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National Association of Social Workers

CALIFORNIANEWS www.naswca.org

January 2012 • Volume 38, Number 4

NASW PRACTICE PERSPECTIVE

Clinical Social Workers: New HIPAA Software Version 5010 By Mirean Coleman, MSW, LICSW, CT, Senior Practice Associate. ©2011 National Association of Social Workers. All Rights Reserved.

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ffective January 1, 2012, clinical social workers and other health care providers, health care clearinghouses, covered entities and business associates who use electronic transactions mandated by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), will be required to replace the current software, Version 4010/4010A standards, with Version 5010 standards. Version 5010 updates standards including claims submission and status, remittance advice, eligibility and referral authorizations. Electronic transactions that do not use Version 5010 beginning January 2012 will be rejected for noncompliance with HIPAA electronic transactions. Rejections include denial of reimbursement. Clinical social workers are encouraged to transition to Version 5010 prior to January 2012. Doing so allows them to participate in training and testing of the new software and systems to ensure it is working properly before the compliance date. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is assigned by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) to oversee compliance of the

standards. Currently, there is no delay expected in the implementation of Version 5010.

Changes in Version 5010 Version 5010 brings improvements in technical, structural, and data content and system changes and will improve standards functionality between providers and payers. The software also does the following: • Accommodates the reporting of clinical data of the international classification of diseases, tenth edition, clinical modification (icd-10-cm), which is scheduled for implementation on October 1, 2013. • Increases the number of diagnosis codes allowed on a claim. • Enhances data collection and transmission. • Distinguishes between principal and admitting diagnoses and reasons for service codes. • Monitors treatment outcomes and clinical care. • Improves claims receipt and procedures. • Acknowledges and rejects transactions across all jurisdictions. • Returns early in the process claims requiring corrections.

The Chapter Launches New Online MixedMedia Courses Are you looking for more interactive continuing education but don’t have time to attend in-person classes? The NASWCalifornia Chapter is proud to announce that it has launched a new mixed-media online program offering courses based on film clips of in-person courses, along with the instructor’s PPT presentation and handouts. The feedback has been outstanding, so don’t miss out. To take the free demo course and view the list of classes, visit www.socialworkonlinece.com.

Continued on page 20

In This Issue

Volunteer Spotlight................................. 5

Social Work Award Recipients.............. 14

Online Classes....................................... 2

Legal Issue of the Month........................ 5

Annual Conference............................... 16

President’s Message.............................. 3

Political Action....................................... 6

Councils ............................................. 23

Executive Director’s Message................. 4

Licensure Classes................................ 11

Regions............................................... 24


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

Continuing Education

that Fits Your Life BBS Approved for LCSW, LMFT, and LPCC Licenses

New Online Options Mixed-media Courses: Offers content based videos of in-person courses. Text-based Courses: Read the content online, save it to your computer, or print it. Film and Book-based Courses: Watch a film or read a book for CEUs.

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Contact Customer Service: louis@naswca.org

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and choose “Professional Development” to access all online and in-person educational options.

CALIFORNIA CHAPTER


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

CALIFORNIA CHAPTER

LEADERSHIP

Board of Directors Officers 2011-2012 PRESIDENT

Mary Kay Oliveri, MSW, LCSW PRESIDENT ELECT

Shirley Gentilini, LSW FIRST VICE PRESIDENT

Emily Nicholl, LCSW

NASW Is Your Voice

By Mary Kay Oliveri, MSW, LCSW, Diplomate in Clinical Social Work

“People who regard themselves as highly efficacious act, think and feel differently from those who perceive themselves as inefficacious. They produce their own future, rather than simply foretell it.”

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—Albert Bandura, PhD, Psychologist. (1985). Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social-Cognitive Theory, p. 395.

s we begin the New Year, there is much to think about and much Jen Henry, MSW work to do. I want to take this VP LEGISLATIVE & POLITICAL AFFAIRS moment to remind all of us to pay attenPatrick Mace, MSW, PhD tion to the important political and policy VP MEMBERSHIP & ORGANIZATIONAL SERVICES agendas that are being debated around Olga Sarabia, MSW us. NASW is your voice, advocating for VICE PRESIDENT PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT public policies that support the needs of Edward Davila, MSW the vulnerable groups with whom we STUDENT DIRECTOR NORTH work each day. In addition, NASW proAndrea Turnbull motes the values and the efficacy of the STUDENT DIRECTOR SOUTH social work profession. This is work that Samantha Chhim cannot be done without your support and action. The ranks of those we represent grow in times of economic distress, and ADVERTISING RATES this is of course happening now. There DISPLAY 1/8 Page Ad (Vertical or Horizontal)............................$300 are increased demands for social welfare 1/4 Page Ad.................................................................$500 services, public child welfare resources, 1/2 Page Ad.................................................................$800 jobs programs, and treatment for those Full Page Ad............................................................. $1,200 struggling with mental health, substance Full Page Color Display Ad Back Cover...................... $1,500 abuse, health, educational access, and 20% Discount on 6 Months of Continuous Display Ads aging concerns. There are fewer and Display Late Fee.......................................................... $100 fewer resources for these services, and CUSTOM DISPLAY continued threats to reduce those that are 1/8 Page Ad.................................................................$400 currently available. 1/4 Page Ad.................................................................$600 As a profession, we need to contrib1/2 Page Ad.............................................................. $1,000 ute to the discussion and to generating Full Page Ad............................................................. $1,500 solutions for the problems we and othCLASSIFIED ADVERTISING ers face. In order to do this, we need to Classified Ad (30 words)...............................................$90 show up where these debates occur. And, Classified Ad (60 words)............................................. $120 we need to be able to put forth thoughtClassified Ad (90 words)............................................. $150 ful discourse from studied positions. I Classified Ad (30 words with box or logo)....................$110 Classified Ad (60 words with box or logo)................... $140 find social workers doing this in the Classified Ad (90 words with box or logo)................... $170 policy arenas, organizations, agencies, clinics and classrooms I participate in on 20% Discount on 6 Months of Continuous Classified Ads Classified Late Fee.........................................................$75 a regular basis. And, at the same time I am continually asked, so what is social NASW California News (ISSN-1042-279X) is work, what do social workers do, and SECRETARY

published monthly except bimonthly in September and November/December by the National Association of Social Workers, California Chapter at 1016 23rd Street, Sacramento, CA 95816. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and not those of NASW California News or NASW California Chapter. Periodicals postage paid at Sacramento, CA. Postmaster send address changes to National Association of Social Workers, attention: Membership Services, 750 First Street, NE, Washington, DC 20002.

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FROM THE PRESIDENT

Christine Ford, LCSW TREASURER

January 2012

“The human condition is better improved by altering detrimental circumstances and personal perspectives than by trying to alter personal outlooks, while ignoring the very circumstances that serve to nourish them.” —Albert Bandura, PhD, Psychologist. (1985). Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A SocialCognitive Theory, p. 23.

are they effective? Fascinating really, that in a room in which members of our profession are contributing to the discussion, there is little recognition of the value of our diverse and considered points of view. And, maybe that is part of the reason our profession is often challenged, we are so diverse in what we do and how we go about doing it. In addition, we are far too humble about who we are and about our effectiveness in policy, practice and research arenas. We need to identify ourselves as social workers and speak from our representative knowledge base. While we need more scholarly assessment and presentation of the effectiveness of our profession, there are many different levels of evidence and what is known needs to be presented. Typically in a discussion about service reductions and service delivery, it is those who are actually doing the work that have the clearest understanding of the costs associated with doing something, nothing, or too little both in the aggregate and individual situations. Speak up, speak out, and identify yourself as a social worker when you do! /

References: Graybeal, C. T. (2007). Evidence for the art of social work. Families in Society, 88 (4), 513-523, 32, 995–1008. Leung, P. (et al.) (May 2011). “The Impact of Title IV-E Training on Case Outcomes,” Texas Title IV-E Roundtable Evaluation Committee, University of Houston, Graduate College of Social Work. (available through contacting pleung@uh.edu) MacDonald, G., Sheldon, B., Gillespie, J. (1992). Contemporary Studies of the Effectiveness of Social Work. British Journal of Social Work: Vol. 22, #6, 615-643.


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

FROM THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

Where They Are On The Issues By Janlee Wong, MSW

An analysis of their positions indicates both candidates would support fewer government programs directly to the people, more tax money to the private sector approach to social issues.

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s this column is written, the two GOP presidential front runners are Newt Gingrich and Mitt Romney. On health care, both would repeal the Affordable Care Act (health care reform) and replace it with a mixture of orthodox conservative policies, such as tax credits and more competition. Romney uses the term “universal health care,” which he thinks will result from tax credits and more competition. Romney also would redirect indigent care payments from providers to health insurers who would cover the uninsured. Gingrich would direct Medicare to focus on prevention to save on treating illness and thinks investing in technology would prevent disabilities. On poverty, both Gingrich and Romney would further limit welfare and impose severe limits such as stiffening work requirements and limiting duration (Gingrich – two years). Gingrich would prohibit welfare to minor mothers and deny increases for additional children born while on welfare. Gingrich supports more orphanages and more educational

opportunities for the poor. Both would use tax credits for job creation in impoverished neighborhoods. An analysis of their positions indicates both candidates would support fewer government programs directly to the people, more tax money to the private sector approach to social issues. Despite their small government pronouncements, both would use government to “engineer” social change through aid disincentives and using tax money to pay for jobs for the poor or to pay health care providers and systems to cover the poor. Both candidates are for reducing direct support to the poor and providing taxpayer support to private industry and hope that any jobs they create would go to the poor. Both candidates would support the health care industry and hope they would cover the uninsured. Interestingly, many elements of both their policies are similar to what the Democrats and President Obama support. In a future column, we’ll compare the GOP nominee to the policies of President Obama. /

NASW-CA CHAPTER STAFF DIRECTORY

Address: 1016 23rd Street, Sacramento, CA 95816 Fax: (916) 442-2075 CA Web: www.naswca.org National Web: www.socialworkers.org Toll Free in CA: (800) 538-2565 Brendan Broms Membership Cheryl Raynak Conferences/Licensing Janlee Wong Ethical/Legal Issues Rebecca Gonzales Legislative Advocacy Lora Pierce Online Education Louis Libert Online Program Saul Kemble Accountant                   Tatyana Timonichev Continuing Education Lisa Kopochinski Editor, California News

Phone: (916) 442-4565 Extension 42     membership@naswca.org     Extension 15 craynak@naswca.org Extension 11        naswca@naswca.org    Extension 12 rgonzales@naswca.org  Extension 10         lorapierce@naswca.org      Extension 16 louis@naswca.org Extension 18         skemble@naswca.org         Extension 17 naswleg@naswca.org           (916) 481-0265 naswnews@naswca.org

Publication of an advertisement does not constitute endorsement or approval by NASW of any product or services advertised, any point of view, standard, or opinion presented therein. NASW is not responsible for any claims made in an advertisement appearing in its publications.

