Page 1

April

2011

SLPKC

LEADERSHIP - SERVICE - RECOGNITION - PHILANTHROPY

LEADERS - GRADUATE STUDENTS - EFFICACY - TEAM

BUILDING - CHANGE AGENTS - GIVING BACK - FACILITAT

DEVELOPMENT - LEADERSHIP - SERVICE - RECOGNIT PHILANTHROPY - LEADERS - GRADUATE STUDENTS - EFF - TEAM BUILDING - CHANGE AGENTS - GIVING BACK FACILITATION - DEVELOPMENT - LEADERSHIP - SERVICE

RECOGNITION - PHILANTHROPY - LEADERS - GRADU STUDENTS - EFFICACY - TEAM BUILDING - CHANGE AGENTS - GIVING BACK - FACILITATION - DEVELOPMENT

LEADERSHIP - SERVICE - RECOGNITION - PHILANTHRO LEADERS - GRADUATE STUDENTS - EFFICACY - TEAM BUI - CHANGE AGENTS - GIVING BACK - FACILITATION DEVELOPMENT - LEADERSHIP - SERVICE - RECOGNITION

PHILANTHROPY LEADERS - GRADUATE


Online Resources for Student Leadership Programs Student Leadership Programs KC has a variety of resources to assist you in developing, expanding, and assessing your leadership programs. We have a list of leadership journals and books as well as literature reviews. There is also a list of leadership conferences available. Want to share ideas and get feedback from your leadership colleagues? You can join the SLP listserv by emailing jdesanto@naspa.org and adding the subject line Join SLP listserv. Already on the listserv? Send an email to slp@listserv.naspa.org

Join us November 16 – 19 for the 2011 NASPA  Western Regional Conference in San Diego at the  Hard Rock Hotel. Come together with students,  faculty and professionals who are con nuing to  build and shape the Anthology of the Student  Affairs profession, a diverse collec on of priori es,  prac ces, and values grounded in the learning of  yesterday and today and commi ed to the  promo on of learning and success today and  tomorrow.    Learn more at h p://naspa2011.ucsd.edu, join us  on Facebook (NASPA Rocks San Diego), and follow  us on Twi er (@naspaROCKSsd) to receive   the latest conference updates.  You can also email us at  nasparockssandiego@gmail.com.    Get ready for a truly unique conference experience  as NASPA rocks San Diego! 


program spotlight >>>

Volunteer Tuesdays Steffoni Smith, University of Northern Iowa Volunteer and service opportuni es are becoming more prevalent  addi ons to standard courses in higher educa on as well as within  the college co‐curricular experience. Currently, at the University of  Northern Iowa, implementa on of volunteerism into the curriculum  has been proposed in the university’s strategic plan through service  learning pedagogy. Service learning programs allow par cipants to  link volunteer and service opportuni es with their own learning and  development in order to apply this knowledge to their personal and  professional lives. In addi on, various programs currently exist on campus to offer service and volunteer  opportuni es to students who merely seek to be involved, serve the community, and meet new friends. One such  program is the Student Leadership Center’s Volunteer Tuesdays program.  Due to the growing interest in developing and implemen ng service and volunteering as part of the higher  educa on experience, the Student Leadership Center developed the Volunteer Tuesdays program in response to a  needs assessment conducted in the spring of 2010. Past research was compiled, as well as findings from surveys  including the EBI (EBI Student Survey Assessment, n.d.), all of which showed that students were very interested in  par cipa ng in service opportuni es as an expression of leadership but were hindered by lack of  me, no  transporta on, and were unaware of the opportuni es. Thus, Volunteer Tuesdays was developed to respond to  these needs and the program has been incredibly successful in its first semester.   Volunteer Tuesdays was created to give students the opportunity to serve at a variety of area agencies, provide  transporta on to and from the agencies, and receive a free t‐shirt for their involvement. Our original goal was to  register 28 total students (14 students per each of two 3 hour sessions). We easily met this goal on the first  Volunteer Tuesday, September 7, 2010, and have averaged 30 students per event for the successive 20 Tuesdays.  With such great interest in the program, we quickly expanded our ini al four dates to the en re Fall and now  Spring semesters.   Local agencies and non‐profits are also reaping the benefits of this new program. Lauren Finke, Execu ve Director  of the Volunteer Center of Cedar Valley, coordinates the dates and  mes with the VCCV’s member agencies in the  community. Volunteer Tuesdays has partnered with over 20 agencies including the Northeast Iowa Food Bank,  Aspire Therapeu c Riding Program, Cedar Falls Lutheran Home, Iowa Green AmeriCorps, and the Cedar Valley  Arboretum and Botanical Garden. Students enjoy the variety offered and connec ng to places in the community  that they may be unfamiliar with.  ( c ontinued on page 7 )


