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News for members of Coast Electric Power Association

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Industrial Heritage Museum celebrates steam power Enjoy Delta dishes from The Crown Restaurant

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Ocean Springs festival commemorates native potter

Periodical postage (ISSN 1052 2433)

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PICTURE THIS:

A Walk in the Woods pages 14-15

Annual Meeting Notice November 5, 2015


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We are passionate. This is where we are supposed to be. Surrounded by open space and perpetual silence. We are pursuing more than wild game in the field. We are following our passion to find the best version of ourselves.

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Awareness key to building Mississippi’s future workforce ov. Bryant has proclaimed the week of Oct. 11 as Careers in Energy Week. Events like this help address a major need for Mississippi: raising awareness for middle-skill career opportunities. Other established resources, like the Mississippi Energy Institute’s Get On The Grid (getonthegridms.com) and the Mississippi Economic Council’s Scholars and TechMasters programs, recognize the demand for more STEM-based workforce development. Mississippi’s four hottest industries this year, ranked in order, are oil and natural gas operations, utilities, construction and manufacturing. In order to keep up with demand, each of these industries is fighting over the same skilled workers. Welders, plant operators and machinery technicians are incredible versatile, able to succeed in any one of these four fastgrowing sectors. Fortunately, these middle-skill positions are in high demand. In 2012, 54 percent of available jobs across the nation were for middle-skill workers, compared to only 31 percent for high-skill and 15 percent for lowskill. Experts predict that middle-skill jobs will continue to dominate the marketplace through 2022, holding strong at 49 percent of total workforce demand. The numbers look even better here at home in Mississippi. In 2012, 59 percent of available jobs required mid-level skills, while only 26 percent required high-level skills and 15 percent required lowlevel skills. Again, experts predict that, by 2022, Mississippi will beat the national average demand for middle-skill workers at a steady 55 percent. Unfortunately, we do not currently have a workforce prepared to meet our industries’ needs. As stated, 59 percent of available jobs in 2012 were at the middle-skill level; however, only 50 percent of available workers met those requirements—meaning some of the hottest jobs in the state went unfilled. This is especially disappointing when you realize that middle-skill, high-tech positions pay much better than their more traditional counterparts. In 2013 in Mississippi, those graduating from a two-year public school with an applied science degree made 50 percent more than those graduating with a liberal arts degree. Despite this huge pay gap, only 16 percent of

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On the cover Greg Hatcher is executive director for the Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum, in Meridian. Located in the historic Soulé Steam Feed Works, the museum hosts the Soulé Live Steam Festival Nov. 6-7, with lots of steampowered action. Story on page 4. Sandy Warren, of Benton, a Yazoo Valley Electric Power Association member, sent her photo of brilliant fall leaves for our Picture This feature.

students enrolled in an applied science program, while 73 percent continued into a liberal arts program. With these factors at play, awareness of middleskill jobs among younger students is now imperative. Companies across the state—including your electric power association—are dedicated to a homegrown workforce, and therefore are becoming involved in community educational activities to encourage awareness of all career opportunities. For example, Mississippi My Opinion Economic Council has dediMichael Callahan Executive Vice President/CEO cated the Mississippi ScholElectric Power Associations ars and Mississippi Scholars of Mississippi TechMaster programs to encouraging students to pursue STEM-based, rigorous academic standards in order to become more college- and career-ready. For Careers in Energy Week, the Mississippi Energy Workforce Consortium and the Mississippi Energy Institute will be traveling to classrooms throughout the state, introducing students to young workers from the local area and giving a relatable face to their opportunities. Also, Get On The Grid (getonthegridms.com) is an online resource for students and teachers highlighting the top careers across energy, advanced manufacturing and construction trades. But these efforts are just the start of building our state’s qualified workforce. Parents and companies must begin these conversations with students and schools to build awareness and redefine the path to the “American Dream.” A “two-cars-and-a-boat” job doesn’t have to come with student debt or a desk career. Use the resources available, ask about becoming involved in a career exploration program and invest in the future of your Mississippi. Help spread the word to Mississippi’s future workforce about the opportunities that will give them the quality of life they want and deserve.

Today in Mississippi OFFICERS Keith Hurt - President Tim Smith - First Vice President Barry Rowland - Second Vice President Randy Smith - Secretary/Treasurer

EDITORIAL STAFF Michael Callahan - CEO Ron Stewart - Sr. VP, Communications Mark Bridges - Manager, Support Services Debbie H. Stringer - Editor Elissa Fulton - Communications Specialist Trey Piel - Digital Media Manager Rickey McMillan - Graphics Specialist Linda Hutcherson - Administrative Assistant

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ON FACEBOOK Vol. 68 No. 10 EDITORIAL OFFICE & ADVERTISING 601-605-8600 Acceptance of advertising by Today in Mississippi does not imply endorsement of the advertised product or services by the publisher or Mississippi’s Electric Power Associations. Product satisfaction and delivery responsibility lie solely with the advertiser. • National advertising representative: National Country Market, 800-626-1181 Circulation of this issue: 455,707 Non-member subscription price: $9.50 per year

The Official Publication of the Electric Power Associations of Mississippi Today in Mississippi (ISSN 1052-2433) is published eleven times a year (Jan.-Nov.) by Electric Power Associations of Mississippi, Inc., P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300, or 665 Highland Colony Parkway, Ridgeland, MS 39157. Phone 601-605-8600. Periodical postage paid at Ridgeland, MS, and additional office. The publisher (and/or its agent) reserves the right to refuse or edit all advertising. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: Today, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300

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Today in Mississippi

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Our Homeplace

It may not shade much anymore, but this old oak strikes a picturesque pose for photographer Reba Ward, of Foxworth, a member of Pearl River Valley Electric Power Association. See more readers’ views of Mississippi woods and wildlife on pages 14-15.

Mississippi is I moved from Alaska where a new resident is considered a Cheechaku. Their opinions are not worth considering until they become a Sourdough. That status is obtained by surviving an Alaska winter and still loving where you live. So, what marks that transition for a new person to the state of Mississippi? There have been several changes in my attitude and behavior since moving to Mississippi two years ago. I wondered which one would mark me as obtaining new state status. Could it be as I drove down back country roads below the speed limit? Surely it came as I bragged about my “best purchase of the year” being a head sweatband so I could continue my outside work without burning eyes. Maybe the better moment came when I sat on the ground watching the water slowly absorb into the hole I just dug for a new plant. But that was more self preservation so I wouldn’t pass out from working too hard in the hot sun and high humidity. All these may have led me closer to Mississippian status, but it was more subtle. I think the actual moment of transition came as I sat on a friend’s porch swing. The conversation, pleasant breezes and long silent pauses melted my thoughts and concerns into pure serenity. I know there are many porch swings all across this beautiful country but on that particular swing, my heart was captivated by Mississippi. — Veva Haas, Carriere

What’s Mississippi to you? What do you treasure most about life in our state? Send your thoughts to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158, or to news@epaofms.com. Please keep your comments brief. Submissions are subject to editing for length and clarity.

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Steam

Picking up

Exhibits in the Soulé foundry building include this 1890 steam engine, which once powered a gristmill in Lauderdale County.

Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum rises from historic machine shop to national significance By Debbie Stringer Purchasing a shuttered old machine shop to create an industrial museum seemed like a good idea in 2002. But organizers of the Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum, in Meridian, could not foresee just how special the property would become. Their efforts preserved Soulé Steam Feed Works, a steamengine factory with a working line shaft to power belt-driven machinery, some dating to the early 1900s. Thousands of these businesses flourished in 19th and early 20th centuries, long before electricity (and later, electronics) revolutionized manufacturing. Today, Greg Hatcher only four other factory complexes like Soulé exist in the United States, and Soulé is one of only two open to the public, according to James L. “Jim” McRae, president of the museum’s board. “Our focus is on steam and the value of steam to

our way of life,” said Greg Hatcher, the museum’s executive director and president of the Mississippi Museum Association. “Steam was the very first portable source of power. A lot of people don’t realize to this day that steam pretty much provides us with our electricity. Even the nuclear power plant uses steam.” Founded in 1891 by George W. Soulé, Soulé Steam Feed Works manufactured steam engines used in the lumber industry from 1892 until the mid-1950s. (“Steam feed” referred to the way of feeding logs through a sawmill.) Soulé’s rotary steam engines, manufactured until 1922, were the only rotary engines built and marketed in great numbers. But their reputation for consuming too much steam led Soulé to create the Spee-D-Twin. This two-cylinder engine featured George Soulé’s patented valving system, an improvement in efficiency that pleased his sawmill customers. In the late 19th century, George Soulé patented and built an automatic lumber stacking system that resulted in more uniform lumber sizes and a boon to the nation’s early building industry.

