, and this can be uncomfortable. But if you choose to brave the heat, fish at any point in the day you want. If I were forced to select one time, that would be late afternoons just when the sun begins to cast long

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Even small streams can produce big results. Fish the dark spots alongside logs in low water. These are generally deeper and are good spots for bass. Photos: Tony Kinton

shadows across the water. Where and how to catch bass are twins and can be isolated into a very few likely spots and methods. One spot is where shallow, relatively fast water rushes over a sandbar and drops into a dark spot just below that sandbar. How? Cast so that the lure runs parallel to that sandbar and let that lure cover the entire length about a foot or so into the current where the water is deep enough to be dark. A Kentucky bass will probably be hanging around there. Another good spot is along a steep bank on the offside of a bend. And like that sandbar regimen, fish the length of the bend, not from the middle of the stream and across. That latter approach allows the angler to prospect only a tiny portion of the bank, where a lengthwise tactic covers practically all of it. Log jams can be good. If the water is pouring through/over these, fish the bottom side. And cast so that the lure runs the length of the logs. This will often be from the bank back toward the middle. Submerged jams, their skeletal fingers the only things giving evidence of the jams, can be good. Fish them thoroughly. And if the path of a single log can be determined, fish its length, even if it is in shal-

low water. Bass will hold in surprisingly nondescript places. Tackle for this fishing is fairly basic. Spinning and/or casting reels on a good rod will work fine. Do, however, keep it all sturdy. Excessive strength is not required, but some backbone will be needed to coax bass from the tangles. This is not a game for ultralights. Line in the 14-pound class is in order. Lures? Spinnerbaits get the nod from most anglers, and they are hard to beat. The simple white-skirted H&H will work perfectly. And take plenty. You are going to break off and lose more than you can imagine, for if you are not fishing the tangles and rough spots, you are not fishing for stream bass in August. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His books, “Outside and Other Reflections,” “Fishing Mississippi” and his new Christian historical romance novel, “Summer Lightning Distant Thunder,” are available in bookstores and from the author at www.tonykinton.com, or P.O. Box 88, Carthage, MS 39051.


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Maple Oatmeal Pie with Cinnamon Whipped Cream

Cooks Mississippi

FEATURED COOKBOOK:

‘Recipes from Our Home’ When you open a cookbook and see recipes from folks named Mae Mae and Mary Sue, you know there’s some good Southern cookin’ between its covers. “Recipes from Our Home” presents some 60 pages of recipes contributed by people living, working or volunteering at Martha Coker Home Green Houses, in Yazoo City. Proceeds help supplement the home’s activity department, and in turn benefit the residents. A program of Methodist Senior Services and an Eden Alternative Community, the Martha Coker Home is the nation’s first stand-alone Green House skilled nursing facility. The Green House concept is designed to de-institutionalize nursing home care and improve well-being by providing a residential community that encourages engagement in meaningful activities. For more information on the Martha Coker Home Green Houses, call 662-746-4621 or go to www.mss.org/marthacoker. To order a copy of “Recipes from Our Home,” mail a check or money order for $10 plus $2 S&H per book to Martha Coker Home Green Houses, 2041 Grand Avenue, Yazoo City, MS 39194.

Lemony Avocado Dip 1 ripe avocado, seeded and peeled 1 Tbsp. lemon juice or lime juice 1/2 cup sour cream

2 eggs, lightly beaten 3/4 cup maple syrup 1/2 cup granulated sugar 1/2 cup packed brown sugar 1/2 cup milk 1/2 cup butter, melted 1 tsp. vanilla

1 cup flaked coconut 3/4 cup rolled oats 1/2 cup chopped walnuts 1 (9-inch) pie crust, unbaked 1 recipe Cinnamon Whipped Cream, optional

Preheat oven to 375 F. In a large bowl, combine eggs, maple syrup, granulated sugar, brown sugar, milk, melted butter and vanilla. Stir in coconut, oats and nuts. Pour into unbaked pie crust. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until knife inserted near center comes out clean. Cool on wire rack. Refrigerate within 2 hours. Cover for longer storage. Serve with Cinnamon Whipped Cream. Cinnamon Whipped Cream: 1 cup whipping cream 2 Tbsp. powdered sugar

1 tsp. vanilla 1/2 tsp. ground cinnamon Dash ground nutmeg

Beat with chilled beaters of electric mixer on medium speed until soft peaks form (tips curl).

