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Natasha Liston-Beck Syracuse University B. Arch Fourth Year

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Natasha Liston-Beck 912.536.1086 njliston@syr.edu

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CONTENTS TYPOLOGICAL • ADAPTABLE

(4 - 9)

GROTESQUE • COMPLEX SITE (10 - 15) INSTITUTIONAL • DOMESTIC (16 - 19) PROCESS • THEORY • ANALOG (20-21) 3


TYPOLOGY | SEQUENCE | REUSE | PLAY FLORENCE, ITALY FALL 2018 PARTNER PROJECT WITH JONATHAN PANG

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While studying abroad in Florence, Italy, this travel studio emphasized the analysis of building typology. The final design prompt was to adapt part of an old prison complex on the edge of Florence’s old city into a new programmed space using our knowledge of typology. This complex, with parts already having been converted into public housing, small shops, exhibition space and restaurants with public courtyard punctuating its interior world, was lacking in certain types of public space: particularly performance and play space. Using the Villia Giulia and the Campo in Siena as precedents, we produced a project with multiple zones of space, with specific interior and exterior programs. The Campo became essential to our concept of both the sequence through the complex and to the relationship with the city and the interior world of the complex. This informed our relationship to the street with this frame-and-loggia filter and to the complex and downtown Florence with the viewing loggia which is arrived at after passing through the retained memory of the half-panopticon of the prison. All work completed with equal intellectual and physical input from both team members.


movement

Public Space in the Complex

Cafe courtyard

Piazza with Hierarchy

Villa Giulia Circulation

Cloister Typology

Loggia Typology

Courtyard axial movement

Domus Typology

Cafe courtyard

Piazza di Campo -

Interior/Exterior Relationships

Loggia grounded for filtering Connection to the dense interior world of the city

Loggia elevated for viewing Prioritized view of the countryside

Diagrams from site and precedent study examining site posturing and typologies present in the design. Please note that the aerial image and the panopticon photo are not original to the authors of the project. Housing and Private Civic and Public Recreation

Loggia grounded for filtering Connection to the viale and city as countryside

Viale Bar

Loggia Typology

Loggia elevated for viewing Prioritized view of the dense interior world of the Le Murate complex

Public play space and theater New urban Campo in the complex

Villa Giulia Circulation

Piazza di Campo -

Interior/Exterior Relationships

Loggia grounded for filtering Connection to the dense interior world of the city

Loggia elevated for viewing Prioritized view of the countryside

Loggia elevated for viewing Prioritized view of the dense interior world of the Le Murate complex

Object

Loggia grounded for filtering Connection to the viale and city as countryside

Housing Bar

5 Public play space and theater New urban Campo in the complex


Ground floor plan 1

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5

10

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All drawings were produced in a reciprocal nature with initial layout completed by one partner and then traded to the other for further development multiple times. Therefore, both design and final representation were heavily influenced by each of us directly. The plan drawing on this page emphasizes the threezoned design as well as the programmatic bent-bar with extended housing and public program. The longitudinal section which highlights the relationship between the city and the complex through the design of the sequence. The cross section shows the similarities and differences also developed in collaged perspectives.

Cross Section 1

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5

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20

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The model was completely hand cut; I was primarily responsible for the construction of the base, ground plane, playground, cloister and central object-building. Jonathan was primarily responsible for cutting the pieces for the central building and for the construction of the street-side buildings. There is a strong grain and directionality in the project emphasized through the model materiality and developed from the structure of the previous cell walls. The ground plane changes reference the memory of the prison wings and are used as a directional threshold between the side courtyards (playground and cloister and the central performance space.

