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TABLE OF

CONTENTS Foreword

4

Introduction

6

Schools

8

Beach High

10

Groves High

38

Savannah High

64

Synthesis

80

Opportunities

86

Gatorball Academy

88

Conclusion

104

Our Team

106

Thank You

108

2 3

Groups make change

1. FOREWORD Do we best understand community action by reading about it in a book? In this case, yes.

What you’re reading is the result of ten weeks of collective effort, capturing the unique constraints and opportunities that emerge from direct collaboration between designers, students, teachers and educators at educational institutions, local nonprofits, and community members at large Our shared goal was to conduct the first highereducation pilot of frog’s Collective Action Toolkit (CAT) in Savannah. The CAT was created for leaders who want to bring together groups to solve problems in their community, while gaining valuable skills and knowledge along the way. The CAT encourages problem solving as a form of skill development, with activities that draw on participants’ strengths and perspectives. It’s available for use by anyone free at www.frogdesign.com/cat. While frog had initially piloted and refined activities from the toolkit with girls living in extreme poverty in sub-Saharan African and Bangladesh, this pilot would serve as an opportunity to understand how to deploy the toolkit in ways that would encourage student-led learning as part of equitable community partnerships.

Eight graduate students in Scott Boylston’s “Sustainable Design Practices” class used the CAT as a set of tools for working with local high-school students, as well as facilitating their own project work. 42 students and 3 teachers at Savannah, Beach, and Groves high schools took part in CAT activities over a series of weeks, moving from identifying community issues they were passionate about solving to coming up with potential solutions. Gator Rivers and Debra Hasan from Gatorball Academy worked with the above constituents, co-creating strategies to encourage their organization’s growth alongside the community. Together, these collaborators have generated strong insights and best practices about how the design process can be used for skill development in education, where the communication of ideas can serve as a vehicle to teach inquiry, leadership, and problem-solving for anyone. It’s our hope that you can use what follows to accelerate your efforts to do the same. David Sherwin Principal Designer, frog Co-author, Collective Action Toolkit

4 5

DMGT 740

SUSTAINABLE PRACTICES IN DESIGN WINTER QUARTER AT SCAD | 2013

PRONG 1

W. 1

W. 2

ORIGINS In response to SCAD’s Design Ethos DO-ference, frog proposes a piloting of their Community Action Toolkit (CAT) within the Waters Avenue community. Gatorball Academy, a non-profit organization that has both served the Waters Avenue Community and participated in the Design Ethos DO-ference, facilitates access to classes in three Savannah high schools for a Sustainable Practices class taught at SCAD.

PROCESS Nine graduate students delve into a complex process of weaving two ‘participatory design’ actions together. First, we facilitate students in three Savannah High Schools through the application of CAT (PRONG 1). Then, through design management tools and processes, we provide insights into the barriers to growth for the small yet ambitious non-profit organization Gatorball Academy (PRONG 2).

PRONG 1 OBJECTIVE: Through participatory design, train high school students to leverage the power of group action as a tool for creating positive change in their community, with an eye toward long-range skill building and collaboration.

PRONG 2 OBJECTIVE: Enhance information flows that improve the efficacy of Gatorball Academy.

W. 3

W. 4

W. 5

W. 6

W. 7

W. 8

W. 9

W. 10

TUES, JAN 8

THURS, MAR 14

Marina, Eric

GROVES HIGH

Nate, Naz, Alex

BEACH HIGH

Katie, Carol, Robynn

SAV HIGH Professor visit/GROVES | TUES. JAN 22 CLASS ONE/BEACH | WEDS. JAN 23 CLASS ONE/GROVES | THURS. JAN 24 CLASS ONE/SAV. HIGH | MON. JAN 28

PRONG 2 Research/GBA

FIELD OF PLAY

Research/secondary Design Development

Nate, Marina, Katie, Alex

FIELD OF PRACTICE Carol, Naz, Robynn, Eric

PARTNERS P

GATORBALL ACADEMY

P

FROG FRIENDS

P

DAVID SHERWIN

P

P

P

P

P

P

ERIN SANDERS

DAVID SHERWIN

SCAD Visit

SCAD Visit

SCAD Visit

GATEWAY 1

GATEWAY 2

GATEWAY 3

GATEWAY 4

frog Principal Designers leaves Savannah

Early research gives way to CAT immersion

Synthesis of CAT findings, early research + forward direction of Gatorball

Transition CAT Teams

2. INTRODUCTION Let’s talk about honest communication. Let’s talk about how things that affect our lives the most are sometimes things we want to talk about the least. Let’s talk about how personal empowerment rarely comes with big, dramatic splashes, but instead usually sneaks up on us in the most unexpected ways, and through the most unlikely individuals. Let’s talk about the power of sharing with people we learn to trust…not blindly trust, but trust enough to open up enough in order to let something unexpected happen. Let’s talk about how we become who we are by doing. But let’s also talk about realistic expectations. Let’s talk about how a life doesn’t usually change in any one, glorious burst, but instead changes in the many individual moments of being. Let’s talk about how the small, quiet choices that we all make can either slowly build up or slowly break down other things in our lives. Let’s talk about how living a life we desire is always defined by moment, after moment, after moment of trying…and finding others to help us keep believing. For the last ten weeks, students from 3 of Savannah’s public high schools and a graduate class at the Savannah College of Art and Design have been learning to trust not only one another, but the notion that creative discussions which remain upbeat yet sincere can nurture a sense of common purpose. The journey that’s represented in this book emerged from experiences between individuals who met during the build-up to Design Ethos 2012, SCAD’s conference on design and social innovation. The conversations

have continued since then, leading to a next point which this book explores, where Savannah high school students have taken ownership of their own future by considering the futures of others around them.

The journey began with many questions. Could designers new to social innovation facilitate the emergence of leadership skills in a group of high school students? Could frog’s Community Action Toolkit be successfully adapted to the limited time frame that a high school classroom operates under? What insights could be gleaned by working with more than one class? What modifications, abridgements and supplements to the CAT might be necessary? Could the application of the tool under these conditions provide actionable insights to a youth leadership organization? Could these insights benefit the strategic direction of such an organization? These questions have been posed, as have many others. And while we don’t have all of the answers, neither have we run out of time. Individuals new to the conversation since the beginning of this academic quarter are now conduits for further conversations. More questions will arise; more insights discovered. Let’s continue the conversation. Let’s talk.

Prof. Scott Boylston Savannah College of Art and Design

6 7

3. SCHOOLS On the website of the Savannah-Chatham County Public School System, we find their official mission and vision. Mission: To ignite a passion for learning and teaching at high levels. Vision: From school to the world: All students prepared for productive futures. The three SCCPSS high schools, Beach, Groves, and Savannah High, demonstrated these values and more during the six-week collaboration with graduate students at the Savannah Collage of Art and Design. During this period, three SCAD students facilitated a sophomore through senior year marketing class at Beach, two facilitated a class at Groves, and three students worked with a larger group of volunteer students at Savannah High. The following section will describe, in detail, the unique paths each group navigated using the Collective Action Toolkit as their compass.

8 9

It’s a Great Day to be a Beach Bulldog! Three designers walked into Beach High School hoping we would be working with bright young minds ripe for exploring a new way of thinking. We were not disappointed. Not only did the students break new ground but we, as designers of varied backgrounds and skill sets, deeply enjoyed growing our new found facilitation techniques with Frog’s Collective Action Toolkit. The following pages document our time with eleven sophomore, junior, and senior marketing students. We started with a simple question: “What change do you want to see in your community?”

Beach High School Marketing Class, M, W 9:15-10:10 am Ms. Wilson students # 11 Facilitators: Naz Mirzaie, Alex Pappalardo, Nathan Sundberg

10 11

Class 1 1-23-13

WHAT WE LEARNED

SUBSTITUTION OF THE PLANNED ACTIVITY, UNEXPECTED RESULTS

Skill Share

Class 2 1-28-13

Define Your Problem

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Ripple Effect

Two Activities

Setting an Agenda

Jam Session

They do not like to do homework, even when the teacher asks them.

It is hard for them to choose between two interesting topics.

Small group discussions are more productive than in larger groups.

They are deeply connected to both topics.

The students were really excited about working with us!

Class 6 2-11-13

What do you want to know?

Find True North

The space is challenging!

The space is a big challenge for our work.

Ms. Wilson is really interested and likes to help.

They are more comfortable with sharing than we thought.

Time frame

Having the teacher helped.

We have to narrow down our steps and adapt the activity based on time and content.

Heavy facilitation is helpful!

They want to help the whole world!

They really trust us! The class tends to follow the ideas of a dominant student

School lunch, commercials, and pizza are among the most favorite topics.

RESULTS

The interests and skills of each student.

WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO NEXT

Class 3 1-30-13

Selecting the problem they would like to work on!

Separate friends, Create the required trust, have Individual Conversations

Our approach ranges from individual concerns to collective concerns

Approach problems from different angles, Help them to think more in-depth

invented activities

modified activities

Second chances, Lowering violence, and Better security at the school are our new topics.

Ask individual opinions Determine main goal

Violence and fitness are two topics. They wrote down all their questions about the topics.

Consider two or one topic for the class?

Main questions (challenges) for their selected topics They chose their initial solutions and the people they need to ask for help.

We need excitement and action in the class. We will focus on idea generation.

The majority wants to work on violence because they believe it is engaged in their daily life. They have talked about the topic outside of class time.

We want to respond to their trust. Share all the work they have done till now with them. As homework, ask them to engage with others out of class.

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Interview 101

Class 8 2-20-13

Stroyboarding

The majority of the class forgot their homework. So, after a quick conversation we chose:

Class 9 2-22-13

Divide and Conquer

Class 10 2-25-13

Storyboarding II

Because two of students were absent, we divided them in two groups instead of three. So, we just covered two activities of violence week.

They shared personal stories.

To be quick on our feet. A back up plan is essential. Work with what we have. Do not depend on students doing their homework.

They decided on the person they want to interview and formulated questions. They learned that it is OK to not have an instant opinion

geThey planned every day of their violence week. They are planning to talk to the principal.

They are not interested or are not familiar with planning details!

5 students were absent, so we had to spend time re-delegating responsibilities for each day!

We will help them to be more realistic about the details of violence week. Explain that we will start on planning one day and go from there. (small steps toward a big target)

We need to practice the presentation for the principal.

Class #13 could be named the class of surprises and memorable achievements! The students thoroughly and deeply have been engaged with the class!

All the students had made a serious connection to the topic. They presented their parts enthusiastically, shared personal insights and gave impressive reasons to the principal for their activities

First paragraph of violence week proposal, the consolidated storyboard, and delegation of all the responsibilities for each student based on day

Second paragraph of proposal, individual responsibilities a have been assigned and they have begun designing their contribution to the presentation.

The principals was deeply impressed by the work and process the students have been following and approved their “Violence Free Week” proposal. Students will continue to work on the week in their marketing class with Ms. Wilson. The “ Violence Free Week” will happen in April!

Review what we have done and practice with them to present their parts.

We will visit the school next week to give them individual hand outs and a poster of the class process.

They definitely have a leader.

We need to find a way for writing a proposal in the class.

Practice & Presentation

Lights, camera, action and its focus on conflict, character, concept, and conclusion was really helpful for them to wrap their minds around their responsibilities. This activity, in these situations, is more productive than divide and conquer.

“Tell me more.”

Ask them to analyze other people thoughts and perspectives

Class 13 3-6-13

Individual activities better enable students to express themselves.

They were surprised by the amount of the work they need to do!

baking and t-shirts activities have been planned in detail.

Light, Camera, Action!

We had to work in the computer classroom, so did not have a chance to post all previous papers on the wall.

We Saw, We Heard

They were really interested in interviewing techniques.

Class 11 2-27-13

We need to finish the proposal. They need to practice presenting their responsibilities for the principal, so lights, camera, action will be a good choice.

Show them how much they have accomplished!

12 13

BUILD: Skill Share BUILD: Skill Share

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

BUILD: Skill Share

Introduction

Design Frog & Nike

Foundation

BUILD ACTIVITY 1

BUILD ACTIVITY 1

Skill Share Homework

1

skill share

Introductions

person write: • The name they’d like the other group

Encourage your group members to share their unique skills—and determine what skills they may need to reach their goals. BUILD: Skill Share

members to call them • The skills and talents they have and believe are relevant • One recent accomplishment

Skill Share 2

who they are and what they like. For exam-

first page and whatever they made on the second page. Take notes about what they share, and consider taking pictures as they present so everyone in the group has a record of who each person is for future group members.

4

Skill share

time 45 min. with a team of 5 people roles Participants, 1 facilitator, 1 recorder materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”), pens, camera optional: stickers, photos, markers, colored paper

frog collective action toolkit

Once everybody has shared, ask people to put up their two sheets of paper on the wall. Lead a discussion with the group and capture on a large piece of paper: • The types of skills your team has a lot of • The skills your team still needs Keep this visible where you meet, so group members are reminded of these skills.

where to next? Try another Build Activity like ‘Rings of Connection‘ to determine who your group members might know who have desired skills.

Rings of Connection

fold along line

We explained the nature of problem solving in design and then introduced frog and the Nike foundation. The students became really excited after watching the Nike “Girl Effect” movie. We asked them to individually write down their skills, likes, and a descriptive doodle of their personality. After making sure that every student was ready, they shared their papers first in small groups and then for the whole class.

On the second sheet of paper, ask each person to create something that expresses

they could create a drawing or a collage. As a ple, group, each shares unique But group members don’t havemember to use the They could also make a skit, a dance, skillspaper. and then decide sing a song about themselves, and so forth.about the skills they might need for reaching to their goals. 3 Ask each group member to share their

Our first class featured Gator Rivers and Debra Hasan from Gatorball Academy as guests. After a short introduction of the guests to the students, we took a couple of minutes to share information about the CAT and the connections between the CAT, and design in general, to students’ lives. We started with this question: “What comes to your mind when you think of design?”