Industrial, railroad and agricultural customers depended on Soulé’s highly skilled patternmakers, machinists and foundry workers to produce replacement parts for their heavy equipment. “They could make a pattern off your part, and it would be a near-perfect match,” Hatcher said. These workers earned an average of 50 to 70 cents per hour, the highest wages of any job in the Meridian area. “You had to be at the top of your trade to work here,” McRae said. During World War II, the factory’s work force peaked at an average 50 employees and operated six days a week. “I bet I’ve had half the people in Meridian tell me that their father or grandfather worked at Soulé,” McRae said. Historical industrial settings are recreated in museums throughout the country, but Soulé visitors walk through the actual factory with original early-20th century equipment and furnishings. They can see the pulleys spin, hear the machinery’s squeals and clangs,


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Soule’s machine shop, above, is filled with metal lathes and other milling equipment, most of it original to the shop and driven by the longest line shaft in existence in the U.S. Each machinist owned his tools and stored them in a personal tool chest, such as the one at left.

made things. “We feel that our young people need to be exposed to the type of work, and work conditions, that existed in our fathers’ and grandfathers’ time,” he said. His wish is to hear a child say, “Mama, that was the most interesting thing I’ve ever seen. I learned a lot.”

New acquisitions, above, include a steam engine from Memphis Machine Works, foreground, and a Red Lion engine.

and smell the machine oil—just as Soulé’s machinists did. Hatcher calls it an “authentic experience.” The line shaft overhead transferred energy from a steam engine (or other source) to machines through a system of belts and pulleys. Most manufacturers scrapped line shafts in the early- to mid-20th century and installed individual electric motors on their equipment. Soulé updated too—somewhat. In the 1950s about 25 percent of its belt-driven machinery was removed to make way for electrified versions. When the museum acquired the property in 2003, the old equipment was reinstalled in the machine shop. The Soulé site today includes the original machine shop, steam engine factory, indoor blacksmith shop,

The Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum is housed in the historic Soule’ Steam Feed Works building, in downtown Meridian. The entrance is in the former Hemmings Wagon Co. showroom.

office, belt-driven freight elevator and employee locker room (with 24 sinks). The two-story brick building next door houses the

company’s iron foundry, core-making department and pattern-making workshop. In addition to the factory’s original equipment, the museum showcases a large, diverse collection of antique steam engines, some donated by collectors. A 1905 Corliss made by Watts-Campbell dominates the steam engine demonstration room. This engine powered a generator for a factory in Connecticut until the 1940s, when buying electricity became less expensive than generating it. Four of McRae’s own antique engines are displayed at the museum, including a restored 1890 steam engine that ran a gristmill in Lauderdale County. McRae pulled it from a creek bed, where it was abandoned after the boiler failed. A former Hemmings Wagon Co. showroom and office building on the site houses the museum’s gift shop and three exhibits of donated collections: • Gower Print Works, featuring a steam- (or treadle-) powered 1910 Chandler & Price letterpress and a linotype machine that produces metal type for printing. • Heblon Broom Factory, with original broom-making equipment used by the Heblon family of Meridian. • An 1830s weaving loom, two antique spinning wheels and a sock-knitting machine from the mid-20th century. McRae wants visitors of all ages to leave the museum with a better understanding of how Americans once

The Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum, located at 1808 Fourth St. in Meridian, is open Tuesday through Friday, with guided tours at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Admission is $10 per person, $25 per family. Group tours and special event hosting are available. Call 601-693-9905 or visit the Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum website at soulelivesteam.com.

Live Steam Festival set for Nov. 6-7 The Mississippi Industrial Heritage Museum will fire up its steam engines Nov. 6-7 at the Soulé Live Steam Festival, an annual two-day celebration of steam engine history held in conjunction with the Meridian RailFest. In addition to operating steam engines, knowledgeable volunteers will demonstrate blacksmithing, weaving, spinning, broom making and letterpress printing—all with authentic, antique equipment. Other activities include a gathering of the Carousel Organ Association of America, whose lively organ music is always a crowd pleaser, and a molten iron pour by Alabama Art Casting. Admission is $5 per person, $25 per family. The museum will host Santa’s Christmas Factory Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays, Dec. 319 (and other times by appointment). For details, go to soulelivesteam.com.


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Time is not kind to historic sites he year starts speeding up about now. It’s a quick slide from here to New Year’s Day. Or maybe it just seems that way because there are so many calendar landmarks between now and the end of the year. Halloween and all of the holidays are yet to come. And you hardly get past one before you have to get ready for the next. I guess that’s why time seems to fly. Speaking of passing landmarks and passing time, I really got a jolt the other night watching the news when suddenly up popped a live shot of buildings burning in downtown Port

A long time ago it had been a store owned by a fellow named F.S. Wolcott. Wolcott sent a rocking chair as a gift to President Roosevelt and got a thankyou letter back from the White House. So many people stopped in wanting to see the letter that he hired a sign painter to paint it on the side of the building so people would quit bothering him about it. The thank-you letter was still there, although hidden under shingles for decades, when the building burned to the ground the other night, letter and all. Port Gibson still has plenty of historic buildings left. But two more of them are gone now. These two most recent casualties follow the collapse of a Civil War-era barracks earlier this year that had housed occupying Union troops. It just fell in on top of itself. But, time passes and things age. You wouldn’t believe how much change I’ve seen in just the short time I’ve been doing feature stories. I never would have thought it. When you first see stuff you figure it has been this way forever. Then you In the old photo Eudora Welty snapped of this old grave in Rodney, the lid is scoot- see it again after a ed to one side at a corner so you could see into the box. Nothing in it but dirt, by few years and it is the way. It just sits over the grave. Nothing stays the same. Some change is good. overrun with Some, however, is forever. Photo: Walt Grayson shrubs and winGibson. It took until the next day to dows are broken and paint has faded. find out for sure which they were. I think of the tiny town of Rodney One was a 1930s-era service station in that respect. Eudora Welty took a with an unusual architectural second bunch of pictures there 60 or 70 years story that jutted out and covered the ago. Back then she lamented how much gas pump area below. It had been of Rodney had vanished since its heyvacant for several years. The fire started day. Imagine how much more of it is in it and jumped next door to a 1900s gone today, especially after the 2011 building that evidently had housed a Mississippi River flood that damaged number of things. Most recently it was beyond repair many of the few survivknown at the Masonic building. ing buildings.

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Time marches on and seems to stomp all over our landmarks as is does. Years ago we went to the Rodney Cemetery to see if Mississippi there was anySeen thing still recby Walt Grayson ognizable from the Eudora Welty photos. Right away I spotted a grave with a concrete box situated vault-like over it. In Ms. Welty’s picture the lid on the box had been slid to one side at a corner. But here 70 years later it had been straightened. I called to Miz Jo, “Come see what some ‘vandal’ did to this grave. They straightened the lid on it!” I guess all of this is simply to say that when left alone, nothing stays the same. If we have cherished landmarks in our communities, we need to take care of them, or else take lots of pictures of them now so we will have something to remember them by. Walt Grayson is the host of “Mississippi Roads” on Mississippi Public Broadcasting television, and the author of two “Looking Around Mississippi” books and “Oh! That Reminds Me: More Mississippi Homegrown Stories.” Contact Grayson at walt@waltgrayson.com.

