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portfolio f a l k

natalya


new metropolis . chicago

fusion . chicago

upcycling . haiti

chapel . champaign

boutique hotel . chicago

aquae . chicago

japan pavilion . hanover

sketches

photography

table of contents

portfolio

natalya f a l k

university of illinois


A twenty million square foot, mixed-use development along the lakefront of Chicago. The site is located at the McPier trucking yard, an area once considered for the 2016 Olympic Village. The site’s centrally-located transit hub serves as a major port of entry to Chicago’s Bronzeville neighborhood and the city’s south side.

2nd place recipient of Ryerson Travelling Design Award Nominated for AIA Chicago Design Award Partners: Carolyn Mesha & Gavin Sharp

new

metropolis

c h i c a g o

arch 574 archtectural/urban &

preservation

spring 2012


GOALS

SIG

DE

RK S MANG ND DI LA IL N BU

IVEN S -DR ES ART ITIATIV ITY IN MUN COM

STRATEGIES

ECOLOGICA

LLY RE SP NS IT O ECO NO M LY VIBRAN L T RA VE

VISUAL COHE LY SI

C UL TU

TR A

EXTEND CHICAGO SKYLINE TO SITE

L OCA CES OF L UR USEERGY SO EN ENCOURAGE SUSTAINABLE INNOVATIONS

COL THINLABOR K TA ATIVE NKS

CREATE ECONOMIC CORE

HBOREVITAL RHO IZE OD/ THE ARE A

NEIG

P IN ROP VE ER ST TY ME W NT ITH VA H LU IGH E

The project is located at the intersection of Lake Shore Drive and I-55, south of McCormick Place in Chicago. The development aims to be culturally vibrant, ecologically responsible, pedestrian friendly, and strategically designed for future growth and change. Public parks, connections to the lakefront and McCormick Place, and diverse program - including retail, public, institutional, residential, hotel, and office - work together to connect with and draw in residents of nearby neighborhoods.

NT ME IN TA ER NT PE LO VE ICT DE TR S DI OR ES F ION PLACECREAT R IGN DESTDOOR OU

FR IN AS N TR OV UC AT TU IVE RE

O TS T POIN YPES CESSUSER T C A N TE O CREEABASED P SIT LO N VE LA DE G P IN AS PH

IN

CE

EN ND PE LL) E U D IN R F GY L O ER TIA N E AR (P

LE SIB D ON TE IA B LE EN LY V RI AL IC

LA E KE MU FR LA ON TE T C CH HA ICA RA GO CT ’S CREA ER TE S E N PLAC SE OF E FO IDEN R TH TITY E AR / EA

HIG RES H POPU IDEN LAT EMP LOY TIAL &ION, MEN T DE NSIT AC Y FU CO TU M R E OD GR AT OW E & TH PLA N FO R

DESIGN FLEXIBLE SPACES TO ACCOMODATE CHANGE OVER TIME

KEY:


Financial District

Program Matrix

High

PROGRAM MATRIX Medium

R

R

G ALTER N

E N TE R T

INF

BIKE FRIE

H IG

DENSI

T

IB EX

LE SPA C

EN

&

Ped & Bike Friendly Community

FL

E GROW

H

R TU

Collaborative Use of Local Energy Plan for Future Think Tanks Energy Sources Independence Growth

PED

NDEPEN YI

FU

A L E N E RG

G

OC

E NE R

TIVE THI RA

L

TMENT VA ES

Property with High Investment Value

COLLABO

RTAINME

INV

EN

ECO

I

P

A

COM

F LAKE

L AN

258,859

19,880,101

TE

Entertainment District

TE

RTAINME

NT

Total

CREATION RE

Outdoor Recreation

ES

Museum

MIC DIST

Y

Energy Services/Research 1,558,200

NO

LY

1,594,629

VITALIZE

ND

RE

SE U M

690,290

Entertainment

RE

BRONZEVILLE

Innovative Revitalize Create Thriving Infrastructure Neighborhood Economic District

