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NATHAN MAHONY PORTFOLIO2018

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NATHAN MAHONY UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS AT AUSTIN SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE MAHONY.NATHAN@GMAIL.COM (310) 874 - 2005

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01 BIRDING CENTER - page 4 -

03 FORMAL STUDY - page 22 -

05 GULF COAST TRAIL - page 4O -

02 ACCOUSTIC REDESIGN - page 14 -

04 KINETIC LIBRARY - page 32 -

06 VERTICAL GARDENS - page 5O -

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BIRDING CENTER LAGUNA GLORIA

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Laguna Gloria is situated along the Colorado river in west Austin, Texas. The primary function of the site is that of a nature preserve, however, it is owned by Austin's Contemporary Art Museum. As such, this project’s focus was one weighted equally on programmatic function and aesthetics, striving for a project that acted as another art installation. Bird watching is an individually focused program. Once views and bird sighting frequency were established, site selection was ultimately decided by a study in pedestrian flow. The least traveled portion of the peninsula’s infrastructure was chosen. This location grants a level of intimacy unique to this location. The area also provides a tree framed view of the lake (where birds often land) and a unique grade change allowing for a taller back portion for the center.

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Birding is a unique program that had to be studied in order to fully understand the needs this center was going to have to address. The two most important factors were broken down into their simplest forms, one must be able to view out to birds, and the birds must not be aware of the viewer. This favors a horizontally focused formal strategy. The use of horizontal members allows the viewer to track a bird in flight unobstructed. This is crucial to the program of bird watching as it allows for viewers to establish birding patterns as well as predicting capturing them in flight. The strategy also serves to obstruct the bird’s view of said viewer. Looking in from the outside produces a broken image of the viewer by means of physical obstruction and shadow casting. The program favored a timber construction and a combination of physical models and drawings were used to study the formal relationships that could be created to achieve the aforementioned building functions.

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Once a system of formal arrangements that allowed structure to serve function was established, a group of massing studies helped determine the final form for the building. The main purpose was finding a way to provide ideal places for three different birding concepts as well as support for these programs. Viewers needed to be able to follow a bird path, take unobstructed photographs, and wait comfortably for extended periods for birds to arrive. These spaces were built into the hill rising above the ground level dark room and recessed information center/office.

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The final product was a light timber framed structure that added to the museum-like nature of the area. Accounting for the birding needs of the user by means of structure allows for a building that harmoniously blends form and function.

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ACCOUSTIC REDESIGN

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AUSTIN, TEXAS

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The dining hall at the Delta Tau Delta house serves a dual purpose. The room is used for dinner at 6 pm but is followed immediately by chapter and then study hours. The members of the house often complain of an inability to focus due to noise. A remodeling with acoustic intention was proposed.

First the acoustic properties of the space had to be assessed. Dimensions of all surfaces and objects were taken and used to calculate reverberation time. The hall expressed traits similar to a theater space which serves well for a lively dinner area but less so with regards to focusing.

The proposed alterations allow for an adaptable space that retains the liveliness desired at dinner time, but brings the reverberation time closer towards the desired library affect for study hours. A final addition of a sliding fabric panel separates the space from the TV area that is not used during study hours, allowing for a drastic increase in acoustically absorbent surface area while

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The majority of the surfaces in the space have a very low Noise Reduction Coefficient (NRC), meaning most of the sound in the space is reflected rather than absorbed. Notably, the research into the house revealed that the structure and walls used to be exposed wood but were painted over a few decades prior. The coating on the soft wood decreases the normal NRC value by only about .1 but is also the most abundant surface in the space occupying nearly 7500 square feet.

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The original wood members in the house were exposed (the paint was in need of refurbishing to begin with) reducing the reverberation time by .1 seconds. The addition of 8 large acoustic panels on the ceiling coupled with the curtain wall that divides the room in half lends to a final reverberation time of .8 seconds. This is similar to the target for a secondary school classroom, acheiving the target accoustic effect for the space. The final refurbished space revitalizes the house’s original visual intent while creating an amicable environment that can be adapted to fit the needs of the programs it houses.

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SOLAR MANIPULATION MILAM RESIDENCE

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The present case study located in Sawgrass, Florida is characterized by a unique facade strategy. The arrangement of vertically and horizontal extruded members frames views out towards the water and stops direct sunlight from heating the windows. The project studies the arrangement of parts in the precedent and abstracts them in a way that allows for a manipulation of color using solar

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The tectonic facade into a stereotomic mass was the first product of design that was derived from a collection of study models and drawings. The mass was carved to grant the block more complexity allowing for better manipulation of exterior apparitions and interior portions on which photo reflective members could be placed. The goal was to test the knowledge of how the sun moves across the sky by using it to manipulate the space. Orienting the front of the building south allowed for the best form of this manipulation with cuts that would be shaded or directly exposed to sunlight at varying hours of the day.