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Plant in fall for spring daylilies ast week, I had the oppor- couple of years. That means they should be divided every few years. You can do tunity to speak to the this in the spring or fall. You don’t need Hattiesburg Area Daylily special tools for dividing daylilies, but Society and had a great the tools you use must be sharp. A gartime doing some gardenden spade and/or fork and sharing. Afterknife, or maybe a small, ward, I was thinking about pointed saw will get you startthe daylilies in my landscape ed. I have a trusty old bread and how gorgeous they’ll be knife that works great. next year. Dig the entire daylily out Daylilies are easy landof the ground and shake off scape plants guaranteed to the excess soil. This will cause please. They come in probaless damage to the plants, and bly any color, shape and size you will be able to make more you could desire for your Southern landscape. The colors seem Gardening divisions. Identify the growing points, which are the spots like a kaleidoscope with by Dr. Gary Bachman where the cuts are to be made. reds, peach, white and yelUse your sharp spade to cut lows. Like the colors, the the clump apart so that each division has flowers themselves are never boring. at least one fan of leaves with roots There are double-flowered and petiteattached. flowered varieties, along with flowers When replanting, prune off about with gold-edged ruffles and spidery half of the foliage to reduce water loss as blooms with long, linear petals. the roots begin to regrow. Plant the Though it may seem a little early to crown of the division at the same level be thinking about next year’s daylilies, fall is the perfect time to get those plants in the ground it was growing on the original plant. Arrange the pieces in a in the best shape for next year. random fashion so they do not all grow Daylilies are vigorous and fast growin the same direction. Replant in new ing and can form a dense mat in just a

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Close call with an identity thief tolen identity is a big problem today. The age of technology has opened a new door for unethical people: the ability to steal our Social Security card numbers and sufficient information to conduct unauthorized business transactions and take possession of most of our assets. Two years ago Mr. Roy, my in-house financial advisor, had the nerve to tell me that I gave out too much information. He said I gave important data to just about anybody—including unknown voices on the phone and orders on the Internet. He hurt my feelings. After my hurt feelings had subsided, he called one of the major identity protection companies. They monitor the financial activity conducted in our names and halt the thieves on the spot. For a modest fee, of course. Mr. Roy chose a good company and then he didn’t worry about me talking too much.

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Yea! I was thinking I can order from my little catalogs. So I put talking too much out of my mind. Now, this August, Babette came for a visit and we decided to go window- shopping in Mobile and have lunch across the bay. We found ourselves in the midst of Bel-Air Mall and happened to see a few things we really needed. By the time our arms were loaded with packages, our appetites were calling us to leave. At Felix’s Fish Camp I ordered a fried oyster salad and Babette had a fried oyster lunch plate. As we walked down the winding, rustic wooden walkway to leave, my smartphone made a siren sound. It was an alert. “Oh my gosh!” “What’s wrong, Mom? “Someone applied for a credit card in my name.” My body began trembling as I imagined thousands of dollars charged to me. So immediately I called Mr. Roy. He answered and I shouted, “I had an alert

The daylily Suburban Nancy Gayle is one of the most outstanding new selections available. Photo: MSU Extension Service/Gary Bachman

areas of the garden, or share with friends. While there are literally thousands of named daylilies on the market, one of the most outstanding new selections is Suburban Nancy Gayle. This variety was hybridized at Suburban Daylilies in Hattiesburg. It has big, red, yellow-throated flowers and is resistant to daylily rust. Its performance in my landscape the past four years has been outstanding. Suburban Nancy Gayle has flowered in my garden from mid-May until

August. Because of its fantastic garden and landscape qualities, Suburban Nancy Gayle was selected as a Mississippi Medallion winner for 2015. Check with your local nursery or contact Suburban Daylilies directly if you want to try this beauty.

on my phone that someone is stealing my identity.” He said, “Hang up and I’ll call our identity protection company.” My phone rang in a about 30 minutes. Babette and I were headed home, shaking in our sandals. It was my financial advisor. Roy, to be exact. “Here’s what I found out. Someone signed your name at the J.C. Penny store in Mobile and received a temporary credit Grin ‘n’ card. They are Bare It tracing your by Kay Grafe Social Security number now.” I was sniffing by then. Crying. “Don’t worry, that’s why we pay for the service.” “Thank goodness you signed up for the protection, honey,” I managed to say. “This may save my identity. I want to be

who I am.” He gave me a half laugh. “This is nothing to joke about. See you at home.” Babette asked, “Mom, did Dad find out which store the person attempted to get a credit card from?” I said, “Penney’s, and it was this morning.” Then Babette reminded me of a very pertinent fact in this whole shady saga that I had completely forgotten. “Mom we were in Penney’s earlier today before we went to eat lunch.” “Oh my gosh, I completely forgot about that. And the clerk telling me that if I got a temporary credit card I could get 30 percent off the silver chain I bought.” Babette started laughing. “I can’t wait to tell Dad that you caught the identity thief red-handed. And it was you.”

Dr. Gary Bachman is an associate Extension and research professor of horticulture at the Mississippi State University Coastal Research and Extension Center in Biloxi. He is also host of “Southern Gardening” radio and TV programs.

Kay Grafe is the author of “Oh My Gosh, Virginia.” To order, send name, address, phone number and $16.95, plus $3.50 S&H to Kay Grafe, 2142 Fig Farm Road, Lucedale, MS 39452.


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LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

LOT 60658 97711 shown

$44.99

• 1500 lb. Capacity

LOT 61328/62843 47902 shown

$219.99

4999

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 5 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be al coupo Origin rable. purchases after 30 ransfe es last. Non-t er per day. Offer good while supplih 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

• 5400 lb. Capacity

$

R PE ON SU UP CO

Customer Rating

$59.99

SUPER-WIDE TRI-FOLD UPERON ALUMINUM LOADING RAMP SCOUP

$17.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$39

Customer Rating

SAVE $70

REG. PRICE

40 PIECE 1/4" AND 3/8" DRIVE SOCKET SET

SAVE

REG. PRICE

$299.99

LOT 90018 shown 69595/60334

5

$ 99

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

99

55%

LIMIT 3 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

149

REG. PRICE

LOT 60657 shown 38391/62306/62376

3/8" x 14 FT. GRADE 43 TOWING CHAIN SAVE

15499

SAVE 66%

$9.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

R PE ON SU UP CO

$

R PE ON SU UP CO

99 $70

Not for overhead lifting.

REG. PRICE

LOT 66537 shown 69505/62418

VALUE

2.5 HP, 21 GALLON 125 PSI VERTICAL AIR COMPRESSOR

Customer Rating

LOT 32879 60603 shown

72" x 80" MOVER'S BLANKET Customer Rating

LIMIT 1 - Cannot be used with other discount, coupon or prior purchase. Coupon good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Offer good while supplies last. Shipping & Handling charges may apply if not picked up in-store. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one FREE GIFT Coupon per customer per day.

Customer Rating

R PE ON SU UP CO

$29.99

• Pair of Arbor Plates included

$649.99

LIMIT 8 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

$8 $1499

20 TON SHOP PRESS

36999

R PE ON SU UP CO

6

LIMIT 1 - Save 20% on any one item purchased at our stores or HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. *Cannot be used with other discount, coupon, gift cards, Inside Track Club membership, extended service plans or on any of the following: compressors, generators, tool storage or carts, welders, floor jacks, Towable Ride-On Trencher, Saw Mill (Item 61712/62366/67138), Predator Gas Power Items, open box items, in-store event or parking lot sale items. Not valid on prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase date with original receipt. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

REG. PRICE

R PE ON SU UP CO

330

$ 99

ANY SINGLE ITEM

99

calling rFreight.com or by or prior n at our stores, Harbo LIMIT 8 - Good t be used with other discount or coupo al receipt. 800-423-2567. Cannodays from original purchase with originn must be Original coupo rable. purchases after 30 ransfe Non-t day. last. per es er Offer good while supplih 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per custom presented. Valid throug

$

t 800-423-2567. Canno ht.com or by calling 30 days from original after our stores, HarborFreig LIMIT 3 - Good at discount or coupon or prior purchaseslast. Non-transferable. Original es other suppli with day. while used per be al receipt. Offer good coupon per customer purchase with origin ted. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon must be presen

LOT 69052 shown 69111/62522/62573

LOT 62340/62546 96289 shown

Customer Rating

$

REG. PRICE

3-1/2" SUPER BRIGHT NINE LED ALUMINUM FLASHLIGHT

LOT 61258 shown 61840/61297/68146

• Weighs 32 lbs.

99

$31999

WITH ANY PURCHASE

2500 LB. ELECTRIC WINCH WITH WIRELESS REMOTE CONTROL

SAV

SAVE

• 1060 lb. Capacity ge • 14,600 cu. in. of stora LOT 61609/67831 shown

FREE 20% OFF

R PE ON Customer Rating SU UP CO

® RAPID PU CING JACK RA M INU UM AL E

SUPER COUPON

SUPER COUPON

How Does Harbor Freight Sell GREAT QUALITY Tools at the LOWEST Prices?

