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NATALIE MARCISZ B. ARCH UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

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925.200.6091 . ncmarcisz@gmail.com 1


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CONTENTS STUDIO WORK THE SHAY: Regenerating the Heart of the Sierra ..................... REDESIGNING CHINATOWN .......................................................... CENTRO CIVICO .................................................................................. IMPROVING THE HOSPITAL INPATIENT ROOM .....................

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ARTWORK 33 MODELS & RENDERINGS 39

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REGENERATING THE HEART OF THE SIERRA

ARNOLD, CA // THESIS 2012-2013 The current economic recession has tested many cities’ infrastructures and has turned many previously thriving areas into ghost towns. The towns within Calaveras County, CA have seen a mix of ups and downs within a 25-mile stretch- Arnold being one that has not been able to keep its head above water. Businesses are closing, people are selling their homes, and the population is in decline. It is curious as to why Arnold seems to be struggling to survive, while Murphys (a town only 12 miles away) has been flourishing. Arnold needs a plan to regenerate the community and bring business and residents back into the area.

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proposed design economic impacts

Attracts residents and community volunteers looking for gathering spaces

COMMUNITY CENTER

Produces an outlet for leadership and a reclaimed sense of town pride Attracts residents looking to learn an artistic and sustainable trade or express their creativity

Arnold sprung up in the mid-1800s due to the inflow of Gold Rush hopefuls. The discovery of gold in the area also brought about a demand for wood products in order to create necessary buildings and mining structures. Thus, the first real industry of logging began with the first mill opening in the 1860s. Steam locomotives were used to transport logs throughout the Sierra Nevada and in the nearby Stanislaus National Forest. One of the trains (called Shays) has been preserved in the nearby Logging Museum. These trains became the catalyst for economy boom of that time period. The logging mill closed in 1931 due to an eventual lack of demand for timber in the area; however, Arnold continued to thrive due to the tourism industry that had developed. Arnold’s towering sequoia trees, clear rivers, and abundance other natural attractions made it a popular area with residents and visitors alike. Tourism still acts as the main source of revenue for the town .

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Attracts non-residents who are looking to learn an artistic and sustainable trade

WOODWORKING SCHOOL & CRAFT CENTER

Produces an economic boost through the cost of attendance, and using the surrounding accomodations

Attracts elderly in the community who want a senior community or assisted care

Attracts non-residents who are looking to retire or recieve assisted level care in a beautiful mountain setting

SENIOR COHOUSING & ASSISTED LIVING

Produces an economic boost by keeping the current elderly population in town, while accomodating non-residents


RESIDENTIAL

COMMUNITY

RETAIL

This project aims to be the new economic catalyst for Arnold, much like the Shay Steam Engines were for the town during the logging era- thus the project title “The Shay”. The Shay’s program includes a community center, woodworking school/ craft center, senior housing, assisted living, and retail space.

SITE PLAN

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BUILDING FORMATION

EAST/ WEST SECTIONS

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ANCHORED IN TOPOGRAPHY


COMMERCIAL

RESIDENTIAL

AXIS & NEGATIVE SPACES

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PROGRAM KEY

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SECOND FLOOR PLAN 10

1 . Community Center lobby 2 . Mini clinic 3 . Doctor’s office 4 . Exam room 5 . Dental exam room 6 . Storage 7 . Auditorium 8 . Craft Center/Woodworking multipurpose space 9 . Craft Center work space 10 . Restrroom 11 . Clean up area 12 . Gallery/ Retail 13 . Visitor’s Center 14 . Public Restroom 15 . Retail 16 . Restaurant

17 . Rentable office space 18 . Community Center administrative office 19 . Lecture room 20 . Kitchen 21 . Event room 22 . Pantry 23 . Outdoor concert space 24 . Finishing room 25 . Woodworking classroom 26 . Woodworking admin. office 27 . Woodworking lobby 28 . Machine room 29 . Underground parking 30 . Mechanical room

GROUND FLOOR PLAN


STRUCTURAL DETAIL

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Building model 1/16”=1’ acrylic and stained basswood

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Tectonic model 1/4�=1’ museum board and stained basswood

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REDESIGNING CHINATOWN

PORTLAND, OREGON // FALL 2012

Located in a historically significant district with a high indigent population, this project presented several interesting challenges. This district is divided into three neighborhoods: Japan Town, Old Town, and Chinatown. This studio collaborated with architecture students at Meiji University in Tokyo, Japan in order to immerse ourselves in the ideals of the culture. Maximizing cost efficiency and program relevance for the surrounding context was also emphasized.