Pat’s Ratatouille Casserole 1 eggplant, peeled and sliced 4 yellow squash, sliced 4 Roma tomatoes, thickly sliced 1 bell pepper, chopped 1/2 large onion, chunky cut (preferably Vidalia)

3 slices bread 1 (8-oz.) pkg. shredded Mozzarella cheese Sharp Cheddar cheese, shredded Salt, pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 350 F. Place eggplant and squash in salted water. Cover and bring to a boil; cook until tender. Drain. In a large mixing bowl, mix eggplant, squash, tomatoes, bell pepper and onion. Cut bread into cubes. Stir into the mixture. Place half to a whole package of mozzarella cheese in the mixture; stir well. Pour mixture into a greased 9-by-13-inch casserole dish. Cover with foil and bake approximately 45 minutes. Remove foil and sprinkle casserole with Cheddar cheese to taste. Return to oven, uncovered, for 15 minutes.

Veronica’s Famous BLT Dip 2 (12-oz.) pkgs. bacon 2 can mild Ro-Tel tomatoes

1 cup sour cream 1 cup mayonnaise

Cook bacon; drain and crumble into pieces. Combine bacon and remaining ingredients, mixing well. Serve with corn chips.

Fresh Fruit Parfaits 4 oz. reduced-fat mixed berry yogurt 3/4 cup reduced-fat whipped topping 1 cup sliced ripe bananas 1 cup sliced fresh strawberries

1 cup fresh pineapple chunks 1 cup fresh blueberries 4 whole strawberries

In a small bowl, combine yogurt and whipped topping; set aside 4 teaspoons for topping. Spoon half the remaining yogurt mixture into 4 parfait glasses. Layer with half the banana slices, strawberry slices, pineapple and blueberries; repeat layers. Top each parfait with reserved yogurt mixture and a whole strawberry. Chill until serving. Yield: 4 servings.

Watermelon, Feta and Mint Salad 1 clove garlic, minced 1/8 tsp. salt Sweet pepper strips

In a medium bowl, combine avocado and lemon juice; mash with a fork. Stir in sour cream, garlic and salt. Serve immediately or cover surface of dip with plastic wrap and chill for up to 4 hours. Serve dip with sweet pepper strips. Makes 8 (2tablespoon) servings.

4 cups seedless red and yellow watermelon, cut into 1- to 2-inch chunks 1 cup (4 oz.) feta cheese, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup loosely packed fresh mint leaves, torn into pieces 2 Tbsp. olive oil Freshly ground black pepper

In a large bowl, combine watermelon, feta cheese, mint and oil. Season to taste with black pepper. Cover and chill 2 to 4 hours to blend flavors. Makes 6 servings.


Weekend getaway:

August 2012

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unique offerings A stroll around the heart of the city reveals its special appeal By Nancy Jo Maples A walk in Oxford is a walk among legends and life. Writers, artists and scholars tread alongside the streets surrounding the famous Courthouse Square. Even football heroes walk these sidewalks. During a weekend getaway, a power walk leads me along South Lamar Street’s canopy of trees and stylish old homes. A few blocks off South Lamar lies one of the town’s most visited homes, Rowan Oak. About 25,000 people a year tour the home of the late William Faulkner. Nestled among acres of oaks, cedars and magnolias, it’s easy to see why the Nobel and Pulitzer winning author often moved his typewriter to the porch to find inspiration for his writings. As my steps steer me into the heart of Oxford, the stately white-columned Lafayette County Courthouse stands on a knoll and draws me to what’s affectionately known as The Square. Shops and cafes pop up like popcorn and as I approach the corner of The Square an independent bookstore, Square Books, lures me inside. Books are everywhere and everywhere you turn is a nook or a comfy old chair for lounging and reading. It can take hours for a book lover to leave here. On Thursday nights the bookstore’s sidekick, Off Square Books, hosts the Thacker Mountain Radio show, which Mississippi Public Broadcasting stations air the following Saturday nights. Readings of poetry and prose by literary artists and music by bluegrass bands entertain crowds that spill into the sidewalks and street. Yes, Oxford is a literary town, but it’s also a town of epicureans.

