Page 1

The Guillotine

Guillotine Inc 12000 SW 49th Avenue Portland,OR 97219-7199 CMET 223 Project Management Instructor Gregg Meyer Spring 2014


Table of Contents Introduction

Project Management Approach

Project Scope

Milestone List

Schedule Baseline and Work Breakdown Structure

The Plans

Sponsor Page

Photo Journal

Design Progression

Team Bios

Conclusion


Introduction (Rationale) The Guillotine is a computer data storage device destruction machine utilizing a hand-crank lifted, gravity driven punch. The use of personal electronic devices is an integral part of life within modern industrial civilization. A consequence of such common utilization of computer technology is the accumulation of substantial amounts of private, sensitive data on electronic storage devices. With the rapid pace of technological advancements, the capabilities of computer performance steadily accelerate and improve, creating strong demand for the newest, most powerful devices. This constant demand, coupled with regular failure of electronic devices past their anticipated service life, results in a continuous waste stream of electronic components. In order to secure the privacy and sensitive data of consumers discarding their used electronic storage devices, it is necessary to properly incapacitate the operational ability of the device and render the storage medium unreadable. We do this by punching a whole strategically through the hard drive effectively destroying any possibility of recovering any information from it while giving the previous owner visual confidence the task is complete. Spectacle is a prime directive in our project’s success.


Project Management Approach With a limited budget, time restraint, and assistance or instruction, our approach to this project was also limited mostly to a “materials first” and “design parameters last” philosophy. Guillotine Inc. was provided financing by our instructor, Gregg Meyer with additional funds authorized by our project manager and provided by ourselves. Specific funds will be listed in the budget section of this report. Although we started with an ideal initial design and purpose, only the purpose could remain unchanged due to circumstances and opportunity provided. Ultimately, the final result of our prototype was dependent on the material as they came. Details will be provided in our milestone list. The project manager, Jerome Manspeaker, is the director and the deciding factor in our company. He has been responsible for finding resources and materials. Jerome has planned our off-school-hours work sessions and gave overall direction for the scope and realistic objectives in our goal. The PM was also where all questions about this venture from our sponsors and stakeholders would be directed to. The technical lead, Jacob Rosen, provided guidance and parameters on the operation and execution of our design. All technical language, descriptions of process, and calculations detailing the aspects of the Guillotine were left to him. Technical application inquiries and safety concerns would be directed and responded to by Jacob. Operation presentations will also fall under this umbrella. The communications specialist, Nate Albright, has taken the duties of originally presenting Guillotine Inc’s intention, scope, and projection of the project to the sponsors and stakeholders. This includes communicating all updates of our progress and writing the initial plus the final report. In addition, Nate has provided motivations and support to the team where needed in this endeavor. Communicating needs to our instructor, Gregg Meyer has been the responsibility of all team members when necessary.


Project Scope The scope of the Guillotine project includes the planning, design, development, testing, and presentation of the prototype to our sponsors and stakeholders available on June 13th, 2014 at 9am. This machine needs to be all steel from the frame to the weight to the punch welded in place for sturdiness and strength. An easy-to-use pulley or winch system capable of raising and releasing the weighted punch will be paramount in an ideal operation. The Guillotine must be tall enough, the weight must be sufficient, the accuracy of the punch and position of the hard drive mount must be in synch, and the operation must be relatively effortless for our prototype to have a successful demonstration.

All material is either donated by the PCC Sylvania campus or approved and purchased by our project manager. Any purchased material is detailed and accounted for in our budget. Assistance with welding and other machining necessary for the parts is outsourced to Rafe Rouse with our team’s gratitude. All work is done on campus.

As a prototype made with limited resources, the concern for safety measures will be considered and the demonstration will be a controlled operation by our team staff only.

A brief description and design of an ideal, final construction is in the unfinished business section of this report.


Milestone List The following chart list our team’s milestones. The listing is the actual dates of significant progress made throughout the project’s development as opposed to the planned schedule of deliverables and duties.

Milestone

Description

Date

Team

Recruited team, picked a name and goal

4/15

Presentation

Initial sketches done, presentation to sponsors

4/25

Plan

Budget, 2nd sketches done, schedule and duties set

5/2

Materials

Material purchased and/ or gathered from school

5/23

Construction

Guillotine prototype constructed, present progress

5/23

Demonstration

Open house, demonstration views w/o operation

5/30


Schedule Baseline and Work Breakdown Structure Guillotine Inc. Project name: The Guillotine (Hard Drive Crushing Spectacle)

Week 5\5: Major Deliverable – Budget Plan Secondary Deliverable – Resources Tertiary Deliverable – Notation PM – Plan and decide on size, scale, and resources available. Get feedback TL – Technical parameters, bill of materials, material assessment CS – Document needs and progress weekly. Prepare final report