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Above is an example of a solar path study used to study the path of light as it passes through an opening at varying degrees. While light and shadow trails reflect the apparitions they pass through, or solids they are cast by, the result is often diffused. As such, the use of three point cuts through rectilinear members was favored by granting the ability to focus sunlight from more controlled angles. The diagram to the left is derived from a 3D model used to decide where light enters the spaces to inform which portions would receive color. The diagram represents the effects of early morning sunlight and evening light at an exaggerated degree. Light coming from the east would reach deep into the space from the apparitions on the right while the western portion would remain completely shaded.

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KINETIC LIBRARY

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SOUTH CONGRESS

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South Congress acts as a major axis for Austin, Texas leading straight to the capital and hosting a great deal of popular landmarks and commercial spaces such as Joe’s coffee shop. The street does not currently provide for a library. The challenge for this project was to create a branch library that challenged the idea of what a library is by introducing a radically different secondary program. In the early stages of the project the question of “what is a library” was studied in order to ascertain what a library wasn’t, but could be. The product of this research broke down into a simple idea about calmness and privacy. The apposing program would have to involve a more public and active base. The kinetic library idea attempts to merge the active program of climbing with the static programs surrounding a library. A formal arrangement presented itself when trying to design a structure that would allow for both programs. A structure comprised of vertical members punching through an array of horizontal members would form the base components for the library.

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Working with the aforementioned strategy was the concept of a folded shell that would serve as the building envelope as well as the floor and ceiling component. Being able to walk on what would be ceiling elsewhere or lean against the ground was a way to get the inhabitants to further experience the building. The shell then incorporated the previous formal arrangement with two large vertical shafts that act as structural support and house circulation and program.

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The final product was a system of shelves that when inside reaching outside the building became habitable space. The exploration of the library from various entry points encourages the user to experience entire structure and challenge what a library is meant to be.

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TRAIL INTERVENTION GULF COAST, TEXAS

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Pirates In Galveston

During the 17th century, the British colonies of the New World welcomed piracy as a means to get around British embargoes and high-taxes. Almost two hundred years after the “golden age of piracy” The Gulf of Mexico continued to serve as a major port for pirates and privateers. Privateers, if a distinction from pirates were to be made, would go out and capture enemy ships and divvy up the goods found with the authorities. This ideology of “piracy through legal permission” allowed the Lafitte brothers to become the Gulfs most notorious pirates.

Regarded as the first crime bosses of America the Lafitte brothers – most notably Jean – brought prosperity and wealth to New Orleans by way of smuggling illegal goods through the Gulf Coast’s intricate system of swamps and river channels. Adding to the mystery and legends that surround him it is unknown where Jean Lafitte was actually born – but a few texts suggest he may have been born in France. Following his virtual monopoly on smuggling operations to Louisiana, Jean finally made his way to Galveston, leading supply runs aiding General Francisco Mina and the South American Revolution against Spain. Succeeding his takeover of the “Campeche” operation, one of Lafitte’s captains conducted a raid on an American merchant ship forcing the USS Enterprise to Galveston. Lafitte sailed out of Galveston in 1821 and there is no record of what really happened to him after leaving Galveston, until earlier this decade that is.

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Jean Lafitte

Discovered by the Shell Oil Company, while trying to secure permits for deep-water oil and gas development, a mysterious shipwreck is capturing the imaginations of researches 150 miles off the Galveston Island coast. The vessel is believed to be remnant of the early 19th-century – when Jean and his crew were known to be in Galveston – as the British cannons and Spanish/Mexican items date to around the era of the war of 1812.

Galveston The Port of Galveston was established in 1825 under Mexico and has since become a major US commercial center and one of the largest ports in the United States. The 41 square mile barrier island has been devastated by hurricanes, but constantly re-emerges as a leading tourist hub. Galveston is home to six historic districts containing one of the largest and historically significant collections of 19th century buildings in the US with over 60 structures listed in the National Register of Historic Places. For things to do, there are many beaches along the southeast side of the Island, paying close attention to Apffel Park, Stewart Beach, and Dellanera RV Park. Galveston Island State Park is also a good place to hike, kayak, and enjoy the environment, while the Moody Gardens and Schlitterbahn are other tourist attractions to visit while in the city. Just north of the Island lies Bolivar Flats, a globally important birding area for viewing dozens of migratory birds that stop along the Texas coastline.


