Page 1

OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

To What  Extent  Is  ‘The  Gaze’  Theory  Still  Relevant  In  Modern  Advertising       “  Advertisements  rather  provide  a  structure  which  is  capable  of  transforming  the   language  of  objects  to  that  of  people  and  vice  versa  ”  (Williamson,  J.  Decoding   Advertisements”       Advertisements  are  a  big  part  of  today’s  life,  they  are  an  important  factor  that   shapes  the  way  in  which  we  live.  Even  if  you  don’t  read  the  newspaper  or  watch   the  television,  you  can’t  escape  adverts  as  they  are  posted  all  around  the   surroundings  in  which  we  live  in.     Advertisements  create  structures  of  meaning;  they  sell  things  to  us.  They  have  to   take  the  characteristics  of  the  products  they  are  selling  and  make  them  mean   something  to  the  viewer.  In  other  words  they  make  the  viewer  think  that  they   need  to  product  and  that,  that  product  will  improve  their  lifestyle.       One  technique  used  in  advertisements  is  ‘The  Gaze’.  This  is  a  psychoanalytical   term,  which  was  first  brought  into  use  by  Jacques  Lacan.  It  was  used  to  describe   the  awareness  that  a  person  can  be  viewed  upon.  In  todays  society  it  is  used  by   many  theorists  to  refer  how  both  viewers  look  at  images  of  people  and  to  the   gaze  of  people  being  depicted  any  visual  medium.     Lacans  idea  of  ‘The  gaze’  was  challenged  by  many  philosophers  the  main  and   most  famous  for  doing  so  was  Michel  Foucault.  He  spoke  about  the  gaze  in  his   book  ‘  Discipline  and  punish’  which  adapted  the  gaze  for  power  relations  and   discipline  mechanisms.       “  The  Gaze  is  integral  to  systems  of  power  and  ideas  about  knowledge”  (Foucault,   M.  Discipline  and  Punish)   The  gaze  is  not  something  that  someone  has  or  can  use;  it  is  a  relationship  in   which  someone  enters.     In  1975  ‘The  Gaze’  was  again  brought  to  light,  but  this  time  in  a  feminist  view.   Laura  Mulvey  spoke  about  ‘The  gaze’  in  her  essay  ‘Visual  Pleasure  and  Narrative   Cinema’.  The  concept  in  which  she  took  was  that  women  are  objectified  in  film   because  heterosexual  men  were  in  control  of  the  camera.  They  would  make  the   camera  linger  on  the  curves  of  the  female  body,  making  them  an  object  on  which   the  males  can  look  upon.  For  the  women  to  identify  with  this,  they  would  have  to   put  themselves  in  the  view  of  the  male.     “Pleasure  in  looking  has  been  split  between  active-­‐male  and  passive-­‐female”   (Mulvey  1992,  27).  “  