C AL L F O R 2 0 1 2 Annual Conference

Presenter Proposals

The chapter is requesting proposals for three-hour presentations covering a broad range of topics related to clinical practice issues for experienced practitioners as annual conference attendees have an average of 15 to 25 years of social work experience.

2012 NASW-CA Annual Conference Friday and Saturday October 26-27, 2012 Marriott Hotel, Irvine, Calif. Presentation Requirements • Provides advanced-level themes taught by licensed experts • Offers curriculum that has been highly rated by other audiences • Includes content specific to treatment modalities • Emphasizes activities such as group discussion, vignettes and case studies Application Deadline Please complete and submit the application before 5:00 p.m. on Monday, February 6, 2012. Due to the planning process, no exceptions or extensions will be made. Presenter Compensation/Travel Selected presenters will be paid a $250 stipend within 30 days of the event. The chapter does not reimburse presenters for lodging, travel or any related expense. To request an application, contact Cheryl Raynak at (916) 442-4565, ext. 15 or email craynak@naswca.org.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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MEMBERSHIP NASW LEGAL ISSUE OF THE MONTH

VOLUNTEER SPOTLIGHT

Release of Records and Client Privacy

Jerry Lawrie

By Sherri Morgan, Associate Counsel, LDF and Office of Ethics and Professional Review and Carolyn I. Polowy, NASW General Counsel

NASW-CA Region G Director I believe that we are all destined to do great things. We just sometimes need a push in the right direction. A parent of a teen I worked with when I was 19 gave me that push by telling me what she thought was my gift. At that point, I was open enough to grasp onto it and let it lead me to where I am today— the field of social work. I have absolutely loved each step of the way. My journey after receiving my bachelor’s degree (11 years ago) has been rewarding and exciting. I’ve met incredible social workers, traveled across the country working in wilderness therapy programs and the educational system. Each experience was just as rewarding as the last. Back home in Santa Barbara, I’ve instructed, coordinated and directed experiential enrichment programs, drug and alcohol prevention programs, and mentor programs. Each had a mission of developing the next generation of leaders through experiential education, adventure, service, personal challenge, teamwork and group processing. Once I am finished with my master’s degree in social work at USC (I’m in my second year now) I plan to continue advocating for the youth in my community and creating programs that continue to support, enrich and expand their dreams and visions. Being a part of NASW has allowed me to meet amazing social workers doing incredible things. I look forward to the opportunity to collaborate with many of you in the future and to continue learning from each of you. /

National Association of Social Workers California Chapter Financial Statement of Activities Year Ended June 30, 2011 To view this financial statement, please visit:

www.naswca.org/associations/ 7989/files/NASW-CA_ financial_6_30_11.pdf

©2011 National Association of Social Workers. All Rights Reserved.

Introduction Social workers who receive a request for client records from a third party or a subpoena will have a number of questions. These may reflect concerns regarding the client’s privacy, the social worker’s obligations and/or rights, potential liability, the social worker’s role in responding to clients’ legal matters and questions concerning the scope of the request, such as: • Am I allowed or required to release the client’s information? • How much information must I disclose? • What type of client information should be released? This Legal Issue of the Month article will address questions related to making well-reasoned decisions when responding to requests for confidential client information. This review does not address situations where the social worker is the target of a lawsuit or complaint.

Basic Client Privacy Considerations Client’s privacy rights are embedded in professional healthcare provider standards, the U.S. and state constitutions and other state and federal laws addressing patient records (Morgan, Polowy, Carvino & Kraft, 2007). Clients’ rights to exercise self-determination (NASW, Standard 1.02, 2008) are at the core of decisions regarding the release or disclosure of client information. However, these rights may be impacted by the requirements of certain legal proceedings or court orders or may be affected by the requirements of insurers, employers, or other requesting entities (Polowy, Morgan, Bailey & Gorenberg, 2008). It is the social worker’s obligation to maintain the client’s confidences, as guided by the client, to the extent permitted by law (NASW, Standard 1.07, 2008). / To view the entire article, please visit the national website, a member- only section, http://www.naswca.org/associations/7989/files/legal_issue_of_month_1_2012. pdf. Please email Brendan at membership@naswca.org or call (800) 538-2565, ext. 32 to have a copy emailed.

Feel Creative?

Want To Win $300, $500 or $1,000? ENTER THE SW PUBLIC EDUCATION CAMPAIGN (PEC) CONTEST Create a PSA The goal is to create a social work Public Service Announcement (PSA). This PSA must be a 30- to 60-second digital presentation highlighting what social workers do. The winning PSA will run for an undetermined amount of time on the NASW-CA YouTube channel and potentially be utilized for future NASW campaigns. The submission deadline is February 1, 2012. The Purpose March is Social Work Month and NASW has chosen the theme “Social Work Matters” as seen in the logo above. The purpose of the PSA is to highlight social workers as change agents, while increasing public awareness of the profession. FOR DETAILS, RULES AND REGULATIONS, VISIT, WWW.NASWCA.ORG.

FIRST PLACE IS $1,000 • SECOND PLACE IS $500 • THIRD PLACE IS $300


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

POLITICAL ACTION

Government Relations Update By Rebecca Gonzales, Director of Government Relations and Political Affairs

State Budget Update Since the last budget update, state revenues have continued to fall below forecast levels. By the time this newsletter has gone to print, state budget “triggers” may have already been pulled, which would result in up to $2.5 billion in cuts to higher education, social services and K-12 schools. The possibility of another round of budget cuts has resulted in new revenue proposals to help the state fund vital programs and services. Some of these proposed solutions direct all of the money to K-12 schools, while other proposals also help out other areas of the budget. It is too early to tell which proposal—if any— makes it to the ballot. Watch for future updates as these propos-

als are developed. It is noteworthy and encouraging that the Governor, the Legislature and other interested parties are finally discussing new revenues instead of only concentrating on cutting services.

Adult Day Health Care The proposed elimination of Adult Day Health Care (ADHC) has been postponed once again. The December 1 deadline has been extended to February 29, 2012 as a result of a lawsuit brought against the State by Disability Rights California (DRC). In settling this lawsuit, the state has also agreed to create a new program called Community-Based Adult Services (CBAS) that will provide necessary medical and

social services to those determined to have the greatest need. Only about half of the current ADHC participants will qualify for this new program. Eligibility will be determined by state medical professionals on the basis of medical need and the benefits will be provided with managed care plans. While the new program will not be as large as ADHC, it will still provide essential health care services to vulnerable poor and elderly residents. For more information, please visit the California Association for Adult Day Services’ website at www.caads.org/. /

Legislative Scorecard for the 2011 Legislative Session

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he National Association of Social Workers, California Chapter (NASW-CA) is proud to release our 2011 Legislative Scorecard. NASW-CA represents more than 11,000 professional social workers who have degrees from accredited social work programs.  NASW-CA advocates on behalf of our members and their clients, for the implementation and improvement of programs and policies designed to enhance human well-being and help meet the basic needs of all people.  For more information on the NASW-CA policy priorities, please visit www.naswca.org.

Methodology This analysis is based on the final floor votes (excluding the concurrence vote) cast on the selected measures. If a final floor vote was not available, in some cases a previous committee hearing vote or voting record was substituted. Legislators who were officially absent for a vote did not have their vote included in the rating.  The Governor’s rating is based on whether he signed or vetoed the measure.  Please note that these bills are a subset

of the bills on NASW-CA’s priority list for 2011. They do not constitute all of the bills NASW-CA took a position on in 2011.

SUMMARY OF LEGISLATION AB 6 (Fuentes): CalWORKs and CalFresh This bill will expand access to the CalFresh and CalWORKs programs by eliminating the expensive and unnecessary finger imaging requirement for CalFresh and by implementing semi-annual rather than quarterly reporting for CalWORKs and CalFresh. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

AB 9 (Ammiano): Pupil Rights: Bullying This bill requires school districts to establish a policy that prohibits discrimination, harassment, intimidation and bullying. Policies must also be developed to receive complaints and a timeline to investigate and resolve these situations. NASW-CA Position: Support

Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

AB 12 (Swanson): Human Trafficking (Lobby Days bill) This bill treats the children of human trafficking as victims, rather than prostitutes. Also, this measure treats persons purchasing sexual services from a minor as harshly as an adult engaging in a noncommercial sex act with a minor. This bill raises fines against the perpetrators and directs the funds toward programs that serve sexually exploited youth. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

AB 69 (Beall): Senior Nutrition Benefits This bill allows counties to access the Social Security database in order to identify seniors who are eligible for CalFresh benefits in order to enroll them in the program through a streamlined, automated application process. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

AB 131 (Cedillo): Student Financial Aid The Dream Act (Lobby Days Bill)

AB 604 (Skinner): Needle Exchange Programs

This bill will allow undocumented students, allowed to receive instate tuition through the AB 540 program, to apply for and receive publically funded financial aid at California public colleges and universities. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

This legislation authorizes the Department of Public Health until 2019 to approve needle exchange programs if the conditions exist for the rapid spread of HIV, viral infections or other infectious diseases that are spread through used hypodermic needles and syringes. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

AB 201 (Butler): Veterans Courts

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2011 Highlights and Notes

This bill authorizes the Superior Courts to develop and implement Veterans Courts, which are a hybrid of drug and mental health courts which serve veterans struggling with addiction, serious mental illness and /or co-occurring disorders. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Vetoed by the Governor

SB 48 (Leno): Pupil Instruction: Prohibition of Discriminatory Content

AB 499 (Atkins): Minors: Medical Care: Consent

SB 747 (Kehoe): LGBT Cultural Competency

This bill allows a minor who is 12 years of age or older to consent to medical care related to the prevention of a sexually transmitted disease. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

This bill requires specified medical and mental health providers, including LCSWs, to receive two to five hours of continuing medical education on cultural competency, sensitivity and best practices for providing care to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender persons. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Vetoed by the Governor

This bill requires that the contributions and history of the LGBT population is included in school instructional materials. NASW-CA Position: Support Outcome: Signed into law by the Governor

In 2011, the success of our Lobby Days program proved to be the highlight of our legislative program! The Governor signed both Dream Act bills, AB 130 and AB 131 (Cedillo), as well as AB 12 (Swanson), the Lobby Days bill on human trafficking. In total, the Governor signed 34 bills that we supported and he vetoed 11. Many measures we supported stalled because of fiscal considerations. Another huge success was to help stop the passage of AB 73 (Fuentes). Along with our coalition partners, we were able to prevent a vote on this bill that would presumptively open dependency court hearings to the press and public. The author chose not to take this bill up for a vote because it would have failed. This bill is now a two-year bill, which means it may be taken up in January. We are continuing to work to defeat this measure. We look forward to the new legislative session and to hopefully a happier new fiscal year! For additional information, please contact: Rebecca Gonzales, Director of Government Relations and Political Affairs, 1016 23rd Street, Sacramento, CA 95816. By phone at (916) 442-4565, ext. 12 or via email at rgonzales@naswca. org.