Hand out two sheets of paper per group member. On the first sheet, have each

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

14 15

Skill share papers

CLARIFY: Define Your Problem CLARIFY: Define Your Problem

CLARIFY: Define Your Problem

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13 CLARIFY ACTIVITY 2

CLARIFY ACTIVITY 2

NAME GAME

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM INTERVIEWS

1

define your problem

people. Hand each team a piece of paper and ask them to write the most important problem their group is trying to solve, plus one to three key questions the team needs

Define the problem your group wants to tackle and establish key questions to answer along the way.

A Slice of Life

to answer to tackle this issue.

CLARIFY: Define Your Problem

2

Give each team 10 minutes to make a skit

Define your problem that illustrates their problem. Teams can use whatever props they can find where they meet.

The class divided into groups of three and talked about the problems they wanted to work on. Each group then agreed on their favorite topic and created a skit to present it to the class. Group 1: What college I am going to? **** Group 2: Commercial: food does not come out the way you see it on TV. ** Group 3: Pizza does not look as good as it does in the picture ***** Afterwards, all the problems were posted on the wall, and students voted for their favorite ones by putting a star next to it.

The group will divide into smaller groups. The smaller groups will decide a problem they want to solve and its related questions to be answered. Then they 3 Have each team perform their skit. After will play a skit to present it to the whole each performance, have the audience guess the problem they tried to illustrate. group. Finally the group will be agreed Ask each team to read aloud and post their problem and question on the project they wantsheet. to address.

4 time 45 min. for a team of 3 people, add 5 mins. each additional team roles Participants, 1 recorder, 1 facilitator

where to next? Try another Clarify activity like ‘Ripple Effect’ to see what impact you’d like to have with this project.

After every team has gone, ask everyone to put a star next to the problem they feel is most important. Discuss the problems that received the most stars and come to an agreement on the problem and key questions the project needs to address.

Ripple Effect

Group 2 (Aaliyah, Mikeia, De Avery)

materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens Optional: camera, markers

frog collective action toolkit

Group 3 (Joseph, Alexis, Dante) fold along line

Group 1 (Haily, Deandre, Warren)

Divide your group into teams of three

Pizza Hut does not deliver ***

Body odor ****

My hair be done

Organizing **

Jacket zipper broke

Determining life on other planets **

Reminders

Why we are so high *

What college I am going to ****

Air-condition

Why is cigs legal but weed not ****

Commercial: food does not come out the way you see on TV. ** School uniform colors

Cancer

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Why school is so long * Why school is so long *

Blocks classes

Why 5 days school but 2 days of weekend? **

School lunches ****

Pizza does not look good like in picture ***** Why is Subway advertising a $5 long when it costs $ 6.05? *

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

16 ters is really all the compu The space with easily be n e students ca challenging. Th e activities. They feel too m th distracted fro d with their their spots an in le comfortab them from ed to separate friends. We ne this space.

Define your problem- Practicing skits

h about think that muc t no do ey Th don’t yet and perhaps “serious” issues project! r tential for thei realize the po

17

CLARIFY: Ripple Effect CLARIFY: Ripple Effect

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

CLARIFY: Ripple Effect

PRESENTATION

MINDMAPPING

(RECAP PREVIOUS ACTIVITIES)

CLARIFY ACTIVITY 1

CLARIFY ACTIVITY 1

RIPPLE EFFECT HOMEWORK 1

ripple effect

Making Connections The class started with a presentation about CAT and how it can be helpful to the class. It was followed up with a group created mind map about “What college I am going to ****” (as a follow up of their previous session- define your problem). Then, the group moved to a new room with a more traditional space to work on the ripple effect activity. As a group, the students came up with a topic they would like to tackle and developed a diagram of project impacts in different levels.

Decide what kind of impact you want your group to have—from improving the lives of individuals in your community to changing your country or the world. CLARIFY: Ripple Effect

ripple effect 2

Have each team write around the first circle the effect they’d like to have on close friends or family. Draw a larger circle around

these names and label it ‘individuals’ . The group decide about the impacts they would like to have on their close friends, families, community or even the world. 3

Write the effects the team would like to have on their community around the individuals circle. Draw a larger circle around these newly added affects and label it ‘community.’ Continue the exercise for the effects the team wants to have on their country, nation, and world.

4 time 30 min. for a team of 3 people, add 5 mins. each additional team roles Participants, 1 recorder, 1 facilitator

frog collective action toolkit

The groups are working on their ripple effect diagrams.

where to next? Try another Clarify activity like ‘Define Your Problem’ to better understand the problem you want to solve.

Define Your Problem

Ask everybody to post their Ripple Effects on the wall and talk about their similarities and differences. Choose a circle to focus on and the effects you’d like to see. Write these on a clean sheet of paper with when you’d like to see this happen. Put this sheet on the wall so the team can use it later.

fold along line

materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens Optional: camera, markers

Mind map activity for “Going to College”

Divide your group into teams of three people. Hand each team a piece of paper and ask them to write a question they’re trying to work through at the top. Then draw a circle in the center of the page that contains the names of the group members.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Students presented their work to the class

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Second chances

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

Better security at the school It cr will e le ate str ss es wo and s pe rry op in le.

Churches to thank God for another chance

Aunt tenesha

pe

Moral boost

Sc

Ho

Bett com er mun ity Ricky

Mikeia Deuntrice Jerode

The students will have better behavior around the community and the school.

Better economy

People in our neighborhood

Pe o w ple be ho liev in yo e u

Opportunities to get jobs

Teachers

Lowering violence

Ma

Principle Uncles

School companions Sematha & Robert Myles

Ne i bo ghurs

The schoo ls in Savan nah w ill have hope and faith in the se curity .

V CB P TV

yor

C co ity un cil

Ne ig (us hbo be ed t rs ap o & M oli c Sm rs. art ) Pastor

Boyfriend

Judge Cousin

Grandmother

ark nP Ca VP hers CH Teac g n u . Yo (Mrs rtis . Cu Father Mrs Mr. s) on Future imm daughter and S son

Deandre Dante Aaliyah Warren

Mother

Aunties Hell

Brother & Sister

Pre

sid

ve

in le op n Pe riso p

Principle (Mr.Muhommad, (Mogwood, & Milton)

Commissioner

B. O .E .

rn

or

18 19

West SAV East SAV

Go

Direct effect

HVP

Girlfriend

Niece/nephew

Outside community

Cousins

It will also keep the neighborhood safe for the people.

Outside community

Community

Joseph Hailey Alexis

Sisi, Ivana,

ity un l m m hoo ) o C (Sc ni m alu

y

Cit

Sisters & brothers

Community

Outside community

Ripple effect- The first circle represents the participating students.

Aunts

Direct effect

Direct effect Community

ol Friends

Daddy

Alex

Grandparents on both sides

God family

ho

e Th ool y h sc urit ct c se affe er ll th i o w e ls th hoo sc

School neighborhood

hale

en

t

Class 1 1-23-13

Homework

Class 2 1-28-13

Find true north

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

What do you want to know?

Honing In

Find true north

The class began with a presentation of their ripple effect activity homework. It led to a very insightful discussion in class and the final topic that group selected. In previous classes, we had heard that pizza delivery was an issue for the community, but in this class we discovered the reason: deliveries are often robbed, so restaurants no longer deliver to certain areas of Savannah. The discussion continued into the true north activity. Each member stood in the middle of a circle and picked one of the topics that had been posted on the wall and shared her/his reasons.

Homework presentation (Ripple effect of lowering violence )

The group stands in a circle and each member talks about the goals she wants to achieve. Then the group will decide the most favorite goals among all the members.

Sharing ideas with group in a circle

The discussed topics

What do you need to know?

Fitness

Lowering violence

Second chance

Better security at the school

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

What Do We Need to Know? Fitness and Violence had been selected as the true north topics, then the class was divided into two groups, each tackling one of the topics. They were asked to write down questions about all the unclear aspects of the topic.

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

? ??

Class 13 3-6-13

What do you want to know? Group members try get a better grasp of the topic by quick brainstorming about all the questions they need to answer.

“I do not want to get fat like my mon and aunt!” “You can’t take the hood out of people.”

20 21 ns k more questio We should as eas, id r ei th t h abou and go in dept such as: ? think like this “Why do you t it!” Tell more abou l e surface leve lik s em se What go ay actually topics to us m more and be much er much deep complex. The questions from “What do you want to know” activity

PLAN: Set an Agenda

PLAN: Set an Agenda

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

PLAN: Set an Agenda

Class 6 2-11-13

PLAN ACTIVITY 1

Voting for your favourite

questions

Setting agenda

Understanding the Issues

PLAN ACTIVITY 1 1

setting an agenda

At the top of the sheet of paper, write the following question: “What challenges are we trying to solve right now so we can

Identify the most pressing challenges your team needs to tackle, then agree on the steps you should take to address them.

accomplish our overall goal?” Have the group members write answers to this question underneath it on sticky notes.

PLAN: Set an Agenda

2

following questions for that challenge:

• Why is this challenge important to solve? • Who needs to be involved to solve it? The group discussed and decided the • When do we want to resolve it? • What hurdles stand in our way? main challenges they want to work on • How can we remove those hurdles? and the required steps to take for these 3 Take a step back and look at everyone’s challenges. answers as a group. Ask these questions:

• Which challenges do you need to address most urgently? • What patterns or themes are visible across all of these challenges? • Do you see ways to resolve multiple challenges with similar efforts?

4

Why do people bring violence to schools?

What it is the reason for violence?

Why do people do not exercise?

time 40 min. roles Participants, 1 recorder materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens optional: camera, markers, Post-Its

Why does the school not have a class that helps people get in shape?

Afterwards, the class was divided into two groups and picked two of the main challenges to work with further.

where to next? Try another Plan activity like ‘Divide & Conquer’ to split up some of these tasks up between people.

frog collective action toolkit

From your group discussion, write down the action items your team should take on next to address the challenges you’ve identified as most urgent.

Divide & Conquer

“We only have McDonald’s in our neighborhood, so we don’t have healthy options” fold along line

Take each Post-It note and put it in the center of a new sheet of paper. Answer the

Setting an agenda

We gave the students the list of the questions they had created in the previous sessions and asked them to individually choose the two most important challenges they need to begin. The results were the following four: •

Post one sheet of paper on the wall and have everybody gather around it.

When you’re done in this activity area:

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when

Try moving to Seek New Understanding activities to determine who to talk to next, or Imagine More Ideas to come up with

you transition to another activity area.

more solutions.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

e part of the The time fram t to hard for studen activities are ! ith w k or dw understand an impacts aware of the They are not up the ve! Opening they could ha ng is ni an detail pl discussions to really helpful!

Setting an agenda- The class is working in two groups on violence and fitness topics.

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Violence Why do people bring violence to schools? What are our Challenges?

What is the reason for violence?

Why is this challenge important to solve?

So that we can bring the violence to an end.

Who needs to be involved to solve it?

The city of Savannah, Church people, Police, People who want to see others change, Teachers, Parents, Instigators, Gangs, and younger peers.

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

Fitness

Why do people not exercise?

Why do sTUDENTS NOT use the exercise classes at school?*

Because people can be healthy and in shape, fight with obesity, it will help everyone

Because people can be healthy and in shape, fight with obesity, it will help everyone

Nutritionist

Nutrition teacher, School store

When do we want to resolve it?

22 What hurdles stand in our way?

How can we remove those hurdles?

Movies, and TV shows, Games, Make videos, Encourage people, Do interview with teachers and students

Lower self-steam, more technology, jobs, games, busy life, depressed, time, kids, lazy

It is mandatory, kids have to participate in gym, students just go there and sit there to escape classes.

Kids K-12 (Park), anti depressions, stop using technology, no electricity, schedule, baby sitter

4th block people who pass go and help people who fails study for test, healthy food from school store, Zumba * The students decided to change their topic from “Why does the school not have a class that helps people get in shape?� to the above question.

23

IMAGINE: Jam Session IMAGINE: Jam Session

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

IMAGINE: Jam Session

Select final topic for all the class

(Lowering Violence)

Jam Session

IMAGINE ACTIVITY 1

IMAGINE ACTIVITY 1 1

jam session

Opportunities

directly related to your goal, and will inspire your group to immediately generate ideas.

Jam Session

IMAGINE: Jam Session

2

paper on the wall and draw a large arrow on it. On one end of the arrow, write “Easy.” On the other end, write “Impossible.”

3

Divide group into two teams. For 20–25 minutes, ask each team to write or sketch ideas related to the topic on individual pieces of paper. Create a range of ideas that are possible, impossible and anything in between. Be sure to give each idea a title.

4

roles Participants, 1 facilitator materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger and smaller sheets, pens optional: camera, markers

where to next?

Grow an Idea

fold along line

Jam Session- So proud of their achievements

When both teams are done, share the title and a one-sentence description of each idea with the group. Have the presenter to pin the idea where it belongs on the Easy to Impossible arrow. When everyone has presented, ask them to put a star next to the idea they’re most excited about. Ideas with the most stars can be pursued.

Try another Imagine activity like ‘Grow an Idea’ to bring one of these starred concepts into another round of ideation.

frog collective action toolkit

Jam Session- The class is posting their ideas and discussing about their possibilities.

Have the activity facilitator put a piece of

The group create ideas without any limitation and collectively sort them based on easy to difficult range.

time 45 min.

“I want to make sure my kid has a chance to walk freely in her neighborhood!”

captured to date. Identify a topic the team would like to explore. A good topic will be

Create as many ideas as possible with your group, exploring a range of different solutions and building on each other’s ideas in a supportive manner.