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MEMORY | HUMOR | DOUBLE | PROCESS BERLIN, GERMANY SPRING 2018

= 100’

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This project, a library and cenotaph memorial on the difficult site of the Bebelplatz in Berlin, the location of one of the most significant book burnings in Nazi Germany, required a depth of theoretical and formal exploration. One of our primary tasks was to understand the complex relationship between remembering and forgetting as two sides of the same thing, as inseparable doppelgangers. I became specifically drawn to ideas of censorship and silencing which led me to the disturbing form of the tongue. Through my research of the grotesteque, I became fascinated with the qualities of humor which can be used to untangle atrocious pasts. The use of the tongue also led me to question the relationship between container and contained: what is it that makes a tongue so disturbing, the lack of a mouth to hold it? the texture itself? And what does it mean to have an empty tongue, or one filled with books? If a tongue is not in a mouth but somewhat contained in another object, does that make it alright? I capitalized on the Humboldt-University library next to the site and took it over with these severed tongues to explore the relationship between container and contained and the violence of remembering and forgetting.


B

Reception and Circulation

B

A

A Library Administration

Loading Dock Special Collections Stacks

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Special Collections Stacks

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Reading Rooms

Book Restoration

Reading Rooms

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C

A

A

New Arrivals Exhibition

Ground Plan 1/8” = 1’

Cenotaph Void

Non-entrance Exhibition

First Plan 1/8” = 1’

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Image transfers were integral to the design process both theoretically and formally. Specifically, the idea that reality leaves traces, but also blank spaces was essential, and rendering through acetone transfer embodies this fuzziness of memory and loss. By image transferring in multiple layers on mylar sheets mounted to grey board, I produced an even fuzzier but still clear reading of the image. Then, returning to detail with ink and charcoal, I could emphasize or disguise different aspects of the image. The middle image is the digital collage used to produce the two different image transfers above and below during the experimentation process.

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The casting process also has a similar theoretical relationship to the project. The cast object retains a memory of the mold, it’s texture and detailing and sometimes even actual pieces of the mold which are too embedded to safely remove. Through casting, we also worked with the idea of the living versus the dead with heavy concrete casts and agar growth medium casts planted with alfalfa. Because of the quick repeatability of the casting process, I was able to test various different methods of mold production (CNC and laser cutting) as well as various additives, including glass, charcoal, and hot glue, and finally a gloss finish.

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Container / Contained

Container / Contained

Container Program Container / Contained Program - Technical services Uncontained Entrance / Non-Entrance A Almost - Library administration B - ReferencePartially desk Contained and sectionTransition / Internal Threshold Contained Contained Container - Loans C andFully returns - Mechanical rooms

Entrance, reception, exhibition, group rooms Reading room, restoration, library administration, reference desk Cenotaph, library stacks

Contained as Container Program - Cenotaph void: Room for 20000 missing books / Contained - Library solid:Container Nonfiction, Fiction, Graphic Novels, Periodicals

Un-contained Program - Reception / lobby Container Program - New arrivals and - Reading Room(s) - Technical services exhibition space -Group meeting rooms -Special collections - Library administration -Seminar room - Reference desk and section

- Loans and returns - Mechanical rooms

C

B B C A

A B

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Program This page isProgram composed of explorations Un-contained of Container the ideas of container and contained both Reception / lobby - New arrivals and - Technical services formally and theoretically in relationship Reading Room(s) exhibition space - Library administration to the project and its program. Eventually -Group meeting rooms -Special collections - Reference desk and section through iteration I arrived on the design to the -Seminar room - Loans and returns left which programmatically defined the three - Mechanical rooms types of containment in relation to sequence. The almost uncontained tongue serves to Un-contained Program dislocate the visitor from the original entrance, - Reception / lobby - New arrivals and now non-entrance, to the new asymmetrical - Reading Room(s) exhibition space entrance, reorienting the visitor to the site. -Group meeting rooms -Special collection Partially contained tongues become threshold -Seminar room spaces and semi-private program. Finally, the most “sacred� program of the library and the cenotaphy are in fully contained containers.