TH

ORTS SP

STRUCTU

MU

Transport Hub

OVATION

N CE DE

NSIT RA

IVE PUBLIC T AT

NMENT & AI

824,316 2,893,800

Create Sense Extend Create Access Develop of Identity for Chicago Points to Site Phasing Plan the Area Skyline to Site Based on User Types

NN

Y

Parking

SING PLA

-TANKS NK

Institutional

KI N G PAR

RA

392,884

HA

E LU

CATION

426,146

Public

SS POIN

NT

U ED

2,290,528

Green Space

E CC

CT RI

CIVIC

3,486,663

Hotel

L SKY INE

N

EN SPAC E

RE

Office

ITY IDE

TS

HOTEL

Residential - Condos

UN

ITY

IDENTIA L

OFFICE

1,023,562 476 - 1 bedroom 1,907,416 636 - 2 bedroom 476 - 3 bedroom 633 - 1 bedroom 2,532,809 844 - 2 bedroom 633 - 3 bedroom

Emulate Chicago’s Lakefront Character

M

NT

ES

Residential - Rental

T C HA R

R

Retail

IDENTIA L

Design Landmark Buildings

N RO

TE AC

RETAIL

ES

Number of Units

ARK BUIL S

Square Footage

M

NG DI

D

Low

High Density Flexible Spaces Arts Driven for Change Community Over Time Innitiatives


SOLAR HEATED SIDEWALKS

ATER CON T MW

L RO

STO R

STO R

PEDE ST

ATER CON T MW

L RO

ALTERN A

& BIKE AN FO RI SED CU

RCES OU

E ENERGY S TIV

E ENERGY S TIV

RCES OU

ALTERN A

Inside Transit Hub

GREEN ROOFS

(MELT SNOW)

WA

ALTERN A

E ENERGY S TIV

RCES OU

STO R

WAVE VIBRATION ENERGY

WASTE-TO-ENERGY PLANT

ANAGEM EM ST

T EN

ATER CON T MW

L RO

ALTER N

IVE PUBLIC T AT

NSIT RA

NSIT RA

ALTER N

GREYWATER TREATMENT

IVE PUBLIC T AT

E ENERGY S TIV

RCES OU

ALTERN A

BIOSWALES

The green initiatives diagram to the left describes the potential sustainable practices that can take place on the site. The various initiatives include alternative energy sources, storm water control, alternative transit methods, waste management, and pedestrian and bike focused streets.


U UP UP

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

UP

DN DN

DN

DN

DN

Transit Hub_Level 0

Transit Hub_Level 1

UP

UP

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

The centrally-located transit hub is accessible from ground level and the platform level that spans across the McPier site. Cars and buses travel through the main plaza only - allowing the site to remain car-free - while pedestrians and bikers move to the hub from various ramps and paths on the site. The hub houses a station for Amtrak, Metra, and CTA trains that allow passengers to enter and exit the site in a variety of ways.

DN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT

DN

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK STUDENT PRODUCT


STREET DIAGRAM

A

MAIN BOULEVARD

B

BIKE BOULEVARD

USERS: PEDESTRIANS CYCLISTS TRAM RIDERS

USERS: PEDESTRIANS CYCLISTS

Major thoroughfare following the suspended tram Double-wide bike lane for faster commuting No cars

dark blue_A light blue_B orange_C yellow_D

RADIUS = 5 MINUTE WALK

Major thoroughfare for commuters on bicycles Curb separates pedestrians from cyclists so bicycles can travel faster

NODE DIAGRAM

red_on site tram stations/stops blue_points of interest radius of circle_5 minute walking

C

D

PEDESTRIAN BOULEVARD USERS: PEDESTRIANS CYCLISTS

No curb separating cyclists from pedestrians

PEDESTRIAN STREET USERS: PEDESTRIANS

Small street for pedestrians only

GREEN DIAGRAM

dark green_green space light green_green roofs tan_beach/ lakefront paths


Site Model


Winner of Critical Mass Student Choice Award Nominated for Chicago Prize Partner: Jenna Goebig