26", 16 DRAWER ROLLER CABINET

$29.99

LIMIT 4 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• No Hassle Return Policy • Lifetime Warranty On All Hand Tools

SAVE 50% Customer Rating $

LOT 61611 46092 shown

3999 REG. PRICE

$79.99

LIMIT 5 - Good at our stores, HarborFreight.com or by calling 800-423-2567. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Non-transferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 2/5/16. Limit one coupon per customer per day.

• 600 Stores Nationwide • HarborFreight.com 800-423-2567


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The bounties of a splendid month ctober is splendid. It is port one to pleasant times at grandma’s that grand transition house. October is filled with such stimuli. between too hot and too The air smells fresh. And while there may cold, a time that accombe little protracted need for it in this modates outdoor activities month that can still be quite warm, the rather than dissuading the occasional wood smoke from a stove or practice of them. A time when the sun’s fireplace smells comfortable. Odors from positioning casts shadows at angles that a woods slough with its mud and decayappear peculiar, this simply because the ing leave is often pungent, but it is annual sequence creating that visual poignantly pleasant. I smell this and transformation is short lived by its very become absorbed in the squirrel woods of nature, and it has now been childhood with my dad. a year since its last celebraSince I was reared on a tion. The sky is distant, poor-dirt country farm, deep blue and clear save agriculture runs deeply into that occasional wisp of high my very core. Sights, smells clouds. and sounds of farm life And the sunrises: from the past now punctuIncredible! At first a faint ate memory and touch senglow of orange below the timents. Locale will be a horizon and then a glimdetermining factor regardmering bright that pushes ing what I might see, smell straight and tenacious finor hear in more modern gers through misty treetops times as compared to those and onto waiting ground. of five-plus decades past, by Tony Kinton Dew will soon give way. A but when well chosen, that special treatment is given to locale in October can prod an October morning when that sun gets and prompt. Pumpkins making ready for fully above the timber and draws a line harvest. Aged corn stalks rustling in a of clouds toward itself. It doesn’t, of friendly breeze. Insects chirping from a course; the display is only optical gymfallow field. Wild geese honking in an nastics created by vastness. But it spellazure sky. The haunting but soothing binds the one who takes time to observe. drone of a tractor on a gentle afternoon. Smells are reported to be the most October provides. memory-eliciting sense present in October has long been the inaugural humanity. For instance, the aroma of for hunting seasons. That practice cookies baking may immediately transbecame entrenched in me as a young child. It was a part of life that we employed to provide an addendum to Medicare our food supply and was always a pedesSupplement trian procedure. The most complex eleInsurance ment was navigating a ragged pickup Low Rates for Plan F down treacherously muddy roads that led to the river swamp and its hardwood botMale (Non Tobacco) Female (Non Tobacco) toms. Things, as things generally do, have Age Mo.Prem. Age Mo.Prem. changed. For the better remains undeter65 $121.00 65 $105.00 mined. 70 $135.00 70 $117.00 Denim and brown coats have been 75 $157.00 75 $137.00 replaced with designer patterns. A single80 $182.00 80 $158.00 shot 20-gauge with battered wooden Rates vary slightly by zip code. Not affiliated with any government agency stock and rust-spotted barrel has fallen in favor of synthetic handles and stainless steel tubes. The simple thrill of squirrel hunting has been supplanted by the glamor of outsized antlers. But for one Call brought up amidst the basics, October affords that opportunity to visit my roots, 6045 Ridgewood Road, Jackson, MS 39211 to sit beneath a hickory in relaxed reflec-

O

Outdoors Today

HAMILTON INSURANCE AGENCY

800-336-9861

Attached to an autumn leaf, this moth would be virtually invisible. Humanity can’t replicate such cunning. Photo: Tony Kinton

Nature’s camouflage eclipses man’s attempts Recently I came upon a moth. Initially considered a simple and somewhat insignificant find, contemplation of this discovery spurred thought that seemed applicable to this month that sees the opening of hunting seasons. Tremendous hunter effort, and money I must add, is poured into concealment, primarily through the purchase and wearing of camouflage. The market is ripe with various color schemes and researched patterns and fabric choices. And it must be said that most if not all these tion and wait for a squirrel to come within range of No. 6’s. These cast from a single 20, by the way. October is as inviting now as it was then. Despite the pleasantries of this month, however, October can be melancholy. This sensation is perhaps a function of that sentiment mentioned earlier, or it is perhaps a function of time’s passing, signaling the beginning of the end of another year. Those with a propensity for searching will recognize this condition and come to individual conclusions about

attempts work well. But compared to what the Creator created, all else pales. The moth in question chose to rest a moment on the expanded metal of a hitch hauler hanging on my storage shed. He was marvelous. The thought arose that had he elected to make that same stop on an autumn leaf or bark of a tree or any number of other well-chosen entities, a hungry bird or fox or bobcat or whatever else that might drift by and grab a quick morsel would have gone home hungry! the matter. But it should be remembered and embraced that October not only announces an end; it also heralds a beginning, a beginning of a great many things of import and wonder. Regardless of the persuasion, the truth is that October is simply too good to miss. Tony Kinton has been an active outdoors writer for 30 years. His newest book, “Rambling Through Pleasant Memories,” is now available. Order from Amazon.com or Kinton’s website: www.tonykinton.com.


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Communicators: Melissa Russo and April Lollar For Today in Mississippi information, call 877-7MY-CEPA (877-769-2372) www.coastepa.com

Where our members have the power This institution is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

CEO’s message

Membership matters October is National Cooperative Month, and for the many different Robert J. Occhi types of co-ops in the President and CEO U.S., it’s the time of year to celebrate what membership truly means. It’s also the time of year that Coast Electric is gearing up for our Annual Meeting and asking you to participate in voting for the men and women who represent you on the board of directors. So, why is it important for you to vote and to be an active member of Coast Electric? After all, you could be a member of a lot of different places – a gym, a 4-H club – the list goes on and on. But what makes being a member of a co-op different?

The simple answer to that question is that when you are a member of a co-op, you are also an owner. You own a stake in our business, and just like any stakeholder, there are many benefits to your membership. As a member of Coast Electric, you have a say in the representatives who are elected to serve on the co-op’s board of directors. You have an opportunity to make your voice heard every year at our Annual Meeting. You get a say on policy issues your electric cooperative supports or opposes. Our bottom line is providing you with safe, reliable and affordable electricity. Of course, we have to think about expenses, overhead and other aspects of daily business, but when we have a little left

Household hazardous waste day reminder

Mark your calendars! Saturday, Oct. 10 is the date Coast Electric is hosting a free Household Hazardous Waste Collection Day sponsored by the Hancock County Board of Supervisors. The event will take place at Coast Electric’s headquarters facility located at 18020 Hwy 603 in Kiln, between the hours of 8 a.m. and 1 p.m. Call 228-255-3367, the Hancock County Road Maintenance Department, for more information. Visit coastepa.com for a list of accepted materials.

over, we send it right back to you. And returning capital credits to you is a major part of why being a co-op member matters. As your local electric co-op, we get to be a part of this community. When we think about membership, we think about all of the ways we can give back to you, our members – and that’s what matters most to us. We hope you will join us Thursday, Nov. 5 at our Annual Meeting so you can exercise your voting rights as a cooperative member-owner. We want to hear from you and we want to let you know about the things that affect your electric service and your bill. Join us Nov. 5 and learn why your membership matters.

TOU winter period begins Nov. 1 Members taking advantage of our residential Time of Use rate plan should note that winter hours begin Nov. 1. That means peak times will be from 6 a.m. to 8 a.m. Monday through Friday from Nov. 1 through March 31. Please remember to make necessary adjustments to your programmable thermostats, water heater and pool pump timers. Not saving with Time of Use? Maybe it’s time to try. With our six-month guarantee, there is no risk to you! Visit coastepa.com and check out our Time of Use Web page for more information.


October 2015

QA QUESTIONS

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I’ve heard that some items are using power, even when I turn them off. Is this costing me a lot?