A walking tour of The Square in Oxford should include stops at the stately Lafayette County Courthouse, top, as well as Square Books, above, an independent bookstore and the venue for the live broadcast of the Thacker Mountain Radio show. Photos: Hello Delta Photography for Oxford CVB

My power walk develops into a stroll upon approaching The Square and restaurant choices run the gamut from casual to fine dining. Old Venice Pizza Company offers delicious food in a nice but casual atmosphere. For a more formal experience, City Grocery sports the menu of Chef John Currence, a James Beard award winner, who owns four Oxford eateries.

Ya-ya’s Frozen Yogurt on the north side of The Square catches my attention, and I opt to buy something sweet and to stroll while I eat. More restaurants and shops offering clothing, paintings, pottery and gifts dot the landscape that circles the courthouse. Other retailers wedge into the offshoot streets and alleys.

While countless quality stores pull people through their doors, the J.E. Nielson Company has been doing it longer than anyone else in Oxford. In fact, they’ve been in business longer than any other department store in the South. The store started in 1839, and though it might be old its stylish window displays prove it is not old-fashioned. Nielson’s store has been in Oxford longer than the University of Mississippi, which opened in 1848 and sits a mile from The Square. Oxford has 19,000 residents and when Ole Miss is in session that number doubles. On Rebel game days 60,000 people converge on the town for food, fun and football. My frozen yogurt is finished and the stroll around the famed square is complete. While the walk didn’t brush me against legends like John Grisham or Eli Manning, it did connect me to life—the luscious and large life of Oxford. For information about activities, festivals, lodging and dining in Oxford, visit the website of the Oxford Convention and Visitors Bureau at www.oxfordcvb.com.


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August 2012

Mississippi Marketplace ROLL-UP DOORS

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone (601) 605-8600.

Wholesale Prices Delivery & Installation

FOR SALE USED PORTABLE SAWMILLS! Buy/Sell. Call Sawmill Exchange 800-459-2148, 205-969-0007, USA & Canada, www.sawmillexchange.com. HOME IN HARTFIELD SUBDIVISION IN MADISON County School District, 2,326 sq ft, 4BR-3.5BA, built in 2004, one owner, $209,900. Call 601-906-9328. http://www.forsalebyowner.com/22210348. CUSTOM MADE CYPRESS SWINGS & CHILDRENS FURNITURE www.theoldsouthcypressstore.com. 601738-5504. 17.2 ACRES IN OCEAN SPRINGS, MS Near I-10 228-392-6029, 228-218-1603. BEAVER DAM TUNICA , MS 157 ACRES for sale or lease. www.TunicaDuckHunting.com. MS Delta Realty 662-357-8052 Steve Gelvin. GREEN PEANUTS, PUMPKINS, SWEET POTATOES Mitchell Farms - 601-765-8609 or 601-517-1161. Collins, Mississippi.

VACATION RENTALS PIGEON FORGE, TN-CABINS, peaceful, convenient setting, 251-649-3344, 251-649-4049 www.hideawayprop.com.

Available

MOUNTAIN CABIN, WEARS VALLEY NEAR PIGEON FORGE, all conveniences, 3/2 Brochure available. 251649-9818.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY WATKINS SINCE 1868. Top 10 home business. Over 350 products everyone uses. Free catalog packet. 1-800-352-5213.

MISCELLANEOUS FREE BOOKS/DVDS, Soon the “Mark of the Beast”will be enforced as Church and State unite! Let the Bible reveal. The Bible Says, P.O. Box 99, Lenoir City, TN 37771. 1-888-211-1715. www.thebiblesaystruth@yahoo.com. DON’T LET YOUR FAMILY MEMORIES FADE AWAY! We can transfer your VHS, VHS-C, Betamax, Minidv ... to DVD. We provide Macintosh computer support with 28 years experience. Parrot Video Productions LLC. Call (601) 826-1168 or visit us at www.parrotvideoproductions.com. BECOME AN ORDAINED MINISTER, by Correspondence study. The harvest truly is great, the laborours are few, Luke 10:2. Free info. MCO, 6630 West Cactus #B107-767, Glendale, AZ 85304. http://www.ordination.org.