A mixed use development on nine acres of unused land along the Chicago River, including a residential/office tower, a hotel tower, and an iconic performing arts center. Focus on the arts center allowed for the development of its expressive form coupled with a unique skin system in order to create a distinguished, place-identifying development. arch 574

fusion on the river

c h i c a g o

architectural / urban &

fall

preservation

2011


Vehicles Pedestrians Boats

SITE PLAN WITH ACCESS DIAGRAM

SITE DIAGRAMS


TOWER ON HARRISON Residential Condos Commercial Office Commercial Retail Water Taxi Station

WELLS STREET

Hotel Jazz Club Restaurant & Bistro Commercial Retail Artist & Student Apts

SHELL & ISLAND

Fine Arts School Theatre Art Gallery & Exhibition Outdoor Amphitheater

PROGRAM AXON

VIEW FROM HARRISON & WELLS


RIVERBOAT APPROACH TO SITE

LONGITUDINAL SECTION THROUGH SHELL


GROUND LEVEL PLAN

SECTION THROUGH SHELL WING

The “Shell,” the site’s expressive performing arts center, is composed of a central theater and atrium flanked by two wings - one containing an art gallery and the other housing a fine arts school. Separating the wings from the central form are passages that lead from the street corner to the site’s outdoor amphitheater. Stepped landscaping provides seating for outdoor performances and is separated from the Shell by an elevated bike path.


Two composite bays

Concrete & metal truss arches clad with metal panels

Tension rods

Prefabricated panels clad with metal panels

Metal tube framing

Floor plates & columns

STRUCTURAL AXON _BAY

The Shell’s unique and expressive form required an equally unique structural/skin system. Columns and floor plates are independent from the building’s skin, which is supported by a series of arches along the building’s wings (inspired by the Saint Louis Arch). The rounded, stepped form of the arches enhance the performing arts center’s shell-like form, a result of project’s conceptual focus on a synergy of water and music.


SHELL ATRIUM


A submission to the ACSA’s 2011 Haiti Ideas Challenge which aims to address long-term solutions for the earthquakeravaged country and its epicenter, Léogâne. The concept of upcycling drives the design of the existing market and proposed “Eco-Campus” as well as the design of passive drainage systems for the low-lying sugarcane-growing region. haiti

ideas

challenge

upcycling . haiti Partner: Max Garland

l é o g â n e

arch 572 bevhavior and environment

spring 2011


HYGIENE

URBAN

TOUSSAINT LOUVERTURE

MOUNTAINS MULATTOBLAN HEALTH

COCKFIGHTING SOCCER PROTESTANT TOURISM

SUBSISTENCE CORRUPTIONFARMING POVERTY SANITATION

CHARCOAL AGRICULTURE HAITIEN LITERACY EPICENTER CAP PETIONVILLE DUVALIERS SHACK SLUMS

RESTAVEC

BLACK PLACAGE CREOLE AUTHENTICITY

LAND TENURE

RITUAL MUDSLIDES COOKING

COMMERCE EARTHQUAKE

DAMAGE CATHOLIC

HAITIFOOD

MUD COOKIES

SUGAR

WATER CHRISTOPHE

GOAT

JACMEL

HURRICANE DIASPORA

VOODOOVENDORS MARKET MANGO KINSHIP RARA COAST PORT-AU-PRINCE CROPS FOOD AID

DEATH CARNIVAL PRESIDENTIAL MIDDLE CLASS STREET PALACE SCHOOLS SOIL EROSION EDUCATION CHILDREN SHANTYTOWN BEANS BOAT PEOPLE DEFORESTATION BABY DOC SLAVERY FRENCH UNEMPLOYMENT

RICE

CITE SOLEIL

INDEPENDENCE TAINO HISPANIOLA CHOLERA PAPA DOC BANANA

YAM

POOR

IMPORTS COFFEE EXPORTS

ARISTIDE

LEOGANE CASTE

HOT-COLD

The key focus of the project is to create a closed-loop system between the market and Eco-Campus in order to create jobs, ensure financial wellbeing, reuse materials, reduce waste, and encourage & develop community empowerment. Great emphasis was placed on understanding the history and culture of Haiti in order to best meet their needs.