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GROUND FLOOR PLAN

Conceptual courtyard design diagrams 16

The block design was heavily influenced by collaboration with the Japanese architecture students at Meiji University. The idea was formed to break up the blocks into smaller pieces- split up by alleys and interior gathering places. While this idea may not be viable for every block, its general notions of creating active areas for pedestrian interaction with the building can still be upheld. This block has two existing buildings, the Leather Company and the Fleishner Buildingboth of which were kept in order to maintain as much of the historic character of the area as possible. The block is consisted of 3 main building programs including a grocery store, office space, and residential units (in ascending order). The new construction is pulled away from the existing structures in order to create an interior courtyard. The courtyard is raised one level in order to allow maximized solar access as well as a provide space for much needed parking underneath.


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RESIDENTIAL COMMERCIAL RETAIL

Development Cost Expected Revenue/ Year FAR Efficiency Cost Effectiveness Ratio

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NORTH SECTION

26 million 1.4-1.7 million 91% 5.6- 6%


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CENTRO CIVICO VICENZA , ITALY // SPRING 2012

A group of three piazzas located in the heart of Vicenza, Italy surround a historic basilica designed by Andrea Palladio and an adjacent office building . The office building has become a n eyesore t o the community. Replacing it with a building that includes more engaging functions and physical connection to the surrounding area would enliven the community. The design process involved a term abroad in Vicenza, studying not only how to integrate a contemporary building into a historical context, but also what characteristics constitute a successful piazza .

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The form of the building is strongly affected by its surroundings. Its dynamic shape creates two unique piazzas. Many piazzas that were studied during this program were those that emphasized the importance of views. This project became an excellent illustration of those successful piazzas. The building seems to almost crack in half to open up to a church view. When organizing these two buildings, it made sense programmatically to put the larger more public spaces in the bigger building facing busy Piazza Signiori. The smaller programmatic pieces were placed inside the smaller building that faces a quieter street. This idea of directionality of the building further came to life when each building was given both an extra thick stone wall and glass facade. This allowed for the building to engage with certain advantageous points of each courtyard and piazza.

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Proposed building site

Core stone wall on either side of staircase holds artwork, provides seating, and emphasizes the central axis through the building 23


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IMPROVING THE HOSPITAL INPATIENT ROOM WINTER 2011

The current hospital standard is highly efficient and focused on ease of use for the caregiver. Unfortunately, the patients’ comfort becomes an afterthought. The exposed medical equipment, bright lights, and sterile design make the patient feel victimized and has been seen as a hindrance to their healing process. This studio had no site or outside context, but rather focused from the patient’s view outward to create a completely different way of looking at the hospital inpatient room.

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CHALLENGING THE CURRENT INPATIENT ROOM PARADIGM • • • •

creating distinct patient/caregiver zones developing two walls with windows, as well as one in the bathroom hiding medical equipment in easily accessible built in cabinets camouflaging necessary artificial light by creating unique visually pleasing patterns • a living green wall on the side of each room exterior, to be seen by those in the adjacent room

CONSTRUCTION SECTION CUT

PLANS IN SUCCESSION 29


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SKETCHES & ARTWORK A collection of various sketches and artwork that have been produced over the years in my free time. Includes acrylic, watercolor, and graphite media.

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“Poppy” Acrylic

“Hannah” Watercolor & Pencil


“Dandelion” Watercolor & Acrylic

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ON-SITE FREEHAND SKETCHES Various sites around Italy, including Vicenza, Marostica, Bologna and Florence

Unfinished Project by Palladio in Vicenza (above); Piazza in Marostica (right) 36


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RENDERINGS & MODELS A sample of purely reproductive work that displays skills in computer rendering and physical modeling outside of the studio atmosphere.

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Rendering of the First Light House. Designed by University of New Zealand for the Solar Decathalon in 2011 40


Site model of Westwind Camp on the coast of Oregon. Constructed of chipboard contours, basswood buildings, and framed with birch wood.

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NATALIE MARCISZ B.ARCH, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON ncmarcisz@gmail.com (925) 200-6091

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Natalie Marcisz Portfolio  

University of Oregon B.Arch Undergraduate Portfolio

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