The Gulf Coast Conservation trail was an extensive project that manifested itself in four parts. 1) A series of maps that demonstrated the collective research efforts of the studio and would serve as an imformational brochure to anyone visiting the trail. Our trail was to stretch the 320 miles of coast from Port Arthur to Brownsville. 2) A floating orientation center of about 10,000 square feet meant to promote environmental education and stewardship. 3) Prototypical check-in points (placed every 20 miles or so along the trail) that could be quickly disassembled - or rellocated in some manour - at the first sign of hurricane or other natural disaster. 4) Multiple studio visits to the coast - post hurricane - in an effort to rebuild and aid the communities affected by the disaster.

Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge

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McFaddin Refuge

History of Port

Port Arthur resides 91 miles East of Houston on the border of Louisiana. The Port is actually the second attempt to settle the area following the failure of the city of Aurora. As a result of the civil war, The Eastern Texas Railroad that connected Sabine Pass and Beaumont, Texas was removed. Following a hurricane in 1886 the final residents of the former city dismantled their homes and resettled in Beaumont. Arthur Stilwell founded the city that currently resides there in 1895. Port Arthur, as would come to be known, was officially incorporated as a city in 1989 and developed into a sea port that fed into the Gulf Coast. Following the discovery of oil in the region the city became the center for the world’s largest oil refinery network for some time and is still home to the largest oil refinery in America – the Saudi Aramco - Motiva refinery. As a result of the decline in the oil industry, decades of neglect and stagnation took its toll on the economy of the area. However, Port Arthur is reviving in the 21st century through several large projects that are currently underway or proposed as well as renewed investment in expanding the refinery. Focused on energy infrastructure a few of these projects include the Golden Pass and Sabine Pass LNG terminals. While this expansion is expected to create a large number of job opportunities in the area, Port Arthur still suffers from one of the highest unemployment rates in America.

The McFaddin National Wildlife Refuge was purchased under the authority of the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission in 1980. The 58,861-acre refuge is open to the public and includes the largest remaining freshwater marsh on the Texas Coast, as well as intermediate to brackish marsh. Visitors can enjoy wildlife watching, hunting, fishing, photography, and special wildlife-related events. 0.5

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The marsh habitat is home to northern river otters, bobcats, gray fox, coyotes, a large number of bird species, and the largest concentration of American CO in the State of Texas. For the Central Flyway XIalligators MEthe ducks and F geese refuge serves as the primary wintering area. Hundreds F Oof thousands shorebirds, wading birds, and other marsh/water birds ULmigrate through the area and it serves as a critical staging area for G waterfowl migrating to and from Mexico. A total of 285 bird species have been documented through various times of the year, including some year-round residents such as the mottled duck.

Along the southern boundary of the refuge, the shallow Gulf of Mexico waters, tidal flats, and beaches provide feeding, breading, and nesting habitats for species like the killdeer, black-necked stilt and willet. Apart from the various animals residing here, this transition from land to sea allows for a combination of salt tolerant marsh and beach plants like the saltmeadow cordgrass, camphor weed, and gulf croton. Apart from serving the needs of the wildlife, this vegetation has adapted to shifting sands, high winds, and rising waters resulting in a unique ability to protect the dunes from erosion.

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Established in 1963, Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge has 34,000 acres of land dedicated to hiking, boating, fishing, and hunting. The management focus of the refuge is to protect and manage the coastal marsh for migrating, wintering and breeding waterfowl, shorebirds and waterbirds, and provide strategic and crucial nesting areas for the neotropical migratory songbirds migrating across the Gulf of Mexico. There is also an environmental education center with free classes for children K-5 to learn about the environment following the Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills. The chorus of thousands of waterfowl, wind moving through coastal prairie, the splash of an alligator going for a swim, a high-pitched call of a fulvous whistling duck. These are just some of the sounds you may hear when visiting the Anahuac National Wildlife Refuge.

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After working with a typical shipping barge for ome time my research led me to the damon ponton. This barge was unique in that it had four pilons integrated into the barge that would act as the structure for my orientation center. In an emergency these pilons could root the barge into the shallow bay of port arthur.