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

Mulvey refers  ‘the  male  gaze’  to  the  term  scopophilia  -­‐  the  pleasure  involved  in   looking  at  other  people’s  bodies  as  (particularly,  erotic)  objects.  This  is  most   apparent  when  watching  a  film  in  the  cinema.  The  darkness  of  the  auditorium   makes  it  okay  for  the  viewer  to  look  upon  the  women  in  the  film,  as  they  cannot   be  seen  looking  back  and  other  members  in  the  auditorium  cannot  see  them   doing  it.       Another  example  of  the  male  gaze  is  taken  from  Coward.  R  essay  on  ‘  The  look’.   In  this  essay  she  has  depicted  a  picture  of  a  women  stood  in  the  streets  with  little   clothing,  but  high  heels  and  sunglasses  on.  Here  it  is  seen  that  the  camera  in   contemporary  media  has  been  used  as  an  extension  of  the  male  gaze.  The  nudity   of  the  women  normalises  this  view  of  women  in  the  media  and  makes  it  seem   ‘okay’  for  them  to  view  upon  like  this  by  the  males.  Also  the  use  of  the  sunglasses   and  high  heels  adds  the  glamour  element  to  the  photograph,  women  must  dress   to  impress  and  be  at  their  best  at  all  times  because  they  are  constantly  viewed   and  judged  upon.  But  this  is  not  the  correct  image  to  be  using  in  the  media  as  all   girls  that  see  this  will  think  this  is  the  accepted  style  and  start  to  dress  and  act   like  themselves.     In  todays  society  the  male  gaze  can  be  seen  in  more  than  just  advertisements  and   films,  take  for  instance  ‘Shes  so  lovely’  by  Scouting  for  Girls.  In  the  song  the  lyrics   are  ‘  I  love  the  way  she  fills  her  clothes.  She  looks  just  like  them  girls  in  Vogue’   Along  with  the  lyrics  applying  the  male  gaze,  when  watching  the  video  you  can   also  see  that  this  is  demonstrated.  Throughout  the  video  the  woman  is  constantly   the  main  attraction,  the  camera  looks  up  and  down  her  body  and  lingers  around   the  shape  of  her  body  and  how  she  looks.  The  males  within  the  video  are   watching  and  looking  upon  the  woman  and  group  of  women  in  the  video  again   taking  the  characteristics  of  the  male  gaze.    This  is  an  example  of  a  modern   application  of  ‘The  Gaze’.     “According  to  usage  and  conventions  which  are  at  last  being  questioned  but  have   no  means  been  overcome  –  men  act  and  women  appear.  Men  look  at  women.   Women  watch  themselves  being  looked  at.”  (Berger,  1972).     In  the  quote  above  the  last  sentence  is  often  overlooked  because  it  is   misunderstood.  Berger  means  that  it  is  difficult  for  women  no  to  think  as   themselves  as  being  looked  at,  because  they  are  used  in  this  way  so  much  in  the   media,  compared  to  men.  Women  are  constantly  surveying  the  idea  of  femininity.       John  Berger  studied  the  gaze  within  the  Renaissance  period  in  particular  within   oil  paintings.  In  this  time  the  paintings  were  done  by  male  artists  for  the  male   viewers,  it  was  exclusively  for  males  and  that  could  be  seen  in  the  direction  of   the  paintings.  The  women  were  always  nude  and  often  had  their  body  turned  


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

towards the  viewer,  with  their  head  turned  away.    This  direction  of  the  gaze   made  it  okay  for  the  viewer  to  be  looking  upon  her,  as  she  couldn’t  see  them   looking.  The  women  in  the  paintings  knew  they  were  being  used  as  an  object  to   be  looked  at  by  the  males,  but  accepted  this,  as  it  was  now  part  of  society  for  men   to  do  this.   A  good  example  of  this  is  Hans  Memling  painting  of  ‘Vanity’.     This  was  painted  by  a  male  artist,  the  composition  of  the  woman  in  the  painting   was  like  that  because  the  artist  enjoyed  looking  at  her  naked.  Often  symbols   were  used  within  in  paintings,  this  one  included  a  mirror  which  the  woman  is   looking  into,  this  gives  the  impression  of  the  woman  being  vain  –  hence  the  name   ‘Vanity’  and  making  it  seem  viable  for  people  to  look  upon  her,  but  really  it  seen   as  symbol  that  the  woman  is  looking  at  herself,  just  like  all  the  viewer  will  be   looking  at  her.   Berger  also  add  that  “  All  most  all  Renaissance  European  sexual  imagery  is   frontal  –  either  literally  or  metaphorically  –  because  the  sexual  protagonist  is  the   spectator  –  owner  looking  at  it”  (Berger,  1972)     A  great  example  of  this  is  the  painting  of  ‘Birth  of  Venus’  by  artist  Alexandre   Cabanel.  In  this  painting  a  women  is  seen  to  be  a  Goddess  –  Venus,  this  implies   high  in  power  and  someone  to  be  looked  at  as  a  figure,  the  status  of  this  person   claims  that  is  someone  of  this  class  can  be  like  this  and  condone  such  an  act  then   it  must  be  okay  for  us  to  look  at  it.  The  position  in  which  she  is  placed  draws  the   viewers  to  her  body,  which  is  facing  us,  with  her  head  turned  away  and  covered   by  her  hand.  The  majority  of  the  painting  is  taken  up  by  her  body  itself,  focusing   the  attention  on  that  and  not  of  her,  this  makes  it  easy  for  the  viewer  to  look  at   her  as  a  sexual  object  it  becomes  no  sort  of  challenge  for  them  as  she  is   presenting  herself  to  them.     This  same  idea  and  position  of  the  gaze  can  be  seen  in  the  modern  advertisement   for  Opium  which  features  Sophie  Dahl.  Here  the  original  photography  for  the  ad   had  Sophie  Dahl  laid  in  a  similar  position  as  the  painting  above,  she  was  naked   covering  her  breasts  with  her  hands.  When  this  was  presented  to  the  company   they  turned  it  down  straight  away  because  they  thought  it  was  too  sexual.  To   correct  this  the  designers  simply  rotated  the  image,  so  it  was  portrait  and  this   gave  the  whole  thing  a  completely  different  meaning.  Now  the  main  attention   went  to  the  model  head  and  not  just  her  body.  It  doesn’t  seem  as  though  she  is   laying  there  and  presenting  herself  in  a  sexual  way  like  before.       Which  brings  us  onto  the  direction  of  the  gaze,  within  any  painting  or   advertisement  there  is  always  a  direction  of  gaze.  This  is  how  the  model  in  frame   is  looking  back  at  the  viewer;  many  theorists  can  depict  a  meaning  from  the  way   in  which  they  are  gazing.    