Counseling and Psychotherapy Referral Service of Orange County—NASW www.referralsforcounseling.com We are licensed, experienced, ethical LCSW’s in private practice who operate as equal partners uniting to advertise and service the community, offering counseling by geographic area, specialty and fee requested.

Call today and receive a 40% discount on membership. Specialties: premarital, marital, relationship, anger, domestic violence, abuse, molestation, grief, substance abuse, trauma, PTSD, anxiety, depression, etc. Client fees: sliding, Medi-Medi, Medicare, and insurance offered. LCSW membership fee: covers advertising, phone, mailings, brochures, our Web site with your personal picture and page.

Guidance offered: To newer private practitioners, sharing clinical and practice information. Providers needed: for Medi-Cal, Spanishspeaking, domestic violence groups. Areas most needed: North Orange County. All are welcome due to our different practice criteria and specialties.

Call (714) 259-7167 for information/application and New Membership Specials today!


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

NASW California Chapter 2011 Legislative Score Card

ist ri ct A B 6 C al A W B O 9 Bu RK A lly S B 12 ing & C H al A u Fr B es 69 ma n h Se T A ni ra B or f fi 13 N ut cki 1 ng D A ri t R B EA ion 20 B 1 Ve M A ene A B fit t 49 era ct s 9 n sC M A B i 60 nor our 4 N s M ts SB e 48 edl edic eE al L G SB BT xch Car 74 In ang e 7 C EU stru e LG ctio BT n

rt y

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S

S

S

V

GRADE B

RATING 80%

Y N N N Y N Y N Y Y N N Y N N Y N Y N Y N Y Y Y Y A Y Y Y N N Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y

Y N N N Y N Y N Y Y N N Y N N Y N Y N Y N Y NV Y Y Y NV Y Y N N Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y

Y N N N Y N Y A Y Y N N Y N A Y N Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y N Y N A Y N Y

Y N N N Y N Y Y Y Y N N Y N N Y N Y N Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y A Y NV Y Y A Y

A F F F A D A B A A F F A F F A F A F A F A A A A A A B A B F A A F A F A A F B

90% 20% 40% 30% 100% 40% 100% 80% 90% 100% 20% 40% 100% 20% 30% 100% 20% 100% 20% 100% 30% 100% 90% 100% 100% 100% 90% 80% 90% 80% 30% 100% 100% 30% 100% 20% 100% 100% 30% 80%

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Governor Brown Jerry D N/A S S S Senator Name Alquist Elaine D 13 Y A Y Anderson Joel R 36 N N Y Berryhill Tom R 14 Y N Y Blakeslee Sam R 15 N N Y Calderon Ronald S. D 30 Y Y Y Cannella Anthony R 12 Y N Y Corbett Ellen D 10 Y Y Y Correa Lou D 34 Y Y Y De Leon Kevin D 22 Y Y Y DeSaulnier Mark D 7 Y Y Y Dutton Bob R 31 N N Y Emmerson Bill R 37 Y N Y Evans Noreen D 2 Y Y A Fuller Jean R 18 N N Y Gaines Ted R 1 N N Y Hancock Loni D 9 Y Y Y Harman Tom R 35 NV N Y Hernandez Ed D 24 Y Y Y Huff Bob R 29 N N Y Kehoe Christine D 39 Y Y Y La Mafla Doug R 4 N N Y Leno Mark D 3 Y Y Y Lieu W. Ted D 28 Y Y Y Liu Carol D 21 Y Y Y Lowenthal Alan D 27 Y Y Y Negrete McLeod Gloria D 32 A Y Y Padilla Alex D 20 Y Y Y Pavley Fran D 23 Y Y Y Price, Jr. Curren D. D 26 Y Y Y Rubio Michael D 16 Y Y Y Runner Sharon R 17 N N A Simitian Joe D 11 Y Y Y Steinberg Darrell D 6 Y Y Y Strickland Tony A. R 19 N NV Y Vargas Juan D 40 Y Y Y Walters Mimi R 33 N N Y Wolk Lois D 5 Y Y Y Wright Roderick D. D 25 Y Y Y Wyland Mark R 38 N N Y Yee Leland D 8 Y Y NV (NV) indicates Not Voting/Abstaining (A) indicates an excused absence and is not counted in the rating

Pa

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S NV N Y Y Y Y Y Y NV Y NV Y Y NV N Y NV Y NV Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y NV Y Y Y Y NV Y NV Y Y NV NV

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Y Y N Y NV Y N Y Y A NV Y Y A Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y N Y NV Y Y Y NV Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y Y NV NV Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y

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NASW California Chapter 2010 Legislative Score Card Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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al

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W O Bu RK A lly S B 12 ing & C H al A um Fr B es 69 an h Se Tr A ni af B fic 13 or ki N 1 ut ng D A ri R B EA tio 20 n 1 Ve M A Be A B ne 49 tera ct fi t 9 n s s M A C B i 60 nor our 4 N s M ts SB e 48 edl edic eE al L G SB BT xch Car 74 In ang e 7 C EU stru e LG ctio BT n

POLITICAL ACTION

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Assembly Member Name Achadjian Katcho R 33 N N Y Y N Y N N Alejo Luis A. D 28 Y Y A Y Y Y Y Y D 7 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Allen Michael Ammiano Tom D 13 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Atkins Toni D 76 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Beall, Jr. Jim D 24 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Berryhill Bill R. R 26 NV N Y NV N Y N N Block Marty J. D 78 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Blumenfield Bob D 40 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y D 11 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Bonilla Susan Bradford Steven D 51 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Brownley Julia D 41 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Buchanan Joan D 15 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Butler Betsy D 53 NV Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Calderon Charles D 58 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Campos Nora D 23 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y D 62 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Carter Wilmer Amina Cedillo Gilbert D 45 Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Chesbro Wesley D 1 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Conway Connie R 34 N N Y N N Y N N Cook Paul R 65 N N Y N N Y N N Davis Mike D 48 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Dickinson Roger D 9 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y R 59 N N Y N N Y N N Donnelly Tim Eng Mike D 49 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Feuer Mike D 42 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Fletcher Nathan B. R 75 N Y Y Y N Y Y N Fong Paul D 22 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Fuentes Felipe D 39 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Furutani Warren T. D 55 Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y R 4 N N Y N N Y N N Gaines Beth Galgiani Cathleen D 17 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Garrick Martin R 74 N N Y A N A A N Gatto Mike D 43 N Y Y Y NV Y Y Y Gordon Richard S. D 21 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y *Gorell Jeff R 37 A A A A A A A A Grove Shannon L. R 32 N N Y N N Y N N R 60 N N Y N N Y N N Hagman Curt Halderman Linda R 29 N N Y N N Y N N Hall, III Isadore D 52 Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y (NV) indicates Not Voting/Abstaining (A) indicates an excused absence and is not counted in the rating *Assemblymember Gorell was deployed to Afghanistan in March 2011 and missed most floor votes

N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y Y Y N N A Y N Y Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y A N N N A

N Y Y Y Y Y N Y Y A Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y N N A Y N Y Y N Y Y Y N Y N Y Y A N NV N Y

GRADE F A A A A A F A A A A A A A A A A A A F F A A F A A F A A A F A F B A A F F F A

RATING 30% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 20% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 90% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 20% 20% 100% 100% 20% 100% 100% 40% 100% 100% 100% 20% 100% 40% 80% 100% N/A 20% 20% 20% 100%

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NASW California Chapter 2011 Legislative Score Card Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

C al u Fr B m es 69 an h Se Tr A n a B ffi 13 ior ck N 1 in ut D A g ri R B EA tio 20 n 1 Ve M A Be A B ne t c e 49 t ra fit 9 n s sC M A B in o 60 or ur 4 N s M ts SB e 48 edl edic eE al SB LG BT xch Car 74 In ang e 7 C EU stru e LG ctio BT n

January 2012

g

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GRADE

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B

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Assembly Member Name Harkey Diane L. R 73 N N Y Hayashi Mary D 18 Y Y Y Hernandez Roger D 57 Y Y Y Hill Jerry D 19 Y Y Y Huber Alyson D 10 Y Y Y Hueso Ben D 79 Y Y Y Huffman Jared D 6 Y Y Y Jeffries Kevin R 66 N N Y Jones Brian W. R 77 N N Y Knight Steven R 36 N N Y Lara Ricardo D 50 Y Y Y Logue Dan R 3 Y N Y Lowenthal Bonnie D 54 Y Y Y Ma Fiona D 12 Y Y Y Mansoor Allan R. R 68 N N Y Mendoza Tony D 56 Y Y Y Miller Jeff R 71 N N Y Mitchell Holly J. D 47 Y Y Y Monning William W. D 27 Y Y Y Morrell Mike R 63 N N Y Nestande Brian W. R 64 N N Y Nielsen Jim R 2 N N Y Norby Chris R 72 N N Y Olsen Kristin R 25 N N Y Pan Richard D 5 Y Y Y Perea Henry T. D 31 Y Y Y Perez John A. D 46 Y Y Y Perez V. Manuel D 80 A A Y Portantino Anthony J. D 44 Y Y Y Silva Jim R 67 N N Y Skinner Nancy D 14 Y Y Y Smyth Cameron R 38 N N Y Solorio Jose D 69 Y Y Y Swanson Sandre R. D 16 Y Y Y Torres Norma J. D 61 Y Y Y Valadao David G. R 30 N N Y Wagner Donald P. R 70 N N Y Wieckowski Bob D 20 Y Y Y Williams Das D 35 Y Y Y Yamada Mariko D 8 Y Y Y (NV) indicates Not Voting/Abstaining (A) indicates an excused absence and is not counted in the rating

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N Y Y Y Y Y Y A N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N Y N N N Y Y Y A Y N Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y Y

N Y Y Y NV Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y Y

Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y A Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y Y

N Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N N N N Y Y Y Y A N Y N Y Y A N N Y Y Y

N Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N N A N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y Y