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The Orientation center itself included an educational assembly room that visitors would first encounter when attending. The area in which the barge would primarily reside was right on the edge of three amazing ecological spheres. The bay and its many species of clam and fish, the marshlands including 3 wildlife preserves to the west, and the dunes with their own preservationtions and parks. The barge itself kept patrons low to the ground until they learned of the wonderful natural elements surrounding them, at which point they are raised above the center revealing everything they had just studied. the low valley nature of the site helped to mask these elements allowing the barge to serve as the catalist for revealing them.

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Kayak Storage Facility Located along designated kayak trails and water crossings The structure was designed for picking up kayaks and returning rented kayaks This included a rest area for those who had just completed a crossing. Bird Blind Utilizing lessons learned from the previous birding facility the blinds were to be built into the dunes at designated bird crossings - with the same horizantal language - so as to mask the birders approach and provide for the birding experience. Hiker’s Rest and Viewing Area Rest stops were mostly covered in order to provide maximum protection from the elements while framing views out to the sea.

Wilderness Type Restroom Drawing from the previous structures the bathrooms used the more sheltered language of the rest stop where privacy was needed and created a comfortable/protected gathering space along the ocean side. 048


Along the trail was llocated a collection of service like structures to be used by people hiking the trail. In lue of the recent hurricanes, the structures were designed to be non-permanent and easily rellocated. I chose a mechanical system inspired by Ten Fold engineerings trailer offices that could be compressed into a series of parts. The members were all sized to fit onto the back of a truck and require no more than two people to relocate.

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VERTICAL GARDENS

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AMAZON GROW

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Amazon Vertical Gardens Objective: To educate the community about the process of food production while actively engaging the community in the process of vertical farming. Amazons vertical garden initiative is an attempt to create a new building typology meant to cultivate produce in an urban condition. This garden consists of three types of farming: aeroponics, hydroponics, and aquaponics. Growing produce in this manor uses a fraction of the recources that typical farms require and occupies down to 5% of the protypical land. the crops are processed on site and then served in the community market and cafe. the processes is completely open to the public and a series of classrooms suplements this educational aspect.

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7:00 am

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JANUARY

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LANDSCAP

Land Use

INDUSTRIAL OFFICE COMMERCIAL MULTI - FAMILY SINGLE FAMILY CIVIC STREETS & rOADS/ TRANSPORTATION OPEN SPACE UNDEVELOPED

Fresa’s shoal creek saloon

winflo osteria

faizan bend z’ tejas tnt tacos and tequila clark’s oyster bar counter cafe 24 Diner snap kitchen amy’s icecream

whole foods market the grove wine bar & kitchen Hut’s hamburgers frank & angies star bucks irenes tiniest bar in texas

Austin station

trader joes

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transit

heavy traffic moderate traffic

The vertical garden was to be located on the intersection of North Lamar Blvd and 5th street. Looking at the existing transit system and surrounding buildings the bottom of the given site was selected. In doing so the building activates the existing pedestrian walkway and encourages nonautomotive mean of transportation in line with the purpose of the building.

light traffic Bike friendly streets bike paths trails train track one-way traffic

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27.

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WALL SECTION 1/3” = 1’

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1 Exterior Lightweight Aluminum Diagrid 2 Wavelength-Specific Photovoltaic Panel 3 Aluminum Horizontal Member

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4 Steel Horizontal Connector 5 Double Pane, Low E Coat Glass

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6 Algae Bioreactor Tube 7 Double Pane, Low E Coat Glass (Slideable)

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8 Metal Grate Floor 9 Steel Beam 10 PVC Water Valve/ Pipe 12.

11 CO2 / Oxygen Valve/ Pipe 12 Interior Concrete Diagrid

13 Air Intake Grate 14 Flashing 15 Exterior Hydroponics Bed

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16 Leafy Veggies on Flotation Device 17 Water Filter 18 Drainboard 19 Waterproof Membrane

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20 PVC Water Pipes 21 Concrete Footing 22 Rebar 23 Gravel 24 French Drain 25 Earth 26 Water Collection Gutter 27 Glass Paraphet Roof

