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natal i e broton

bs. ar chi tecture

2014 - 2017


^ study of points, lines, and planes


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TINY HOUSES TRENDING

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URBAN TH EFT

15.

19.

25.

33.

41.

the modern derivative of primal living

a park of stolen parts

HEAVY THINGS CAN FLOAT TOO an assortment of objects and their relations

POOLSIDE POSTURES reflections of a sauna

LET THEM EAT CAKE less than standard living

METHODS OF TRANSFORMATION a culinary performance art center

PEAR AND A PRIMITIVE case studies of ruination

317.504.3184 ... nataliebroton@gmail.com

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TINY HO M E S T R E N D IN G

^the mod ern d eriva tive of primal liv ing

fall 2016...prof Enrique Ramirez awarded “Design of Note� for 4th year student-wide Cripe Competition on display at CAP Indy Connector in Indianapolis, IN


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^ co l l ect ive f l o or p l a n A trend of tiny homes is pervading several generations in the form of two “tiny-house lifestyles” including those that are environmentally/ financially conscious, and those who build or buy for luxury. Regardless, the principal intention of a tiny house is to live in limited space with only the necessities of the modern world. In this way, it is a glorified vision of reverting back to the most primal state of living without compromising the evolutionary necessities of technology and expected luxuries. The design also meets this expectation in tandem with the function. Each tiny house is a single story, simply constructed, small housing unit reminiscent of a primitive hut. The forms can be deconstructed

to post and lintel volumes, exposing the collection’s primal derivative. Each house contains an elegant ribbon of solid framework on the side exposed to the street, reminding the dweller and passers-by that this house is of modern times. With the inclusion of many more budget and client-preference constraints, most tiny houses directly resemble a typical suburban house typology, despite the high prices some builders and buyers will pay for a custom design. “Tiny Houses Trending” is a design response which capitalizes on the primal qualities of tiny house lifestyles and outfits a space for both the lowly and ostentatious dwellers.


1. 400 sf

2. 150 sf

3. 400 sf

4. 150 sf

5. 200 sf

6. 600 sf

7. 200 sf

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CONSTRUCTION MADE EASY WITH THESE 10 SIMPLE STEPS:

birch panels

STEP 1: Dig that foundation.

rebar concrete

STEP 2: Form steel reinforcement and molds according to a set of standardized radii. Don’t forget to account for doors and fenestration!

1’

STEP 3: Assemble first layer of steel reinforcememnts on site. STEP 4: Pour concrete. STEP 5: Repeat steps 2-4.

Roof to wall section 14’

STEP 6: Repeat step 5. STEP 7: Clad in wood. STEP 8. Repeat steps 2, 4, and 7 for roof. STEP 9: Install appliances and furniture. STEP 10: Admire your hard work.

^col l e ct ive fac a d e The facade of each dwelling faces inward toward the others, and the most formally intriguing part of the structures are turned toward the public. This allows privacy for the dwellers and a nearly sculptural sea of uninterrupted birch wood for the passers-by.

3.5’


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URBAN T H E F T

^ a p a rk of stolen p a rts

fall 2016...prof Enrique Ramirez


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^si te pl a n # 1/ 3 The proposal for a renewed park at Major Taylor Skate Park in Indianapolis, IN includes three types of objects which transform the lifeless site (top right) into a destination (bottom right) for a larger demographic. 1. Skateable objects: Skateparks most simply are a collection of objects which are either taken from, or reminiscent of the urban landscape. Each skateable object within a city had an original programmatic use. The surgical removal and replacement of them into a skatepark does not compromise their use, but instead reevaluates it and replaces it with an equally valuable function. 2. Pedestrian-scaled objects: “The Phat Hole� is a donut shop on the

site which was designed by the same method. Objects from architectural history were found, collected, and reused with equal programmatic value as their original intent. The objects surrounding the building are intended for pedestrian use as seating or an appropriately scaled playground of misfit objects. 3. Objects intended for viewing: Skateparks have many qualities which overlap with brutalist architecture. Each are constructed with raw materials, formed with modular repeating elements, have direct exposure of a portion’s function, and can easily be underappreciated. The inclusion of objects for viewing contain all of these qualities. These sculpture-esque objects make this park a destination for a larger population than that of skaters and donut eaters.