ENERY WATER LUMBER PAVERS

MARKET

ECO-CAMPUS TRASH RECYCLABLES COMPOST SEWAGE

CLOSED LOOP UPCYCLING SYSTEM SOLUTIONS AT ECO-CAMPUS:

IDENTIFIED NEEDS FOR MARKET:

• • • • • • •

• • • • • •

TRASH COLLECTION RECYCLING COLLECTION & EDUCATION CLEAN DRINKING WATER CONSISTENT SOURCE OF ENERGY SUSTAINABLE BUILDING MATERIALS EDUCATION ABOUT CONSTRUCTION TECHNIQUES EDUCATION ABOUT SUSTAINABLE FARMING PRACTICES

PROPER DRAINAGE STRUCTURALLY STABLE MARKET STALLS EARTHQUAKE- AND HURRICANE- RESISTANT STRUCTURES PUBLIC RESTROOMS DISPOSAL FOR SPOILED PRODUCE DISPOSAL FOR TRASH


WITH

TH

BY

H HE

PLASTIC BOTTLE CONSTRUCTION

+

CONCRETE

PROPOSED CITY MARKET Using plastic bottle construction to create sturdy market stalls with the capacity to store rainwater

COCONUT FIBER OR FILL PLASTIC BOTTLES WITH 1 DIRT 2 MIX SUGARCANE BAGASEE WITH OR TRASH

BOTTLES SEPARATED BY 3 STACK ABOUT 2” OF CONCRETE

+

USE A TROWEL TO SMOOTH THE OUTER SURFACE OF THE CONCRETE

5

PAINT FINISHED SURFACE

CONCRETE

CONCRETE

4

COCONUT FIBER OR 2 MIX SUGARCANE BAGASEE WITH

BOTTLES SEPARATED BY 3 STACK ABOUT 2” OF CONCRETE

4

USE A TROWEL TO SMOOTH THE OUTER SURFACE OF THE CONCRETE

5

PAINT FINISHED SURFACE

CONCRETE

BOTTLES SEPARATED BY 3 STACK ABOUT 2” OF CONCRETE

4

USE A TROWEL TO SMOOTH THE OUTER SURFACE OF THE CONCRETE

5

PAINT FINISHED SURFACE

The proposed method of construction focuses on alleviating Haiti’s pre-earthquake waste disposal problem by incorporating discarded trash and plastic bottles with construction techniques familiar to Haitians. Additionally, a byproduct of the local sugarcane industry (bagasse) is mixed with the concrete for further reinforcement.

4

USE A TROWEL TO SMOOTH THE OUTER SURFACE OF THE CONCRETE

5

PAINT FINISHED SURFACE

5

PAINT FINISHED SURFACE

MOCK UP WALL


PLY

P SU

RN

U RET

VALUE ADDED:

DRAINS OFFSITE

LIQUEFACTION MITIGATION STORMWATER DRAINAGE

MARKET

BEFORE

AFTER LIQUEFACTION

Water fills in the pore space between soil particles. Friction between the particles holds sediment together.

BEFORE

Liquefaction increases water-filled spaces between particles, allowing sediment to flow like liquid to the ground surface.

AFTER

WITH DRY WELLS Liquefaction increases the water-filled spaces in the dry wells, lessening the amount of liquefaction the occurs to the ground surface.


A non-denominational burial chapel located at the Mt. Hope Cemetery. inspired by the phenomenologist views of Professor Juhani Pallasmaa and the research of Stephen & Rachel Kaplan on the restorative qualities of nature. Considerations included the processional sequence to and through the chapel as well as the emotional experiences of the mourners. n o n . d e n o m i n a t i o n a l arch 572

burial.chapel

bevhavior and environment

c h a m p a i g n fall 2010


CASKET COLUMBARIUM

FAREWELL PAVILION

URN COLUMBARIUM


W

M

FLOWERS

CHAPEL LOBBY

COLD STORAGE OFFICE

OFFICE

PRIEST

MECH.