601-416-7222 Call for pricing

PLAY GOSPEL SONGS BY EAR! $12.95. “Learn Gospel Music” - chording, runs, fills - $12.95, both $24. Davidsons, 6727MS Metcalf, Shawnee Mission, KS 66204. Call: 913-262-4982. EARN $75,000/YR PART TIME in the livestock or equipment appraisal business. Agricultural background required. Classroom or home study courses available. 800-488-7570. MISSISSIPPI COUPLE discovers a way for anyone (teenagers to seniors) to make great part-time and fulltime income doing something unique, fun and exciting and they will help you get started and give you the support you need to succeed. Areas are limited and they can only work with a few at a time. This is not network marketing (mlm), is not mail-order, has nothing to do with running an online business and can be learned in just minutes. You can go to: www.EasyFunBiz.com or write to: Scott & Elizabeth Tyner, P.O. Box 974, Long Beach, MS 39560. PUT YOUR OLD HOME MOVIES, PHOTOS OR SLIDES ON DVD. 888-609-9778 or www.transferguy.com.

• Serving Mississippi over 20 years • NFBA (National Frame Building Assn) Accredited Builder • NFBA Building of the year winner • BBB Accredited Business with an A-Plus rating • The siding we manufacture is UL Listed, File # R23370 • Our Vice President recently passed the National Standard General Building Contractor Exam

1-800-766-5793 www.bcibarns.com e-mail: barn@bcibarns.com All buildings constructed with pre-built trusses w/stamped engineered drawings

8:00 to 5:00 Mon. to Fri. 8:00 to 12:00 Sat. CST


August 2012

30ʼ x 50ʼ x 10ʼ . . . . . . . . .$7,126 40ʼ x 60ʼ x 12ʼ . . . . . . . .$10,287 50ʼ x 75ʼ x 14ʼ . . . . . . . .$15,196 80ʼ x 120ʼ x 16ʼ . . . . . . .$36,874 Minis-30ʼ x 100ʼ with 20-10ʼ x 15ʼ units - $14,740

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Today in Mississippi

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Celebrating 18 years of ironclad customer service!

MOBILE HOME INSURANCE

No Credit Check Payable in monthly payments.

1-877-297-0850 (601) 701-5849

FARM BARNS

Hattiesburg, MS • 1-601-296-0550 Our Prices Include Labor & Metal Sides Also Available in Wood Sides

30 x 50 x 10 = $8,900.00 40 x 30 x 20 = $17,900.00 Painted Sides Log Sides www.farmbarnsinc.com Mobile Home Owners: ROOF KING

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17

Foundation Problem?

We can fix any problem, statewide, either slab or conventional. No job too big or too small. What ever your foundation needs.

For FREE estimate, call. BOWLIN FOUNDATION CO., INC. 1-800-898-0567, Jackson area 936-7775

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All persons preparing to dig must call Mississippi 811 or utilize our online E-locate system, www.ms1call.org, two days prior to the beginning of any work. Underground facilities will be marked using the color code system and then work may proceed.


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Mississippi

vents E Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your event? Send it to us at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events of statewide interest will be published free of charge as space allows. Event details are subject to change, so we strongly recommend calling to confirm dates and times before traveling. For more events, go to www.visitmississippi.org.