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

To illustrate  this  we  can  compare  Titians  ‘Venus  of  Urbino’,  1538  and  Manet’s   ‘Olympia’,  1863.  Here  both  paintings  include  a  model  which  is  laid  out  on  a   chaise  longue.  Both  models  are  looking  directly  at  the  viewer,  but  the   expressions  in  which  they  have  are  both  different.  In  ‘Venus  or  Urbino’  her  head   is  positioned  looking  up  at  the  viewer,  she  has  the  knowledge  that  the  viewer  is   present,  but  doesn’t  want  the  attention  to  be  on  her  face.    To  change  this  her  arm   is  positioned  casually  leading  you  down  her  body,  to  where  she  covers  herself   with  her  hand,  but  it  is  still  in  an  inviting  way  and  makes  the  viewer  now  look  at   her  body.  In  comparison  ‘Olympia’  is  more  assertive.  The  model  is  still  in  the   same  position  but  her  head  is  lifted  more  as  though  she  is  acknowledging  the   viewer  and  presenting  towards  them.  She  is  covering  herself  in  the  same  way   except  her  hand  is  pressed  against  her  body  in  a  more  defensive  way.  We  can   depict  from  the  painting  that  model  is  most  likely  to  be  a  prostitute  as  it  is   showing  success  and  wealth  through  the  jewels  and  flowers  that  she  is  receiving   –  probably  from  one  of  her  admirers.  This  painting  was  seen  as  modern  reality   and  shocked  the  society.  The  black  cat  is  also  a  symbol  of  individual  femininity   and  independence  again  showing  that  she  is  doing  it  for  the  wealth  it  brings  her.       “It  is  the  expression  of  a  woman  responding  with  calculated  charm  to  the  man   whom  she  imagines  looking  at  her  –  although  she  doesn’t  know  him.  She  is   offering  up  her  femininity  as  the  surveyed”  (Berger.  J,  1972,  p56)     We  can    look  at  Ingres  ‘Le  Grand  Odalisque’,  1814.  Here  the  model  in  the  painting   has  there  back  turned  to  the  viewer  and  is  looking  over  her  shoulder,  with  part   of  her  breast  showing  between  her  arm  and  body.  The  expression  of  the  model  is   enticing  to  the  male,  she  is  only  showing  part  of  her  body  to  the  viewer  but   enough  to  make  him  want  more,  the  expression  on  her  face  acknowledges  this   idea  as  she  looks  the  viewer  straight  in  the  eye.     In  Berger’s  Ways  of  seeing  he  compares  this  painting  to  a  modern  photograph  of   a  young  girl  in  a  magazine  advertisement  saying  that  the  expression  is  the  same   in  both  and  therefore  both  are  doing  the  same  thing  to  the  viewer.       This  is  becoming  more  present  in  todays  society,  as  younger  women  read  these   magazines  and  see  the  sort  of  images  in  this  advertisements,  they  want  to   become  that  women  and  start  to  change  to  be  more  like  them.   Charles  Lewis  has  reported       “From  the  mid  1980’s  onwards  and  present  today  American  teenagers  have   chosen  to  be  portrayed  differently  in  there  high-­‐school  yearbooks  –  the  focus  of   their  eyes  has  shifted  from  a  straightforward,  open  look  to  a  sideways  glance   resembling  glamour  poses  in  fashion  magazines”  (citied  in  Barry  1997,  268).       The  final  example  of  the  direction  of  gaze  comes  from  Eva  Herzegovina   Wonderbra  advertisement  in  1994.  IN  this  advertisement  there  is  a  women  