N Y Y Y Y Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N N N N Y Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y N N Y Y Y

N Y NV Y Y Y Y N N N Y N Y Y N Y N Y Y N N N N N NV Y Y Y Y N Y N Y Y Y N N Y NV Y

F A A A A A A F F F A F A A F A F A A F F F F F A A A A A F A F A A A F F A A A

RATING

20% 100% 90% 100% 90% 100% 100% 30% 20% 20% 100% 30% 100% 100% 20% 100% 20% 100% 100% 20% 30% 20% 30% 20% 90% 100% 100% 100% 100% 20% 100% 20% 100% 100% 100% 20% 20% 100% 90% 100%

Page 2 of 3


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

LICENSURE CLASSES

January CE Fair in Los Angeles January 26-28, 2012 LA Athletic Club, 431 West Seventh Street, Los Angeles, CA 90014 ROOM RESERVATIONS: Call the hotel at (213) 625-2211 and request the NASW rate - $134 per night. PARKING: $4.50 per day / approximate REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Monday – January 9, 2012 Registration fees increase $25 after this date. DATES:

LOCATION:

Human Sexuality (10 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement Course: #12-201 Instructor: M. Harwood, LCSW Date: Thursday, January 26 Hours: 8:30am-7:30pm Fees: Member $180 Non-member $210

Child Abuse (7 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement Course: #12-204 Instructor: R. Liles, LCSW, DSW Date: Friday, January 27 Hours: 8:30am-4:30pm Fees: Member $140 Non-member $170

Spousal/Partner Abuse (15 Hr) 2-day Pre- License Requirement

Substance Dependency (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-202 Instructor: M. Harwood, LCSW Date: Fri. & Sat., Jan. 27 & 28 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Course: #12-203 Instructor: G. DiStefano, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., Jan. 27 & 28 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Advanced Law & Ethics (6 Hr) BBS Requirement for LCSW & LMFT

Clinical Supervision (15 Hr) BBS Requirement for Supervising ASW

Course: #12-205 Instructor: M. W. Siegel, LCSW Date: Friday, January 27 Hours: 9:00am-4:00pm Fees: Member $120 Non-member $150

Course: #12-206 Instructor: M. Jung, LCSW, DSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., Jan. 27 & 28 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

February CE Fair in Santa Clara February 24-25, 2012 Embassy Suites, 2885 Lakeside Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 ROOM RESERVATIONS: Call the hotel at (408) 496-6400 and request the NASW rate - $109 per night. PARKING: No charge REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Monday – February 6, 2012 Registration fees increase $25 after this date. DATES:

LOCATION:

Human Sexuality (10 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement Course: #12-207 Instructor: R. Nizzardini, LCSW, JD Date: Friday, February 24 Hours: 8:30am–7:30pm Fees: Member $180 Non-member $210 Substance Dependency (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-license Requirement Course: #12-210 Instructor: G. DiStefano, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., Feb. 24 & 25 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Spousal/Partner Abuse (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-License Requirement

Advanced Law & Ethics (6 Hr) BBS Requirement for LCSW & LMFT

Course: #12-208 Instructor: J. Jackson, LCSW Date: Fri. & Sat., Feb. 24 & 25 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Course: #12-209 Instructor: P. Tsui, LCSW, PsyD Date: Friday, February 24 Hours: 9:00am-4:00pm Fees: Member $120 Non-member $150

Clinical Supervision (15 Hr) BBS Requirement for Supervising ASW

Child Abuse (7 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-211 Instructor: M. Stern, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., Feb. 24 & 25 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Course: #12-212 Instructor: J. Robbins, LCSW Date: Saturday, Feb. 25 Hours: 8:30am-4:30pm Fees: Member $140 Non-member $170

Register online at www.naswca.org

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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

LICENSURE CLASSES

May CE Fair in Burlingame May 18-19, 2012 Doubletree Hotel, 835 Airport Blvd., Burlingame, CA 94010 ROOM RESERVATIONS: Call the hotel at (800) 222-8733 and request the NASW rate - $109 per night. PARKING: $6 per day / approximate REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Monday – April 30, 2012 Registration fees increase $25 after this date. DATES:

LOCATION:

Human Sexuality (10 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement

Child Abuse (7 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-213 Instructor: R. Nizzardini, LCSW, JD Date: Friday, May 18 Hours: 8:30am-7:30pm Fees: Member $180 Non-member $210

Course: #12-214 Instructor: J. Robbins, LCSW Date: Saturday, May 19 Hours: 8:30am-4:30pm Fees: Member $140 Non-member $170

Advanced Law & Ethics (6 Hr) BBS Requirement for LCSW & LMFT

Substance Dependency (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-216 Instructor: P. Tsui, LCSW, PsyD Date: Friday, May 18 Hours: 9:00am-4:00pm Fees: Member $120 Non-member $150

Course: #12-217 Instructor: G. DiStefano, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., May 18 & 19 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Spousal/Partner Abuse (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-License Requirement Course: #12-215 Instructor: J. Jackson, LCSW Date: Fri. & Sat, May 18 & 19 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280 Clinical Supervision (15 Hr) BBS Requirement for Supervising ASW Course: #12-218 Instructor: M. Stern, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., May 18 & 19 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

June CE Fair in Burbank June 21-23, 2012 Holiday Inn, 150 E. Angeleno Ave., Burbank, CA 91502 ROOM RESERVATIONS: Call the hotel at (818) 841-4770 and request the NASW rate - $118 per night. PARKING/SHUTTLE: $5 approximate parking & free Burbank Airport shuttle REGISTRATION DEADLINE: Monday – June 4, 2012 Registration fees increase $25 after this date. DATES:

LOCATION:

Human Sexuality (10 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement

Spousal/Partner Abuse (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-License Requirement

Advanced Law & Ethics (6 Hr) BBS Requirement for LCSW & LMFT

Course: #12-220 Instructor: M. Harwood, LCSW Date: Fri. & Sat., June 22 & 23 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Course: #12-221 Instructor: M. W. Siegel, LCSW Date: Friday, June 22 Hours: 9:00am-4:00pm Fees: Member $120 Non-member $150

Child Abuse (7 Hr) 1-day Pre-license Requirement

Clinical Supervision (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-222 Instructor: R. Liles, LCSW, DSW Date: Friday, June 22 Hours: 8:30am-4:30pm Fees: Member $140 Non-member $170

Course: #12-223 Instructor: M. Jung, LCSW, DSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., June 22 & 23 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Substance Dependency (15 Hr) 2-day Pre-license Requirement

Course: #12-219 Instructor: M. Harwood, LCSW Date: Thursday, June 21 Hours: 8:30am-7:30pm Fees: Member $180 Non-member $210

Course: #12-224 Instructor: G. DiStefano, LCSW Dates: Fri. & Sat., June 22 & 23 Hours: 8:30am-5:00pm Fees: Member $250 Non-member $280

Register online at www.naswca.org


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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2012 NASW CE FAIR REGISTRATION FORM Registration Instructions: 1. Provide all required information using black ink pen. 2. Indicate type of license and number. 3. Include full payment. No registration is processed without full payment. 4. Mail or fax to Sacramento or Register online at www.naswca.org Fee $

Course Number and Title

If registering after the deadline, add $25 to each class.

Total Amount

1. 2. 3. 4.

Pay with check or credit card. Complete payment information. Mail or fax to Sacramento office. Tax ID # 94-1745038.

Please Check Type of Payment

Fee $

Course Number and Title

Payment Instructions:

$ _____________

To receive the full credit, registrants must: Arrive within 30 minutes of class start time. q Sign-in and sign-out at the NASW registration table. q Provide a state license or file number. q Complete online evaluation after the event. q

q

Check payable to NASW-CA

q

Credit: Master Card or Visa

Master Card, Visa, or AMX Expiration Date Authorized Signature

NASW-CA Chapter 1016 23rd Street

Type of License and Number ________________________________________ q LCSW q LMFT q ASW q IMF q LPCC q Student q Out-of-State First Name

Last Name

Street Address City

State & Zip Code

Primary Phone

Work Phone

Email Address (required*)

NASW Membership #

*Confirmations will be sent the to the email address provided.

Special Needs Request: If you need this brochure in an alternate format or require other special arrangements, please submit your request a minimum of 30 days in advance of the event. For questions, call (916) 442-4565 ext. 17 or email naswleg@naswca.org. Course Cancellation Policy: Classes which do not have sufficient registrants by the registration deadline may be canceled and registrants notified by phone. Refund Policy: Refund requests must be made in writing. All refunds will be assessed a $25 fee and must be received by 5:00 p.m. seven days prior to the event. Registrants who cancel less than seven days prior to the event or who do not attend forfeit the entire fee. CE Provider Information: Courses meet the qualifications for CEUs for LCSW and MFT as required by the CA State Board of Behavioral Sciences PCE 44.

Sacramento, CA 95816 FAX # (916) 442-2075 In CA: Local: Email: Web:

(800) 538-2565 ext.17 (916) 442-4565 ext.17 naswleg@naswca.org www.naswca.org

Register Online Register for CE Fair Online Enroll & Pay on a Secure Site Receive Email Confirmation Visit: www.naswca.org

Register for 2 Free Online Classes

Take courses any time night or day Visit: www.naswca.org

SAVE THE DATE! 2012 Annual Conference Fri. & Sat., Oct. 26 & 27, 2012 Irvine, CA Exhibit Hall Networking Receptions SW Awards Celebration Mandated Licensure Classes Workshops for Non-Licensed Visit: www.naswca.org


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January 2012

Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

Social Work Award Recipients Celebrated

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ASW-CA recently honored five outstanding individuals with awards for Social Worker of the Year, Lifetime Achievement and Public Citizen. The annual awards recognize those who are steadfast in their pursuit of professional excellence and commitment to the values of social work. NASW Chapter President Mary Kay Oliveri presented the awards at the annual Social Work Awards Luncheon held in October in conjunction with the 2011 Annual Conference. Please join us in congratulating the following recipients.

