Issuu on Google+

NB

photo by natalie boverman

1


photo of james turrell’s “the color inside” skyspace

2


NB personal Natalie Susan Boverman natalieboverman.com (503) 330-6592 natalieboverman@gmail.com

education University of texas at Austin School of Architecture | Bachelor of science Interior Design 2018 (expected)

work experience laura roberts design- Austin, TX assisted local residential interior designer. produced drawings, perspectives, and concept proposal boards. Used autocad,

JAN 2017

Rhino, and InDesign to format presentation boards for clients.

100 Fold Studio- Lakeside, MT worked as a Student intern and design build participant for non-profit studio. steel work design and fabrication, schematic design, community volunteer work

skills DIGITAL Adobe Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, Rhinoceros, AutoCAD, VRay rendering, REVIT Analog DRAFTING, WATER COLOR, MODEL MAKING

professional

Tau sigma delta honors society IIDA member Ampersand interior design member UT student organization for ASID and IIDA

3 Fold Design Studio- Austin, TX served as an Intern for small residential studio.

OCT 2015-MAR 2016

space planning, schematic design, sample ordering, product research. hand sketched drawings and researched code restrictions for remodel.

Zimmer Gunsul Frasca Architects- Portland, OR High school intern upkeep of material library, sample ordering and returning,

JUN- AUG 2016

dec 2013- jan 2014

site visits, presentation boards

awards & scholarships School of Architecture Excellence in Design Award recipient

dec 2016

one student per studio nominated to pin for a jury to be considered for the award

Excellence in Design Award recipient Excellence in Design Award nominee Debbie Ann Rock Scholarship in Interior Design recipient Brundrett Maddox Scholarship in Interior Design recipient Other ASID STUDENT PORTFOLIO COMPETITION SEMI-FINALIST imrpove UT challenge semi-finalist Signature Course Literacy Award nominee

may 2016 may 2015 2016 2015

2017 2017 2015

other & service Younglife ministry

2 yrs

Volunteer leader

ransom note a capella ensemble National Charity League

1 yr 7 yrs

Over three hundred and twenty-five hours of community service

3


4


3

resume

5

table of contents

6-13

body erosion bathhouse

14-17

IIDA booth competition

18-25

Vitra. showroom

26-31

100 Fold Studio design build

32-35

innovative assembly

36-43

Laguna Gloria birding center

44-49

nobo lantern

50-53

tree tile

54-59

Blanton Museum atrium

60

analog work

61

photography

5


6


BODY EROSION BATHHOUSE design V- fall 2016 | 14 weeks professor Nerea Feliz design excellence award This bathhouse, a contemporary of the Roman and Turkish bathhouses designed for public bathing, sits in the top two floors of the Hotel Van Zandt, a boutique hotel in downtown Austin, Texas. The program requires varying bathing experiences and pools, as well as spa treatment rooms and necessary offices, locker-rooms and storage. ​ A bathhouse has two main elements that come in contact with the material of which it is made of- water and the human body. Using these two items as agents of erosion, Body Erosion bathhouse responds to three different scales- water, the body, and the hand. The bathhouse is about celebrating the human body and its unique experience with surface. When one comes to the bathhouse they find their place in the different moments that are carefully crafted to accentuate the different sizes of the human body, and experience moments of similarity that celebrate commonalities between people. As people experience surfaces that match their body, they begin to relax and stresses erode.

Stemming from small tiles that are about support and intimacy, the concept of shaping architecture to the human experience guides the design. The intimacy comes from the tailored shapes of the insertions, designed to fit like a garment. Intimacy with the building also involves texture and temperature, evident in the change in material and surface temperature when going from the tiled surfaces to the larger moments designed for the whole body. The tile itself serves as a grid, to give scale and allow for organization, while allowing the small moments to sit within the grid. The larger moments designed for the whole body shift off the grid and are used as modular chunks, allowing for the sequencing of moments into bands that facilitate circulation from band to band and vertically through the space. Sectionally, the moments are organized based off of view- seeing the human body in abstract ways in order to highlight its form- and accessibility, as the bathhouse is about the inclusion and celebration of all different body types. 7


8


9


10


5’

10’

11


cold plunge

tea bar

warm sitting pool storage

hot pool

steam room

sauna

level 16

office

storage

jacuzzi

treatment rooms

10’

level 15

12

20’

pool

main pool


13


14


IIDA BOOTH COMPETITION design IV- spring 2016 | 4 weeks professor Igor Siddiqui

As a booth for the International Interior Design Association, this design aims to provide an experience that immerses one into the realm of interior design while testing and transcending ones typical visual boundaries. The main concept of an immersive interior experience arose in a funnel form. To define the spaces around the “funnel� and to test spatial perception, the design utilizes a tectonic structure with colored translucent planes. These planes take form as custom scrim wall panels and colored floor planes. These flexible planes, along with the tectonic structure of the design, tests spatial boundaries and also creates a dialogue between interior and exterior. The structure and form of the space are ideal for the trade show because of the limited amount of material needed. Being a booth that will only stand for five days, it is important to be environmentally responsible and conscious of the amount of material being used for such a short life.

