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PEDAGOGICAL MAGAZINE


INDEX 1.

BIOMES

2.

MANGROVE

3.

TEMPERATE CLIMATE

4.

DESERT CLIMATE

5.

AMAZONIAN CLIMATE

6.

TROPICAL CLIMATE


BIOMES: Set of ecosystems that are characterized by a composition of species and a spectrum of biological types of plants (tree, grass, and shrub) by a functioning and an adjustment to the climate and to the soil typical. Normally they are defined by the structure of the vegetation and the climate. In several cases the biome is defined also by geographical components (latitude and altitude) and even there are used regional names (V.G. Mount, Patagonian Steppe).


VISITED PLACE: BOTANICAL GARDEN JOSE CELESTINO MUTIS


MANGROVE: Mangroves are various types of trees up to medium height and shrubs that grow in saline coastal sediment habitats in the tropics and subtropics – mainly between latitudes 25° N and 25° S. The remaining mangrove forest areas of the world in 2000 was 53,190 square miles (137,760 km²) spanning 118 countries and territories.The word is used in at least three senses: (1) most broadly to refer to the habitat and entire plant assemblage or mangal,[3][page needed] for which the terms mangrove forest biome, mangrove swamp and mangrove forest are also used, (2) to refer to all trees and large shrubs in the mangrove swamp, and (3) narrowly to refer to the mangrove family of plants, the Rhizophoraceae, or even more specifically just to mangrove trees of the genus Rhizophora. The term "mangrove" comes to English from Spanish (perhaps by way of Portuguese), and is of Caribbean origin, likely Taíno. It was earlier "mangrow" (from Portuguese mangue or Spanish mangle), but this was corrupted via folk etymology influence of "grove" The mangrove biome, or mangal, is a distinct saline woodland or shrubland habitat characterized by depositional coastal environments, where fine sediments (often with high organic content) collect in areas protected from high-energy wave action. Mangroves dominate three-quarters of tropical coastlines.[4] The saline conditions tolerated by various mangrove species range from brackish water, through pure seawater (30 to 40 ppt), to water concentrated by evaporation to over twice the salinity of ocean seawater (up to 90 ppt).


MANGROVE:


TEMPERATE CLIMATE: In geography, temperate or tepid latitudes of the globe lie between the tropics and the polar regions. The changes in these regions between summer and winter are generally relatively moderate, rather than extreme hot or cold. However, in certain areas, such as Asia and central North America, the variations between summer and winter can be extreme because these areas are far away from the sea, causing them to have a continental climate. In regions traditionally considered tropical, localities at high altitudes (e.g. parts of the Andes) may have a temperate climate. The north temperate zone extends from the Tropic of Cancer (at about 23.5 degrees north latitude) to the Arctic Circle (at approximately 66.5 degrees north latitude). The south temperate zone extends from the Tropic of Capricorn (at approximately 23.5 degrees south latitude) to the Antarctic Circle (at approximately 66.5 degrees south latitude). [1][2] In a very broad sense, temperate climate also includes a subtropical climate, variants: subtropical semidesert/desert, humid subtropical, oceanic subtropical and Mediterranean climate. However, a typical temperate climate is one of the four climate zones in the world, beside polar regions (subarctic climate, arctic climate, tundra climate, ice cap climate) and the subtropics, tropics.ETC‌


TEMPERATE CLIMATE:


DESERT CLIMATE: Deserts are areas where the rainfall is too low to sustain any vegetation at all, or only very scanty scrub. The rainfall in desert areas is less than 250 mm or 10 inches per year, and some years may experience no rainfall at all. The hot deserts are situated in the subtropical climate zone where there is unbroken sunshine for the whole year due to the stable descending air and high pressure. Such areas include the Sahara, Saudi Arabia, large parts of Iran and Iraq, northwest India, California, South Africa and much of Australia. Here, maximum temperatures of 40 to 45째C are common, although during colder periods of the year, nighttime temperatures can drop to freezing or below due to the exceptional radiation loss under the clear skies. The Gobi desert in Mongolia is an example of a cool desert. Though hot in summer, it shares the very cold winters of central Asia. The Arctic and Antarctic regions, too, receive very little precipitation during the year, owing to the exceptionally cold dry air, but are more usually classified as types of polar climate. Semi-desert areas include the Steppes of southern Russia and central Asia, and the Parries of Canada.


DESERT CLIMATE:


AMAZONIAN CLIMATE: The climate of the Amazonian Region is characterized for being hot - humid; all the year round it has constant rains and a dry station does not exist. His average temperature is between 25 and 26 centigrade degrees. For this reason, his vegetation is exuberant; but the great majority of his soils are not suitable for the agriculture, since the rains drag towards the rivers the minerals that need the plants. Only in the small striping near to the rivers it can cultivate rubber, banana, naranjilla, maracuyรก, yucca, between other products. The indigenous peoples and others are itinerant farmers, that is to say, time and again they change lands, because of the quality of the soil of this region.


AMAZONIAN CLIMATE:


TROPICAL CLIMATE: A tropical climate is a climate of the tropics. In the Köppen climate classification it is a non-arid climate in which all twelve months have mean temperatures above 18 °C (64 °F). Unlike the extra-tropics, where there are strong variations in day length and temperature, with season, tropical temperature remains relatively constant throughout the year and seasonal variations are dominated by precipitation.


TROPICAL CLIMATE:

MADE BY:


MARIA PAULA QUINTERO 6ª NATALIA PLATA 6ª LAURA MARMOLEJO 6ª YESID TAMAYO 6ª TATIANA BETANCUR 6B VALENTINA TORRENTE 6C SANTIAGO BEDOYA 6C DANIEL DELGAD 6C ANDREA CADAVID 6D CARLOS PEÑA 6D

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