Social Worker of the Year Award Marshall Wong, MSW

Lifetime Achievement Award Beverly Schydlowsky, PhD, LCSW

A native of Los Angeles, Marshall has been with the Los Angeles County Commission on Human Relations since 1999. He is the primary author of the agency’s annual hate crime report, has developed human relations curricula for L.A. County employees, and coordinates a countywide coalition against hate crime. Previously, he held positions with the Smithsonian Institution and the Mayor of Washington, D.C. From 1991-1994, he was a Fellow in the Kellogg National Leadership Program and has been a recipient of the Community Service Award from the National Multicultural Institute, the Abacus Award from the Organization of Chinese Americans, the Mayor’s Distinguished Service Award from the District of Columbia, and the NASW-CA Region H Social Worker of the Year award. Currently, he co-chairs API Equality-LA, a coalition advancing marriage equality and LGBT civil rights in the Asian Pacific American community. Marshall received his bachelor of arts in sociology and his master’s of social welfare from the University of California at Los Angeles. Additionally, he has studied Spanish in Cuernevaca, Mexico and Antigua, Guatemala, has co-authored, “Organizing in Communities of Color: Addressing Inter-Ethnic Conflicts,” for Social Justice, and has written articles for the Washington Times and Asian Week.

Dr. Schydlowsky is both a clinical psychologist and clinical social worker. Since moving from Boston to Santa Barbara 21 years ago, Dr. Schydlowsky has been very active in the professional community; directing and founding nonprofit agencies, teaching and training interns and professionals, and speaking publicly on relevant issues of aging. Upon arriving in Santa Barbara, she assumed the position of clinical director of the Santa Barbara Counseling Center (former Night Counseling Center), then founded the Senior Peer Counseling, which developed into the Center for Successful Aging. Dr. Schydlowsky has been on the faculty of Antioch University and was a supervisor at the Hosford Clinic at UCSB. She recently opened her private psychotherapy practice specializing in issues of aging for families and adult children, women’s issues, support groups and training and supervision of professionals. Dr. Schydlowsky is also a research fellow at the Center for Longevity, Wisdom and Aging at the Fielding University where she received her PhD in clinical psychology. She is one of the founders of the Santa Barbara Village, a program designed to help seniors stay in their homes. In 2010, Dr. Schydlowsky received the Senior Citizen of the Year award from the Central Coast Commission for Senior Citizens.

Lifetime Achievement Award Timothy A. Brown, LCSW Tim is a licensed clinical social worker and the former director of Sacramento Steps Forward (previously the Sacramento Ending Chronic Homelessness Initiative), which coordinates the implementation of the Sacramento Cities/County Ten Year Plan to End Homelessness. Under Tim’s leadership, 600 chronic homeless people moved into permanent supportive housing from 2007-2011 and chronic homelessness decreased by 50 percent in Sacramento County. Tim served as executive director of Sacramento Loaves & Fishes, an Interfaith, privately funded day center that feed 700 homeless people every day. He has worked as manager of the Behavioral Health Clinic of the UC Davis Department of Psychiatry and as director of the Northern California Conditional Release Program, a forensic mental health program for Mentally Ill Offenders in 16 counties. Tim is a long-time advocate for mentally disabled and homeless people and programs and a founding board member and former board president of the Sacramento Housing Alliance, the Sacramento Homeless Organizing Committee, Sacramento Self-Help Housing, Clean & Sober, and the Mather Community Campus Advisory Board. He served as co-chair of the Sacramento City/County Board on Homelessness from 2003 to 2006 and was involved in the planning effort resulting in Sacramento’s 10-Year Plan to End Homelessness.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

Public Citizen of the Year Assemblymember Jim Beall, Jr. Jim Beall has served in the Assembly since 2006. He represents the 24th District, which includes San Jose, Saratoga, Santa Clara, and Campbell. He is known throughout California for his expertise in health care, the foster care system, transportation, and improving the delivery of services for people with disabilities and for low-income families. His work includes establishing the framework for the Santa Clara County Children’s Health Initiative, a first-in-the-nation program to provide health coverage for all of the county’s children. He was a driving force behind Assembly Bill 12, landmark legislation to extend transitional support for foster care youth in California from age 18 to 21. This year, he played an instrumental role in shepherding legislation to the Governor’s desk that would mandate health insurers to cover the costs of therapies and services for people with Autism Spectrum Disorders. He currently serves as the chairman of the Assembly Human Services Committee. Beall, a life-long San Jose resident, is a former member of the San Jose City Council and the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors. He and his wife, Pat, have been married for more than 25 years. He has two stepsons and a grandson.

Public Citizen of the Year Earl Kelly Earl is a Past President of United Advocates for Children and Families. He is currently board member and policy cochair holder with UACF. He has worked with individuals to create and stabilize the communication process to insure the family voice is being heard at the state and local level. To that end, Earl worked to form parent advisory boards and used those entities to influence legislative decisions. He participated and organized many letter writing campaigns, written and delivered several trainings throughout California and the nation on subjects including wrap-around services, coaching and empowering parents, the role of the family/parent partner, engaging marginalized fathers and many more. He is a former Family Partner and a Parent Involvement Coordinator with EMQFF

January 2012

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in Program UPLIFT Wrap Around, Matrix, the Receiving Center Stabilization Team and Addiction Prevention Services. Earl serves as manager and member of the senior leadership team that guides these programs. He is a parent and foster parent to several children with special needs. Earl is a believer in the Wrap Around process and believes that most families can and will succeed with the right kind of support and is committed to working at local and state levels to help our systems in support of our families.

CalSWEC is pleased to support CDSS, CWDA and the other sponsoring partners in implementing AB 12, the California Fostering Connections to Success Act. Please see below for information on the After 18 campaign and a link to the after18ca.org website. Training materials are also available on the CalSWEC website: http://calswec.berkeley.edu/ CalSWEC/OtherTraining_AB12.html

Spanish Immersion Program for Social Workers in Costa Rica! Learn or improve your Spanish while visiting a true tropical paradise.

For details, visit www.acce.co.cr/social_workers.html.


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

ANNUAL CONFERENCE

Scenes From the 2011 NASW-CA Annual Conference October 28-29, 2011 • Burlingame, California

Fran Morse.

Edna Lee Harold, Robert Brenner, Evelyn Subido, Ikuko Means, and Stephanie Nguyen.

Laura Ayala, Cyndy Thomas and Erin Truex.

Shoshana Taubman and Jeremy Taubman.

Assemblymember Jim Beall, Jr. and Nayiri Nahabedian.

Mary Kay Oliveri and Marshall Wong.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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Dear California Members of NASW, Below is an open letter from more than 140 students (MSWs, PhDs) and faculty at the U.C. Berkeley School of Social Welfare. The letter was written in response to the Occupy Movement, proposed U.C. fee hikes, and violence by police officers against two U.C. Berkeley MSW student protesters on November 9, 2011.

An Open Letter to: The Office of the Chancellor, UC Berkeley California Members of the National Association of Social Workers Students, Faculty and Alumni of the UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare “Social workers should engage in social and political action that seeks to ensure that all people have equal access to the resources, employment, services, and opportunities they require to meet their basic human needs and to develop fully.” —National Association of Social Workers Code of Ethics On November 9, 2011, during a peaceful protest of the University of California’s proposed 81-percent tuition increase, police officers assaulted several UC Berkeley students, including two School of Social Welfare students, for exercising their constitutional right to free speech. This violent suppression of student rights denigrates the University’s proud legacy as the birthplace of the Free Speech Movement. The student protests and unprovoked violence are symptoms of a political-economic system that favors the wealthy and powerful and divides Americans along ideological and economic lines. Vast wealth disparity and unequal access to the American Dream are the defining social issues of our time. As social workers, we embrace our ethical and moral obligation to take action. We respect the diverse array of ideas and demands put forth by the OccupyCal movement. Students at the UC Berkeley School of Social Welfare will provide unwavering leadership to help forge a future where: 1.) All Americans have meaningful employment opportunities, adequate housing, safe and healthy communities, vibrant public spaces, and a quality education 2.) Employment of any type guarantees an adequate standard of living, including quality healthcare and a secure retirement 3.) Social, political and economic systems work to maximize the potential of all citizens regardless of inherited privilege and circumstance. We firmly oppose the unmaking of California’s great public university system. The proposed cuts directly impact the quality of social work education and threaten the social work profession’s ability to provide quality services to the most vulnerable members of American society: 1.) Skyrocketing tuition prevents UC social work schools from recruiting a diverse student body, which decreases

our ability to provide culturally and linguistically competent services to all California residents. 2.) The high cost of post-secondary education will steer students away from moderate-income careers like social work at a time when professional helpers are needed more than ever. 3.) Student debt has reached astronomical levels and has a crippling effect on young people’s abilities to support themselves and their families. We are outraged and appalled by the violent silencing of UC Berkeley student voices. Community members (endorsements enclosed) of the School of Social Welfare call on the University and Chancellor Birgeneau to: 1.) Protect students from physical and emotional harm above all else and never again sanction violent acts in the name of student safety and school policy. 2.) Recognize the pitching of tents on campus as a nonviolent act of protest in the tradition of the sit-in protests of the past. The “tent” has become a symbol of the Occupy movement, and should be treated as an extension of free speech. 3.) Engage in open, sincere dialogue with student protestors and take every measure possible to maintain affordable, high-quality education and a diverse student body. 4.) Guarantee the right of nonviolent protest and free speech on the UC Berkeley campus. As social workers, we embrace our long history as agents of social change and remain committed to addressing all inequalities and injustices. Our participation in the General Strike at UC Berkeley on November 15th will be a springboard for sustained, strategic action. To read the letter in its entirety, please visit www.naswca. org/associations/7989/files/letter_to_alumni_1_2012.pdf.


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

OPINION

CALCRA: A Story of Courage, Risk Taking and Devotion The Story of Old People Who Our Society Say Have Nothing to Contribute By Lillian L. Hyatt, MSW, a resident of a CCRC and AARP Policy Specialist on CCRCs

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his column will tell the history of two courageous people, as well as an organization, that for over two decades has been led by other courageous clearheaded men and women dedicated to defending the rights of all CCRC residents. The organization is the California Continuing Care Residents Association (CALCRA). Many of the men and women who have contributed to the legislative success of CALCRA are no longer with us. They successfully passed eight bills benefiting CCRC residents. Some of these people who are still with us are suffering from various illnesses and disabilities. Those people no longer have the luxury of continuing the years of devotion to the

organization. I have a name for my comrades in arms defending the rights of the elderly. I call us “the thin gray line.” My story begins when I first met James Transue, CALCRA’s founder, in his home in a CCRC in northern California owned by the same corporation that owns the CCRC where I live. Maude Transue had already died some years before. While James was not as active as before, he spent the day educating me about why CALCRA was so necessary to protect the rights of CCRC residents. I learned from James that just because people had enough money to pay for their care, they could still be cheated out of their life savings. The method used by this CCRC corporation was called the “eight-year plan.” This plan was

conceived by a minister who was made executive director of the CCRC where James lived. The plan’s objective was to be sure that the CCRC got all of the residents’ money in eight years, leaving their funds in the coffers of the CCRC. / To view the entire article, please visit www.naswca.org/associations/7989/files/ hyatt0112.pdf. To request a printed copy of this article, please contact (800) 538-2565, ext. 42. California News columnist Lillian Hyatt is an AARP California policy advisor. A policy advisor reviews legislation, regulations and other proposals to promote official AARP policy updated annually and approved by its board of directors. Professor Hyatt can be seen at www.youtube.com. Search for Lillian Hyatt.