We started the class with a discussion about the necessity of working on one topic due to the time limitations. Each student was asked to select between the two final topics and shared his/her reasons with the class. Lowering violence was a unanimous topic among the 11 students. They explained the topic is important for them as it is an inescapable part of their daily lives. “So many people are being killed everyday!”

Look at all of your group’s ideas that you’ve

When you’re done: Try out some Make Something Real activities to bring your ideas to life!

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

Violence

** *

Public Spanking for Criminal and Suspects More police Enforcement

Easy

* * **Play * * * *** Community * * Service * * * * Commercials cHU * * R aFFA CH IRS * ASSEMBLIES OF FORMER gangs or victims of violence

Community Gathering

*

* *

Campaign Violence for downtown

** *

Speakers in School

*

** * Dress *for

*

** SchoolEvent Fund raiser

*

*

Tv Shows

Block Party

* * *

Down Violence

* * * * *

* * *

Fundraiser

*

*

ut

kO

* *

Coo

Better of Version 2nd amendment Public ing Speak

***

Violence Week

* * * * ***

*

Survey on Violence

Violence Website

Impossible

Design T-Shirts

* *** ** Guns for k Par MoneyEvent

* * *

* *

Beyond Scared or Straight Juvies down Students going path wrong

24 25

*

National Hug Day

* * *

SEEK: Interviewing 101 SEEK: Interviewing 101

Class Class1 11-23-13 1-24-13

SEEK: Interviewing 101

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

SEEK ACTIVITY 2

INTERVIEWING 101

SEEK ACTIVITY 2 1

interviewing 101

Reaching Outward

SEEK: Interviewing 101

2

Students roleplaying interviews

Divide your entire group into pairs. Ask the people in each pair to read out loud each list and select one of the people they would like to interview. Ask the pair to write down at least five questions they’d like to ask that person at their interview. Encourage each team to ask follow-up questions like “Why?” to provide suprising insight.

INTERVIEWING 101

Plan an interview from start to finish, then go into your community and talk with people about issues that matter to pair will roleplay the interview. The them. 3 Each teammate who is being asked questions will provide feedback about whether the questions make sense and suggest additional questions to ask. The pair will update the interview questions accordingly.

4 time 1 hr. for a group of 10 roles Participants, 1 facilitator, 1 recorder materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”)

where to next? Try another Seek activity like ‘We Saw, We Heard’ to share what you discovered in your interviews.

We Saw, We Heard

or larger, pens optional: camera, markers

Bring the entire group back together. Ask each pair to roleplay their interview again, soliciting feedback from the whole group. Then task group members to do their interviews when they leave the group meeting, encouraging them to take good notes at each interview to share with the rest of the group.

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to Imagine More Ideas to fold along line

Students brainstorming interview questions

a list of people that struggle with issues related to the goal you want to achieve. Write down: • Why you would want to talk with them • What you would learn by talking to them • Where you would want to meet with them

Plan an interview from start to finish, then go into your community and talk with people about issues that matter to them.

Now that the students had cohered around a topic, we challenged them to reach out beyond the classroom. The students brainstormed individuals within their homes and/or larger community who they could interview to search for insights and experiences that may help them better understand the issues involved. They also wrote down potential questions for their interviewees. After brainstorming, they broke off into pairs to role play and offer each other feedback. Finally, the class came back together as a group to help each individual further refine their interviewing technique. We gave out disposable cameras at the end of class, and asked the students to document their interviews over the weekend and to report to the rest of the class the following Monday.

Ask your individual group members to write

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

act on something in your interviews that inspired a potential solution.

frog collective action toolkit

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Students roleplaying interviews

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-18-13

Class 9 2-20-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

Facilitation Needs Interviewing 101 was an activity in which most of the students seemed to benefit from one-on-one attention. Once they better understood that the activity was designed simply to search for new information, whatever that may be, they were able to dive into the task.

Students role playing interviews for the class

Students role playing interviews for the class

e termine th ling to de had a g g u tr s ts e studen ws so we s. We saw th ns for the intervie t practice o sti wing bes ie best que rv te in on on e mini-less e class, w front of th e th in hite board On the w better stions- It’s e u : q te o n ro r w so y from ye ” Stay awa or “Why? .” .. d n a , s e “y , k s to a .” me more Ask “Tell

Students role play their future interviews to get feedback from the class.

26 27

MAKE: Storyboarding 101

Class Class1 11-23-13 1-24-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

MAKE ACTIVITY 1

MAKE ACTIVITY 1 1

storyboarding 101

HOMEWORK REVIEW STORYBOARDING

Drawing Ideas

idea from a previous activity to storyboard. They should discuss how to tell this idea in

Create a visual story, much like a comic strip, that explains how an idea would impact people in your community over time.

a story to another person: • Who are the main characters? • What specific challenge is being solved? • What steps do they go through?

MAKE: Storyboarding 101

2

Post a large piece of paper for each team.

Have each group draw four storyboard Storyboarding frames (squares) on the 101 paper. They should write a few words below each frame

to describe what should happenlike in the a comic Create a visual story, much scene they are about to draw or collage strip, that explains how an idea would from images in magazines. Follow the outline in included in Step 3. impact people your community over time.

We ventured into the Make It Real activity section during our eighth session at Beach. Unfortunately, only a couple of students had completed the homework so we could not continue with our planned activity, We Saw, We Heard. Instead, we went ahead with our backup activity, Storyboarding. We started by gaining consensus about one of the most popular ideas from the Jam Session with which to move forward during our short time together. Almost unanimously, they chose to pursue the idea of Violence Week. Since both groups from class five had mentioned that at some point they wanted to speak to the principal, Mr. Muhammad, about their ideas, we framed the activity as a tool for creating a tangible plan to present.

Divide your group into teams of one to three people. Ask each group to select an

3

Have the team illustrate each frame: • First frame: Introduce the characters

• Second frame: Create a scene that shows the problem where it happens • Third frame: Show a close-up of one of the characters using your idea • Final frame: What happens after the character uses it?

4 time 45 min. for a group of 5 roles Participants, 1 facilitator

Try another Make activity, like ‘Write a Blurb,’ to shape the story you just drew into clear, crisp statements you can share.

Have each group share their storyboards and pin them up on the wall. Have a discussion about what works about each storyboard and what potentially is missing that could expressed in a different way.

Write a Blurb

fold along line

materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens optional: camera, markers, collage materials, e.g. photos, magazines, colored paper, stickers

where to next?

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to the Plan for Action activity area to plan how and when you could realize your idea for the community.

frog collective action toolkit

Excerpt from one of the teams storyboards

Students present their storyboards

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Students present their storyboards

Class 7 2-13-13

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 8 2-18-13

Class 9 2-20-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

28 29

Storyboards for possible frameworks for Violence Week

PLAN: Divide and Conquer PLAN: Divide and Conquer

Class Class1 11-23-13 1-24-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

PLAN: Divide and Conquer

PEP TALK

SCHEDULE REMINDER

DIVIDE AND CONQUER

RIPPLE EFFECT

PLAN ACTIVITY 2

PLAN ACTIVITY 2 1

divide and conquer

Plan Refinement To help the students start to think about the details of a very large and ambitious project, we divided them into two teams and asked them each to pick one activity from the whole of Violence Week to plan in detail. We urged them to answer the big questions: Who, What, Where, When, Why and How. Having these six questions written large on the board helped the students maintain momentum throughout the somewhat unfamiliar and challenging activity. They were also asked to delegate responsibilities for each part of the days events.

Divide and Conquer

PLAN: Divide and Conquer

2

3

Split your group into their specific committees. Have them go to different parts of the room and meet with their committee. Ask the committee members to write down the responsibilities, challenges and goals they should tackle. If there is only one person in a committee, they should join another group.

4 time 1 hr. roles Participants, 1 facilitator, multiple recorders materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens optional: camera, markers

where to next? Try another Plan activity like ‘Set the Pace’ to establish your future meeting schedules. . Set the Pace

frog collective action toolkit

Students practicing presenting their storyboard

Have someone from your team write these task names on separate sheets of paper.

will be different committees to take SplitThese your group care of a specific responsibilitiesinto for your smaller teams that Ask people to write their initials can group. plan and execute specific action with the name of the committee they want to join. items.

fold along line

At the end of class, each team practiced presenting their day (t-shirt or bake sale) while Naz asked questions in the role of Mr. Muhammad .

Split your group into smaller teams that can plan and execute specific action items.

Gather your group around a sheet of paper. Ask everyone to write on the sheet every activity they’re doing right now to help the group reach their shared goal. Have the group look at all the activities and identify which are similar and can be grouped together. Give these similar tasks a name. Keep it simple, like ‘recruiting.’

Students practicing presenting their storyboard

Have each committee write down specific tasks to help them reach their group’s goals. Prioritize the activity list as a committee, taking at least 15 minutes to write action items based on their top five to ten priority tasks. Have team members initial which action items they’ll take on. Then have each team post and share their plan.

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to Seek New Understanding activities to determine who to talk to next, or Imagine More Ideas to come up with more solutions.

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-18-13

Class 9 2-20-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

Existing ideas for violence week • • • • • • • • • •

Opening Assembly (Intro) Games Selling food Bake sale Play T-shirt station Pep rally/ music Lunchroom/ cookout Donations Public speaking

Bake sale

Item for sale?

muffins cookies/ brownies Doughnuts cupcakes/cake ice cream lemon squares Violence Education. We can put paper on these items, stating facts.

Why?

Fundraiser School courtyard

T-shirt Sale T-Shirts

To spread the word to everyone about stopping violence. Hopefully, have the community and school support about stopping violence. Fundraiser School courtyard

When?

During lunch hour

Where?

Thursday on 4th block and on lunch

31

We can get stuff from Sam’s. Go to Mr. Bonnell for t-shirt designs to print off press on.

We use the money from the bake sale to get the shirts.

How?

Donations can come from our parents, the church, organizations, and teachers

30

Have the kids wear the t-shirts on Friday at the cookout!

MAKE: Storyboarding 101

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

MAKE ACTIVITY 1

MAKE ACTIVITY 1 MAKE: Write a Blurb

WRITE PROPOSAL CONSOLIDATE PREVIOUS STORYBOARDS

PRESENTATION PRACTICE Sstoryboarding

1

101

idea from a previous activity to storyboard. They should discuss how to tell this idea in

MAKE: Write a Blurb

Create a visual story, much like a comic strip, that explains how an idea would impact people in your community over time. MAKE: Write a Blurb

Proposal Creation

• Who are the main characters? • What specific challenge is being solved? • What steps do they go through?

MAKE: Storyboarding 101 MAKE ACTIVITY 3

MAKE ACTIVITY 3 1

write a blurb Craft a simple story that explains to other people why your group’s idea is relevant, then practice sharing it with others. MAKE: Write a Blurb

2

3

2

Split your entire group into teams of three people or less. Have each team select an idea they want to work with. Multiple teams can work on the same idea or different ideas at the same time. (Note: This activity can also be done by individuals rather than teams, depending on how many people are in your group.)

4 time 1 hr. for a group of 5 roles Participants, 1 facilitator, 1 recorder

where to next? Try another Make activity like ‘It’s Like, It’s Not Like’ to help other people understand your group’s idea.

materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens optional: camera, markers

It’s Like, It’s Not Like

Over 10 minutes, ask each team think through and discuss: • What the idea is • Who the idea is for • How it will change the community • Why it will help the community • When it will happen • Where it will be used

scene they are about to draw or collage

from images into in magazines. The group is split twoFollow totheplan outline included in Step 3. different aspects of their presentation .

Have each team write a one-sentence description about why the idea is great. Then each team should spend 20 minutes writing a paragraph telling the story of

3

time 45 min. for a group of 5 roles Participants, 1 facilitator

the problem where it happens • Third frame: Show a close-up of one of the characters using your idea • Final frame: What happens after the character uses it? Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

4 www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Try another Make activity, like ‘Write a Blurb,’ to shape the story you just drew into clear, crisp statements you can share.

Have each group share their storyboards and pin them up on the wall. Have a discussion about what works about each storyboard and what potentially is missing that could expressed in a different way.

Write a Blurb

fold along line

materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens optional: camera, markers, collage materials, e.g. photos, magazines, colored paper, stickers

where to next?

Have the team illustrate each frame: • First frame: Introduce the characters • Second frame: Create a scene that shows

Ask each team to share their story. Then have each team post their written story on the wall. Gather the entire group around each written story and talk about the elements of each story that stood out and the qualities of a strong story. Have one of your group members write down what worked and what could be improved in each story.

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to the Build Your Team activity area to recruit more people for your group using these stories.

Post a large piece of paper for each team.

Have each group draw four storyboard Proposal and framesIdeation (squares) on the paper. They should write a few words below each frame Modified Storyboarding to describe what should happen in the

the idea. Experiment with the tone of your story by pretending to be journalists, the town preacher, your city’s mayor, and so forth. Give your story a snappy title.

frog collective action toolkit

At the end of class, each team presented their ideas both for feedback and as practice for the upcoming presentation to Mr. Muhammad.

a story to another person:

MAKE: Write a Blurb

fold along line

The students began by individually writing on post-its reasons why they want to do Violence Week and how it will benefit participants. Then one student volunteer, using the post-its for material, wrote the first half of the proposal for the principal. Concurrently, using ideas generated from the two storyboards from last session, the rest of the class created one comprehensive storyboard outlining five days of activities for Violence Week.

Divide your group into teams of one to three people. Ask each group to select an

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to the Plan for Action activity area to plan how and when you could realize your idea for the community.

frog collective action toolkit

A student writing a draft of the proposal

Students consolidating ideas and delegating responsibilities

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-18-13

Class 9 2-20-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 13 3-6-13

d better focuse students stay g this in ur D . It seems the ur fo ps fewer than rd when in grou and had a ha st focus early lo ey th , ity tiv ac c. ck to the topi time getting ba are working inded that they m re r te af t, Bu for a project eir own idea e success together on th es and that th at sm to as cl r ei for th lves, they got lely on themse so ed . nd ss pe de progre e impressive work and mad

32 33

MAKE: Lights, Camera, Action! MAKE: Lights, Camera, Action!