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worm’s eye view f loo r pla n^

Enter: The Phat Hole. Objects are scattered across the field as a pedestrian playground and seating for the donut shop.

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^sc ale and rela tionship of objects 2/3 types of objects on the site are compared for appropriate scale adjustment.

^obj e c t s reminicent of br uta list a rchitecture Formed with modular repeating elements, these brutalist objects are intended for viewing.

^f i e ld of objects Objects scaled for pedestrian use and archtiectural structures found from architectural history.


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HE AVY T H I N G S C A N FL OAT TOO fall 2015...prof James Kerestes

^an a ssortment o f objec ts


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^a stu dy of k itb a s h i n g Object Oriented Ontology is a philosophy studied by Mark Foster Gage and Associates and is explored in their work through the existing method of kitbashing. The philosophy questions the relationships of individual objects retaining individual qualities, and the collection of them as a whole to exist with equal status within a composition. In the first part of this project, objects were collected from models kits from local toy store and were tangibly kitbashed (right). Each act autonomously per their physical constructed state, but when smashed, connected,

and joined together, they become part of an object which reads, and is understood as a larger whole. In the second part of this project, digital collection, assembly, and representation were approached by a similar method. Online models of parts were downloaded and arranged, duplicated, mirrored, and arrayed to create an object which exists sans gravity. Heavy consideration was taken into the location of each part in relation to the adjoining objects. A product with no orientation and only local symmetries resulted.


[ x 2 ]

[ x 2 ]

[ x 2 ]

[ x 2 ]

base

cap

patch

extend

spider

drape

taper

feather

display

base

cap

patch

extend

spider

drape

taper

feather

display

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PO O L SID E P O S T U R ES

^ref lecti ons of a sa una

spring 2015...profs Ana DeBrea and Andrea Swartz part of Wenderkammer Company “Unbuilt Works” exhibit


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^ref le ct ion s of a s a un a “Poolhouse Posture” is a bathhouse created for the use of public poolgoers, with no specific site context given. It’s design occurred in three parts using variations of the same developed shape for continuity. First, a core was formed. Program was added in the next in two steps, through a division of men’s and women’s spaces, then divisions based on the the specific program which includes bathrooms, changing rooms, and showers. The design is intended to reflect a sauna in both the physical aspects through materiality and the experiential intentions achieved through surface

positioning, scale, relationship to site, and program organization. The inflections of surfaces occur based off of the posture of the human body according to each activity. Unlike a sauna, the space is not closed off. The bathhouse is intended to bring calm to an often noisy and overwhelming space without entirely blocking out the surroundings. This is achieved by leaving a space between the roof and the walls which also allows sunlight into otherwise dark spaces. The shapes that compose the bathhouse are formed with concrete structured by rebar grids and clad in a lightly colored wood veneer.


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^explosion of key com ponents from top to bottom

A: core of building, ceiling and roof B: Separation of men’s and Womens Spaces C. Integration of program including bathrooms, shower, and changing rooms D. combined components ^ separation of m en’s and wom en’s spaces

Men’s restrooms, shower, and changing room Womens’s restrooms, shower, and changing room

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LE T T HE R E B E C A K E

^less tha n sta nd ard multi use building

spring 2016...prof Ana DeBrea in collaboration with Matthew Hayes awarded first prize for 4th year school-wide Steel Competition