New Professionals Network Hosts Cookies & Connections II By Marina Ovanessian, NPN Advisory Committee member

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he second annual Cookies & Connections event took place on November 5, 2011 at Yxta Cocina Mexicana in Los Angeles. It was hosted by the New Professionals Network (NPN) in collaboration with Region I with more than 45 enthusiastic attendees participating. NPN co-chair Rachel Gardner energetically led the after-

MASTER OF

noon’s program, with support from fellow co-chair Dustin Manhart. The students and recent graduates in attendance played a bingo ice breaker while enjoying an array of gourmet desserts. The chapter’s dynamic membership coordinator, Brendan Broms, discussed the benefits of NASW membership and recruited new members. He also

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introduced several innovative networking games, which greatly encouraged participants to interact. The successful event drew to a close with a raffle drawing where several lucky attendees won gift cards from generous corporate donors. NPN is currently working on many ventures including the Junior Board Member project, the Community Service project and the Rising Star of Social Work Award. Also, please look out for the miniconference coming up in the spring 2012. “Like” our page on Facebook! If you are interested in becoming more involved with NPN, please contact Brendan Broms at membership@naswca.org for more information. /


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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Diana Ming Chan Bilingual Social Work Scholarship Awards Presented at NASW State Conference By Nancy Lim-Yee, LCSW

T

he first annual Diana Ming Chan Bilingual Social Work Scholarship Awards were presented at an awards luncheon during the NASW State Conference on October 29, 2011. Diana Ming Chan, a licensed clinical social worker, was the very first Chinese bilingual social worker in San Francisco’s Chinatown. She was a social work pioneer and inspirational community leader. Throughout her distinguished 46-year career, Diana was an innovator and risk taker who repeatedly made contributions of long-lasting impact in various communities. After Diana passed away in August 2008, the Asian Pacific Islander Social Work Council, in collaboration with the NASW California Chapter and the NASW Foundation, established a scholarship fund, to honor Diana’s memory and to support her legacy.

Applicants for the scholarship were asked to submit their applications by answering Left to right: Rod Santos, Maria Luna, Clarence two questions: 1) How would you advance Chan (husband of Diana Ming Chan), Nancy Limsocial work in the Asian Pacific Islander Yee and David Wu (scholarship recipient). community; and 2) How do you plan to or State East Bay. The API Social Work Counhave you used your bilingual skills to help cil extends its congratulations to these four others? We received a number of appli- future social workers. The Asian Pacific Islander Social Work cations from each of the four Bay Area Council hopes to continue to present the universities (SF State University, San Jose State University, UC Berkeley, and Cal State Diana Ming Chan Bilingual Scholarship to East Bay) and after our selection committee other social work students for many more reviewed all of the applications, we selected years to come. This is just the beginning. If four recipients who each received a $1,000 you would like to support Diana’s vision and passion for the social work profession, the scholarship award. The four scholarship recipients include Council invites you to make a tax-deductible Sandy Ngo, an undergraduate social wel- donation to the Diana Ming Chan Scholarfare student from UC Berkeley; Deborah ship Fund. There is information about how Son, a second-year MSW student at Cal to make a donation at the NASW FoundaState East Bay; David Wu, a second-year tion website as well as on our API Social MSW student at UC Berkeley; and Kelvin Work Council website at http://sites.google. 1/4 Page - Vertical: 3.625x4.875 Xu, a second-year MSW student at Cal com/site/apiswcgroup/Home. /

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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

A R O U N D T H E S TAT E After more than 38 years in social work education, Dr. E. Frederick Anderson retired from the faculty at the Cal State University Los Angeles School of Social Work. Dr. Anderson was the founding director of Cal State LA’s masters of social work degree program and the School of Social Work in 1997. Dr. Anderson was also one of the administrators of the original College of Human Services at San Diego State University and the first principal investigator for the Inter University Consortium Child Welfare training program and the California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC).

Assemblymember Mariko Yamada, MSW, with Captain Edward Woodard, one of the original Tuskegee Airmen, the first African American and much decorated military pilots in World War II at the annual Tuskagee Airmen Banquets on October 22, 2011 at Travis Air Force Base.

NASW Practice Perspective Continued from page 1

Preparing for Implementation of Version 5010 Clinical social workers should develop an implementation plan for compliancy in transitioning to Version 5010. Full functionality is expected by CMS on January 1, 2012. The following steps may help prepare clinical social workers for the conversion: • Contact your practice management and/or software vendor to determine when Version 5010 will be available and installed into your computer system. • Contact your billing service, clearinghouses, payers and other covered entities to determine when they will have upgrades completed and when testing can begin. • Identify and make any changes that will occur as a result of the new software. • Enroll in training courses to become familiar with the software. • Conduct internal and external testing

to ensure that electronic transactions can be sent and received.

Begin using Version 5010 prior to January 1, 2012 to ensure that electronic transactions are working smoothly. Clinical social workers should be aware that successful implementation of Version 5010 will be dependent on when they are able to acquire and install the new software. The amount of time that it takes for clinical social workers to become compliant will depend on the size of their private practice and available resources. To avoid placing themselves at risk for payment denials and other interruptions of services due to inappropriately submitted claims, clinical social workers are responsible for confirming compliancy of Version 5010 with practice management and billing services employed by them to perform electronic billing. Additional information about Version 5010 is available online from the

CMS Website at www.cms.hhs.gov. NASW members may also contact NASW for questions at mcoleman@ naswdc.org. /

Resources HIPAA Insurance Reform: Modifications to the Health Insurance, Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA): Final Rules, 74 Fed. Reg.3296 (January 16, 2009) available online at http://edocket.access. gpo.gov/2009/pdf/E9-740.pdf. For more information and resources on HIPAA, visit www. socialworkers.org/hipaa/. To view this document online, visit www.socialworkers.org/assets/ secured/documents/practice/ clinical/Clinical%20Social%20 Workers%205010%20is%20Coming.pdf. To view all NASW Practice Perspectives, visit www.socialworkers. org/practice/newsletters/default.asp. Mirean Coleman can be reached at Mcoleman@naswdc.org.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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California Social Work Hall of Distinction Welcomes New Members By Maya Meinert The California Social Work Hall of Distinction inducted six new members, three posthumously, on October 29 at a ceremony in Burlingame, Calif., who were honored for their significant contributions to the profession. These social work pioneers join a list of 67 existing Hall of Distinction members—all of whom have made coursealtering decisions that have uniquely affected the direction of social welfare in California. “Tonight’s induction class represents contributions in a broad range of social work practice, from education and research to social services and justice,” said Colleen Friend, Hall of Distinction committee chair. “Their work collectively spans well over 100 years and has resulted in changes in the way social work is practiced and perceived and leaves a legacy that has enriched people’s lives beyond measure.” The 2011 inductees include Richard Masato Aoki, a counselor, instructor, administrator and influential political activist who dedicated his life to his beliefs and the struggle for human rights; Ronald V. Dellums, former U.S. Congressional Representative from California, Ninth District, and mayor of Oak-

land who earned his master’s degree in social work from the University of California, Berkeley; Herman Gallegos, a pioneer for civil rights for Latinos and other minority groups who held leadership positions in a wide range of philanthropic and civic activities, including cofounder of the national Community Service Organization with Cesar Chavez; Edward Nathan, former faculty at UC Berkeley and executive director of the Zellerbach Family Foundation, who was one of the nation’s most innovative philanthropic grant makers and whose efforts were pivotal to the creation of the California Social Work Education Center (CalSWEC); Janice Kay O’Donnell, a social work professor and administrator at California State University, Chico, whose unparalleled efforts in the areas of education and outreach brought professional social work services to northern, especially rural, California; and Kermit T. Wiltse, a social work practitioner, educator, administrator and researcher devoted to improving the lives of disadvantaged children and families. The Hall of Distinction was established in 2002 under the auspices the California Social Welfare Archives (CSWA) to honor individuals who have

Left to right: Christina Wong, Patrick Mace, Awardee Jan O’Donnell, Celeste Jones, Patty Hunter, Donna Jensen, Kim Gaghagen, and Janlee Wong.

Ben Cuellar, Hall of Distinction Committee Member and Professor and Dean Emeritus, CSU Fresno and 2011 Inductee, Herman Gallegos.

made exceptional contributions to social welfare and the social work profession in California. CSWA, with support from the USC School of Social Work, maintains one of the most extensive collections of California social welfare history. The organization conducts oral history interviews and acquires and preserves materials of historical significance, documenting the development of social welfare in California and making it accessible for future generations. “At least a half a dozen of our social work leaders in attendance tonight conveyed to me that it was a moving, inspirational and emotional event that renewed their spirit and reinvigorated them for meeting the challenge of social work today,” said Janlee Wong, NASWCA executive director. The event was sponsored by several social work schools and organizations from throughout the state, including: USC, Cal State Los Angeles, Cal State Long Beach, Cal State Stanislaus, Loma Linda University, San Jose State University, UCLA, UC Berkeley and the California Deans and Directors of Schools of Social Work (CADD) and the National Association of Social Workers—California Chapter. /


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

The National Network for Social Work Managers Presents its 2012 Institute Human Services in Transition: Sustaining Impact in a Changed Economy April 26 and 27, 2012 — San Diego, CA Each year the National Network for Social Work Managers (NNSWM) holds an annual institute that brings together leaders from throughout North America. This year’s institute is designed for an interdisciplinary audience including: • middle and senior human services managers of non-profit, for-profit and government organizations; • faculty of social work administration and other administration programs, and; • social work management students interested in learning about the most current issues, practices and theories associated with agency management. Participants are encouraged to network with colleagues and discuss cutting-edge practices and issues in the field. Our network includes decision makers, academics, practitioners and policy analysts from a wide variety of private organizations and public agencies across the entire spectrum of the human services field. This year’s program focuses on Human Services in Transition: Sustaining Impact in a Changed Economy. The institute will take place at the Jacobs Center for Neighborhood Innovation at 404 Euclid Avenue, San Diego, Calif., 92114.

Workshop themes and related topical areas: • Social Entrepreneurship • Social Innovation • Use of Social Media

The NNSWM is soliciting nominations for awards for outstanding individual practitioners, academics and organizations that have demonstrated excellence in the teaching and practice of social work management.