ANSWERS

A CEPA members beware! There are phantoms lurking in your homes. No This month’s question is answered by our Harrison not those phanCounty Residential Energy toms, but rather Representative Tyler Green. energy phantoms! Our parents taught us when we were growing up to turn off lights, fans and televisions when no one was in the room to help conserve energy, but electronics have changed a lot since we were kids, and turning things off doesn’t always save as much energy as we are lead to believe. “Off” does not always truly mean off. Phantom loads can be everywhere in your home. The largest of these phantom loads are high definition tele-

visions. Most TVs slowly sip power, keeping the television primed until the user presses the “on” button. This allows televisions to remember the time, language preferences and, most importantly, channel lineups. Smaller home phantoms include: Blu Ray players, DVRs, and set top cable and satellite boxes. Studies show that in an average home, 5 to 8 percent of electrical consumption can stem from phantom loads. To put that in perspective, the average North American household consumes roughly 11,000 kilowatthours of electricity per year. If you estimate that 6.5 percent of that use comes from phantom power, that means that around 700 kWh, or about $70 every year, pays for phantom power load. Stopping energy phantoms is as easy as looking around your home and inspecting the items that stay plugged in that you might not think about on a daily basis. Microwaves and alarm clocks use a small amount of power

and it is fine to leave them plugged in. DVRs use a fair amount of power, but if you frequently record programs, keep them plugged in so you do not miss out of your favorite shows. Plugging household electronics into power strips can help rid your home of energy phantoms. Televisions, speakers, stereos and phone chargers can be plugged into power strips that can protect them from power surges and allow you to turn all of your devices off at once. However, since most power strips are hidden behind entertainment centers or under desks, they may be overlooked. Smart strips are a unique way to eliminate phantom power. These strips have different outlets which allow you to plug items in that will either remain on or cut completely off when the electronic is turned off by the user. Some smart strips can be made even smarter with timers or occupancy sensors. Smart strips can chase energy phantoms away from your home and, most importantly, your wallet.

If you want to see what kind of phantom power may be lurking in your home, visit your local library and check out Coast Electric’s Kill-a-Watt meter. There is no charge and the device lets you see how much energy you are using. Knowledge is the first step of ridding your home of energy phantoms! To see these and other helpful tips to help you save energy and lower your electric bill, visit www.coastepa.com or give one of our Residential Energy Representatives a call for more information: Hancock County Phillippe Michel: 228-363-7261

Pearl River County Scott White: 601-889-5109

Harrison County Tyler Green: 228-539-5720

Or you can email asktheexpert@coastepa.com

Remember, the greenest power is the power not used.

October Featured Artist

Don’t let phantoms suck the life out of your energy efficiency efforts! Unplugging unused electronics – otherwise known as "energy phantoms" – can save you as much as 10 percent on your electric bill. Source: energy.gov

Coast Electric’s 2015 calendar was completed with help from some talented young students in the service area. Artists from schools in Harrison, Hancock and Pearl River counties submitted artwork and winning drawings will be featured each month. This month, we congratulate our October artist, Riley Blethen. Riley’s artwork reminds us not to be scared to save energy. Thanks, Riley! To learn how you can avoid energy phantoms, check out this month’s Q&A with our energy efficiency expert. Member Services Director Clay Sweet presents a certificate to October’s featured artist Riley Blethen.


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Annual Meeting Notice

November 5, 2015 YOUR VOTE COUNTS! Be on the lookout. Your proxy will be mailed OCTOBER 6.

Signed proxies must be recieved by Coast Electric Power Association no later then Oct. 31, 2015.


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Board of Directors

Gordon Lee resigns, Teri Eaton appointed to represent Harrison County members on the Coast Mutual Automobile Company – each are owned not by Teri Eaton of Gulfport has been appointed to Coast stockholders, but by the rural electric members or mutuElectric’s board of directors after board member Gordon Electric Board of Directors.” Lee resigned earlier this year. Lee served Coast Electric’s While on the co-op’s advisory committee several years al auto company policyholders. My career with State ago, it became apparent that Coast Electric, as a memFarm has already made me familiar with working with members as a board member for 38 years. Eaton was ber-owned cooperative, works very similar to State Farm policyholders who are in fact ‘owners’ of the company. appointed to serve the remainder of Lee’s term. Serving my policyholders is a part of everyday life Eaton is a State Farm agent, serving residents of the Gulf Coast since 1980. Eaton is a graduate for me; serving Coast Electric members will be second nature since it’s what I do every day!” of William Carey University and a former teacher at St. John and D’Iberville high schools. As a “Teri is a welcomed addition to our board leadership,” said Coast Electric President and State Farm agent, Eaton has received the designaCEO Bob Occhi. “She serves many Coast tion Chartered Life Underwriter. Electric members already in her professional Besides her work with State Farm, Eaton is capacity and we know she will be a great advocate active in the community, working on projects that have raised more than $900,000 for Cystic for them as part of our board. We also want to commend Gordon for almost four decades of Fibrosis. She has also chaired the Heart Association’s Go Red for Women campaign, raisservice to Coast Electric. His dedication to our members and the impact he and his fellow board es funds for the Home of Grace and is active in members made in his years here have certainly her church. Gordon Lee recently resigned from the Teri Eaton was appointed to Coast Electric’s strengthened this cooperative for our member“I’ve been a good neighbor and a Coast Electric board after 38 years of service to Coast Board of Directors to represent members in owners.” member for 35 years,” said Eaton. “I am excited Electric and its members. Harrison County.

Your co-op at a glance PEARL RIVER COUNTY

Mission We exist to provide our member-owners superior service and dependable electricity at the lowest possible price, and to improve the economy and quality of life in our community.

Vision HARRISON COUNTY HANCOCK COUNTY

Coast Electric will be the best electric cooperative in the country. We will be valued and respected for providing superior service to our members at a competitive price, for improving the quality of life of our members, and making our community a better place to live and for developing our employees into a workforce envied by other organizations.

Values STATISTICAL INFORMATION Incorporated 1937 Total Miles of Lines 6,845 Total Meters Served 80,704 Meters Per Mile of Line 11.67 Number of Full-Time Employees 238 Serving Hancock, Harrison and Pearl River counties.

Our foundation, like rural electrification itself, is people. We value the people we employ, the members we serve and the community in which we live. We have been and will continue to be a caring, family-oriented organization working together for the common good of all, ensuring respect, integrity, fairness and honesty in our dealings. We value the trust that our members have placed in us to operate and manage their electric cooperative. We are an environmentally-responsible community partner, and we work hard to provide a safe and healthy work environment for our employees.


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Principles + values = cooperatives “A people that values its privileges above its principles soon loses both.” – Dwight D. Eisenhower All cooperative businesses around the world operate in accordance with the following seven cooperative principles listed in the graphic to the right. Less known is the fact that cooperatives have also adopted a set of values that helps to put these principles into practice. Cooperatives are based on the values of self-help, self-responsibility, democracy, equality, equity and solidarity. In the tradition of their founders, co-ops believe in the ethical values of honesty, openness, social responsibility and caring for others. Let’s take a closer look at these values and see how they impact us here at Coast Electric Power Association. The founders of Coast Electric created it to serve the members that use the electricity and other services we provide, and we continue to do that today. This embodies the values of self-help, taking action and doing what needs to be done. We also know we must embrace the value of self-responsibility and be accountable to you, our member. Each member has one vote, no matter how much electricity you use. This ensures that democracy is practiced the way it is intended with equality for all members. This is a key difference between co-ops and investor-owned companies where the number of votes you have depends on the number of shares you own. For co-op members, equity has two meanings. We strive to treat all of our members fairly. It also means that, as a member, you have equity (ownership) in the co-op.

While each co-op is autonomous, we do act in solidarity with other co-ops and our community. We know that we can do more for you by partnering with other co-ops and like-minded organizations. Your parents were right when they said, “honesty is the best policy.” As an owner, you have the right to expect us to

act with openness and in a transparent manner. We welcome your active participation in our co-op. Cooperatives have long (and correctly) been identified as the original socially responsible business, meaning we care about the impact we have on the community while ensuring we are economically viable.

Coming to a mailbox near you! Your Coast Electric membership card will be in your mailbox soon! Want to know why being a member of Coast Electric is valuable to you? This card, which includes your member number, highlights the benefits you receive by being a member of Coast Electric. Keep your card in your wallet for easy access to information such as your member account number, outage numbers and other ways you can keep in touch with us. Cards will be mailed this month as part of the proxy mailer.