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

dressed in  only  lingerie  looking  down,  with  the  title  ‘Hello  Boys’.  The  idea  of  the   model  looking  down  is  to  accept  her  body  and  and  look  at  what  she  is  showing  to   the  world.  She  is  showing  that  nudity  on  the  street  is  accepted  and  acts  to  the   voyeurism  within  the  males.       These  examples  I  have  used  to  describe  the  direction  of  gaze  have  all  involved   women  –  which  is  because  the  gaze  is  mainly  seen  to  be  men  gazing  upon   women.  But  there  are  advertisements  that  use  male  models  and  still  work  in  the   same  way,  with  the  same  elements  that  of  the  women  advertisements.     Paul  Messaris  comments  that   “During  the  past  two  decades  or  so,  there  has  been  a  notable  countertrend  in   male-­‐oriented  advertising,  featuring  men  whose  poses  contain  some  of  the  same   elements  –  including  the  direct  view  –  tradionally  associated  with  women’   (Messaris  1997,  45).     Take  Dolce  &  Gabbana  advertisement  from  2007.  This  pictures  a  group  of  males   in  only  underwear  in  a  gym  stood  around  a  weights  machine.  All  the  males  are   looking  directly  at  the  viewer,  just  like  the  paintings  and  ads  that  include  women.   However  the  way  in  which  we  interpret  this  is  much  different  to  that  of  women.   Instead  of  females  looking  at  the  viewer  to  acknowledge  them  or  entice  them  in,   the  males  are  looking  at  the  viewer  in  the  way  of  authority,  its  like  they  are   saying  ‘  I  know  you  are  looking  at  me’.  The  male’s  body  here  is  seen  as  a   powerhouse,  depicted  from  the  gym  and  weights,  they  are  the  active  gender  and   the  cult  of  fitness.  This  is  showing  what  all  males  should  look  like  and  that  they   should  have  that  dominating  attitude  towards  women.       As  well  as  oil  paintings  ‘The  gaze’  was  present  in  other  means  of  mass  media.   Throughout  the  1950’s  Vue  magazine  took  on  the  same  representation  of  women   as  described  throughout  the  essay.  The  front  covers  would  always  include  a   women  model  with  very  little  clothing,  they  would  have  child  like  faces  with   adult  bodies.  This  would  appeal  to  the  male  viewers  by  having  a  natural  looking   woman.  Again  the  magazine  took  on  the  concept  of  designing  for  males  by  males;   the  women  on  the  front  of  the  magazine  are  what  the  designers  think  is  an  ideal   woman  and  how  they  should  look.  Along  with  the  front  covers  the  stories  within   the  magazines  all  played  on  sexual  notations;  the  articles  were  about  dominating   women  and  how  to  act  around  them  /  how  they  should  act  towards  you.     In  today’s  society  these  attitudes  and  values,  which  were  tradition  when  the   theorists  came  about  them,  are  now  more  widely  used  in  the  mass  media  today   though  advertising,  journalism  and  television.  But  the  way  of  seeing  women  and   how  the  images  are  used  hasn’t  changed.  Women  are  still  depicted  in  a  different  