FUNERAL PROCESSION

HEARSE ENTRY


Following the ceremony mourners are led through the farewell garden where the calming sounds, smells, and sights of nature are intended to provide comfort.

Rain water collected from the “butterfly� roof flows behind the altar vision panel and into the shallow fountation, inspired by Luis Barragan, t,hat runs alongside the north-facing curtain wall.


Guests wandering the farewell garden are calmed by the trickling sound of water in thefountain that runs above and ends in a shallow pool. In winter this is drained and becomes a granite plaza situated between the two outdoor columbariums. The ceremony concludes at the farewell pavilion where mourners can say their final goodbyes in the copper-clad structure. Texture and materiality are used to create simple & subtle visual interest that does not distract from the funeral ceremony. Patinaed copper panels line the inside of the visiting room so light may reflected down the sides of the tall, narrow room and brighten the room with an ethereal quality.


A thirty-two room hotel design located along the northern Chicago lake front. In congruence with the rectilinear nature of the city, the hotel undulates orthogonally in a horizontal manner. Guests can retreat from the busy streetscape to the rear garden that imitates this same push and pull vertically with a sculptural green space.

b o u t i q u e. h o te l

c h i c a g o

arch 475

arch. design and development

fall 2009


level 3

level 1

level 2

level 4


Three room types accommodate a variety of guests and create different price points. Windows are oriented along the east-west axis to create a connection between the busy streetscape of Sheridan Rd and the rear alley. The exterior facing glazing leads to an enclosed balcony with a reflective interior that allows only ambient light to enter the unit so that guests will not be awoken by direct sunlight. A central atriumfacing window brightens the opposite side of the room as ambient light filters from the atrium into the room, reducing the need for artificial lighting. Roooms without a balcony have a clerestory ribbon window covered with an extruded aluminum lighting screen to allow only ambient light to enter the space. The room is divided into three major areas that are separated by thick wall partitions. This creates a sense of flow and openness in the room yet defines a sense of enclosure for each space.


The hotel’s structure consists of EIFS on concrete and is laid out on a structural grid of alternating columns and bearing walls. Thermal bridging from the balconies is prevented by Schock Isokorb insulation, through which steel reinforcement is pierced in order to structurally support the balconies. The atrium is covered with an aluminum light screen to allow only ambient light to filter into the central vertical space, which then filters into the rooms. This screen also covers the ground level glazing to create definition from outside space.


A fifty-unit hostel designed to incorporate a public park area in coordination with revitalization of the Chicago riverfront. The design is linked to UrbanLab’s Growing Water: Chicago in 2100--a project that aims to redesign the city’s current water system and introduce new green space, completing the Chicago’s “Emerald Necklace” as proposed by Daniel Burnham.

Nominated for Earl Prize Partner: Brian Vesely

aquae.hostel

c h i c a g o

arch 374

arch. design and t h e c i t y

spring 2009


The hostel is located in situ with the existing structure of Wacker Drive along the Chicago River.


The hostel rooms are designed for both short- and long-term stays, with either one, two, three, or five beds per room. Other amenities of the building include medical services, job offices, a bar and cafeteria as well as a public media center. The upper levels feature private media terminals for use by hostel students. The lowest level of the complex includes homeless shelters and a center to aid individuals with job and home searches. This was incorporated to acknowledge the homeless population that frequently inhabits lower Wacker Drive.


The facade features a unique shading device that is electronically controlled to open and close based on the amount of sunlight hitting the building. The shape of the metal mesh shades fits within the structural system.

level 3

level 5

level 7

east-west section


FROM CITY

TO CITY TREATMENT

OVERFLOW

The exterior park level of the complex mimics the geometry of the structure, with individual units acting as reed beds. These reed beds purify rain water and feed into a grey water system. Together these two systems allow the building to remain “off the grid” as far as water usage and the building owner can even sell water back to the city for profit. Aside from the conservation benefits of the reed beds, they also bring life to the riverfront, which is particularly desolate along the eastern portion of Wacker Dr.