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Class 3 1-30-13

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13 MAKE: Lights, Camera, Action!

Class 6 2-11-13

MAKE ACTIVITY 2

Proposal

light camera action

Practice Makes Perfect As one of us worked with Aaliyah to finish the proposal for the Violence Free Week, the other group gathered to discuss our last CAT activity. Each student chose one of the Violence Free days and then, as the presentations developed, the information consisted of:

Instead of developing a skit, we asked them to create a two minute presentation which has the conflict, concept, characters, and conclusion factors, for the meeting with principal.

lights, camera, action!

Split your entire group into teams of three people or less. Have each team select an idea they want to work with. Multiple teams can work on the same idea or different

Use characters, scenes, and conversations to tell a meaningful tale about your idea to an audience.

ideas at the same time. (Note: This activity can also be done by individuals rather than teams, depending on how many people are in your group.)

MAKE: Lights, Camera, Action! 2

Give each team ten minutes to decide how to talk about their idea to other people in the group through a story. Each team needs to think about: • Conflict: What problem you will address • Character: The people helped by it • Concept: How the idea should be shared • Conclusion: Its larger impact on the world

Light, Camera, Action! The members develop a story of their interested topic with including factors such as conflict, characters, concept, and 20 minutesthe to craftskits a three- will be shared Conclusion. Then 3 Give each team to five-minute skit that expresses their idea in group toa story. getProvide feedbacks. through them an additional five minutes after they’ve planned their skit out to practice it and come up with a title for it. Encourage each team to include all of their team members in the skit and use any relevant props.

4 time 1 hr. for a group of 5 roles Participants, 1 facilitator, 1 recorder materials Printer-size paper (8.5” x 11”) or larger, pens, camera optional: markers

where to next? Try another Make activity like ‘Prototype It’ to build an idea from scratch.

Prototype It

fold along line

Conflict (the topic they want to address), Concept (the activities they propose for their special day), Character (the people they need to be involved in their proposed activity), and a Conclusion (The results they would like to pursue by that activities).

MAKE ACTIVITY 2 1

frog collective action toolkit

Ask each team to perform their skit. As one team shares their story, the other teams should take notes, photograph, sketch, or videotape the performance for future reflection. After the skits, have a discussion about what everyone learned about the ideas in the stories and what it would take to bring them further to life.

When you’re done in this activity area: Try moving to the Seek New Understanding activity area to determine how people in the real world might use these ideas.

Don’t forget to fill out a Learning Card when you transition to another activity area.

www.frogdesign.com/CAT

Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 13 3-6-13

34 35

Light, camera, action- Students are presenting their assignments to the class.

Class 1 1-23-13

Class 2 1-28-13

Overview of all the previous activities

Class 3 1-30-13

practicing roles getting feedbacks

Preparing for the Big Day! The class focused on reviewing the activities they have done during the past 11 classes. Afterwards, each student practiced alone, presented their part to the class and received and offered feedback.

Getting ready for the big day!

Class 4 2-4-13

Class 5 2-6-13

Class 6 2-11-13

Class 7 2-13-13

Class 8 2-20-13

Meeting the principal presentation

Class 9 2-22-13

Class 10 2-25-13

Class 11 2-27-13

Class 12 3-5-13 Class 13 3-6-13

questions and answers dancing portrait shots interviews

Bulldog Pride! Mr. Muhammad, the Beach high school principal, showed up to our class before the students arrived with his laptop and notebook in tow. He seemed enthusiastic and serious about the meeting. Nervousness was hidden behind confident smiles; “Will all the hard work pay off?!”. Mr. Muhammad was greeted and the presentation started with an overview of the process of the past 12 classes by Hailey and then each student presented their roles for Violence Free week to Mr. Muhammad. He listened patiently to the presentation, said that he is really impressed by all of the work, and the process the students went through and then asked some questions. He asked: “How did you guys reach an agreement about the violence topic? Tell me about the process? How did you keep your concentration through all these previous sessions?...” The responses of each student proved that they deeply embraced the process and all have a personal connection to the topic. Even one student, who is usually very quiet, impressed all of us by strongly advocating for his ideas and the importance of Violence Free Week. There were many truly confident and proud smiles in the room! He approved of the proposal, thanked us and promised to get back to the class with his feedback on the proposal. Our last class ended with dancing, happy students!

36 37

“Kids always complain about the school system, it is great to hear a solution for once!” -Mr. Muhammad

Go Future Minded Dreamers! We start the day as visitors. Every Tuesday and Thursday we enter Robert W. Groves High School, we sign our names, we get a visitor tag, and we head for room 600 to spend 55 minutes with 11 students in Ms. Dawson’s 9th-12th grade class. Then we leave … as something more than just visitors. There is a reason for being at Groves High; a reason that we hope is meaningful, fun, and larger than ourselves. We are there to help unleash the power of the students. Together, we want to learn about the nature and value of human connection, crossing boundaries, the process of sharing perspectives and building off of each other’s ideas. Is this ordinary? Have students been given the power to address challenges through their own unique perspective?

Groves High School Nutrition Class, T, Th 8:25-9:20 am Ms. Dawson # students: 11 Facilitators: Eric Green, Marina Petrova

What We Are Hoping to Achieve •

Learn the process

Learn to better work in groups

Become better problem solvers

Understand our needs

Imagine possibilities

Learn to use the skills on our own

Learn how to engage people in a conversation

Dive beyond the obvious

Have fun

Working in teams

38 39

Class 1 1-24-13

Ripple Effect

SUBSTITUTION OF THE PLANNED ACTIVITY, UNEXPECTED RESULTS WHAT WE LEARNED

Find True North

Class 3 1-31-13

Define Your Problem

The most common goals: work as a team, do something for the community, open up , have fun

Define Your Problem

Knowledge Fest

Class 4 2-5-13

Define Your Problem

Class 5 2-7-13

Ball Game

Because some of the students were missing the previous class, we had to repeat the mindmapping exercise and the students were not very engaged.

We came up with the game to provoke brainstorming.

Changing the work place enlivens the class energy.

Introducing an element of play keeps the students engaged and focused.

It was a part of Jam session, but was fast and kept the students engaged.

Class 6 2-12-13

Knowledge Fest

The students asked to see the Girl Effect video again.

The students were engaged in the activity more than usual.

Some students did not do their homework.

The students have never done anything to make them think about the effects their actions have on the community or the world.

Student groups came up with three ideas for positive actions: RESULTS

Class 2 1-29-13

- Homework cafe

The students really liked the pep talk video. When everybody sits around the table, rather than in the auditorium, it is much easier to have discussions.

By asking a follow up question on Adam’s wish to have a talent show at school we found out that the students liked drama. They enjoyed doing skits.

The students find it easy to express their ideas visually. We learn more about them from their drawings.

Mind mapping was very useful to break the very general initial ideas into more specific ones.

Students created individual and group goals.

3 mind maps and more specific ideas.

They came up with a team name - Future Minded Dreamers and class rules.

Adam talks about giving courage to members of the women’s shelter.

Working in a big group is not productive. The students get more excited when the ideas look more real.

In previous food drives the students would only bring food, but they would have no contact with the people who the food was intended for.

Students are motivated by competition. Giving them the countdown and asking them to be more specific in their answers produces better results.

The students find the homeless people scary and stinky. We have two winning ideas - bringing canned food to the homeless and having a dress down day to raise money for school supplies. Krissy refers to the class list of rules - “No idea is stupid.”

- Help build and repaint houses

The students unanimously chose to go for the bringing food to the homeless idea. The ball game produces good ideas about how to make bringing food to the homeless more different and interesting.

Students developed a lot of good questions about what they wanted to know about the homeless people.

WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO NEXT

- Fundraising for college fees

We would like to explain what the project is and what the process are about. We want to keep the students inspired.

We will start thinking about a common goal.

We will try to come up with a class wide idea.

We would like to have the students grow the ideas and choose one. To keep them engaged we had to come up with something fun and fast. We would like to make the idea more personal.

We try to contact Second Harvest and look for potential places that the students can go to.

The students wrote their answers, but we did not have time to read the answers. We will discuss the answers next class.

Class 7 2-14-13

Knowledge Fest II

Class 8 2-19-13

Interviewing 101

Class 9 2-21-13

Mr. Heery’s Visit

Ms. Dawson surprises us with her personal story. Mr. Heery reconnects with school faculty from past years.

Class 10 2-26-13

Discussion

Class 11 2-28-13

Cards

Class 12 3-5-13

Divide and Conquer

None of the opportunities we were hoping to discuss seemed to work, so we spent the class going over the idea and potential new places.

The students did not ask Mr. Heery very many questions. They were unusually quiet . The balloon video showed the class that a simple and tangible idea can have a large impact.

The students are interested in developing a personal connection with the homeless.

Community issues can be more personal than we think.

Setting an Agenda

The class was smaller which allowed for more participation from students who were usually quiet.

The students are very creative and enjoyed making cards.

If we make a field trip, it has to be during class hours.

Adam told the class about a place we could use to feed the homeless. Tiana told the class about a place close by where they seemed to serve food to homeless people.

The video on homeless children was very emotional. We are getting more personal responses from the students.

Students learn from Mr. Heery that homeless people in Savannah are not really hungry. They are in need more of support.

Instead of bringing food, the students decide to give clothes and care packages to the homeless. The students decided to make cards as well.

Each student created a card for a homeless person.

Krissy suggested we played the Ball Game or Ripple Effect with Mr. Heery.

Mr. Marvin Heery is coming to next class.

- Introducing the team when they meet the homeless

40

- Facilitate a conversation

41

- Have games to play

The students think they might need to talk to the principal or his assistant for help. We contact Mr. Marvin Heery, a homelessness activist and ask him to visit the class.

The students came up with specific steps for three main tasks:

Ms. Dawson will check a couple of shelters, Mr. Heery will think about potential places the students could visit.

We continue to search for opportunities to meet with the homeless.

We continue to search for opportunities to meet with the homeless.

Class 1 1-24-13

INTRODUCTIONS

Class 2 1-29-13

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

RIPPLE EFFECT

The Ripple Effect The first day we were inspired to jump right in and ask the students what positive effect could they have on their community. After meeting, introducing ourselves, sharing, and overview, we presented the Ripple Effect activity. After the students gained an understanding of the activity, they lead the process. It was quickly learned that this was something new and their own ideas were valued. We ended with a modification to the Ripple Effect. The class was brought together to discuss all three positive actions and their impact on the world. It is our hope that the students realize that there is something greater than ourselves and that everyone has something to give.

Fig. 1 The class was split into teams of three. Each team had to come up with a positive action and think about the effect it would have on their friends and family and the community.

RIPPLE EFFECT Decide what kind of impact you want your group to have - from improving the lives of individuals in your community to changing the country or the world.

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

42 43

Students’ Ripple Effect diagrams and list of effects.

Class 1 1-24-13

RECAP

OVERVIEW OF CAT

Class 2 1-29-13

PEP TALK

RULES OF THE GAME

Class 3 1-31-13

FIND TRUE NORTH

Set the Stage In order to set the stage for the coming weeks, we saw value in emphasizing to the students that this was their time, their space and that we would do our best to help them. The day began with the students coalescing around a team name - Future Minded Dreamers.

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

HOMEWORK

FIND TRUE NORTH As a group come to an agreement on the goals you want to achieve and when you want to achieve them.

Individual goals were made along with a list of student defined class rules. Building on team dynamics we shared the value in consultation and the power of coming together as groups.

Pep Talk by Kid President

We wanted to set the tone on a high note, so we looked to Kid President for a fun, motivational speech. They loved it so much that we decided to show something inspiring every class.

We wanted to give the students more context and understanding for the activities that we were going to do with them, so we created a diagram for the process.

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

STUDENT GOALS

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

TEAM NAME

Class 12 3-5-13

RULES OF THE GAME

Rough Ryders

No idea is stupid

Caillou

Be open minded

No Names

Be respectful

Future Minded Leaders

Don’t talk over each other Don’t be shy, participate

I would like to be more open with things

Be helpful with group work

Learn more things that will help our community and neighborhood

How to have fun in groups

Learn not to be shy or hold back my thoughts

Work well with people I normally don’t talk to

Better my public speaking skills

I would like to solve problems, learn how to work better as a team and learn new things

Give us tips on how to study in a fun way

Make more fun things to do for our school

I hope we work together as one

Do a lot of hands on activities

Get more comfortable around each other

Work with students who are different and have different ideas, which will make our ideas stronger

Get along

HAVE FUN!

Be patient with your group

Learn about some things I can do to better myself and the community I live in

Talk things out more

Solve problems

I would also like to learn about different skills I can use when working in groups

Make new friends

Be nice to everyone in class

Never do mean things

Expand activities

44 lves by out themse ed more ab ar drew a h sh ts ea sh en Ty Stud en talking. th e loved er sh th ra id g drawin rse, Krissy sa ol garden. nu a as r ho picture of he create a sc wanted to flowers and video. lk the Pep Ta ts enjoyed spirational in ng hi et The studen m to show so We decided s. every clas

45

Class 1 1-24-13

HOMEWORK

Class 2 1-29-13

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

MIND MAPPING

First Homework We really enjoyed the students’ drawings, so we decided to ask them to draw their initial ideas for a positive action within the community. Our process has been different than the other high school groups in that we have addressed positive actions rather than problems. Our goal is that we are turning problems into opportunities.

HOMEWORK ASSIGNMENT Illustrate something (write, diagram, draw) that would collectively improve our lives. For example making higher education more attainable or growing a school garden. Bring the paper to the next class ready to discuss.