15


section A 16


custom designed table

meeting area

immersive area

custom designed reception desk

entry

A

plan

Original study models begin to articulate the tectonic structure of the form as well as explore the use of a translucent material. 17


18


VITRA. SHOWROOM design IV- spring 2016 | 10 weeks professor Igor Siddiqui design excellence award The design consists of a system of frames and panels that allow for the creation of different vignettes. As a showroom for Vitra, this design allows for connective yet unique show spaces and programmatic zones through layered screens and spatial scaffolding. The planes are angled to funnel vision and path, and to also provide an experience that feels immersive. The system tests one’s typical visual boundaries by separating spaces, while also creating an integrated show and design space through translucent screens. This allows for the program to have different conditions, while still relating as a group, through flexibility in creating separate spaces and different styles of display. The concept of an immersive interior experience arose in a funnel form. To define the spaces around the funnel and to test spatial perception, the design utilizes a tectonic structure with translucent planes. The custom scrim screens are neutral to allow for the furniture to be the main focus. Allowing the form to be more neutral in color, the walls took on a graphic that is a drawing taken from a view of the scaffolding. This adds depth to the neutral screens and to each space or vignette. The color red was used because it is a favorite of Vitra’s for its classic and bold qualities, and it aids in the showroom’s branding. With a colony of spaces, the space between them also becomes important. In plan the different planes were adjusted to provide people a clear way to interact between each space, slipping through the openings. Horizontal pieces and planes were also used to enhance and direct thresholds and the different vignettes.

19


east wall elevation

frame and scrim explorations

20


21


22south facade elevation


23


section A

restroom

studio

C O L O R A DO S T.

sales

sto rag e

o fďŹ c e

on B

2 n d S T.

plan

24


west-east section

south-north section 25


26


100 FOLD STUDIO DESIGN BUILD summer 2016 | 6 weeks 100 Fold Studio

The client of the design build was the Westshore Visitors Bureau- a group of community members who facilitate business, community events, and visitor information for the town of Lakeside, Montana. ​ The project was a group of information kiosks that would provide information to visitors passing through Lakeside on HWY 93, and also keep local residents up to date on Lakeside happenings. The design concept was a colony of kiosks that could provide the needed program and client requirements, including signage and attraction on the S side to those entering town and information on the N side for locals. Each kiosk was constructed using 7 structural bays that were then clad to allow for signage. The center kiosk allows for a small lockable storage room for the client to stock and maintain the kiosks. ​ A specific role I and one other student took on was the design and coordination of the steel work for the kiosks. We designed in AutoCAD the detail and coordinated with a local steel shop to cut the pieces. We then ourselves went in to the shop to finish the pieces, including cutting the backing and countersinking the steel letters and shapes.

27


1

1

10' 8"

10' 8.5"

10' 4"

7'

5' 6" 8' 4.5" 1

28

2

2


Countersinking holes at steel fabricator and mounting letters onto kiosks. 29


30


31


32


INNOVATIVE ASSEMBLY construction II- spring 2016 | 4 weeks professor- Tamie Glass in partner with Samantha Shiminski This partner project is based on the principle of creating innovative designs from recycled, reused, or repurposed materials. ​ A large stack of unused air conditioning filters for sale at 50 cents a piece in varying sizes was found at a material resell store. The filters were noticed due to their depth, density, strength and weight. Though originally designed as an air filter, they were repurposed as visual filters. ​ Different shades of blue glass objects found at another resell store and were broken into little pieces. These were then placed into the filter in a gradient pattern to provide additional layers of depth and light reflectivity. To stabilize the assembly, the filter with the inserted glass pieces was cast in resin

33


6”

WOOD STUD ATTACHMENT HARDWARE

2’

WOOD FURRING ATTACHMENT HARDWARE WOOD STUD

WOOD FURRING GYPSUM BOARD

GYPSUM BOARD GLASS PIECE

FIBERGLASS FILTER GLASS PIECE

FIBERGLASS FILTER

RESIN

RESIN OPTIONAL LIGHT

34


2’

2’ ATTACHMENT HARDWARE RESIN

GLASS PIECE

FIBERGLASS FILTER

35


36


LAGUNA GLORIA BIRDING CENTER design II- spring 2015 | 10 weeks professor- Allison Gaskins design excellence nominee Laguna Gloria is a park and center run by the Austin Contemporary as a unique experience of history, art and nature. The land lies on a peninsula on Lake Austin in NW Austin, Texas. ​ The project creates a space that allows for learning, birding and sharing of information for those that visit the peninsula in west Austin. ​ The programmatic responsibilities of the building include spaces for lectures, classrooms, bird blinds, photography development, and informational pin-ups. Three main views of the peninsula were activated by creating a rectilinear axis for path and building. To ground the design and facilitate circulation and path, that axis translated into a strong structural wall. On both ends, and anchored by this transcending wall, two primary spaces emerged. One is for primary entrance and formal engagements of photo editing, display and lecture space. The second functions as an educational space with classrooms and reference areas. The path that connects the two sits on the ground level and references Laguna Gloria’s nature through curated courtyards.