We try to demonstrate our concern for the community through caring for others every single day. By using our values in support of our principles since our founding in 1937, we have been able to serve you for the past 78 years, and will do so long into the future.


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The Crown’s Apple Cake mississippi

The Crown FEATURED COOKBOOK

of Southern Cooking For a restaurant to thrive nearly 40 years, it must be special. The story of how The Crown Restaurant began in a steel-frame building surrounded by cotton fields and grew to become a famous Delta eatery in downtown Indianola is covered in owner Evelyn Roughton’s new cookbook, “The Crown of Southern Cooking: Recipes from the Birthplace of the Blues.” Tony and Evelyn Roughton’s menu of southern cuisine proved catfish did not have to be served fried; in 1990 their Smoked Catfish Paté won Best Hors d’Oeuvre in an international competition. The restaurant has been featured in TV shows and major magazines, including “Food Nation” and Cooks Magazine. The cookbook includes 171 recipes, as well as color photographs and stories about the food, the blues and the Delta. “The recipes are from our restaurant, with family food memories and all the recipes my customers ask for constantly,” Evelyn Roughton said. The Roughtons also founded the Taste of Gourmet line of specialty food products. The 224-page softcover cookbook is available in stores and online at tasteofgourmet.com. Price is $19.95. For details, call 800-833-7731.

Broccoli and Mushroom Soup 2 sticks unsalted butter 1 small onion, diced 8 oz. fresh mushrooms, sliced thinly 4 cups diced fresh broccoli 1 cup all-purpose flour

4 to 5 cups milk, divided 1 cup chicken broth 1 cup grated Swiss cheese 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. coarsely ground black pepper

Melt butter in a large saucepan or Dutch oven on medium heat. Add onion, mushrooms and broccoli, tossing and stirring vegetables in butter 2 to 3 minutes. Sprinkle flour into pan, continuing to stir so flour is evenly distributed and mixed with vegetables, and flour is being cooked; you are making a roux for this thick, nourishing soup, so stir for another 2 minutes to blend completely. Add 3 cups milk, continuing to stir vigorously to create a sauce. Turn heat to low and continue stirring. As soup thickens, add chicken broth and additional milk, a little at a time, stirring constantly so soup stays smooth. Cook another 2 minutes, stirring constantly. Add cheese, salt and black pepper, stirring while cheese melts. Add more milk if you want a thinner soup. Cool and refrigerate until needed. Soup keeps well 2 to 3 days but may need a touch more milk when reheating. Serves 6 to 8. Note: If you don’t have Swiss cheese, Cheddar substitutes nicely.

2 ½ cups all-purpose flour 2 cups sugar 2 tsp. baking powder 1 tsp. baking soda 1 tsp. salt 1 tsp. cinnamon

1 tsp. nutmeg 3 eggs, beaten 1 cup oil 1 tsp. vanilla 3 cups chopped apples, peeled or unpeeled

In a large bowl, combine flour, sugar, baking powder, baking soda, salt, cinnamon and nutmeg; mix well. Add beaten eggs, oil and vanilla, and combine thoroughly. (This is a very stiff batter.) Add apples and stir vigorously to combine well. Pour batter into lightly oiled 9-by-13-inch baking pan. Bake in preheated 325 F oven about 50 minutes. Apple cake does not need to be refrigerated; it will stay moist and delicious for a week. Serves 15 to 18. Pumpkin variation: This recipe, using a small can of pumpkin instead of apples, makes a wonderfully moist Pumpkin Bread. Bake in sprayed loaf pans, small or large, 30-40 minutes. Keep an eye on them, and be sure middle of loaf has risen and is firm. Pumpkin Bread freezes perfectly and makes a lovely gift.

Catfish Allison 6 to 8 U.S. farm-raised catfish fillets ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. black pepper 1 lemon, sliced

Allison Butter: 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese 1 stick butter (no substitute), softened 6 Tbsp. mayonnaise ½ tsp. Worcestershire ½ tsp. Tabasco 6 green onions, chopped very fine

Poach catfish fillets 4 to 5 minutes in a large skillet in lightly simmering water (enough to cover fish) with salt, black pepper and lemon slices. Gently lift fillets from water and set aside to drain. (Fillets can be refrigerated overnight before serving.) For Allison Butter, place cheese, butter, mayonnaise, Worcestershire and Tabasco in a mixing bowl and blend thoroughly. Gently stir in green onions by hand. (Can be made 2 weeks ahead and kept refrigerated. Soften a little before using.) For individual servings, place fillets in au gratin dishes; cover with 2 tablespoons Allison Butter. Place dishes under hot broiler and brown deeply for more flavor. Serves 6 to 8.

World’s Best Catfish Salad 8 U.S. farm-raised catfish fillets ½ tsp. Old Bay Seasoning or crab boil 1 lemon, sliced 4 cups water 1 cup mayonnaise

½ cup finely chopped celery Juice of half a lemon ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. coarsely ground black pepper

Cut catfish into bite-size pieces. Place in a saucepan with Old Bay Seasoning, sliced lemon and water. Bring water barely to a boil, cut off heat and let catfish cool in the seasoned water. Drain well; mix gently with mayonnaise and celery. Taste and adjust seasonings as desired, adding lemon juice, salt and black pepper. Refrigerate until ready to serve. Serve a scoop on top of a quartered tomato, in the old-fashioned way, or as a healthy and delicious sandwich. Serves 6 to 8. Tip: Use this recipe with any fresh fish to create your own fresh, unprocessed fish salad.

Sweet Corn Pudding 4 eggs 1 (16-oz.) can whole-kernel corn, drained 1 (16-oz.) can cream-style corn 2 cups milk

½ stick unsalted butter 4 Tbsp. sugar 2 green onions, thinly sliced 2 Tbsp. cornstarch ½ tsp. salt

In a large bowl, beat eggs well with a fork. Add remaining ingredients and mix thoroughly. Pour corn mixture into butter 9-by-13-inch baking dish. Bake in preheated 325 F oven about 45 minutes, until light brown and firm. Slice into squares to ensure nice, even servings. Pudding can be covered and kept warm for an hour before serving. The texture is almost like an egg custard and melts in your mouth. Serves 10 to 12.


Ocean Springs

arts and crafts

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sets the stage for

By Nancy Jo Maples What began as a local celebration of provincial painters and potters in Ocean Springs has evolved into a premier twoday annual affair known as the Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival. Last year the event drew more than 150,000 visitors and hosted 400 booths. Two years ago it was dubbed Festival of the Year by the Southeast Tourism Society. This year’s 37th Annual Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival will take place Nov. 7-8 from 9 a.m. until 5 p.m. in downtown Ocean Springs. In addition to the artisans’ exhibit booths, local chefs will offer cooking demonstrations with Gulf fresh seafood and samplings will be available; St. Alphonsus Catholic Church will host a petting zoo and other children’s activities; and the University of Southern Mississippi’s Gulf Coast Research Laboratory will lead a hands-on marine education session with a variety of artifacts and displays. Additionally, Blue Moon sponsors the Blue Moon Art Project contest for artists throughout the state to craft their interpretation of “Blue Moon” for a chance to win $2,000 and be the symbol of Blue Moon’s marketing surrounding the festival next year. Voting for a People’s Choice Award is open to festival attendees. Local bands add to the weekend’s ambiance with live music. The event began with 56 exhibitors in 1978 as an effort to highlight the local arts community. In 1984 it was renamed the Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival to memorialize master potter Peter Anderson who died that year of Lou Gehrig’s disease. Along the Mississippi Gulf Coast, the surname Anderson is synonymous with pottery and art. Peter Anderson founded Shearwater Pottery in Ocean Springs in 1928. He was the elder brother of distinguished local painter Walter Inglis Anderson and James McConnell Anderson. The Anderson brothers were originally from New Orleans and had attended prestigious schools in New Orleans as well as fine boarding

schools in the northeastern United States. In 1918 the Anderson family purchased a 24-acre wooded tract of property in Ocean Springs as a summer home they called Fairhaven. Their father, George Walter Anderson, was an import/export merchant. Their mother, Annette McConnell Anderson, was from a prominent New Orleans family and had studied art in college. In 1922, George retired and the family moved to Fairhaven in an effort to encourage their sons to not only become artists but to earn a living as artists. Peter knew he wanted to have a career in creative arts and first pursued shipbuilding. While rowing one of his vessels to nearby Deer Island he had a chance encounter with Joseph Meyer, mentor to the famed “Mad Potter of Biloxi” George Ohr. Meyer spurred Peter’s fascination with pottery and the shipbuilding interest was short-lived. Afterward, he endured years of instruction from potter Mary Sheerer of Newcomb