Class 7 2-14-13

Kristina

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

Adam

46 47

Tyshea

Chelsey

Class 1 1-24-13

HOMEWORK

Class 2 1-29-13

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

MIND MAPPING

Generating Ideas

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM Define the problem your group wants to tackle and establish key questions to answer along the way.

We kicked the class off with a video about connection; an essential skill in group consultation. On that note we paired students up to have them discuss their personal positive actions from last class. The small teams were asked to come to a shared vision of a positive action, which was presented in the form of a collective skit to the class. Skits created a sense of play, fun and laughter. To further develop ideas we incorporated mind mapping as a tool to find deeper insight. Facebook: The Things That Connect Us

groceries

Get more comfortable around each other

clothes

homeless shelters

community service hours company

Debria

hospital

Being a helping hand

being a helping hand

role model Adam

graduation

women’s shelter

Make more fun things to do at our school

courage visit

Student’s individual idea for a positive action

Group skit

Collective mind map with class

entertain nursing home

groceries

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

pooler recreation

Community Center

parents can exercise

keep youth out of trouble something to do

basketball

liberty city

location good exercise

softball

Chelsey

Sports Exercise

Sports in the Community Center

Tony

sports in the community center

sports

football

swimming lessons

invite homeless guys

we can dodgeball

get equipment advertise give them snacks

clean up

Krissy

peers

Grow a Community Garden

Fundraise for College

water fountains instead of paying city employees pay students trash cans

Clean parks and raise money

Shavonna

make signs

49 clean park and earn money for college

advertise

campaign bring sponsors Daiwon

organize an event

Clean Parks

Student’s individual idea for a positive action

Group skit

48

Collective mind map with class

Class 1 1-24-13

RECAP

MIND MAPS REVIEW

Class 2 1-29-13

Class 3 1-31-13

DEFINE YOUR PROBLEM II

Choosing an Idea In the search of a common class goal the students participated in the Define Your Problem activity. Team FMD worked on writing out initial ideas and then narrowing them down. At the end of the day there were three common goals. Consultation was good and we hope to define one specific class goal next class.

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

50 51 the e enlivened orking spac

We Have a Tie We will continue next class further discussing the ideas and choosing one.

ew Changing th e class. th f o gy it er en ise money, students ra e th if at th We learn school. ent on the or has to be sp ing a dollar asked to br e ar to ts er si en ea If the stud they find it for charity, something r. give a dolla e the we can mak ng of how ki bringing in st th ju e ar an We personal th re o m e nc experie school. cans to the

Class 1 1-24-13

CANS vs. BAKLAVA

Class 2 1-29-13

STORIES FROM THE STREET VIDEO - CASS

Class 3 1-31-13

DISCUSSION

Class 4 2-5-13

CHOOSE AN IDEA

Class 5 2-7-13

YOU MAKE ME SMILE VIDEO

Class 6 2-12-13

BALL GAME

How Do We Connect? As an opportunity to personalize relationships Marina (class co-facilitator) baked home-made baklava and shared pictures of her friends and family from Bulgaria. While enjoying, the students realized that there was canned food on the table as well. This proved as an effective exercise to realize what is the emotion of connection. Coming into class team FMD had two opportunities waiting to be chosen upon from the last session; giving canned food for the homeless or having a dress down day as a fundraiser for school supplies. Marina’s gift inspired the students to make canned food personalized. Stories from the Street - Cass

We showed this video to the students to help them with the understanding of what is homelessness.

Team FMD (Future Minded Leaders) unanimously picked Idea #1 Providing food for the homeless people.

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

Think Quick We learned that it was very easy to lose the students’ attention and interest. Our goal for the class was to grow the idea and keep the students excited. The Jam session activity in CAT requires that the students do skits, but we decided to try something different.

How can we make this idea more fun •

Sit down and eat with them

Give them books

Have a conversation

Make them happy

Bring shoes

Bring hygiene products

Donate old clothes

Hand out cards

Play games

Help them cook

Cook for them

Do arts and crafts

Bring the girls jewellery and purses

Bring blankets

Bring scarves

How can we share it with our classmates, friends or family, so that they can join us? •

Have a family fun day

Advertise on radio, newspapers, tweet it

Talk to the teachers and Principal

Put fliers at groceries stores

Facebook page

Car wash to raise money

Lemonade stands

Tell students they can get community service hours

Go door-to-door

Make an event

s food drive d o ipated in fo ic rt e a th p g ts n ri en ld only b The stud ple u o o e w p y e e ut th meet th before, b uld never o w y e h T in class. ded for. was inten had the food the video e girl from th d e c ti They no unique dreams. nts what the stude answer the d e sk a e When w first girl to any unique had, the ve skills they id not ha d ion e said sh the quest d e sk a question ve a ? What h lp e ld h u o u c o skills. We ow can y “H x. e r y, fo differentl ood at. are you g

52 53

Class 1 1-24-13

RECAP

Class 2 1-29-13

TAKE A SEAT, MAKE A FRIEND VIDEO

KNOWLEDGE FEST

Class 3 1-31-13

The best way to find something out is to ask questions, but what do we ask? A fun and lighthearted video was shown that encouraged learning by questioning. Knowledge Fest, as an activity, helped us facilitate questions and answers specifically toward how Team MFD can give a helping hand to the homeless. By asking questions the team developed a connection to the project.

e teams etween th petition b they liked m h o g c u a o h g lt n Havi excited. A not want to be ts n e d u st got the ey still did g skits, th performin . m a ng te them on the losi own kept the countd m e th g in Giv re working. stions we to the que t should”. rs e sw n a “I e ”, Some of th such yes “Yes”. “No ey should ral nts that th e d u very gene st e th to d e We explain cific. spe Effect be more t the Girl d us abou e sk a ts n . The stude ed it again we watch video and

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

SKITS

What Can Questions Reveal? (Class 6) Take a Seat, Make a Friend (Class 6) Girl Effect, frog design (Class 7) Stories from the Street - Jason (Class 7) You Make Me Smile

Class 4 2-5-13

KNOWLEDGE FEST Find out what your team already knows about the challenges you are interested in solving together - and what you’d like to learn.

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

54 55

Class 1 1-24-13

MY OWN FOUR WALLS VIDEO

Class 2 1-29-13

ANSWERING THE WHY

Class 3 1-31-13

BALL GAME

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

INTERVIEWING 101

We Have a Guest

INTERVIEWING 101 Plan an interview from start to finish, then go into your community and talk with people about issues that matter to them.

Over the weekend we have reached out to community member and homeless activist Mr. Marvin Heery. We shared Team FMD’s story, their desire to connect with the homeless community and if he would like to be a part. Mr. Heery’s response was “When can I come?” Our response was ““You came come next week” and that’s how community action takes place.

Questions for the class: 1 2

Why do you want to meet a homeless person? Why do you want to help him or her?

1 2

Answers 1

So that I can talk to them and talk about their dreams.

2

I will like to help them because if I was homeless I will want someone to help me.

- Chelsey 1

To give them hope and to show them that we care.

2

They need help because being homeless is a sad situation and they have no food and no place to go.

Because we can do fun stuff like: play a board game, tell jokes, talk about ourselves and watch movies. - Shavonna

- Tony 1

I would like to meet a homeless person because I want to see what the homeless life would be like. They need help because being homeless is a sad situation and they have no food and no place to go.

1 2

- Daiwon

I would want to meet a homeless person to make them feel happy, loved and appreciated. I would want to help a homeless person because if I was homeless, I’d want someone to help me and it would help build character. - Krissy

1 2

I will like to meet a homeless person so I could talk to them to really find out how does it feel not to have (a home?) and how do they manage to stay on the street. - T. Miller

1 2

Because I want to meet someone that’s different from me. And I want to know what led them to being homeless. I want to help him/ her because nobody deserves to live on the streets, and I want to let them know that they can change this. - Tiana

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Understanding Stereotypes When you hear the word ‘homeless’ or see a homeless person, what is the first thing that comes to your mind? •

Homeless

Dirty

Less fortunate

We should help them

Mean

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

Interview Questions for Mr. Heery We asked the student to think about the following questions while they worked on interview questions for Mr. Heery - Why are you asking this question? - What do you want to find out?

Q: What happened to his family? > I want to find out where his family is and > why did they let him become homeless Q: How did he become homeless? > I want to know how he became homeless

Hope

No Money

Hungry

Sad

Houseless

Ashamed

Haircut

Q: Do you look at homeless people the same way?

Bad

Q: What/Who was your motivation to becoming successful?

Faith

- Krissy & Daiwon

Give them change

No family

Q: How did it feel to be homeless?

Buy them something to eat

Q: What did it take to get back on your feet?

Lonely

Q: Is your business a success right now?

Help

Lazy

Drug Addict

Praying

Scared

Never Loved

Q: What did he think of homeless people before he became homeless?

Q: How did you become homeless?

Because we want to find out about his homeless life

Q: How long have you been homeless? Q: How did you overcome homelessness? - Chelsey & Shavonna

Q: How did becoming homeless affect his character? Q: How did he get through being homeless? Q: Who gave him hope? Q: How did he get out of the shelter; how did he start over again? Q: What was it like being homeless?

> To see how homeless people feel. > Does it make him feel that no one love him? > To see if his strategy would help other homeless. > Because they are more homeless in the world that can get off their feet. > Because he spent his money on it that what made him homeless. To see if he is getting big guwop. - Tony & Debria

56 a new the students One of e av g o e d The vi ssness. on homele that perspective shared was ts n e d u st e th s the thing n-ups ke like grow the kids spo erstand d them und e lp e h e am The ball g pes had stereoty that we all all e did the B ested that w g ery. g e su H y r. ss M ri K ffect with E le p ip R r Game o

57

Class 1 1-24-13

Class 2 1-29-13

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

MR. MARVIN HEERY VISITS THE CLASS

The Power of Personal Stories We met Mr. Marvin Heery on a Saturday afternoon. We talked to him about the project, the students, how they came up with the idea of helping the homeless people. We showed Mr. Heery the CAT, and discovered that he was already familiar with the use of toolkits to facilitate collaboration, collective decision making and problem solving. Mr. Heery is a social entrepreneur. Having experienced homelessness himself about two years ago, now he is an active homelessness advocate. He started the “Homelessness in Savannah” non-profit organization, administers a couple of blogs about homelessness and participates on a number of social projects.

Mr. Marvin Heery

“What I want to encourage you is that this should not be the end of your community involvement. If you feel called and motivated to do more in your community once you get out, I encourage you to do that. Right now you are getting the foundation of being very successful as a neighborhood activist or a neighborhood leader.” -Marvin Heery

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

“I absolutely love what I do and the best part is watching my students grow and mature throughout the years that I have them. Teaching for me is more than just teaching content but about making connections and building relationships. It is my sincere desire that my students do not leave the same once they have had an encounter with me.” Ms. Natosha Dawson

Mr. Heery shared his personal story about how his business depleted his resources and he lost his home. He lived in a shelter, then moved to an affordable housing development. He worked hard to get out of his situation and stayed dedicated to help the homeless. The students were surprised to hear that there were many reasons for people experiencing homelessness, among which domestic abuse, unstable family, medical or health crisis, loss of a job, foreclosure because of the economy, poor life choices and poor financial management choices. Students were very quiet... Then something happened that none of us will ever forget. After sitting silently in the back, Ms. Dawson cleared her throat, and said she had something to say. “I don’t think I ever told any of my students that have been here at Groves this, but I’ve been homeless.” The room went silent. We’d been talking all that time about connections, only to discover one right in class.

“You don’t know where people come from, you don’t know what they’ve been through… The world is real out there. The world is real raw. It doesn’t care if you have a child, it doesn’t care that you are smart… For me, this is something very dear, this is something very important, because I’ve been there.” Ms. Natosha Dawson has been teaching high school for five years and has spent three years at Groves High School. She is a Family and Consumer Science Teacher and currently teaches in the Nutrition and Food Science and Interior Design pathways.

58 59

Class 1 1-24-13

Class 2 1-29-13

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

DISCUSSION

Discussion Last class was an empowering and emotional day for all. The students were thankful of the stories told by Ms. Dawson and Mr. Heery and this has made them realize how personal connection in community can be.

“We could interact with them and talk to them. I want to talk to some homeless people really because I want to know their story... Because not every homeless person is a drug addict or alcoholic, there are other things.� -Tiana

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

More Ideas

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

How long can we be there for?

What do you need?

Create cards, give words of encouragement

What ages?

Play games - Uno, Bingo, Shoots and Ladders, Heads Up 7 Up

Do you have meals?

Create name tags so that we know their name and they know us

Can we bring food?

What day?

Have a speed meeting?

How do they get money?

Tell them why we are coming to meet them

Can we take pictures?

Show them our process, show them everything we’ve done to get to the idea.

Class 12 3-5-13

More Questions

Bring clothes and hygiene products to make care packages

Class 11 2-28-13

60 ernts a new p e the stude av e g th o f e o d e vi The ess. On e homelessn th n o at th ve ti c as e w sp shared ts n e d u st e things th ps like grown-u kids spoke erstand d them und e lp e h e am The ball g pes had stereoty that we all all e did the B sted that w e g ery. g e su H y r. ss M Kri ect with ff E le p ip R Game or

61

Class 1 1-24-13

Class 2 1-29-13

Class 3 1-31-13

Class 4 2-5-13

Class 5 2-7-13

Class 6 2-12-13

MAKING CARDS

Words of Encouragement

“My dream might be going to college, their dream might be just getting a house�.

The team at Savannah High developed a connection to the homeless community in Savannah. This connection inspired them to create deeper, more personal connections outside of the classroom. Through the involvement of Marvin Heery, and the inspiration of Ms. Dawson, the students plan on taking tangible steps in the near future to step outside of the comfort of their classroom and continue to discover new aspects of homelessness.