26th Annual Mississippi Wildlife Extravaganza, Aug. 3-5, Jackson. Admission. Mississippi Trademart. Details: 601-605-1790; www.mswildlife.org. City Wide Rummage Sale, Aug. 4, Laurel. Some 100 families selling items; concession and door prizes; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. South Mississippi Fairgrounds. Details: 601-319-6086; www.myrummagesales.com. Bikes, Blues & Bayous Cycling Event, Aug. 4, Greenwood. Three course distances for all skill levels; Mississippi’s largest with more than 600 riders predicted; 7 a.m. Details: 662-4534152; www.bikesbluesbayous.com. 37th Annual Harrison County Gem, Jewelry and Mineral Show, Aug. 10-12, Long Beach. Begins at noon Friday. Admission. West Harrison County Civic Center. Details: 228586-5279; tomsey@cableone.net. Brad Paisley Virtual Reality Tour, Aug. 17, Southaven. With guests The Band Perry and Easton Corbin; 7 p.m. Snowden Grove Amphitheater. Details: 800-745-3000; www. snowdengroveamphitheater.com. Memphis Tri-State Blues Festival, Aug. 18, Southaven. Entertainment by Bobby Rush, Sir Charles Jones and more; 6:30 p.m. Admission. Landers Center. Details: 800-982-2787. Delta Clues of the Written Word and Images at the Mississippi Department of Archives and History, Aug. 21, Rolling Fork. Lower Delta Talks presentation by Clinton Bagley; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library Fine Arts Room. Details: 662873-4076. Sounds of Summer Music and Art Fest, Aug. 25, Byhalia. Arts and crafts, Kids’ Zone, tractor/ATV/golf cart run, 5K family run/walk, live music, Cornhole Tournament; 5-10 p.m. Byhalia Walking Track. Details: 662-838-8127; www.facebook.com/byhaliachamber. Summer Arboretum Field Walk, Aug. 25, Picayune. Director Pat Drackett to lead walk and discuss native plants; 10-11 a.m.

Admission. Register by Aug. 24. Crosby Arboretum. Details: 601-799-2311. Mid-South Toys for Tots Golf Tournament, Aug. 25, Olive Branch. Eighteen-hole fundraiser with shotgun start at 8 a.m. Plantation Golf Club. Details: 662-895-8894; www.midsouth.toysfortots.org. Cruisin’ the River 21st Annual Car Show, Aug. 25, Columbus. 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Gravity slow drag race. Raffle, live auction, trophies at 2 p.m. Registration fee; spectators free. Lock and dam, East Bank. Details: 662-324-1251, 662-574-2678; khenry0247@aol.com. Southaven Mississippi Annual Car and Bike Show, Aug. 25, Southaven. Benefits MidSouth Wounded Warrior Project. Open to all vehicles. Entertainment, vendors. Admission. Landers Center. Details: bobbyoj@bellsouth.net; www.mswwpr.com. Mississippi Sacred Harp Singing Convention, Aug. 25-26, Forest. Singing 10 a.m. - 2:45 p.m.; potluck lunch. Antioch Primitive Baptist Church, Miss. Hwy. 21. Details: 601-940-1612; davis@scott.k12.ms.us. Seventh Annual Ernest and Evan Theriot Memorial Calf Roping Challenge, Aug. 2526, Hattiesburg. Includes live/silent auction on Saturday. Proceeds for scholarship fund; 9 a.m. Multi-purpose Center. Details: 601-466-0548; eememorial@yahoo.com. Beta Sigma Phi 81st Annual Beginning Day, Aug. 26, Columbus. Details: 662-243-2097. 17th Annual Howlin’Wolf Memorial Blues Festival, Aug. 31, West Point. Indoor blues concert featuring Lightnin’ Malcolm with Cameron Kimbrough and others; 7 p.m. Admission. Mary Holmes College auditorium. Details: 662-605-0770; www.wpnet.org. Gospel Singing Jubilee, Aug. 31 - Sept. 1, McCall Creek. Miss-Lou Gospel Singers, Singing Echoes, New Ground and more. RV hookups. McCall Creek Community Center. Details: 601835-3229, 601-757-1263. 34th Annual Prairie Arts Festival, Sept. 1,