Conference Room

Administration

Conference Room

Administration

Entrance

Reception and Circulation Desk

Building Services

Entrance Section 1/8” = 1’

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DOMESTIC | INSTITUTIONAL | PUBLIC UPPER WEST SIDE, NYC FALL 2017 This project is an institutional building in Upper West Manhattan near Grant’s Tomb and Riverside Church. The site has a very rich history which I chose to highlight in this design through the domestic scale. This building matches the fabric of the city in material, and shifts between readings as a large institutional building and a series of domestic buildings. This building aims to facilitate the transition between city, to the Southeast, and garden, Riverside Park to the Northwest. It also facilitates the tansition between and domestic and institutional since it lies at the edge between the mostly residential Harlem and more institutional Upper West Side of Manhattan. It produces this transition through a cross-grain rhythm particularly evident in plan which balances the structural scale of row houses with the structural and ornamental rhythm of the Jewish Seminary and the Riverside Church. The program includes five major elements: assembly, exhibition, contemplation, archive, and printmaking studios. The assembly space is both indoor and outdoor with the opportunity to open the wall between the two spaces creating an even greater space of assembly.

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and political platform.

My design process was primarily sketchbased. I was constantly shifting between plan, section, axonometric and perspective to work through different issues in the project. These perspective sketches show designed moments in the primary sequence, especially the main assembly space and the comtemplative space. The plan sketches are early attempts at reconciling the study of housing morphology shown to the left with the institutional scale of the building through repetition and rhythm. The clear division and sidedness of the plan was something I tried to break down over the course of the project through the introduction of gross-grain.

DISINTEGRATION OF PRIVATE SPACE

BUILDING IS PRIVATE SPACE IN THE CITY

UNIT IS PRIVATE SPACE IN THE BUILDING

BEDROOM IS PRIVATE SPACE IN THE UNIT

U / W TYPOLOGY

COURT TYPOLOGY

H TYPOLOGY

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I TYPOLOGY

T TYPOLOGY


These plans (from left to right) are the upper street level, equal to Riverside Drive and Grant’s Tomb, the second is the level of the lower corner towards the city, and the final is an uppper level showing further flexible use exhibition space and the upper indoor assembly space. As is shown in earlier perspective drawings, this indoor assembly space is able to be opened up to connect to the outdoor assembly space for larger demonstrations and events that are intended to take place in this active complex. These plans show most clearly the crossgrain rhythm and its structuring effects on circulation and program.

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MEMORY

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PRODUCTION

CANFIELD DRIVE, ERIE CANAL

mold topography and body silences

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topography

topography silences

body

body silences

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CASTING SPRING 2017

These two projects were produced under the theoretical framework of an elective class taught by Linda Zhang, the 2017-2018 Boghosian Fellow who I also worked with for the studio project in Berlin. The first project deals with the complexity of physical memory with regards to the site of the Mike Brown shooting. This was a partner project with Amanda Liberty where we chose to link the idea of the ideal vitruvian man with the depiction of Mike Brown’s autopsy report to draw difficult connections between social norms and brutality. The second project, memorializing the Erie canal, was far less controversial, but aimed to produce similarly complex readings. The project was a large installation piece, which each student in the class was responsible for the conceptual and physical production of one layer of this monument. This project activated ideas of hollowness and solidity by problematizing the construction process. My process specifically looked at movement through repetitive actions like driving piles for construction, movement of horses pulling the barges, tie rods, rudders and the wake of a boat. All of these things leave a trace on reality and on my cast represcentation.


actions and repetitive actions and repetitive use use Mule movement

Tie rod Boat memory - Pile wake Pilefor driver for construction driver construction

Mule movement Mule movement

Boat tiller Boat tiller

Tie rod

Boat memory Boat memory - wake - wake

Construction rail scaffolding Construction rail scaffolding

Tie rod Tie rod

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Joint Detail B

Joint Detail A

Joint Detail A

Joint Detail B

Joint Detail B Joint Detail A

Natasha Liston-Beck Class of 2020

Joint Detail A

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Profile for Natasha

Spring 2019 Portfolio  

Architectural Portfolio showcasing the first four years of my design work at Syracuse University.

Spring 2019 Portfolio  

Architectural Portfolio showcasing the first four years of my design work at Syracuse University.

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