-Tysheah (?)

Debria

Adam

Class 7 2-14-13

Class 8 2-19-13

Class 9 2-21-13

Class 10 2-26-13

Class 11 2-28-13

Class 12 3-5-13

62 63

The Savannah High Blue Jackets Each Friday morning from February 1st through March 1st 2013, Team High arrived at Mrs. Reese’s class to facilitate the Frog Collective Action Tool Kit. At first, Team High was a little apprehensive about meeting the students and trying to explain to them what we were doing in their classroom. To Team High’s surprise the students were extremely excited to be there and to see what Team High had to offer. In fact, they were extremely excited to get started. All of the classes were made up of about eighteen to twenty students per class. The best part of all was that the students who did decide to show up all were all volunteers, nobody was forced to be. Little did they know what they would be getting themselves into.

Savannah High School Marketing Class, Fri 8:15-9:15 am Ms. Reese students # 18 Facilitators: Robynn Butler, Carol Lora, Katie Mansell

64 65

Class 1 2-01-13

Who or what inspires us turned into ‘who� or what inspires us

Students relate with one another on a number of similar topics The students are very supportive of one another ideas The students agree on the topics that inspire them

WHAT WE ARE GOING TO DO NEXT

RESULTS

WHAT WE LEARNED

SUBSTITUTION OF THE ,PLANNED ACTIVITY UNEXPECTED RESULTS

Who Inspires Us

Common themes related to inspiration included: God, Love, Family, Michelle and Barack Obama

Class 2 2-08-13

Find Issues, Uncover Needs Identifying individual goals and two obstacles to success

Class 3 2-15-13

Class 4 2-20-13

Storyboarding 101 & Find True North

Knowledge Fest

Storyboarding 101

We focused the entire class on the two main issues or problems

Combination

Class 6 3-01-13

Jam Session

Review & Celebration

The students wrote the ideas and solutions they thought of directly before the sorting section of the activity

For this class we ended it as we opened up the sessions with a yes and activity

It was easy and beneficial to see how answers overlapped since the students wrote ideas down individually at first. There were many strong ideas that were repeated throughout the group

We as group learned that giving back is a really rewarding feeling and just bringing them food was such a nice gesture for the good moments that we had with them

The students identified which of their solutions were the most attainable at that moment and chose to pursue an actionable one they could complete in our time with them: the petition

The last class ended up finishing on a really high note

My name and what I liked and learned about the entire process

Find True North

How the students understand their role in the larger community Students were excited to talk about their future endeavors They were able to realize potential dangers around them that might inhibit good decision-making

Career, money, crime,are all obstacles to success Having the money to pay for college or to support a family is difficult for these students to understand

The students are faced with a number of different obstacles and it is hard for them to just focus on one thing Students are interested in empower themselves and the community but they are not sure how or even if they can do it

The students worked really well in large groups This activity was more about creating a dialogue than about doing They have really good ideas but you just have to get them to think more about .them

Three main goals were to have better food in the cafeteria stop the gun violence and learn how to keep their streets clean

We got a lot of brainstorming done, and got the students talking, this went really well

Understand how they can learn to be apart of the larger community

We decided that we would hone in on one issue to get them really focused on that issue this issue ended up being about the cafeteria

It created a nice dynamic where the students really got to know one another

Joining the military is a viable option for some

The next activity will dig deeper into the personal lives of each student in order to grasp where each student see him or herself now and in .the future

Class 5 2-22-13

As a group have the students identify the goal they want to work on and have them storyboard it.

Have them visualize a path to their own success and how they can help others

We used pictures of food that was in their school-provided lunch and food they liked to print out a cleaned-up version of the petition they wrote. Next class we will bring it to them and review the quarter while enjoying some good, .local food

It was more about just finishing up and talking and seeing the final product

Celebrate!

66 67

Class 1 2-01-13

INTRODUCTIONS

“YES, AND...”

Class 2 2-08-13

Class 3 2-15-13

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 3-01-13

WHO INSPIRES US

Team Building This team building exercise was designed to help us understand which images or icons bind this community of students and young athletes. We also wanted to understand how their inspirations aspire them to want to achieve great things for themselves and their families. We spilt the class into four team of 5. Each team had to brainstorm and write down all of the people or things that inspire them. Afterwards they presented their posters to the class.

WHAT INSPIRES US Identify people in your community and beyond that inspire your group and could help you solve your group’s challenges.

68 69

RECAP

Class 1 2-01-13

Class 2 2-08-13

OVERVIEW

Find issues, uncover, needs

Class 3 2-15-13

In Ten Years... We wanted to find insights by framing questions to actualized their inspirations. We also wanted them to look for the obstacles that might hinder them along their career paths or journeys in life. If the students were to realize that they had similarities and differences in this process, we thought that that might be a point of connectivity.

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 3-01-13

Find issues, uncover needs Better understand the problems people face in your community and consider what your group can do collectively to help.

Looking into the future

Money is an obstacle, how will I pay for college

I hope to join the military

Staying out of trouble is difficult

I hope to graduate from high school

There is not much to do during the summer and after school

I would like a family and kids

Hopefully I will get married some day

I want to be a professor, but I’m not sure if I am smart enough

I need money to pay for tuition

I am lazy and not disciplined

When I graduate from high school, I will join the military and then my tuition will be paid for.

I have a child and I am not sure how I am going to be able to support it in the future.

I would like to be a professor

I would like a good job

• •

I would like to be a fashion designer when I grow up

I see myself be a counselor

I would like to have a job one day

I need to get better grades and study more

There are a lot of drugs in the high school and it is hard to stay clean

My parents are separated and my mom works full time so it is hard to get ahead.

Top Goals

Top Obstacles

Professor

Money

Family

Crime

Military

Drugs

DJ

Laziness

Personal Support

who they mments on o c ’s they ts n e d The stu w and how hen the gro ht w g e si b in to d t wan rovide get there, p their to d g an in o m g o e fr ar me ere they co into the wh aits. tr y it al n o ers individual p y are growew that the kn l al , ts n e ary to them The stud seemed sc is s th al d o g an a p have ing u y all seem to achieve e th r, ve e w ho ed to d determin and seeme them.

70 71

Class 1 2 -01-13

Class 2 2-08-13

Class 3 2-13-13

Getting Focused After building teams, focusing on where the students want to go, and the obstacles that the students might face, we really wanted them to get focused on what the problems that they face really are and where these problems exist out in the real world. At this point the group really seemed ready to make some decisions.

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 3 -01-13

FIND TRUE NORTH STORYBOARDING 101 As a group, come to agreement on the goals you want to achieve- and when you want to achieve them.

72 73 The students each came to an agreement to

Afterwards they categorized their storyboards

Nathan (above) wanted to work on cleaning up the

work on individual goals before working on larger

and prioritized which goals seemed to the most

neighborhood because there is a lot of pollution on

community goals. They created a storyboard of

important to work on.

the streets and around the neighborhood.

their goals and then shared their goals with the class.

Class 1 2-01-13

Class 2 2-08-13

Class33 2-15-13 2-15-13 Class

We Need To Talk After reviewing the progress from the last session, the students used a modification of Build Activity 2: Knowledge Fest to express what they already knew and how they felt about their two chosen topics. The class was split into two groups, half discussing violence in their school and community and half looking at their discontent with the school-provided lunches. After writing as much as they could in about ten minutes, each group shared with the rest of the class and gave the others an opportunity to share their ideas for solutions. Half the students brainstormed questions and thoughts they had about the issue of their discontent with the cafeteria food in their school . The second group of students wrote their assumptions, impressions, and questions surrounding violence in their community. The students started with who the issue affects, how it impacts individuals and the community, and possible solutions

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 03-01-13

KNOWLEDGE FEST Find out what your team already knows about challenges you’re interested in solving together- and what you’d like to learn

Get the Conversation Going While the two groups were discussing their topics, some students interviewed others in their class. Putting the camera in their hands gave students the opportunity to ask questions that mattered to them and express their ideas in a comfortable atmosphere

What are the students saying about violence? •

There is nothing I can do

Video games promote it

Why does this happen

Sisters and brothers are

Families are effected

Do the right thing

It could get worse

Stand up for a person

So many rumors

Restrict gun usage

People are not educated

Suicide is a result

It is a power struggle

This is a stereotype

affected

What are the students saying about cafeteria food ? •

No more spoiled milk

Have other options in school

It sucks

Michelle Obama school lunch

It is nasty

No more Papa Johns

Snacks can be healthy

Allow off campus food

We could grow our own food

More people should care

program is not good

ld they cou t feel like o n d id n d a l ents rsona The stud t their pe ickly ing abou wever, qu o h s, do anyth m le b ro p y s. it on commun ing soluti rainstorm ore started b were m e class era th m a in c e ts uden ont of th fr in but g Some st , in it k ble spea s behind the comforta mate wa g ss in la k c ta r e oth at were th ed, when an lv ts n vo e d in e stu e more m a c e mostly th b o and vide pictures d excited n a , d e g enga

74 75

Class 1 2-01-13

Class 2 2-08-13

Class33 2-15-13 2-15-13 Class

Actionable Ideas The students took time to write down as many ideas and solutions to the issue they had with the school cafeteria food. After they had as many ideas as they could think of, they sorted them on a spectrum of which they thought were the easiest to the most impossible. They then chose a doable solutioncreating a petition- which they wrote themselves after working together to affinitize the most popular and important points agreed upon by the group

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 03-01-13

JAM SESSION Create as many ideas as possible with your group, exploring a range of different solutions and building on each other’s ideas in a supportive manner.

I Pledge... The students sought to make a petition that was positive, encouraging of change, nonconfrontational, and that would be supported by their peers. They also sought to create awareness of their issue and promote positive action by encouraging their fellow students to post pictures of good food on social media sites and share it with the school

ith me up w ble to co a re o re m e w re ents they we The stud ith a eas, and w id h ve g ti u a very cre ing thro in follow invested n design w o ir e of th solution ea, in their id invested es lv re e se w m y e the to see th eas to Though g n ti n u id ill da it was st ange, submitting ch g in k a m tc figures, e authority

76 77

Class 1 2-01-13

Class 2 2-08-13

Class33 2-15-13 2-15-13 Class

Actionable Ideas The students took time to write down as many ideas and solutions to the issue they had with the school cafeteria food. After they had as many ideas as they could think of, they sorted them on a spectrum of which they thought were the easiest to the most impossible. They then chose a doable solutioncreating a petition- which they wrote themselves after working together to affinitize the most popular and important points agreed upon by the group

Class 4 2-20-13

Class 5 2-22-13

Class 6 03-01-13

REVIEW Standing in a circle, the students were given the opportunity to share their experience, what they found fun or helpful, or what could be improved about the CAT facilitation

For our last class we really wanted to do something special for our students so we went to a local organic food store and bought them a bunch of good organic collared greens, carrots, spinach and oh there may have been a brownie or two. We also got the students in a circle and had them say a few words about their experience with us and the CAT.

All you need is a group and the CAT

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The students get an opportunity to tell us how to make this experience better for future users

4. SYNTHESIS The former high school sections were individual and highly detailed analysis’ of each group’s work. The following synthesis will compare these three processes, on a class-by-class basis, from an objective perspective. According to our analysis, all the three high schools shared the same six objectives, enacted in the following order : discovering the context and building trust, defining a problem, exploring the problem, generating ideas, selecting final concept, prototyping, and executing plans. The goal of the synthesis is to compare the different CAT activities that had been chosen for each objective and the period of time each school spent in each step. Groves and Beach high school met their students twice a week, but Savannah High had just one weekly session, except week 5 when they met twice It should be mentioned that high school meetings started in the third week of SCAD classes. So, week one of synthesis diagram is week three of SCAD classes. Because each high school had unique and specific experiences, we documented the results of each school separately in these categories: •

The activities that we modified and time challenges we faced.

The invented activities

The activities that created excitement in students or they struggled with.

The skills that students, teachers, and facilitators developed or acquired.

Our challenges and related suggestions for successful implementation of CAT activities in school.

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Process

Week 1

Week 2

Week 3

Week 6

Week 5

Week 4

Week 7

TUE, JAN 22

Class 1

TUE, MAR 12

Class 2

Class 1

Class 2

Define Your Problem

Ripple Effect

Class 1

Class 2

Class 1

Class 2

Class 1

Class 2

Class 1

Class 2

Class 1

Postcards

Divide and Conquer

Class 2

Ripple Effect

Discover context Build trust

Skill Share

Find Issues, Uncover Needs

Who Inspires Us

Define Your Define Your Find Problem Problem True North W7

Problem Definition

Define Your Problem

Ripple Effect

Find True North * Story. 101 Find True North

Knowledge Fest Mr. Heery’s Visit

Exploring the Problem

Setting an Agenda

Circle Activity * Storyboarding 101

Knowledge Fest

Ball Game

Idea Generation

Jam Session

Interview 101

Storyboarding 101

Knowledge Fest

Jam Session

Knowledge Knowledge W7 Fest Fest

Discussion Storyboarding

Final Concept

Divide and Conquer

Jam Session Interview 101

Prototyping Execution

Divide and Conquer Jam Session

High school meetings started in the third week of SCAD classes. * New activities

Petition

Storyboarding*

Lights, Camera, Action!*

Overview

Beach High School Our overall approach to facilitating the CAT was based on action research wherein each in-class experience informed our activity plan for the following session. We began by learning about each other and building the trust necessary to successfully create a memorable experience for the students. As time progressed, we learned to direct the group towards community-based goals and created new activities to make quick, informed group decisions where every voice was heard. We saw a turning point when the students really began to see their own potential as a group, during the idea generation activity “Jam Session”. Further along, the students struggled during the planning process of their ideas and needed heavier and more targeted facilitation. Ultimately, due to the nature of the group’s work, we diverted from the CAT and simply offered support where it was needed.