West Point. Music stages, Kidsville, 5K run, fine arts, car show and more. Downtown. Details: 662-552-7835; cwilson@westpointms.org. Fire & Feast BBQ Competition and Festival, Sept. 7-8, Yazoo City. Food, arts, crafts, live music, BBQ competitions with cash prizes. Yazoo County Fairgrounds. Details: 800-3810662; www.fireandfeast.org. Hummingbird Migration Celebration and Nature Festival, Sept. 7-9, Holly Springs. Hummingbird banding, live animal shows, bird experts, author Doug Tallamy, artisans, native plant sale, nature walks, wagon rides and more. Admission. Strawberry Plains Audubon Center. Details: 662-252-1155; strawberry plains.audubon.org. Craftsmen Festival, Sept. 8, Hernando. Featuring fiber-to-fabric demonstrations, live animals, jambalaya, music by DeSoto Songwriters Guild. Free. DeSoto Arts Council. Details: 662-404-3361; www.desotoarts.com. Muscadine Jubilee, Sept. 8, Pelahatchie. Arts, crafts, children’s rides, food and muscadines for sale. Muscadine stomp at noon. Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin Brothers at 3 p.m. Admission. Downtown. Details: 601-854-5224. Fourth Annual Country, Bluegrass and More Concert, Sept. 8, Bassfield. Indoor event featuring Larry Wallace Band, Delta Reign and others; 1-9:30 p.m. Admission. MG Dyess Inc. Details: 601-792-5142, 601-792-5196. CelticFest Mississippi, Sept. 9-11, Jackson. Traditional Irish music, dance and cultural workshops. Admission. Mississippi Agriculture and Forestry Museum. Details: www.celticfestms.org. Tony Kinton Book Reading/Signing, Sept. 11, Columbia. Kinton to read from his novel “Summer Lightning Distant Thunder”; 5:30-7 p.m. Columbia-Marion County Library. Details: 601-736-5516. Twice As Nice Children’s Consignment Sale, Sept. 13-15, Biloxi. Gently used children’s clothing, toys, baby equipment, maternity needs; also crafts and some new items. Dr. Frank Gruich Sr. Community Center. Details:

850-341-1676; www.2asnicekidsresale.com. Joppa Shriners Steak Night, Sept. 14, Biloxi. Joppa Shrine Temple; 6-8 p.m. Admission. Details: 228-392-9345. Betty Allen Festival, Sept. 15, Toccopola. Arts, crafts, music, food and more. Details: 662-509-0903, 662-509-8707. 28th Annual Arts and Creative Crafts Show, Sept. 15-16, Diamondhead. Selected highquality arts and crafts for purchase. Diamondhead Country Club grounds. Details: 228-255-1900, ext. 118. Third Annual Mississippi Gourd Festival, Sept. 15-16, Raleigh. Gourd crafting classes and activities, tools, supplies, gourd art, dried gourds. Admission. Smith County Ag Complex. Details: 601-782-9444; www.mississippigourdsociety.org.

Coming up: 12th Annual Archery Deer Hunt, Oct. 12-13, 14-15, 26-27, 28-29. Two-day sessions for a total of 88 hunters, to be chosen in drawing on Sept. 5. Deadline for receiving applications is Aug. 29. Arkabutla Lake. Details: 662-5626261 ext. 14562, 601-631-5052.

25th Annual

MS Pecan Festival Sept. 28, 29 & 30 2012 Richton, MS Admission $10.00 (Children under 4 Free)

Hu mmingbird M i g r a ti on C e l eb r a ti o n Sept. 7-9, 2012 Holly Springs, Mississippi G G G G G G G

Hummingbird Banding Live Animal Shows & Bird Experts Doug Tallamy, author of Bringing Nature Home Antebellum Davis Home Nature Vendors & Artisans Native Plant Sale Guided Nature Walks & Wagon Rides So u th ’ s

P r em i er e Ou td oo r N a tu r e F e s ti va l ! Call (662) 252-1155 or visit http://strawberryplains.audubon.org

• ANTIQUE BOOTHS • ARTS & CRAFTS • QUILT SHOW • STOCK DOG DEMOS • LIVE CRAFT DEMOS • PURTIEST ROOSTER CONTEST • PECAN FESTIVAL PAGEANT

• SOUTH’S FINEST FOOD • MULE PULL • ANTIQUE ENGINE SHOW • LIVE BLUEGRASS MUSIC • CHARITY BAKE-OFF • DRAFT HORSE DEMOS • VERA’S PECAN PIES