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

way from  men  because  the  ideal  spectator  is  always  assumed  to  be  a  man  and   the  images  of  the  women  are  designed  to  flatter  him.       In  the  mass  media  today  women  are  seen  and  made  up  to  be  something  that  men   would  like  to  see  and  to  have  a  good  appearance.  This  usually  tends  to  be  big   breasts,  long  hair  and  tanned.  A  good  example  of  this  is  Katie  Price.     Culture  wants  women  to  be  and  look  like  this,  but  it  can  also  be  seen  as  a  joke   because  Katie  Price  has  been  trapped  into  what  the  media  has  said  and  taking   the  advertising  ‘ideal’  women  on  board  to  make  herself  look  like  this.  This  in  turn   is  playing  into  the  male  and  again  showing  that  male  have  the  better  power.         Another  great  examples  of  modern  advertisement  is  the  Wonderbra  ad  ‘  I  cant   cook.  Who  cares?’  Here  you  can  see  that  woman  is  more  dominant  by  making  the   eye  contact  with  the  viewer,  along  with  the  way  she  is  positioned  with  the   clothes  –  its  that  of  someone  in  power.  The  tagline  ‘I  cant  cook.  Who  cares?’  can   be  seen  as  the  expectation  that  men  have  of  women,  they  should  cook  for  them   but  if  they  cant  then  they  can  be  a  sexual  object  –  which  being  in  a  bra  sexualizes   the  female  model.    This  advertisement  works  for  both  the  male  and  female   viewer  as  the  males  will  want  their  girlfriends  to  be  like  this  and  take  on  this   dominating  role,  so  they  will  go  out  and  buy  the  bra.  The  females  can  associate   with  the  advert  and  want  be  an  assertive  and  dominant  female  and  go  out  and   the  bra  for  themselves.       The  most  male  dominant  advertisements  of  today’s  society  can  be  seen  with   Lynx.  They  have  many  advertising  campaigns  but  I  have  found  an  example  of   one,  which  uses  Kelly  Brook  as  the  model.  Here  she  is  in  a  kitchen  pulling  a   chicken  out  of  the  oven  with  the  tagline  ‘  Can  she  make  you  lose  control?’     "Clearly  this  comfort  is  connected  with  feeling  secure  or  powerful.  And  women   are  bound  to  this  power  precisely  because  visual  impressions  have  been  elevated   to  the  position  of  holding  the  key  to  our  psychic  well-­‐being,  our  social  success   and  index  to  whether  or  not  we  will  be  loved"  (Coward.  R,  ‘The  Look’)     The  position  that  women  has  been  placed  in  within  the  advert,  makes  it  more   sexual,  the  first  part  of  her  body  you  see  is  her  long  legs  and  bum,  this  draws  you   in  to  her  and  makes  you  look  at  her,  which  she  looks  back  at  you  with  a  very   submissive  face.  Again  this  is  appealing  to  the  male  gender  and  giving  them   something  to  look  at,  along  with  the  aspect  of  being  able  to  fantasize  about  the   women,  it  refers  back  to  the  idea  of  a  'Peeping  Tom'  and  the  fact  that  the  males   can  distance  themselves  from  the  image  and  women  but  still  can  think  about  her   in  the  fantasy  they  create.    


OUGD501  

Nathan Bolton  

BAGD Level  5  

The words  '  Can  she  make  you  lose  control'  are  used  in  the  advert  which  i  think   are  relating  to  that  fact  that  males  see  themselves  as  the  dominating  gender.   Even  the  fact  that  they  control  how  a  women  should  behave  around  them.  This   sentence  is  used  because  the  submissive  women  in  the  advert  is  very  different  to   what  the  male  is  used  to,  the  women  is  what  the  males  would  fantasize  about,  yet   she  is  there  in  front  of  them  doing  everything  they  think  a  women  should  do,  so   in  a  sense  they  have  lost  control  of  that.  It  also  has  sexual  connotations,  which   links  in  with  the  feel  of  the  advert.     The  quote  from  Coward,  R,  "The  Look"  describes  this  idea  of  the  women  living  up   to  the  expectation  of  the  male.   "Some  people  -­‐  those  concerned  with  maintaining  the  status  quo  -­‐  say  that  men's   scrutiny  of  women  is  just  part  of  the  natural  order  "     "Advertisements  set  in  motion  work  and  the  desire  for  products;  narcissistic   damage  is  required  to  hold  us  in  this  axis  of  work  and  consumption"  (Coward.  R,   “The  Look”)   Advertising  and  the  media,  plays  a  big  part  of  the  society  today,  children  and   young  adults  are  brought  up  around  the  media,  through  TV,  magazines  and  the   internet  and  because  of  this  they  often  look  up  to  celebrities  and  people  in  the   press  to  base  their  own  lifestyle  on.  Similar  to  the  Renaissance  when  you  would   look  up  to  the  high  status  figure  within  the  paintings.       The  same  attitudes  towards  women  are  still  being  depicted  in  modern  day   advertisements.  Women  are  being  advertised  with  the  'perfect  body',  making   females  in  society  think  that  they  need  to  be  like  this.  Males  are  still  seen  as  the   ideal  spectator,  which  makes  them  think  it  is  okay  for  them  to  look  upon  women   in  a  voyeuristic  way.         I  have  demonstrated  how  the  gaze  has  been  applied  throughout  different  times   in  society  and  that  is  still  a  significant  technique  used  in  modern  advertising   today.  

Advertising Essay  

To What Extent Is ‘The Gaze’ Theory Still Relevant In Modern Advertising

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you