Adaptation and Time Frame Timing, both in the number of sessions we had with the students and the time per session (a short 45 minutes), was a major factor in our planning process. The majority of the CAT activities are designed for sessions over an hour long, necessitating that we extract the most impactful and salient parts of the activities. We adapted the following activities: -Skill share: students shared their likes and dislikes to share their personality -Setting an agenda: We merged steps 1 & 3 in a new activity that asked them to choose a question to work on from a list they had created the previous session. As it was time-consuming,we ended at step 4. -Lights, Camera, Action: Each student worked on their “skit” individually. The “skit” was their portion of the groups presentation to the principal.

New Activities Since some voices in the class were louder than others, we borrowed a technique from the Find True North activity to make sure each member’s voice was heard. Whenever a group decision had to be made, we had the students stand in a circle and one by one, share their opinion and how they arrived at that opinion. These tended to produce lively and respectful discussions that facilitated group momentum. We designed two new activities: 1 .After Find True North we did not have enough time to run a complete CAT activity but needed to get a deeper understanding about their chosen topics. We designed What Do You Want to Know that asked students, as a group, to brainstorm all the possible questions necessary to understand the topic. 2. Because we needed a proposal for our meeting with the Principal, we asked them to write down all their reasons for choosing Violence at School as a topic

and Violence Free Week as a solution on individual post-its notes. Then a volunteer drafted a proposal from the results.

Enthusiasm, Participation, and Challenges It was typically hard to gauge how enthusiastic the students would be from session to session. Since our class met relatively early at 9:15 am, we learned it was helpful to incorporate a physical, “ice breaking” type of activity at the start of class. Unfortunately, due to the time constraints, we tended to cut out this activity in favor of incorporating more CAT-based time. The students were most enthusiastic during the Skill Share, Define Your Problem, Jam Session, and Storyboarding activities. On the other hand, students struggled in Setting an Agenda and Divide and Conquer activities, perhaps because time management is a new experience for them.

Built skills and Characteristics Students: critical thinking, collaboration with classmates, listening, communication both written and oral, presenting and advocating for their ideas. Teacher: Saw how methods that are already taught can be applied to address real world problems with the students in an engaging way Designers: Compassion, listening skills, respect for other processes, asking “Why” is key, collaboration in a very unfamiliar environment, and trust building

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Limitations and Recommendation

83

For the CAT to work most effectively in a school setting, the activities should be designed for a 40-45 minute time period. Our student were frequently absent or distracted during class so it would be a good idea to provide a recap of the last sessions activities at the beginning of each new session. Depending on the number of sessions available, and the demographic involved, it may be helpful to suggest certain activity paths. For example, had we had another month to facilitate, we would have chosen our activities much differently. It is imperative to have the right and appropriate environment. In our case, the students were much more engaged when we removed the distractions of computers and rearranged the seating. It is also very helpful to physically arrange the desks class in a way that clusters the group members together.

Groves High School We approached our process with three main goals - create a memorable and meaningful experience for the students, teach them collaborative and problem solving skills, and come up with an idea that allows for a rewarding experience at the end. We also approached our work differently than the other teams. Instead of asking about a problem the class can solve, we asked the students to think about a positive action they would like to do for their community. That created a different dynamic for the class - the students did not know much about the homeless and at times it was difficult to discuss ideas and plan. Homeless people were a different audience for the students to research or interview on their own, so we showed them videos and invited Mr. Heery, so that they get a better understanding of the issue.

Adoption and Time Frame We added Mind Mapping to Define Your Problem, and element of competition to Knowledge Fest, Ball Game to Jam Session.

New Activities We came up with two new activities:

Enthusiasm, Participation, and Challenges The students liked Ripple Effect, they grasped the idea quickly and were engaged throughout the entire activity. They referred to the activity a couple of times later - they suggested that they did Ripple Effect with Mr. Heery and the homeless people. Students liked doing skits, although they did not come up with very deep insights by doing the skits. We had a good turnaround of questions during Knowledge Fest. Students were not familiar with the issue of homelessness and we also introduced an element of competition - the team with the least amount of questions was going to do a skit for the class, which motivated the groups. Long discussions were challenging. We usually had discussions with the entire class of 8 or 10 people and it was difficult to keep everybody engaged.

Built Skills and Characteristics Students: asking questions, coming up with ideas, being respectful and tolerant, working as a team

Ball Game - students pass the ball to each other. Whoever has the ball has to come up with the next idea or question depending on what the primary goal is. Students liked it because it was quick and fun. Every time we played it they came up with good ideas.

Facilitators: facilitation, presentation skills

Mind Mapping - After our first round of ideas for a positive action, we felt that they were a little too general. Since we wanted to steer the class towards something that is achievable, we wanted to expand on the ideas.

Limitations and Recommendation We discovered that there could be a specific variation of CAT aimed for students with more hands-on activities and more elements of play to keep them engaged and excited.

Savannah High School At Savannah High School, our goal was to use frog Design’s Community Action Toolkit (CAT) activities to equip the students with skills they can use to clarify their goals, build a team to reach their goals, imagine and seek solutions, and make their ideas happen. To begin, the students shared Who Inspires Us, and then progressed to considering issues beyond themselves and affects they could produce in their own community. Throughout the weeks of working with the group of students at Savannah High School, we watched the students communicating as a group, sharing with and encouraging each other, and pursuing their goals to affect change. Once the students agreed upon an issue to pursue, they quickly reached an actionable, tangible solution which lent an encouraging wrap up to the end of the sessions.

Adaptation and Time Frame During the course of the quarter, we met with the students for six, fifty-five minute sessions. In general, each session occurred during the students’ second period on Fridays (week 5 we had a Wednesday session and a Friday session). In our facilitation, we made strategic decisions on which sections of the CAT activities would be most successful in class periods that were shorter than the activities were designed for with a varying number each week of between fifteen and twenty students and three facilitators. -Who Inspires Us: Rather than focusing on individuals and contacts, in our first session we asked the students to share what inspires them and pointed out overlapping answers among the four groups. -Find Issues, Uncover Needs: In conjunction with the “In 10 Years” activity we created, we used this one to have students act out their goals and obstacles to their aspirations.

New Activities In the first two sessions, our goal was to create an atmosphere of open communication and begin a connection between the students and us as facilitators. Before participating in the Who Inspires Us activity, we gathered in a circle and played “Yes, and... (Circle Activity 1)” to introduce everyone in the group. One at a time around the circle, the students said their name and something they like to do. We learned a little about what the students like to do for fun and what interested them. For class 2, we created an activity called “In 10 Years”. In the second session, we asked the students to write or illustrate where they want to be in ten years. They also identified two obstacles in their way or that they would be required to overcome to reach their goal. In our final session with the students, we sought to reinforce their enthusiasm

about their successes during the quarter and to encourage any desire they might have to continue being leaders and making change. In “Review (Circle -Skill share: students shared their likes and dislikes to share their personality.

Enthusiasm, Participation, and Challenges The students at Savannah High were enthusiastic and willing to participate in almost every activity we presented to them. The class was made up of volunteers from two separate business classes that were meeting at that time, and this provided us with a unique student dynamic. Along with their willingness to participate, having sessions on Friday definitely added to the atmosphere. On only one occasion did the students not participate; we asked them over the week after session 2, to take photographs of anything they would like to change in their own lives or in their community, a variation of the We Saw, We Heard CAT activity. Though they had one week to complete the assignment and all said they had readily accessible cameras or smartphones, none of the students completed the activity outside of class. We learned through this experience that the subject we tasked them with, taking a picture of anything in their life or community they’d like to change, was far too broad and did not give enough direction and safety for them to feel excited and confident about completing it.

Built Skills and Characteristics Students: critical thinking, collaboration with classmates, listening, communication both written and oral, presenting and advocating for their ideas, disseminating their solutions among their peers Teachers: Experienced the excitement their students exhibited about being an integral part of their own education Designers: Facilitation skills, respect for other processes, planning and processing as a group, and trust building between students and group

Limitations and Recommendation We found the CAT to be effective in a high school classroom setting if modified to overcome certain limitations and used by willing, invested participants. We could not run any of the activities exactly as they were written in the CAT. First, the time constraint greatly constricted the opportunity for discussion and reflection. Second, the CAT is designed to benefit a community group that already have at least an initial goal or purpose in mind. We, however, had to adapt the tools to prompt the students to first develop a goal they wanted, then Clarify, Build, Seek, Imagine, and Make.

84 85

5. OPPORTUNITIES After analyzing and synthesizing all gathered data from three high schools, we have found common desires and patterns. Erudite addressing of these patterns from schools and other related organizations are ideal opportunities reaching outstanding prospects in students’ lives: •

Participatory education: The CAT activities have

Interfaith: Students have the opportunity to

built and enhanced different valuable skills in

understand other religions and ethnicities, respect

students such as critical thinking, collaboration

the differences, find similarities, and learn how to

with classmates, listening, presenting and

work together.

advocating for their ideas in students. These activities will enable schools to create a co-design

Facilitate their communities: Students become

environment with active role from students.

familiar with CAT and can play a facilitator role to

According to our observations, students are

bring their families together in communities for

more excited and concentrated in participatory

solving different range of problems.

environments because they feel they have a voice! • •

Problem-Solvers, Step-up Leaders, and Resilience

Collaboration with authorized decision makers,

Communities: With these connections students

e.g., Homeless Authority, etc.

gradually will become familiar and engaged with their communities’ problems, and consequently

Collaboration with successful organizations active

feel positive about their powerful effects in solving

in youth development in communities to address

them. This awareness will enhance their self-

students’ goals in this documentations such as

esteem and responsibility about the surrounding

Lowering Violence or improving school lunches

environment and community, and will create

through gardening

problem-solver ambassadors and resilient communities of future.

Participation in different summits, camps, and events like Youth Summit

86 87

6.

GATORBALL ACADEMY If it were not for Gatorball Academy, a Savannah-based

As part of SCAD’s work with the CAT and high schools,

501 c(3) organization, there would not have been a

we partnered with GBA in helping to define a roadmap

connection between SCAD and Groves, Beach, and

for their organization, to enable them to hone in

Savannah high schools.

on their core goals and competencies, prioritize, and become more effective community organizers,

Gatorball Academy (GBA) was founded by Larry ‘Gator’

participants, and leaders. Their goals as an organization

Rivers, a former Harlem Globetrotter (and Beach High

are echoes of the motivations and desires that we

Bulldog), to marry his passion for basketball with his

heard in the high schools, and provide us with a

passions for youth and community engagement.

tangible example of a group ready and willing to work

Currently run by Gator and CFO Debra Hasan, GBA

with students on meaningful community action.

operates on a number of different levels in the community. Their core function is a program called

The following pages present a high level pass at that

the Globecroppers, which is centered around uniting

roadmap. We as SCAD students are not experts in

basketball skills with organic farming and leadership

GBA, in what it means to run a potent community

skills.

engagement organization in Savannah, or in what the best practices surrounding this kind of work are. This

Gator and Debra, and by extension GBA, are

work is presented as a set of tools that are applicable

fundamentally people-oriented. They thrive on

to any organization, but have been tailored for GBA

connections and relationships, and this passion for

specifically. There are no solutions here, but instead,

people manifests itself in their organizational goals and

we show one possible path, based on our observations

activities.

and conversations with Gator and Debra over the course of the class.

88 89

Who We Are mission & value proposition

value proposition... Gatorball Academy is dedicated to providing youth engagement and life skills through sport for young children and teenagers.

Unlike other local youth empowerment organizations, our unique hybrid of sport and organic gardening provides a rich foundation for the development of future community-minded leaders.

mission statement... Gatorball Academy’s mission is to use basketball, gardening and community engagement as mediums for enabling positive personal growth; teaching young people to be strong in body, clean in mind and lofty in ideals.

“All you have to do is be balanced...and understand your strength.� Gator Rivers, GBA Founder

BRAND HERITAGE former Harlem Globetrotter, Larry “Gator” Rivers, founded Gator Ball Academy in 1988 BRAND OFFERING basketball play +instruction; gardening team building games off field workshops / lesson civic engagement mentors / inspiration

BRAND VISION to foster the growth and development of children and youth becoming positive members of their communities

BRAND MISSION gatorball’s mission is to use basketball, gardening and community engagement as mediums for positive personal growth; teaching young people to be strong in body, clean in mind and lofty in ideals

BRAND VALUES / BELIEFS gatorball believes in the inherent potential and gifts of young people with an openess to all perspectives, voices, and people

BRAND IDENTITY

BRAND AUDIENCE community based with an emphasis on youth engagement

BRAND BENEFITS health, wellness, total fitness, life skills, resilience, courage, education, philanthropy, compassion, community network BRAND PERSONALITY empowered, holisticmind / body / spirit, change agent, sustainable, community focused empathetic

90 91

What We Do

Gardening

Community

Basketball

Enhance participants nutritional knowledge

Encourage lifelong eating habits

Improve group communication skills and personal skills

Engagement in team sports builds a higher self esteem.

Improve life skills, group interaction and self knowledge

Create a willingness to arise and help

Teaches participant that there is always someone in greater need and that we all have something to give

Enhance participants fitness and body health knowledge

Participant improves team skills and personal skills

Increase participants awareness & stewardship

Show an appreciation and respect for nature

Enhance participants social and behavior skills

Participant has an increase in science achievement scores

Encourage skills in addressing community challenges for positive change

Encouraged to take on responsibility and master challenges

Develops a connection with community leaders, members and resources

Enhance participants knowledge of structure, accountability and responsibilty

Inspires a desire to become future leaders and positive members of community

Enhance participants social and

Creates a support network for participants

GARDENING

BASKETBALL

GBA

COMMUNITY

“Be strong in body, clean in mind and lofty in ideals.” Dr. James Naismith (invented the game of basketball in 1891 )

92 93

Who We Serve

the student 16/ Savannah GA/ student

“I think GBA helps me develop as a kid doing things that I enjoy.”