Handcrafted items that meet strict standards, left and far left, are available from vendors at the Peter Anderson Arts and Crafts Festival. This year’s festival mug, above, was designed by James Anderson, Peter’s son, in memory of James’ brother, Peter Michael Anderson. Peter Anderson, below, gives shape to clay at the potters wheel. Photos courtesy of Shearwater Pottery

College in New Orleans, an apprenticeship in Pennsylvania and masters at the School of Clay Working and Ceramics in New York. Ultimately, Peter returned to the Mississippi Gulf Coast. He found a reliable supply of quality clay in nearby George County, Miss., and Mobile County, Ala. In the late 1920s Peter decided his work was ready to merchandise and named his pottery studio Shearwater after a book on North American birds. Ocean Springs gradually grew into an art colony filled with craftsmen beyond the Anderson lineage. Community leaders established the annual festival to increase awareness of local artists, shops and restaurants. After Ocean Springs-based artist Klara Koock approached the local Chamber of Commerce with the idea of an arts festival, Peter Anderson’s daughter-inlaw Margaret Anderson got behind the idea. After the second festival the chamber created a jury committee with strict standards, charged to select vendors showcasing wares of the highest quality. Each year Shearwater Pottery releases a festival mug. This year’s mug was designed by Peter’s son, James Anderson. The mug is in memory of Peter Michael Anderson, eldest son of Peter Anderson and brother of James Anderson. Michael, as the family called him, died earlier this year. Festival organizers encourage out-of-town guests to stay the weekend to enjoy the plethora of artists and events. For details on lodging, restaurants and shopping opportunities, as well other details of the weekend’s events, go to peterandersonfestival.com or call the Ocean Springs Visitors Center at 228-875-4424. Writer Nancy Jo Maples can be reached at 188 Ernest Pipkins Road, Lucedale, MS 39452 or nancyjomaples@aol.com.


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October 2015

Picture This:

a Walk in the Woods 2

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5 1. A doe and her fawn forage together. Jeff Johnson, Quitman; East Mississippi Electric Power Association member. 2. Beauty underfoot at Wall Doxey State Park. Jana Manning, Olive Branch; Northcentral Electric member. 3. Owl in repose. Melissa Campbell, Pontotoc; Pontotoc Electric member. 4. A red fox spied at Plymouth Bluff, Columbus. Pamela I. Brownlee, Columbus; 4-County Electric member. 5. A riot of color in a buttercup pitcher plant bog, Stone County. Jeff Baldock, Lucedale; Singing River Electric member. 6. Autumn paints a woodland in east-central Mississippi. Donna Downey, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric.

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October 2015

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7. Some know Red Bluff, at Foxworth, as “Mississippi’s Grand Canyon.” Brigitte Robbins, Meridian; East Mississippi Electric member. 8. A natural formation growing on a sweet gum tree resembles an aardvark. Susan Pitts, Newton; Pontotoc Electric member. 9. A tree makes a valiant effort to hang in there. Angela Perry, Olive Branch; Northcentral Electric member. 10. Pretty spot on Tallahalla Creek, Smith County. Deborah Blakeney, Jackson; Southern Pine Electric member. 11. At this age, they’re all mouth. Suzie Welch, Purvis; Pearl River Valley Electric member. 12. Colorful portrait of a brown thrasher. Denise Redding, Olive Branch; Northcentral Electric member.

Our photo theme for January:

My best photo of 2015

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We want to see your best photo from the past year! Deadline for submissions is Dec. 7. Details: todayinmississippi.com.


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Marketplace

Today in Mississippi I October 2015

Mississippi

Type or print your ad clearly. Be sure to include your telephone number. Deadline is the 10th of each month for the next month’s issue. Rate is $2.50 per word, 10-word minimum. Mail payment with your ad to Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300. Have any questions? Phone 601-605-8600 or email advertising@epaofms.com.

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A safety message from your local Electric Power Association


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MISSISSIPPI

Events Want more than 400,000 readers to know about your special event? Submit it at least two months prior to the event date. Submissions must include a phone number with area code for publication. Mail to Mississippi Events, Today in Mississippi, P.O. Box 3300, Ridgeland, MS 39158-3300; fax to 601-605-8601; or email to news@epaofms.com. Events open to the public will be published free of charge as space allows. Please note that events are subject to change; we recommend calling to confirm details before traveling.

Fourth Annual Pink Pumpkin Patch 5K, Oct. 3, Lucedale. 5K fun run/walk at 8:30 a.m.; 1-mile fun run follows. Supports breast cancer awareness. Admission. George Regional Hospital. Details: 601-947-0709; eventbrite.com, georgeregional.com. Craft Fair and Bake Sale, Oct. 3, Brandon. Handmade gifts from around the world, baked goods, lunch; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Nativity Lutheran Church. Details: 601-825-5125. Starkville Public Library Book Sales, Oct. 5, Nov. 2, Starkville. Bargain prices; 12-6 p.m. Free admission. Starkville Public Library. Details: 662-323-2766. Southwest Mississippi BBQ Competition, Oct. 10, Port Gibson. Featuring Blues & Bikes; 12-6 p.m. Downtown. Details: 601-437-4500. Ride for Recovery, Oct. 10, Laurel. Dying to Live Ministries event. Blessing of bikes, music, food, more. Christ’s Church. Details: 601-577-4159; 601-543-4744.

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Lower Delta Talks: “The Mississippi Mound Trail,” Oct. 13, Rolling Fork. Presented by Sam Brookes; 6:30 p.m. Free. Sharkey-Issaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-4076. Shape Note Singing School, Oct. 14, Florence. Continues second Wednesday of each month; 6-8 p.m. Free. Details: 601-9531094. Antiques & Collectibles Barn Sale, Oct. 16-17, Purvis. Antiques, collectibles, glassware, primitives, tools, unusual items, more; 7 a.m. until. Free admission. 4799 Old Hwy. 11. Details: 601-818-5886, 601-794-7462. Mississippi Gulf Coast Military Collectors Show, Oct. 16-17, D’Iberville. Buy, sell or trade military memorabilia. Admission. D’Iberville Civic Center. Details: 228-2241120, 228-380-6882. Caledonia Days Festival, Oct. 16-17, Caledonia. Vendors, car/truck shows, children’s events, entertainment. Free concert: Win-Wheel and Trademark. Ola J. Pickett Park. Details: 662-574-3744; caledoniadays@gmail.com. “The Dark Zone,” Oct. 16-17, 23-24, 30-31, Brandon. Spooks, mazes, swamps, zombies, more; not suitable for ages 5 and under; 7-10 p.m. Admission. Crossgates Exchange Club soccer fields. Details: 601-825-2094; thedarkzone.net. Great Mississippi River Balloon Race, Oct. 16-18, Natchez. Balloon glow, race, music. Rosalie Bicentennial Gardens. Details: 800647-6724; visitnatchez.org. River Market and Bluegrass Gospel Singing on the River, Oct. 17, Chunky. Vendors with handmade items; singing begins 11 a.m. with The Rowzees, Alan Sibley and Magnolia Ramblers, and others. Bring chair. Chunky River Recreation Trading Post and Campground. Details: 601-480-3045. “Walking for Heroes,” Oct. 17, Biloxi. Honor/memory bridge walk, chili cook-off,