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^stan da rd m u l t i us e b ui l d i n g Cake is a development proposal which provides employment and residences for those who otherwise would not have the opportunity. It simultaneously addresses the lack of low income housing in Vancouver and attracts a universal demographic by including a program rich with opportunity for each citizen and visitor of Vancouver. It is no coincidence that sweets are placed at the top of the food pyramid. Despite being the smallest segment, and not completely

necessary in a diet, sweets are valued and enjoyed universally. They are often saved for last in a meal, used to assist in celebrations, and comfort those in need of some happiness. Similarly, Cake serves as an expanded palette of functional colors and decadent architectural tastes in contrast to the dreary climate and monotonous city landscape. Cake has a hard exterior and soft interior, inviting all of the visitors, residents, and citizens of Vancouver to come in for a taste.


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^explosion of key com ponents from top to b ottom

A: framing of envelope B: steel structure triangular system of envelope C. framing of interior shapes D. steel structure triangular system of interior shapes E. combined components


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MET HO DS O F T R A N S FOR MATION

^a p erformi ng arts center

fall 2016...prof James Kerestes On display Dec. 2015 - Jan. 2016 at Wunderkammer Gallery in Ft. Wayne, IN


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^a cul in a r y per for m i n g a r t s ce n ter This is the experience of methods and transformation: an interactive culinary performing arts center located in Fort Wayne, Indiana. The five different objects merge to create walkable spaces filled with fresh food, galleries, restaurants, and interactive dimensions. The structure and activities within affords an opportunity for the general public to be immersed in the production, preparation, and consumption of food, something that is often lost in the current and convenient habits of a culinary experience. The five zones are categorized by elemental methods of cooking: fire, air, earth, time, and water. Although the interior is open and all zones can be viewed at once, each difference of zone is evident through its sensory details. The materials smells, and tastes are definitive components of each elemental zone.

Fire: higher floors, shared inside with outside spaces, physically visible smoke and fire, large wood pile, well ventilated Air: a sweet-smelling long space with extensive table surface area, a large convection oven and a bakery to accompany daytime cooking and baking classes Earth: the most dominant space in the building because it is the most dominant source of food, large open flat area visible from many floors above, the ground is the earth Time: darker, deeper room with significant space for wine barrels, beer brewing, and cheese, available to enter from outside directly Water: access point, central area clearly connected to earth, long vertical space, reflecting pools, house’s most gallery spaces


shapes

derived from curves

wrap

pierce

Primitives

glide

overlap

cling

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^obj e c t in a f ield of other objects Rendered object within its context of Ft. Wayne, IN

^se c t i on

A visual description of the intersecting programs with distinct sensor experiences is shown in section.


^physica l model

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PEAR AN D A P R I MI TIVE

^case stud i es of rui na ti on

spring 2016...prof James Kerestes presented at 104th ACSA Annual Conference by James Kerestes


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^ruina t ion o f a s ph e re A glitch is the result of a sudden malfunction; it is an unexpected outcome from an otherwise normal input. Glitches are typically viewed as a negative defect within a process because of their unpredictable and often disruptive nature. By understanding how to control a glitch, designers are capable of pushing productive tools past their intentional use and reevaluating conventional methods of architectural design. This study explores controlled glitching as a method of ruination.

A primitive sphere was glitched first to establish a constant in the process. The sphere’s specific coding was deliberately altered through a process of deleting, adding, duplicating, and rearranging parts several times to establish expected outcomes of the intentional glitch. By understanding the relationship of input and output, a taxonomy of expected outcomes was established (right). A pear, serving as a familiar object, was glitched under the same process to explore the effects on an object which had a more complex geometry.


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^3D pr inted physica l models

Glitched sphere (left) and glitched pear (right) are 3d printed to explore qualities of a tangible glitched model.

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thank you

come again

Natalie Broton 4th Year Architecture Student Portfolio  

2015-2017 @ Ball State University College of Architecture and Planning

Natalie Broton 4th Year Architecture Student Portfolio  

2015-2017 @ Ball State University College of Architecture and Planning

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