As a student: Jamar’s life as a student is simple. He goes to school, to his classes, hangs with his friends as much as he can in lunch and goes on through the rest of his day. He likes sports, he plays basketball and has always been a person that likes to help. Jamar thinks GBA is a good outlet for his passion for basketball, and helping the community.

Trigger: “I want to help while having fun and learning.” Become an inspiration to others

Previous years in GBA: Jamar has been a part of GBA for two years. He became a member because his cousin was part of it and was always telling him about all the activities they did, and the people that they helped in the community. That raised Jamar’s curiosity, because he always likes to be involved in everything. His experience so far has been really exciting, he has develop his basketball skills, and has come to realize how much he likes to help young kids from the program.

Goals

Hear about GBA

Become an active member of community Team building skills

A leader

Enroll in the program Go to a game

GBA

Confidence

- I want to become a community leader. - I enjoy helping and wish to become better at it.

after program

Attend seminar

service experience for Jamar

during program Basketball play

- I want to gain more confidence, while working on my basketball skills.

before program

Team building games Civic engagement

Workshops & seminars Gardening

the coach 34/ Savannah GA/ coach at GBA

“I need focus & motivation in my life and GBA is a window to keep the momentum going.”

Darryl works as a coach in GBA. His job at GBA brings him great pride. He enjoys teaching, and this is the perfect environment for it. His training, discipline and teaching young children about the sport of basketball through the ballhandling and team building skills. Although he is a busy person his time in GBA he make it count every minute.

Trigger: “I want to give back to my community by being an inspiration to others .” before program Become a role model

Darryl has been working for GBA, for two years. He is a fit person, and a sport enthusiast. When not in GBA he works as a personal trainer and a physical therapist. Darryl enjoys working with people and helping them reach for their goals.

Met Gator in a game

Working for GBA has been a very special journey for Darryl. For he was once a teenager in need of focus. He trains children, gives workshops, and engages in community outreach. Daryl feels really lucky to be part of an Training seminars organization that strives for empowering future leaders through sports and give them confidence.

Tryout for GBA coach

Leader in the community Life coach

Be a change agent Build confidence

Pedagogy seminars

GBA

Goals

service experience for Jamar

-I want to be a change agent for my community. during program

after program Does tournaments Works with elderly once a week Is part of GBA Ambassadors

Coaches youth of GBA Attends seminars Does workshops

- I want to be an enabler for empowerment and change. - I want to become someone in my community. - I hope to be a person that inspires & help people reach their goal.

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How We Serve

GBA

Effective community engagement and growth comes with a deep understanding of how you and your organization function, including an awareness of what happens behind the scenes.

service blueprint

Below is a map plotting the relationship between two participants in GBA, the ways that they interact with each other, the community, and GBA as an organization, and the skills used at each juncture.

Training Session in GBA Physical Touchpoints

Gardening Session

Gymnasium at Savannah High School

Garden in SHS

The Student

He arrives at GBA ready to train. He gets the basketballs and heads to the court.

He warms up and practices the routine with other fellow teammates.

He works on their new techniques, and rehearses old ones

Practice is over He helps with the equipment.

The Coach

He is setting the court and starts warming up.

He coaches the team gives tips, runs them through the techniques.

Coaches, Referees, Directs, Helps.

Motivates the team for next session. Cleans the gym.

Backstage

Other People in GBA SKILLS obtain in each step

Coordinates with SHS hours for GBA.

Seminars with Gator to deliver session.

Part of the mission of GBA, accountability.

SHS people/ other members of GBA from 15-17years • Accountability • Organization

His task of the day: Treat the soil for the upcoming tomato season

• Compromise • Responsibility

He organizes and cleans the area of the garden.

Took a seminar last week on preparation of soil for gardening. Gator & Debra are part of the gardening session.

• Team Building • Focus on the goal • Socialize

Helps gather the carrots and teaches the special needs kids to cultivate the tomato seeds.

• Help • Cooperate

Gator Facilitates the gardening process.

They help clean the area and the crop.

• Create Empathy

• Accountability • Proactive

Tournament

Community Enagement

In a school in Savannah

He rides the bus with other GBA members to a tournament

He rides the bus and mentors the team before the game.

Gymnasium in SHS

He warms up and plays the game with opposing team.

He socializes with people from the tournament and the community

Once a week he does Big Brother with GBA kids

He coaches the team throught the game. Helps them focus.

Talks to people, coaches, community people.

Works with young kids coaching and training them.

He meets with the kids helps in training, plays ball with them and supports them.

He does many team building skills with them.

Engagement not limited to GBA activities, includes homework help as well

He always has a moment to ask them; What was your highlight of the week?

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Invited as a special guest in the community

Schuedule of tournament.

Gator- goes to game to promote GBA and handball.

Gator & Debra are in the side line suppoting GBA.

• Responsibility

• Team building skills

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Handball tricks and engages with people in the community • Develop social skills

• Cooperate • Share • Inspire

• Communicate • Support • Help

• Motivate young kids • Become thier friends

How We Organize One of the primary keys to effective organizations is prioritization and concentration on core competencies. Every decision must be evaluated against some set of criteria in order to decide if it is alignment with organisational goals, both in the short and long term. Below, we have taken a first pass at establishing a hierarchy of decision making criteria for Gatorball Academy. These criteria are based on conversations we had with the organization, observations of their existing product offerings, and several sessions of introspective activities. These are not intended to be prescriptive, but provocative, an example of one possible alignment patter for GBA’s core services.

Core Product

Facilitating Services

Enabling Services

Delivery System

Youth Empowerment

Basketball Gardening

Team building Workshops & Classes Basketball training Gardening skills Civic Engagement Tournaments

Website Word-Of-Mouth Printed Advertisement

How We Impact People Until an organization reaches outside of itself and establishes some form of contact with the outside world, it is merely a think tank. This reaching out is manifested through ‘touchpoints’, which are simply physical moments when the organization and the participant come into contact. Throughout the experience of organization/participant contact, the touchpoints may shift, and their meaning may also shift. Below, we’ve provided examples of touchpoints that exist, either currently or aspirationally, between Gatorball Academy and their participants, before, during and after the actual duration of the program.

Before GBA

During GBA

After GBA

Word of Mouth

Transport Shuttle

Print Advertising

Basketball Court

Uniforms GBA Gear

Web Advertising

Garden

Trophies

Website

Nutrition Bar

Social Media

Family Olympics

Vegetables from garden

Big Brother

Media Publicity Memories

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How Do We Relate? A positioning statement is a tool designed to allow organizations, or even individuals, to assess their relationship to other groups (people) doing similar work. What makes you unique? What niche does your organization fill, and how does this enable you to be more effective? We’ve provided the blank template below as a tool to enable new levels of understanding and focus. We’ve also filled out an example version.

WHAT

I’m the only

HOW

that

TO WHOM

for

WHERE

in

WHY

that want(s) to

WHEN

in an era of

example: I’m the only youth empowerment organization that engages youth through sport and gardening for children in Savannah who want to become future leaders in an era of complicated community issues.

How Do We Fit?

youth empowerment through sports

By comparing your organization with others doing similar work in your local region on a set of criteria, the functional space for your organization can begin to be defined. To the right is a quick positioning exercise, by no means comprehensive, executed with a few highlevel searches for community based organizations operating the Savannah area. These organizations were roughly rated on a set of criteria, which allowed for a comparison with Gatorball Academy.

outreach program

GBA

Performance Initiatives

YMCA of Coastal Georgia Choice Neighborhood Youth Advisory Board

The American Legion American Diabetes Association

Fellowship of Christian Athletes Boy Scouts of America

community engagement

Step Up Savannah

American Second Harvest Kids Cafe United Way of the Coastal Empire Habitat For Humanity

community shelter

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What Is Important? Much of the material presented here is the codification of a series of exercises we conducted with Gator Rivers and Debra Hasan designed to illuminate the work that they are already accomplishing through Gatorball Academy, and to provide a roadmap for continued growth. The photos on this page and the following page illustrate the results of one of those activities; an exercise centered around goal setting and prioritization in an effort to concentrate on increasing the efficacy of core competencies. How could GBA get better at what they already do well, by setting aside organizational elements that might distract from their mission and values?

“We’re trying to find out who our niche is. We believe it’s middle school and elementary school...because this is when they are so impressionable and they say, “ Oh I’ll always remember, I was six years old when you came to my school.” (Gator Rivers) Short Term Goals

Mid Term Goals

Long Term Goals

Work As A Team

Connection

Healthy Living / Mind, Body, Spirit

Understand Community Resources

Goal Setting

Problem Solvers

Enjoy Sports and Gardening

Independence

Self Motivation

Awareness Of Others

Solid Winning Team

College Education

Receives And Gives Positive Feedback

Collaboration

Leaders / Community Ambassadors

Develops Relationships With Adults

Income, Prevention Of Poverty

Freedom From Cultural Stigmas

Abides By Rules And Contracts

Confidence

Athletic Success / College, Professional

Build / Improve Basketball Skills

Empathy

Character / Doing The Right Thing

Learns To Avoid Risks

Competence

Personal Success

Leads / Speaks In Front Of Groups

High School Graduation

Sustainability

Participates In Community Service

Compassion

The Value In Giving Back

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7. CONCLUSION Real community happens when our stories collide with other people’s. Real community action happens when we look at the bits and pieces that fly off during those collisions, and realize that they mean something. We can realize that homelessness doesn’t have the face we thought it did, or that we have a voice and someone is listening. We can discover that the world is a more complicated place than we thought, but we can also discover that we have agency in that world, and that our voices and stories have tangible impacts on the people and systems around us.

This book is about story, and agency, and discoveries, and growth, and awakenings. To call the weeks that the students, both from SCAD and the high schools, spent together a process or a project seems wrong in a way, because processes are inherently inhuman. These weeks could not have happened if our group of designers went into the high schools and dictated what was about to happen; if we were just one more authority figure telling a group of teenagers what they could and couldn’t do. Instead, we all discovered that there was a new and better way of doing things, and that way was fundamentally human.

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Together we learned. Together we discovered what impact the community had on us, and what impact we could have on the community. We sincerely hope that the stories that you’ve read here, the beautiful struggles and wonderful successes, will inspire you to go out and do. After all, groups make change, but groups need people. Start there, and give people a voice. You never know what might happen.

“You can never underestimate the innate knowledge, empathy, and perspective of anyone you collaborate with. Every conversation is a gift. ”. David Sherwin Alexandria, VA david.sherwin@frogdesign.com www.frogdesign.com

“I continue to be amazed how magical connecting to someone is. Design does that for me. I hope it does the same for others too.”. Marina Petrova Sliven, Bulgaria marinapetrova2@yahoo.com

“I realize that I love working with teenagers, and making them feel that they can accomplish anything if they put the effort.”. Carol Lora San Juan,PR carolalora1@gmail.com calora20@student.scad.edu

“High school students have a unique outlook on the world and are willing to think critically to create ways to enact change if only given the opportunity and enabled with confidence in the value of their own efforts.”. Katie Mansell Cookeville, TN kmansell72@gmail.com

“There is value here, value in the emotional connections that have been made. There is something larger than ourselves and we have something to give.” Eric Green Lakeport, CA info@ericgreensite.com www.ericgreensite.com

“There is so much opportunity to bring more empowerment and awareness to these students’ lives. All of them want to be successful and do the right thing.”. Robynn Butler Lakewood, CO robynnbutler.prosite.com

8. OUR TEAM “It’s amazing how much transformation took place, both in myself and the students, in such a short amount of time.”. Alexandra Pappalardo Chicago, IL apappa80@yahoo.com

“I’ve been honored to bear witness to the power of transformation when individuals are given the opportunity to combine their unique insights in order to actualize a vision that is defined and created by the group as a whole.”. Scott Boylston New York City, NY sboylsto@scad.edu

“As designers, we talk about creating with and for people, but often don’t get out there and do it. This project grew us, me, by tossing us in the deep end, where the current is strong, and the path unclear. But hearing the stories and watching the evolutions reminded me of why I do what I do: because there are people out there, and they need to know they have a voice.”. Nathan Sundberg Chester, NH natesundberg@gmail.com www.natesundberg.com

“The best memory from this experience for me is about our final class. During the presentation to the Beach High School Principal, the most quiet student in our class professionally presented his part and even went further and strongly advocated the idea of Violence Free Week: “I think violence week will make a huge impact!”. Naz (Najmeh) Mirzaie Tehran, Iran nazmirzaie@gmail.com http://www.behance.net/NajmehMirzaie

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9. THANK YOU The teachers at Groves, Beach and Savannah High Schools; Ms. Dawson, Ms. Green, Ms. Wilson and Ms. Reese– you allowed us to disrupt your normal curriculum and get to know your students, you partnered with us in the activities and we hope that you got as much out of it as we did. David Sherwin and Erin Sanders at Frog Design; you entrusted us with the results of your work and said “go forth and learn!” We thank you for providing us with the opportunity to work with this beautiful toolkit, and for allowing us the space to change and contextualize it, and provide feedback. Marvin Heery, who visited the team at Groves High to lend perspective and his experience to their exploration of homelessness in the community Debra Hasan and Gator Rivers, without whom there would be no teams at schools. Deb connected SCAD with the high schools and facilitated the entire process. Gator inspired us all with his passion and love of people. We thank you deeply for inviting us in, and letting us look and touch! Professor Scott Boylston, who said from day one that we as students would be thrown into a complex and chaotic field of play, and that adaptability and flexibility were the attributes that would save us. You provided a space for us to step outside of designing in a studio for abstract concepts and connected us to real people, reminding us of why we do what we do in a deep and fundamental way.

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We Have A Voice