Awards include:

• Management Transitions/Succession Planning • Financial Management • Building Collaborative Partnerships from MOUs to Mergers/Acquisitions • Veterans • Foster Care

• The Chauncey Alexander Lifetime Achievement Award recognizes an individual who has made a substantial and enduring contribution to the field of social work management. • The Exemplar Award recognizes social work executives who demonstrate exemplary performance for the public good and are worthy of emulation • The Mark Moses Distinguished Fellowship Award recognizes outstanding academics and practitioners in the field of social work management and assists recipients with travel costs to attend the national conference

• Health Care Reform • Transition Age Youth • Vital Aging • School-Based Services • Multiple Generations in the workplace

• The Organizational Excellence Award recognizes the accomplishments of a nonprofit, public or for profit organization and its adherence to the Leadership and Management Practice Standards of the NNSWM.

NOMINATION DEADLINE IS JANUARY 31, 2012 For more information, please visit www.socialworkmanager.org or call (213) 553-1870.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

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COUNCILS

Social Workers and the WOMEN’S COUNCIL Occupy L.A. Movement Is Legal Always Ethical? By Gene Rothman Self-Determination in the Context of Trauma The client base of social workers includes the most vulnerable members of society. Julie Levine, a social work activist and sometime spokesperson for Occupy Los Angeles (OLA), stated this forcefully: “OLA represents all sectors of society who have had their rights disenfranchised and basic needs not met, as well as social workers and others who care about them.  As long as our government continues to be funded by corporations who pay no taxes and continue to have record profits at the expense of our constituents and 99 percent of Americans, we will continue to see essential services cut to the bone while corporate wars destroy innocent people around the world and destroy our environment and the planet.  Police are raiding us, arresting us and government is expanding military powers domestically. We must rise up together against this police state as social workers concerned with basic ethics.” The role of social workers, however, is not only that of direct advocacy. Some colleagues also accompanied the police when they entered the encampment. Their role, sanctioned by the mayor and other politicians, was to provide resources (such as referrals to shelter beds) for occupiers who were willing to leave voluntarily. Our social work code of ethics demands that we recognize the self-determination of our clients. As someone who visited OLA, I would encourage everyone to listen personally to those who have risked their comforts to make their needs known. / Gene Rothman, DSW, LCSW, is a retired social worker active with the NASW California Social Action/Social Justice Council of the National Association of Social Workers.

Janice, an unemployed woman with no family and few friends, was eight months pregnant when a social worker identified a shelter to provide housing, case management support and a path to low-cost housing for Janice and her newborn. After a tour of the facility, Janice learned that she could not use her cell phone at the shelter. She said that she would rather be homeless than be without her phone. Lorraine, recently divorced with estranged adult children, was found eligible for Supplemental Security Benefits on the basis of her mental illness. She insisted she needed a one-bedroom apartment (not a single) and was willing to pay $650 a month plus utilities from her $830 benefit check, saying she didn’t care if there was no money left over for food and that she would get food somehow.

Impacted by a history of familial, community and/or institutional trauma, our clients face limited but crucial choices. How does the social worker balance a commitment to client selfdetermination with her obligation to promoting client well-being? These dilemmas, the ACE study (Adverse Childhood Experiences), and the ethics of social worker self care will be considered at the February 3, 2012 Law and Ethics Workshop at California Endowment LA, offering 6 CEUs (provider #4713) and lunch for $40 ($45 after January 23, 2011). Please send a check to “Women’s Council” Beth Merenda at 13052 Moorpark St., Apt 201, Studio City, Calif., 91694. For more information, contact Beth at (800) 538-2565, ext. 57 or merenda.msw@gmail.com. /


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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

REGION REPORTS Central Coast Unit Report By Ignacio Pacheco, MSW

REGION A

San Francisco, Marin, Sonoma, Mendocino, Lake, Humboldt, Del Norte CONTACTS

Director Mary Kyle, LCSW marykyle53@yahoo.com Regional Alternate Director Mark Thoma, EdD, MSW thoma_mark@yahoo.com Mendocino Unit Contact Nancy Nanna carrianna@saber.net Sonoma Unit Chair Keri Harris harris.keri@hotmail.com Student Representative

Humboldt State

Kim Hall HallK@humboldt.edu

Region A Report Happy New Year from San Francisco! The San Francisco unit had a networking and CEU training on November 30: “HIV and Substance Use: A Panel Discussion on Trends, Best Practices with Clients, and Resources.” Panel presenters included Ramon Matos, LMFT, manager, AIDS and Substance Abuse Program, AIDS Health Project; Karena Franses, LCSW, social work supervisor, UCSF Positive Health Program; and Michael Siever, PhD, director of Behavioral Services, San Francisco AIDS Foundation. A special thanks to AIDS Health Project for hosting the event. And thank you to the panel for facilitating a dynamic exchange of information and discussion. The San Fran-

cisco unit’s next networking and CEU training will be in March. If you have an issue you would like presented, please contact Mark Thoma at thoma_mark@yahoo.com.

REGION B

NASW Central Coast unit has had a very successful three months since our planning committee met in August! We started by welcoming the second incoming MSW class to CSU Monterey Bay in September. Our guest Janlee Wong spoke to NASW members and the students about the profession of social work. In October, Glenn Thomas gave an excellent overview of parent-child interactive therapy and we had several inter-disciplinary participants. Rebecca Gonzales gave a rousing presentation during our November meeting about the ongoing legislative process in Sacramento. These events have occurred in the company of good food, high spirits and because of the hard work of dedicated individuals. Special thanks to the planning committee (Lynne White-Dixon, Rose Luna Regalado, Emily Nicholl, Rebecca Barboza, Christiane Dettinger, Caroline Haskell and Ignacio Pacheco) and the contributions of others—Candice Gregory, Donna House, and Kyle Titus—that have made our meetings successful, intriguing and meaningful. We are looking forward to 2012! In our effort to support Lobby Days in April 2012, our unit voted to give a $20 registration rebate for the first 10 CSUMB MSW students who sign up to attend. We also look forward to welcoming new members/participants to our unit meetings! Our first meeting in 2012 will be January 17 at 6pm at CSU Monterey Bay (Personal Growth and Counseling Center, Inter-Garrison Road and 4th Ave. Marina, Calif., 93933). Please check out www.naswccu.org for details and our latest updates! 

San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Monterey, San Benito, San Luis Obispo CONTACTS

Director Glenn Thomas, LCSW, BCD

glennthomas@loveandencourage.com Alternate Director Marvin Gross marvlus@sbcglobal.net Central Coast Unit Lynne White Dixon, LCSW

lwdixon@sbcglobal.net San Jose Unit Chris Lum

christopherglum@gmail.com Alternate Director Amy Gregor amy.gregor@va.gov San Luis Obispo Unit Ly-Lan M.V. Lofgren, MSW, LCSW

LyLanMVLofgren@gmail.com San Mateo Unit Suh-Liang Ou suhliangou@yahoo.com

Left to right: NASW-CA Executive Director Janlee Wong with Lynne White-Dixon and Rose Regalado, NASW co-chairs.

REGION C

Alameda, Contra Costa, Napa, Solano CONTACTS

Regional Director Natasha Wilson nwilson24@horizon.csueastbay.edu Student Representatives University of California at Berkeley Nina Hausman nina.hausman@gmail.com California State University, East Bay Donald Rodriguez drodriguez36@horizon.csueastbay.edu Ashley Carrion ashleycarrion@yahoo.com


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

25

REGION REPORTS REGION D

Central Valley: Chico, Kern, Fresno, Merced, Sacramento, San Joaquin, Stanislaus; Sierra Foothills: Alpine, Amador, Calaveras, Mariposa, Tuolumne CONTACTS

Regional Director Christina Wong, LCSW naswcachico@yahoo.com Alternate Director North Tracy Kelly turtletides@hotmail.com Alternate Director South Charleen Bright charleen.bright@cdcr.ca.gov Financial Chair Laurie Pence lpence@robla.12.ca.us Chico Unit Chair Christina Wong, LCSW naswcachico@yahoo.com Kern Unit Co-chair Evelyn Eterno eeterno@co.kern.ca.us Northern Gateway Susan Thompson sthompsonlcsw@att.net Sierra Foothills Chair Andrea Hayes ndzbiz@sbcglobal.net Stanislaus Chair Kathy Sniffen, MSW kasniffen@sbcglobal.net

Chico Unit Report

By Heather Clairbourn, LCSW

Activities for the Chico Unit of Region D have had an exciting few months including participation in the Out of Darkness Walk to prevent suicide, a CEU opportunity presented by NASW California’s own Rebecca Gonzales regarding state legislative affairs, and an exciting holiday party! Thank you to all the motivated volunteers, presenters and organizers that made these events possible. Unfortunately we lost a wonderfully convenient meeting place for our monthly meetings and have been working to find a new reliable location. If anyone in the Chico area has a suggestion, please contact the Chico unit at naswcachico@yahoo. com. The location for the January 18, 2012 meeting will soon be announced. We are scheduled to have a presentation by Torres Shelter, which is located in Chico. This is the only emergency shelter in the area that serves men, women and families with children. Happy New Year from Region D Chico unit!

REGION E

For more information and to RSVP, contact Leslie Wind, PhD, LCSW, at wind@usc.edu.

San Diego, Imperial CONTACTS

Palm Springs/Desert Cities Unit Report

Director Jennifer Tinsley, MSW jennifer_tinsley@hotmail.com Regional Alternative Director Bera K. Sekhon, MSW ad.regione.nasw@gmail.com

By Katrina Bullard, MSW

REGION F

San Bernardino/Riverside, Orange County, Palm Desert CONTACTS

Director Cameron Galford, LCSW, BCD

cgalford@naswdesertcities.com Alternate Director John Forand, MSW jforand@dc.rr.com Palm Springs Unit Chair Peter Shorts pcs.socialwork@yahoo.com High Desert Unit Chair Kimberly Cox, MSW, LCSW profiler2k@msn.com Inland Empire Unit Chair Julie Griffin, MSW jg10172003@yahoo.com Orange County Unit Chair Leslie Wind, PhD, LCSW wind@usc.edu

Our monthly meeting will be held at the Mirage Inn in Rancho Mirage on Thursday, February 2, from 6pm to 7:30 pm. Please join us as we make the preparations for the special event coming in March. For our March meeting, please join us to celebrate Social Workers Month with a special presentation, networking and food on March 20 from 6pm to 8pm at the Annenberg Center for Health Sciences located at Eisenhower Medical Center. For more information, contact unit chair Peter Shorts, MSW, at (760)-902-4961 or by email at pcs. socialwork@yahoo.com.