cupcake wars, car show, music, arts/crafts, food, kids’ activities. Point Cadet Plaza. Details: 228-712-0073. Bluegrass, Country and Gospel Singing, Oct. 17, Black Hawk. Featuring Donnie Buckner Group and Long Time Coming; 6 p.m. Black Hawk Old School. Details: 662453-0072; bobbykayalford@gmail.com. Jackson County Fair, Oct. 18-25, Pascagoula. Rides, stockyard exhibits, entertainment, special events, food, more. Fairgrounds. Details: 228-762-6043; co.jackson.ms.us/departments/fair.php. Sawdust and Splinters, Oct. 23-25, Liberty. World champion lumberjacks, log rolling, speed pole climbing and chainsaw carvers to compete. Arts, crafts, food, music, children's activities and more. Admission. Ethel S. Vance Park. Details: 601-876-9635; sdsfest.com. Children’s Fairy-tale Fall Festival, Oct. 2325, Picayune. Life-size wooden fairy-tale characters, children in Halloween costumes, puppet parade, entertainment, food, games, hayrides; 5-8 p.m. Admission. Jack Reed Park. Details: artscouncilpicayune@yahoo.com. Mississippi Pearl River Woodcarvers Guild 21st Annual Show and Championships, Oct. 24, Brandon. Carving classes Oct. 23, 3-6 p.m. Demonstrations, vendors, exhibits Oct. 24. Free admission. Brandon Senior Center. Details: 601-9069933; pearlriverwoodcarvers.org. Fifth Annual October Fest, Oct. 24, Vancleave. Gospel music, children’s games, yard sale, silent auction, food; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Community of Christ. Details: 228-8265171, 228-826-3358. 11th Annual Shallow Creek Homecoming, Oct. 24, Picayune. Bluegrass gospel singing; 6 p.m. Free. Bring chair; 116 Moeller Road. Details: 601-590-1571. Great Delta Bear Affair, Oct. 24, Rolling Fork. Entertainment, magic show, prehistoric mound tour, snake exhibit, chainsaw woodcarving demos, arts/crafts, food, fireworks. Downtown. Details: 662-873-6261; greatdeltabearaffair.org. Antique Days, Oct. 24, Yazoo City. Old engines running, cane syrup mill, blacksmithing, arts/crafts, gristmill, biscuit making, kibbie cookoff, Ace Cannon’s Fall Festival Tour, more. Triangle Cultural Center. Details: 662-590-5415; antiquedays.com. Turkey Shoot, Oct. 24, Vestry community, Jackson County. Sponsored by Daisy Masonic Lodge #421. Details: 228-392-5227. Mid-South Wedding Show and Bridal School, Oct. 25, Olive Branch. Fashion show, seminars games, more; 1-5 p.m. Admission.Whispering Woods Hotel. Details: 901-368-6782; midsouthweddingshow.com.

“Jekyll & Hyde,” Oct. 29 - Nov. 1, Laurel. Broadway thriller musical. Admission. Details: 601-428-0140; laurellittletheatre.com. The Moving Wall, Oct. 29 - Nov. 2, Yazoo City. Half-size replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial; open 24 hours. Free. Hwy. 49 at Hwy. 16. 29th Annual Dancing Rabbit Festival, Oct. 31, Macon. Veterans ceremony, 5K run/walk, costume contest, entertainment, kids’ activities, arts, crafts, food. Downtown. Details: 662-726-4456; dancingrabbitfestival@gmail.com. Fall Fest, Oct. 31, Carriere. Food, crafts, fun jump, hay ride, funnel cakes, yard sale, live auction; 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Byrd’s Chapel United Methodist Church. Details: 601-528-1610. UCA/UDA Mid-South Championship, Oct. 31, Southaven. Regional cheerleading competition. Doors open 7 a.m. Landers Center. Details: 662-470-2131. “Making Strides to End Breast Cancer” Walk and Health Fair, Oct. 31, Poplarville. Entertainment, vendors, health care screenings, silent auction, children’s activities, costume contest, more; 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Pearl River County Hospital and Nursing Home. Details: 601-240-2044, 601-240-2046. Haunted Forest and Pepsi Cola Frontier Days Rodeo and Trail Ride, Oct. 31, Wiggins. Begins at dusk. Flint Creek Water Park. Details: 228-860-4936; Facebook: Splash of Fun. Oktoc Country Store, Oct. 31, Starkville. Brunswick stew, bake sale, quilt raffle, music; 10 a.m. - 2 p.m. Oktoc Community Clubhouse. Details: 662-418-7958; hellenpolk@ftcweb.net. Belmont Plantation Open House Preview and Tour, Nov. 1, Wayside. Tours of 1857 home under renovation; 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. Donation; RVSP requested. Details: 310-210-1964; Facebook: Belmont Plantation; belmontplantation1857.com. The Talleys in Concert, Nov. 5, Petal. Love offering; 7 p.m. First Baptist Church of Runnelstown. Details: 601-583-3733. 38th Natchez Antiques Forum, Nov. 5-7, Natchez. Social events, tours, lectures by noted experts. Hotel Vue and other locations. Admission. Details: 601-443-1261; natchezantiquesforum.org. Soulé Live Steam Festival, Nov. 6-7, Meridian. Steam engines operating on live steam, tours of historic Soulé Steam Feed Works and much more. Also, Carousel Organ Association of America Fall Rally. Admission. Soulé Steam Feed Works. Details: 601-693-9905; soulelivesteam.com. When Pigs Fly BBQ Contest, Nov. 6-7, Louisville. Sanctioned by Memphis BBQ


October 2015

Network. Louisville Coliseum. Details: 662-773-3921, 662-773-8919. Holiday and Toy Sale, Nov. 6-7, Summit. Opens 9 a.m. SMCC Regional Workforce Training Center. Details: bnsconsignment.com; Facebook. 16th Annual Old Time Day, Nov. 7, Leakesville. Demonstrations of cane syrup making, grist mill, smokehouse, cracklin’ cooking, more. Entertainments, vendors, mule pule. Batley Farm. Details: 601-394-2385; trbatley@hotmail.com. Third Annual Gator Fest, Nov. 7, Columbia. Arts/crafts, canoe/kayak races, air boat rides, kids’ activities food, music, alligators; 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Free. Columbia Water Park. Details: 601-736-6385. Heritage Day, Nov. 7, DeKalb. Country music, barbecue, bake sale; 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Free admission. Kemper County Historical Museum. Details: 601-934-2649, 601-743-2412. 31st Annual Homemakers Arts and Crafts Show and Sale, Nov. 7-8, Meridian. Handmade items, baked goods, more. Meridian Community College Dulaney Center. Details: 601-482-9764. Holiday Open House, Nov. 8, Yazoo City. Downtown Marketplace; 1-5 p.m. Details: 662-746-5031. NSDAR Veterans Day Observance, Nov. 11, Macon. Dancing Rabbit Chapter NSDAR and Noxubee Cattlemen’s Association exhibit American Patriot Quilt with names of over 500 Noxubee military veterans from 1940-2015. Food, program at noon. Details: 662-726-4014. Holiday Boutique, Nov. 13-14, Pass Christian. More than 20 vendors with jewelry, art, pottery, ornaments, clothing, more. Admission. Pass Christian Yacht Club. Details: 504-913-1223. Third Annual Veterans Picnic and 5K Race, Nov. 14, Columbia. Special traveling Vietnam-era museum on the grounds; benefits Wounded Minutemen of Miss.

Columbia Water Park. Details: 601-736-2239; Facebook: Veterans Picnic Columbia MS. 43rd Annual Gingham Tree Arts and Crafts Festival, Nov. 14, Lucedale. More than 300 vendors; 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. George County Middle School. Details: ginghamtree.com. Holiday Open House, Nov. 14, Richland. Food, furniture, quilts, glassware, antiques, collectibles, more; 10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Free admission. Rebecca Rose Flea Market.

Details: 601-936-0058. Big Pop Pascagoula Gun Show, Nov. 7-8, Pascagoula. Jackson County Fairgrounds. Also, Nov. 14-15 in Jackson, Wahabi Shrine Building. Details: 601-498-4235; bigpopfireworks.com. Holiday Gift Bazaar, Nov. 14, Meridian. Thirty-five vendors. Frozen gumbo, hot gumbo and soup lunch; 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Trinity Presbyterian Church. Details: 601-485-4105.

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Today in Mississippi

October 7-18

FOOD • RIDES • GAMES • ATTRACTIONS

 Oct. 10 • Kraig Parker

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Lower Delta Talks: “Delta Images,” Nov. 18, Rolling Fork. Photography exhibition by Willy Bearden; 6:30 p.m. Free. SharkeyIssaquena County Library. Details: 662-873-4076. Hobo Day, Nov. 21, Gulfport. Hobo costume contest with prizes (3 p.m.), hobo music and stories, games; noon till 5 p.m. Admission: one can of food per person. Mississippi Coast Model Railroad Museum. Details: 228-2845731; mcmrm@usa.com.

Commissioner of Agriculture and Commerce Cindy Hyde-Smith welcomes you to the

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