REED BED WATER FILTRATION

PUMP 18” OUTPUT STORM WATER RUNOFF GREY WATER

RADIANT TUBING SUPPLY

FILTER

FILTER

REED BED WATER FILTRATION

REED BED WATER FILTRATION

6” OUTPUT

RADIANT TUBING RETURN

PUMP 18” INPUT STORM WATER RUNOFF GREY WATER


lobby

lobby

reed bed garden level


exterior entry path


Water collection was introduced into the hostel in the phase prior to the final design. This stage incorporated the angular geometry of the previous stage while introducing the concept of integrated green spaces. Layering reed bed levels with hostel units was abandoned, however, due to site weather considerations that would create thermal issues. Spaces were organized programmatically to challenge traditional tall-building design.


A model study of a clear-span structure by Shigeru Ban for the 2000 Hanover Expo in Germany. The 80% recyclable structure is composed of three layers: an interior recycled paper tube lattice system, wooden framework necessary for structural integrity and an exterior paper membrane reinforced with fiberglass.

japan.pavilion

arch 272

2 0 0 0 . h a n o ve r. e x p o

spring 2008

strategies of

arch. design


s k e t c h e s


photographs

london bilbao p a r i s


The incredible complexity of our modern world can sometimes foster the desire for increased regularity and uniformity. Yet, to design universally is to disregard the unique social, economic, political, cultural, and environmental variations that exist among the places where we construct our designs and those places’ inhabitants. Instead we should celebrate and draw inspiration from the primordial hut—a building type adapted to its landscape and evolved over time to meet the needs of its dwellers. The architects of these early forms were participants in the design rather than mere consumers of it and can inform our designs for defined places and people. Without an identified place and people, architecture has no contextual basis and may fail to enhance its inhabitants’ physical and mental well-being. To contextualize our designs, we must design based on the experience of place—through empirical research, observation, and interaction, and removed from personal bias. A bird’s eye perspective of the world does not allow us to appreciate the intricate heterogeneity of a place like that of experiencing it on the ground level. Finally, it must be noted that the inhabitants of our constructed spaces are not merely users, but people—who by nature are irrational, emotional, and far from the ideal, universal, utopian user. Metaphorically speaking, architects should paint not with uniform rollers but with delicate brush strokes that accentuate the cultural and historical context and diversity of a place and its people.

d e s i g n philosophy


work history

skills

Chipman Design . Des Plaines, IL Intern . Summer 2008 - present Construction drawing preparation and revision with emphasis on restaurant design & layout; preparing details and specifications; code verification; product research and selection; administrative tasks

technology . proficient in 3DS Max 2010, Vasari, Revit Architecture 2012, AutoCAD 2012, Adobe Suite CS5, SketchUp, beginner experience with Rhino

CNA Insurance . Chicago, IL Administrative Asst . 2007 - 2009 Operating annuity administration systems; data analysis and entry; administrative tasks

education M.Arch 2012

Candidate for May 2012 University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, IL

B.S.A.S. 2010

University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, IL Minor in Urban Planning

Diploma 2006

Exeter Area High School Exeter, NH

contact 1253 W. Early Ave #3 Chicago, IL 60660 773 . 612 . 8194 nbfalk88@gmail.com

strengths . detail-oriented, focused, timely, responsible, friendly; six years of Spanish language leadership . mentor in Architectural Student Advisory Council mentorship program; team leader in several semesterlong projects

awards . honors 3.95 GPA as of spring 2012 Edwin C. Horner Fellowship ($10,000 stipend + tuition) Martha F. Darmstadt Fellowship ($10,000 stipend + tuition) Active Gargoyle Honor Society member (Spring 2009 - present) James Honor Scholar in undergraduate $8,000 National Merit Scholarship Edward Earl Prize & Chicago Prize nominee (Spring 2009 & Fall 2011)

references Janina Kojs . Chipman Design Arch. John Stallmeyer . University of Illinois Lynne Dearborn . University of Illinois Carol Kuntz . CNA Insurance

resume

natalya f a l k


Portfolio