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air barrier metal cap

Lightweight Aluminum Diagrid

flashing

coping

Vertical Mullion Double Pane Glass

Double Pane Glass Low E Coating

Low E Coating

casing bead

Air Space

Air Space

steel stud

Transparent Photo Voltaic Panels AR Coating

Borosilicate Algae Bioreactor Tube

gypsum panel

Metal Grate FLoor

Transparent Substrate Transparent Electorde

Steel Horizontal Member

sheathng continuous insulation with drainage chanels

Water Intake Valve

Magenta Layer

Spandrel Glass

Steel Beam

UV&NIR Active Layers Transparent Electrode UV/ NIR Reflector

Sealant

metal lath

PVC Water Pipe

AR Coating

water resistive barrier control joint

CO2/Oxygen Pipe

butyl tape

Aluminum Horizontal Member Solar Cell Distributor

gypsum sheathing

Sealant Gasket

cavity insulation

roof membrane

portland cement lime stucco

Steel Horizontal Connector Lateral Algae Tube Bracing

flashing insulation concrete structure

DIAGRID TO CURTIAN WALL DETAIL

In order to ensure lasting effectiveness of the garden a few key building details had to be layed out. The final layered wall assembly is shown to the left. A diagrid system was used to support the array of photovaltaics and its connection to the primary structure was detailed along while specifying its seperation from the ground to allow ventilation. As rain water collection was important to the green initiative of the building, roof and retention motes were layed out in the design.

Leafy Veggie Filter Fabric Flotation Device Aquaponics Bed Filter

Structural Diagrid Column

PV Water Pipes

Rebar

Drainboard

Structural Concrete Slab

Waterproof Membrane

Water Resistant Barrier Rebar

Fresh Air intake Grate+ Structural Horizontal Member Flashing

Concrete Footing Drain Board Waterproof Membrane French Drain Gravel Earth

FOUNDATION DETAIL

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PHOTO VOLTAIC LAYERS

WHY PHOTO VOLTAIC PANELS?

AR COATING

Photovoltaic strips embedded in a "bright magenta luminescent dye" absorb some of the sunlight's blue and green wavelengths while converting some of the green light into red light, which "has the highest efficiency for photosynthesis in plants.

TRANSPARENT SUBSTRATE TRANSPARENT ELECTRODE UV/NIR ACTIVE LAYERS AR COATING

The PV panels are comprised of layers of thin coating, that are deposited on a piece of glass. The active layers are located at the core of the coating which absorb UV and NIR light, thus generating a current to flow via the two transparent electrode layers. An external circuit transmits generated energy diagonally along the diagrid, and is captured within the horizontal members and then is distributed to the basement for energy collection and distribution.

WAVELENGTH-SELECTIVE PHOTOVOLTAIC PANELS

A hollow tube diagrid was used an attatchment point for a system of photovaltaics. The energy from the sun is collected in the PV panels and is channeled into the building through the diagrid itself. By manipulating the density of the grid the panels could be strategically layed out to provide shading to the more exposed sections of greenhouse.

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Structural Diagrid Collumns Interior Curtain Wall Algae Tubes Exterior Curtain Wall Diagrid with Integrated PV System Horizantal Diagrid Members

ETRIC

LAYERING

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Rainwater is directed to a vertical gutter that redirects collected water to the basement for recycling

ROOF RAINWATER FLOW DIAGRAM

The following diagrams electrical recycling aspects of th respective drainage ports to be s the ground levels to be processe The diagram on the left shows th the vertical farm.

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2 -> ENERGY

PLUMBING

represent the rain water collection and he garden. The three roofs slope towards their stored in the retention ponds surrounding ed and recycled into the growing systems. he various steps in the electrical system for

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- GROWING Visitors are able to explore the exposed gardens and witness first hand the culitvation of the produce that is sold in the market and cafe.

- PROCESSING The labs work in conjuction with their respective greenhouses to maintain precise temperatures and levels of humidty. Students andpatrons alike can take part in this more technical side of the vertical gardens.

- DEMONSTRATION The best way to truly learn a topic is to teach it to someone else. As such, the schooling program of the garden is feeds into the courtyard where the students will be able to present hat they have learned.

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Those visiting the vertical garden towards the end of the day get to experience a the geode effect given off by the purple LEDs used to grow the plants at night.s

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The design build that usually comes with studio was replaced with a number of studio wide trips down to the coast in effort to help those affected by the hurricane. We were able to fast track the efforts of Camp Aranzonzu to get their facilities back up and running as well as more personal experiences like tarping down leaky roofs for a few of the Galveston residents. The trips were very fullfilling and also served as an opportunity to get more familiar with the coast on which we were building.

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NATHAN R. MAHONY mahony.nathan@gmail.com (310) 874 - 2005 2801 San Jacinto Blvd. Austin, TX 78705

Education University of Texas at Austin Currently enrolled as a student in the Bachelor of Architecture program expected to graduate May, 2019

Skills photoshop illustrator indesign revit autocad rhino sketchup drafting physical modeling v-ray kerkythea

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