601-964-8201

www.mspecanfestival.com


August 2012

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R ! PE ON U P S U CO

Item 68986 shown

80 PIECE ROTARY TOOL SET

SAVE 70%

7

$ 49 REG. PRICE $24.99

$80

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 6 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

TRIPLE BALL TRAILER HITCH Item 94141 shown

6.5 HP OHV HORIZONTAL SHAFT GAS ENGINES (212 CC)

REG. PRICE 99$44.99

SAVE 55%

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 4 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

10/2/55 AMP, 6/12 VOLT BATTERY CHARGER/ ENGINE STARTER LOT NO. 66783

9999

$

REG. PRICE $179.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 3 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

2999

$ SAVE 50%

REG. PRICE $59.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 3 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

45 WATT SOLAR PANEL KIT

R ! PE ON U P S U CO

LOT NO. 68120/69730/60363 LOT NO. 68121/69727, CALIFORNIA ONLY Item 68120 shown

LOT NO. 94141/69874

19

$

SAVE $70

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 4 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE $150

REG. PRICE $179.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 4 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

Item 68048 shown

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 6 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

30", 11 DRAWER ROLLER CABINET

8999

$

REG. PRICE $79.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 5 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOW-PROFILE CREEPER

LOT NO. 66619/ 69381

Item 66619 shown

4499

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 6 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT NO. 67421

SAVE $90

REG. PRICE $29.99

R ! PE ON U P S U CO

Tools sold separately.

800 RATED WATTS/ 900 MAX. WATTS PORTABLE GENERATOR

LOT NO. 97626/68986/ 69451

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 5 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

3999 149

$

LOT NO. 2167

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 8 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Item 2745 shown

$ R ! PE ON U P S U CO

7

$ 99 REG. PRICE $14.99

19"

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

3

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 7 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT NO. 91214

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 8 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

REG. PRICE $6.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 6 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

SAVE 46%

9

REG. $ 99 $24.99 PRICE

$ 49 SAVE 50%

19

SAVE 60%

LOT NO. 877/69137/ 69249/69129

Item 46807 shown

SAVE 50%

Item 95578 shown

ANY SINGLE ITEM!

7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6" ALL PURPOSE WEATHER RESISTANT TARP

Requires one 9 volt and three C batteries (sold separately).

SAVE 53%

R ! PE ON U P S U CO

I

LOT NO. 5889

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 1 Save 20% on any one item purchased at our store. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon, gift cards, Inside Track Club membership, phone or online orders, extended service plans or on any of the following: compressors, generators, tool storage or carts, welders, floor jacks, Campbell Hausfeld products, open box items, in-store event or parking lot sale items. Not valid on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase date with original receipt. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R ! PE ON SU UP CO

Today in Mississippi

29 PIECE TITANIUM NITRIDE COATED DRILL BIT SET

20%

OFF

I

LOT NO. 68751/90599 Item 68751 shown

SAVE $80

14999

$

REG. PRICE $229.99

HARBOR FREIGHT TOOLS - LIMIT 5 Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 12/5/12. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

Order Online at HarborFreight.com and We'll Ship Your Order


HIGH-SPEED INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE STARTING AT

14 95

$

*

(subject to availability)

Promotional Pr romotional prices prices start start a att

19

$

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ffor or 12 mo. mo.

(Reg. (R eg. price price $2 $24.99 4.99 | mo mo.).)

(with 24-month Agreement, not eligible with Whole-Home DVR)

800

SAVE OVER $

FREE WHOLE-HOME HD DVR with AT200 package or higher

Watch 4 HD programs on different TVs simultaneously

when you switch to DISH

FREE

(with qualifying packages)

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Monthly DVR fee and receiver fees will apply.

30 movie channels

$5/mo credit for Blockbuster @Home (regularly $10/mo for one disc at a time) plus $5/mo credit for core programming package (prices vary).

for 3 mo.