Inland Empire Unit Report By Christy Crespin

Orange County Unit Report By Leslie Wind, PhD, LCSW

The Orange County unit and the National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s Terrorism and Disaster Center hosted a free CEU presentation in November titled, “Youth and Disasters: Impact, Assessment, Intervention, and Self-Care.”  Dr. Leslie Wind, director of the USC Orange County Academic Center and Clinical Associate Professor, presented and facilitated discussion.  Special thanks to the University of Southern California School of Social Work for hosting location.  Save the date for our next networking and free CEU event on Saturday, January 28, 2012 from 9 am to noon, entitled “Using Motivational Interviewing to Enhance Practice.” 

Our permanent meeting place is Mimi’s Café at 395 E. Hospitality Lane, San Bernardino, Calif. 92408-3573. The room is nice, the menu is large and the restaurant is accommodating (including a Braille/large print menu). Our February meeting will be held on Monday, February 6, 2012. We are making final plans for our Tribute to Social Work event on Monday, March 5. Stay tuned for news regarding the venue we have chosen. Janlee Wong, Executive Director of NASW-CA, will be our guest speaker. We will be giving out awards for Social Worker of the Year, Social Work Student of the Year, Lifetime Achievement Award and Public Citizen of the Year. We will also be having a work day with Habitat for Humanity on March 24, 2012. This is a new event based on collaboration between the Inland Empire unit of Region F and Habitat for Humanity that came about through having guest speakers in November. We want to get the word out about the 2012 PSA Contest for social work as a profession. For the link to 2011 contestants and the winner of $1,000, go to www.youtube. com/watch?v=hsdccUg-j6c. We need leadership and new members to join us. For more information, please contact co-chairs Julie Griffin at jg10172003@yahoo. com or Glenda Gordon at gal4gsus2009@yahoo.com.

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Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

REGION G

San Fernando Valley, Ventura County, Antelope Valley, Santa Barbara County CONTACTS

Director Jerry Lawrie jerrylawrie@yahoo.com Santa Barbara Unit Kimiko Kurido, MSW kimikokuroda@gmail.com San Fernando Valley Unit Co-Chairs Rina Levi Shroyer, LCSW (818) 366-6950 Judy Harris, LCSW jmharrislcsw@sbcglobal.net Ventura County Unit Maryellen Benedetto marbobben@aol.com

San Fernando Valley Unit Report By Rina Levi Shroyer, LCSW, Co-Chair

Greetings social workers! SFVLU held a lively and productive planning meeting on December 1, 2011 at the home of Robin Stuchinsky, LCSW, in Sherman Oaks, Calif. Communications co-chairs Shauna Blakely and Nancy Menjivar presented SFVLU’s newly created Facebook group page. You can also email nasw.sfvlu@groups. facebook.com. We welcome you to join our group and enjoy using this interactive tool! Guest Cynthia Cooper, representing SFV Employee Assistance Professionals Association, attended to explore planning a joint workshop with SFVLU, slated for late spring 2012, on the “Law and Ethics of Social Media.” Look for details in future articles. A happy hour/mixer is scheduled for Thursday January 26, 2012 from 4p.m. to 7p.m. at the Claim Jumper Restaurant in Northridge at 9429 Tampa Boulevard at the corner of Plummer. There is ample free parking. The restaurant offers a separate meeting space for our group and a nohost bar with discounted drink prices. SFVLU will provide tasty appetizers. We invite all members and prospective members, CSUN MSW students and faculty to join us!  SFVLU has another planning meeting scheduled for Thursday February 2, 2012 from 6p.m. to 8p.m. with a light dinner included, at the home of Robin Stuchinsky, LCSW, in Sherman Oaks, to plan a program in celebration of Social Work Month and to work on our joint “Law and Ethics” program with EAPA. Please RSVP for both the January mixer and for the February planning meeting ASAP to either unit co-chair, Rina Shroyer, LCSW, at anirlevi@gmail.com or (818) 366-6950 or Judith Harris, LCSW, at jmharrislcsw@sbcglobal.net or (818) 986-7762.

REGION H

West Los Angeles and Beach Cities CONTACTS

Director Tracy Greene Mintz srcaretraining@earthlink.net Regional Alternative Director Loretta Sun lorettacsun@yahoo.com

Region H Report

By Tracey Greene Mintz, LCSW

Is 2012 the year you decide to take a new look at your social work career? NASW-CA Regions H and I and the MSW Program at California State University, Dominguez Hills, invite you to attend a special mini-conference: Social Work Across the Lifespan— Emerging Practice Areas For Social Workers on Saturday, January 21, 2012 at CSUDH LaCorte Recital Hall from 9am to 3pm. Learn who is funding social work positions, which practice areas are growing, and what core competencies are required to pursue jobs in these areas? Enjoy news and information about social work opportunities in growing practice areas, tips for career development, inspiration to grow your skills and networking with your social work colleagues. Presenters include: Victor Manalo, PhD, MSW on social work and government; Anthony Hassan, EdD, LCSW on military social work; Wynne Alexander, LCSW on family mental health; Anita Chun from the Center for Healthcare Rights; Patricia Green, MSW, on Age 0-5 Mental Health; Wendy Smith, PhD, LCSW on transitional age youth and more, plus our special guest, Bernie Reifkind with advice on interviewing and marketing your social work skills across practice areas. Register online at www.naswca.org. Click on calendar of events. Choose January 12, 2011—$10 for NASW members; $20 non-members. Earn 4 CEUs! Parking is $4 for a one-day permit. Cash, coins and credit/debit cards are accepted at permit machines. Get driving directions at http://www.csudh.edu/visitus/drivingdirections.shtml or call campus parking office Monday to Friday from 8am to 5pm at (310) 243-3725. Email questions to regionhnasw@gmail.com.

REGION I

San Gabriel Valley, East LA, and South Bay – Long Beach CONTACTS

Director Paul McDonough

paultmcdonough@gmail.com Long Beach/South Unit Chair Dr. Brian Lam blam@csulb@edu Visit http://www.naswca.org/displaycommon. cfm?an=1&subarticlenbr=125

CLASSIFIEDS CEUs Association for Women in Psychology: 2012 Annual Feminist Conference, Palm Springs, California, March 8-11, 2012. Up to 18 CEUs available—certified by Pacific Clinics. Information and Registration at http://awp2012.org. Southern California Society of Clinical Hypnosis. CEU Workshops. Trainings: May 6, 2012: Mind-Body Disorders and Anxiety; Basic Training: January 27-29, 2012; Intermediate Training: March 23-25, 2012. Monthly Meetings, Pacific Palisades. www.scsch.camp7.org. (888) 327-2724. Bringing Trauma-Sensitive Yoga into Individual and Group Psychotherapy. CEUs available. Evidence-based; no prior experience in yoga required; self-care for therapist and client. With Joann Lutz, MSW, LICSW. LOS ANGELES:  Fri. Lecture  and Weekend Workshop; March 2-4.  SAN FRANCISCO:  Workshop; March 11. GRASS VALLEY: Residential Workshop; Two options: March 28-April 1 (3 day) or April 3 (5-day). Visit www.yogainpsychotherapy.com. OFFICE SPACE San Francisco, Pacific Heights Pyschotherapy offices available from $550 to $990. Shared waiting rooms. Great location. Contact Gina Enriquez at (415) 794-7125. SUPPORT Are you raising a relative’s child? Don’t know where to look for support? Call 1-800KIN-0047 (1-800-546-0047), California Kinship Navigator Program. Kinship Navigators offer Referrals, Resources and Support.


Vol. 38, No. 4 NASW California News www.naswca.org

January 2012

Doors Open Once You Pass Your Licensing Exam

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Get an extra advantage in passing the exam by attending an online workshop.

UPCOMING LIve CALIFORNIA 1-DAy WORkshOPs

Get an extra advantage in passing the exam by attending an AATBS workshop.

UPCOMING LIve CALIFORNIA Live 1-Day Written Exam Workshops 1-DAy WORkshOPs

Los Angeles .........................January 22 San Francisco......................February 5 Irvine ........................................... March 4 Regular Price: $249 | Special: $199

Live 1-Day Clinical Vignette Exam Workshops Los Angeles .........................January 15 San Francisco................... February 12 Irvine .........................................March 11

SAVE

“I want to take this opportunity to thank you for helping me to pass my exam. Your presentation material was clear and easy to understand. I am very grateful. I wish you continued success.” Respectfully, Kenneth Griffin

$50

On ANY California Social Work Exam Preparation Workshop Association for

Regular Price: $249 | Special: $199 Small Group Workshop Online ................................... Feb. 4 & 11 Regular Price: $199 | Special: $149 Theories of Psychotherapy Workshop

Online ......................... Feb. 26 & Mar. 4 Advanced Training Regular Price : $199 | Special: $149 in the Behavioral Sciences

USE CODE: CSWJ | eXPIRes: 01.31.12

Association for Advanced Training in the Behavioral Sciences 800.472.1931 | www.aatbs.com MEET YOUR EXPERT INSTRUCTORS Eric Lyden, M.A. is a Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist and a former National Board Certified Counselor. He is a part-time professor at California State University Northridge, in the Educational Psychology and Counseling graduate program. His true passion lies in teaching. Eric teaches the Live 1-Day Written Workshop

Melauree Shaw, Ph.D.

has over ten years of clinical experience working with children, adolescents, adults, couples and families in both in-patient and out-patient milieus. Melauree teaches both the Live 1-Day CVE and Online Theories Workshop.

Kaynor Heineck, M.S. is

a Licensed Mental Health Professional and examination preparation expert in Social Work licensing. She has published numerous articles on exam preparation. Kaynor teaches the Online Small Group Workshop.


National Association of Social Workers California Chapter 1016 23rd Street Sacramento, CA 95816 800-538-2565

Non-Profit Org. US Postage PAID Permit No. 345 Sacramento, CA

Space is limited! For the last two years, the event sold out before the final registration deadline in March! California Chapter

Legislative Lobby Days April 15 & 16, 2012 • Sacramento, CA Register Online Now at www.naswca.org

Keynote Speaker Fernando Torres-Gil is Associate Dean of Academic Affairs at the UCLA School of Public Affairs (SPA). He holds appointments as Professor of Social Welfare and Public Policy in the School and is the Director of the Center for Policy Research on Aging. He earned his MSW and PhD in Social Policy, Planning and Research from the Heller Graduate School in Social Policy and Management at Brandeis University.

January 2012 NASW-CA Newsletter  

January 2012 NASW-CA Newsletter

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