Week 5/12: Major Deliverable – Resources Secondary Deliverable – Notation Tertiary Deliverable – Plan, materials PM – Oversee and approve final project plan and materials TL – Calculations based on crushing numbers, materials, dynamics of design CS – Document needs and progress weekly. Prepare final report. Support


Week 5/17: Major Deliverable – Materials and assembly Secondary Deliverable – Notation Tertiary Deliverable – Operation, consultation PM – Oversee and approve prototype and operation, give feedback on improvements and provisions TL – Demonstrate operation, provide notation on pass/ fail results, observation CS – Document needs and progress weekly. Prepare final report, get group approval on draft of report

Week 5/24: Major Deliverable – Operation, improvements Secondary Deliverable – Notation Tertiary Deliverable – Resources, consultation PM – Final approval TL – Demonstration, operation CS – Final report due, send by email, notebook, and publish on issu.com


Communications Management Plan Status report **This is an email update to our sponsors and instructor** Nathanial Albright <nathanial.albright@pcc.edu>

Project Management Update Nathanial Albright <nathanial.albright@pcc.edu> Thu, May 15, 2014 at 3:26 PM To: gregg.meyer@pcc.edu, Jacob Rosen <jacob.rosen@pcc.edu>, Jerome Manspeaker <jerome.manspeaker@pcc.edu> Cc: jchamber <jchamber@pcc.edu>, Tara Nelson <tara.nelson1@pcc.edu>, "greg.gerstner" <greg.gerstner@pcc.edu> Hello all, This is Nate Albright speaking on behalf of Guillotine Inc. and our disk crusher project, the Guillotine. Though our project is in the material gathering stage, I would like to take the time to briefly update you on our process. - Tweaks to our initial design and focus: 1) We have decided to go with a winch/ pulley method instead of a more complicated (while CMET stylish) gear system to raise and release the weighted puncher. A simple, inexpensive purchase from Harbor Freight will save both manufacturing time and money while simplifying the operation. 2) We will be using an all steel frame. This will ensure stability and strength plus the parts are readily available on campus. We will be gathering parts Friday, 5/16. Thanks, Gregg! 3) It is likely we will forego a blade as a tool or a prop for the sake of time constraints and the effectiveness of a punch with weight behind it instead. 4) We will not be using a spring at the top to aid in delivering power. The added kinetic energy to the weight and punch already planned will not be necessary. Further updates will be available after our team's first attempt at putting our project together. I and my teammates will be in touch and our project manager, Jerome Manspeaker, will be readily available for your questions or concerns at your convenience. He is CC'd on this message. Thank you Nate Albright Communications Specialist, Guillotine Inc. All other communications were made through the presentations.


Cost Management Plan Beginning Budget: From Instructor, Gregg Meyer

$50.00

Student Financed (from us)

$50.00

Budget:

The main intention of our project was to utilize wood as a frame, which would be affordable and readily available at any hardware store. Later, we realized that we could get the steel strut donated and that would make for a much stronger and more stable base. We got as much donation and scrap material as we could. The winch system was a suggested system in place of the gear or pulley idea and turned out to be well within our budget limits. Brackets were always a likely expenditure. All other material and labor was without cost.


Receipts :


Schedule Management Plan (See Schedule Baseline and Work Breakdown Structure)

Risk Management Plan/ Risk Register Our risk analysis told us there was a few aspects to consider when taking on this type of project. Those considerations included safety in construction and in the demonstration, materials not being available or affordable, our design not properly delivering enough force to punch the hard drive to satisfaction, and such a risky endeavor not going over well with our sponsors. Our approach to safety unfortunately would not be totally realized in the prototype. Under these circumstances we would not be able to eliminate the misuse factor with proper shielding and guards as we would intend on a final, fully funded product. Adding the weighted punch to the hook and raising it into position is not to occur until the hard drive is already in place. At our demonstration, only our staff will be operating the Guillotine. Materials not being available was solved by the generous donation of struts for the frame by the Sylvania campus maintenance staff. Calculations ran on the necessary force to punch a hard drive has been reviewed and proven, however, hard drives are at different levels of toughness and this may still prove to be an issue. The science and method is still sound and once again taking into consideration that this will not be the intended final product, only a prototype. The endeavor not being picked up by our sponsors has become apparent to our team but we will continue with our project for grades, future reference to the spectacle it creates, and for our companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s portfolio. The benefits and preparations manage and justify the risks.

Staffing Management Plan The project manager, Jerome Manspeaker, is the director and the deciding factor in our company. He has been responsible for finding resources and materials. Jerome has planned our off-school-hours work sessions and gave overall direction for the scope and realistic objectives in our goal. The PM was also where all questions about this venture from our sponsors and stakeholders would be directed to. The technical lead, Jacob Rosen, provided guidance and parameters on the operation and execution of our design. All technical language, descriptions of process, and calculations detailing the aspects of the Guillotine were left to him. Technical


application inquiries and safety concerns would be directed and responded to by Jacob. Operation presentations will also fall under this umbrella. The communications specialist, Nate Albright, has taken the duties of originally presenting Guillotine Incâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intention, scope, and projection of the project to the sponsors and stakeholders. This includes communicating all updates of our progress and writing the initial plus the final report. In addition, Nate has provided motivations and support to the team where needed in this endeavor.