37


38


south-north section

39


40


41


plan

east-west section 42


south-north section 43


44


NOBO LANTERN environmental controls I- fall 2016 | 4 weeks professors- Matthew Tanteri and Keith Simon in partner with Kim Gabosch & Samantha Shiminski Meet Nobo. Designed to get you home safely each night, its orb-like, faceted character produces a warm, white light that will illuminate the space between Goldsmith Hall and West Mall Building as well as provide a light source to students as they travel around UT ’s campus at night. Nobo lanterns produce equal amounts of ambient and direct light highlighting the path before you. As a part of UT ’s Be Safe initiative, the lantern will serve as a way to provide students with a lit path no matter where or when they are walking on campus. GPS tracking monitors the location of walking students and the moving lanterns within campus. Batteries allow for the ability to charge devices such as cellphones on-the-go through the lantern.

45


+ Lanterns should serve as visually tangible objects that illuminate a students path and provide them safety. They should be at the human scale so that people can relate to them and feel safer in the space. + The second principle driving the design is versatility. The lanterns should be able to be used in some capacity during the day, and also have the potential to be used for events. + A third criteria is that the luminaire should emit strong ambient light. There must be enough light for a student to see in dark areas of the courtyard and campus, but it must not sparkle or be too direct in order to see clearly and not be distracting to other students walking. Something shiny or too direct provides a high contrast, making it hard to see surrounding dark areas.

46


plan

47


candlepower distribution curves

LED 4.5V 71 lumens/watt warm, white light white base 1’ W x 8� H 1 1/2 lbs semi-opaque white plastic (0.0024 kWh x 1,095 hrs) x $.03 = $.08 .08 x 10 = $.80

section

48


HDRI glare analysis

49


50


TREE TILE construction II- spring 2016 | 2 weeks professor- Tamie Glass

These ceramic tiles were handmade as part of a construction course on materials and assembly as an exploration of surface and finish. The inspiration for the Tree Tiles comes from the treelines of evergreen forests. This is evident in the design through the angles and triangulated form, and the different interactions between them. Other inspiration comes from the natural and slim gorges in the Pacific Northwest. This manifests in the design through the carved lines.

51


A 4� x 4� piece of clay is trimmed and carved using clay tools.

Clay pieces of original tile are used to create a plaster mold in order to allow for the casting of new tiles. Tiles are then pulled from clay that is hand-pressed into the created mold. Tiles dry and are then fired.

Fired clay tiles are then glazed and are ready for their final firing to be complete. 52


pattern repeat three example combinations

color palette and finish color- tree green by Stroke & Coat finish- glossy

application The tile can be applied in uses such as bathrooms, kitchens, work spaces and other.

example repeated arrangement

53


54


BLANTON MUSEUM ATRIUM design III- fall 2015 | 10 weeks professor- Tamie Glass

The Blanton Museum of Art sits on the SE side of the University of Texas at Austin’s campus, located in downtown Austin, Texas. The Blanton Museum began construction in 2003 and was designed by San Antonio firm, Kallmann McKinnell & Wood Architects. The museum consists of two buildings with a courtyard in between. The eastern building houses permanent collections and temporary exhibitions and across the courtyard, the second building houses offices, a cafe, and the museum’s giftshop. The two buildings have been successful in their design for art, but lack in creating a social place for students, tourists, and locals to enjoy. In this project, the goal was to socialize the museum. The atrium and the upper lobbies that guide a visitor into the galleries were the only spaces that were open to redesign. ​ The Blanton’s visual qualities and material palette were maintained in order to allow the design to have a more expressive form. In hopes that visitors would find their time at the Blanton more fun and personal, the atrium allows them choice and variation through an expressive form. The scheme capitalizes on vertical circulation as the element of choice, and to maintain a balance and sophistication, the scheme became focused on light and texture and less about color. The shell that attaches to and grows from the mezzanine platform allows for unique spaces underneath it, of which light is the main effect. It also provides a dynamic backdrop for the platform for event spaces.

55


european galleries

entr y

contemporar y galleries

changing exhibit

back of house

reception

basement storage

west-east section

56


contemporar y galleries upper lobby- nor th

locker + prints alley

back of house

basement storage

north-south section

57


material studies

changing exhibit

reception entr y

up bar

locker + prints alley

locker room

back of house

level 1

58


existing circulation and lighting (in footcandles) in Blanton atrium and galleries

european galleries

upper lobbynor th

changing exhibit

down

down

OPEN TO BELOW

down

upper lobby- south

down

level 2

59


ANALOG WORK

60


PHOTOGRAPHY

61


62


NB personal Natalie Susan Boverman natalieboverman.com (503) 330-6592 natalieboverman@gmail.com

63


Natalie Boverman Portfolio