C ALL L TODAY TODAY A CALL

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WE ARE OPEN 7 DAYS             DAYS A WEEK Ä&#x2018; Ä&#x2030;  Ģ       Ä&#x2018;   Ä&#x160;  Ģ     Ä&#x2018;                 Blockbuster 8/01/12 first After Internet Blockbuster @Home (1 disc aatt a time): Only available available with new new qualifying qualiffying DISH service service activated activated between between 8/0 1/12 and 1/31/13. For For the fir st 3 months months of your your subscription, you you will receive receive Blockbuster Blockbuster @Home frfree ee (regularly (regularly $10/mo). $10/mo). Aft er 3 months, months, then-current then-current rregular egular price price applies Requires Requires online DISH account account for for discs by by mail; broadband broadband In ternet ttoo stream stream content; content; HD DVR DVR to to stream stream to to TV. TV. Exchange Exchange online rentals rentals for for free free in-store in-store movie movie rentals rentals at at participating participating Blockbuster Blockbuster stores. stores. Offer Offer not aavailable vailable in Puerto Puerto Rico Rico or U.S. U.S. Virgin Virgin Islands. Streaming Streaming to to TTVV and and some channels not available available with select select packages. packages. Digital Home Advantage Adv d antage plan rrequires equires 24-month 24-month agreement agreement and credit credit qualification. qualification. Cancellation Canc ancellation fee fee of $17.50/month $17.50/month remaining remaining applies if service service is terminated terminated e before before end of agreement. agreement. Online Bonus credit credit requires requires online redemption later activation. waived lifee of current unless you redemption no la ter than 45 45 days days from from service service ac tivation. After After applicable applicaable promotional promotional period, then-current then-current price price will apply. apply. $$10/mo 10/mo HD add-on on ffee ee w aived for for lif current account; account; requires requires 24-month 24-month agreement, agreement, ccontinuous ontinuous enrollment enrollment in AutoPay AutoPay with Paperless Paperless Billing. 3-month 3-month premium prem mium movie movie offer offer vvalue alue is up to to $$132; 132; after after 3 months months then-current then-current price price applies a you downgrade. downgrade. All equipment equipment is leased and must must be returned cancellation unreturned apply.. Upfront monthly hourss based programming. programming packages, functionality offers subjectt ttoo change without notice. returned ttoo DISH upon canc ellation or unr eturned equipment equipment fees fees apply Upfront fee, fee, mon thly fees, fees, and limits on number and type type of receivers rec e eivers will apply. apply. Number of recording recording hours hours will vvary. ary. 2000 hour sed on SD pr ogramming. HD pr ogramming requires requires HD television. television. All pprices, rices, pack ages, programming, programming, features, features, func tionality and off ers subjec notice. Offer Offer available available for for new new and qualified former property Boxx Office, of Showtime former customers, customers, and subject subject ttoo tterms erms of applicable Promotional Promotional andd Residential Residential Customer Customer agreements. agreements. AAdditional dditional restrictions restrictions may may apply. apply. Offer Off O er ends 1/31/13. HBOÂŽ, CinemaxÂŽ and rrelated elated channels and service service marks ks are are the pr operty of Home Bo Office, Inc. SHOWTIME SHOWTIME is a registered registered trademark trademark a Showtime Networks Networks Inc., a CBS Company. Company. STARZ STARZ and related related channels and service service marks are are property property of Starz Starz Entertainment, Entertainment, LLC. cardd requires handling days. cardd will arrive LLC. $25 VisaÂŽ gift car requires activation activation and $2.95 $2.95 shipping and ha andling fee. fee. YYou ou will rreceive eceive a claim vvoucher oucher within 3-4 weeks weeks and thee voucher voucher must must be returned returned within 30 da ys. Your Yoour VisaÂŽ gift car arriv rive in approximately approximately 6-8 weeks. weeks. InfinityDISH InfinityDISH charges charges a one-time $49.95 $49.995 non-refundable non-refundable processing processing fee. fee. Indiana C.P.D. C.PP.D. Reg. Reg. No. No. T.S. T.S. 10-1006. 10-1006. *Certain *Certain restrictions restricctions apply. apply. Based Based on the availability availability in your your area. area.

Today in Mississippi Singing River August 2012  
Today in Mississippi Singing River August 2012  

Today in Mississippi Singing River August 2012