Test/ Validation Plan The Guillotine must meet the quality standards established in the rationale and project scope of this report. The prototype must meet the base function intended by our design and purpose. The chart is as shown: Item: Operation Acceptable Level: Must wind up and release with little effort by way of the crank and the punch must be accurate at impact. Most adult sized persons must be able to operate it. Comments: Initial tests prove operation does work as designed although positioning the hard drive mount needs more consideration with prototype parts available. Item: Safety Acceptable Level: Injury from misuse at virtually any level is unacceptable. Liability must be at a minimum. Comments:


Operation during the demonstration will only be conducted by our team. Warning and â&#x20AC;&#x153;How To Useâ&#x20AC;? signs can also be displayed. Item: Supporting Documents Acceptable Level: Calculations and design specs to illustrate use Comments: Calculations included performed by technical lead, Jacob Rosen, shows failure rate dependent on individual hard drive construction. Lighter casings on certain drives susceptible to punch success.


Sponsor Response

Sponsor Acceptance Signature Approved by Project Sponsor:

Project Sponsor Name and Title

Signature


Photo Journal


Design Progressions


Team Bios

Jerome Manspeaker Bio The details of my life are quite inconsequential. Very well, where do I begin? My father was a relentlessly self-improving boulangerie owner from Belgium with low grade narcolepsy and a penchant for buggery. My mother was a fifteen year old French prostitute named Chloe with webbed feet. My father would womanize, he would drink, he would make outrageous claims like he invented the question mark. Sometimes he would accuse chestnuts of being lazy, the sort of general malaise that only the genius possesses and the insane lament. My childhood was typical, summers in Rangoon, luge lessons. In the spring we'd make meat helmets. When I was insolent I was placed in a burlap bag and beaten with reeds, pretty standard really. At the age of 12 I received my first scribe. At the age of fourteen, a Zoroastrian named Vilma ritualistically shaved my testicles. There really is nothing like a shorn scrotum, it's breathtaking, I suggest you try it. At age 15, I became a Guatemalan Porn star under the name â&#x20AC;&#x153;El Sancho.â&#x20AC;? With a long and prosperous career, I became bored with my porn and moved into the competitive world of chili cook-offs at the age of 20. After accidentally killing the entire judge panel with my chili made from ghost chilies breed from a Hebaravu Insane Asylum garden, I decided to get into engineering.


Jacob Rosen Biography Jacob Rosen began the CMET program at Portland Community College during the fall term of 2012. He had taken a sabbatical from his career as an automotive technician to explore the fundamentals of life by working on sustainable permaculture farms, spending time in the woods learning Stone Age hunter gatherer technology and exploring the varied extremes of the vast American landscape by way of freight train. His attempts to resettle were thwarted by the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great Recession,â&#x20AC;? and he eventually ended up broke and homeless. A friend in Portland offered him a place to stay in exchange for assistance in restoring a fixer-upper house and establishing a large garden. He began exploring options for recovering and moving forward, and decided to take the assessment tests at PCC. Despite the extreme stress and adversity he had experienced, and having not attended


school for many years, he managed to place into Math 111. This gave him the spark of hope he desperately needed, and thus decided to pursue an interest in engineering he had developed while studying automotive technology as a young adult. Completion of the CMET curriculum with an almost perfect 4.0 GPA (currently 3.94) has been a tremendously encouraging and redemptive achievement for Jacob. His appetite for further knowledge has been stimulated and he hopes to continue working on the required university transfer credits so that he may earn a traditional bachelor’s degree in engineering.

Nate Albright. What has led me here… Working man for the last 20 years, father, dreamer, and soon to be a husband for the first time. My life was one of just getting by and paying own my way. Having great kids out of terrible relationships and never really fulfilling my potential. The last few years I have taken up the art of the Kaizen (continuous improvement) and through this journey I am now better than I have ever been… and only getting better. This part of the road is ending but a new one now lies before me. Commencement… the end of one thing and the start of something else.


Conclusion Unfinished Business The ideal design for the Guillotine would have a plastic cover to have the blade dropping be visible but one could not reach inside. A fake blade cover for the punch to give the appearance of a true guillotine. A disposal shaft to the side of the hard drive mount that would lead to a recycle bin. Much of what the first design sketch looks like is what could have been with support and resources to see what a true spectacle our prototype could lead to. I would urge future consideration of how fun the Guillotine could be.

The guillotine notebook  

CMET 223 Instructor Gregg Meyer

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you