Mission Change (Continued from page 3)

Leadership, integrity, and teamwork skills are quali es  the Student Leadership Center values in its student  volunteers. Ge ng the campus involved in ac vi es that  extend out into the community is beneficial to everyone 

Professional Development

involved. It provides a great service and a great way to  show that UNI is more than just a college campus. Rachel  Smithart, a freshman educa on major and ac ve 

How are you developing your staff to be better

par cipant of Volunteer Tuesdays, commented that, 

leadership educators?

“volunteering gives me an overwhelming feeling. You 

Learn something great

know that you have just made a huge difference, and it's 

at a conference or

amazing to know that people around you can benefit 

workshop?

from just three hours of your week. The people we are 

We want to hear!

able to work with are truly phenomenal and have had a  huge impact on my experience at UNI. Making a difference  through volunteer efforts is so important. You never know if 

you might be the one needing help in the future."   The Student Leadership Center is incredibly proud of the Volunteer Tuesdays  program. To date, over 300 students have par cipated in the program, many returning again and again, with a  total of 1764 hours of service just this year. Our hope that Volunteer Tuesdays will become part of the culture at  UNI by con nuing to provide wonderful opportuni es for students to serve while connec ng to the community  in a posi ve and powerful way!    Bibliography  EBI Student Survey Assessment. (n.d.). Q4. Of the following, in what  type of leadership program  would you be most interested in  par cipa ng? [Data file]. Retrieved from 

h ps://wess.webebi.com/

rptweb/RptRouter.aspx?vidx=hwxdeq1+Dwk=&oid=20825


Team Building Program Builds Teams and Leaders Steffoni Smith, University of Northern Iowa

T

The Greek philosopher Plato reportedly once observed that “you can discover more  about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversa on” ("Play therapy," 

n.d.). The Team Building Program offered through the Student Leadership Center (SLC) at the 

MSL Information The Multi-Institutional Study of

University of Northern Iowa (UNI)  set its founda on on this simple statement in order to offer a 

Leadership (MSL) is an annual,

program which would develop groups and teams while also developing leaders. The SLC is 

national survey of leadership

entering its second year of offering the Team Building Program to the campus 

development among college students.

community including students, faculty and staff.   Team building is a form of experien al educa on which compliments 

It explores the role of higher education in developing leadership capacities with a special focus on specific environmental conditions that foster

training and work experiences by crea ng dynamic, real‐life situa ons for 

leadership development. MSL is

learning, growth and development. Experien al educa on compliments 

conducted in partnership with the

classroom experiences by crea ng dynamic, real‐life situa ons for student 

National Clearinghouse of Leadership Programs (NCLP).

learning. A recent program with the UNI Dining Student Supervisors is a perfect  example of how the Team Building Program supports group development. Student par cipants discussed their  experience on the program evalua on saying:  Helped me feel more at ease with my posi on  Helps you see many aspects of leadership  Let us struggle just enough to facilitate learning  Will take what I learned today and apply it to work experiences  In this way, the SLC Team Building Program is serving the campus community by crea ng cohesive and  effec ve groups of individuals.  The Team Building programs are facilitated by SLC Student Facilitators who are trained in not only the  instruc ons of the team building ac vi es, but also in group dynamics, conflict management, debriefing and ac ve  listening. Student Facilitators learn how to assess group needs, develop custom programs, facilitate and debrief 


(Continued from page 5)

ac vi es and ini a ves, and finally help the group apply  experien al concepts to real world situa on. 

Region Reps

The Student Facilitators have all grown as leaders due to  their work with the SLC Team Building Program. Already ac ve  on campus through the Northern Iowa Student Government, 

Region 1 Brian Quinlan

Anna Maria College Region 2 Leah Barrett

Felly Phommalinh commented that her experience as a Student 

SUNY-Brockport

Facilitator has helped her become a be er public speaker and 

Region 3 Leslie Grinage

Duke University

more aware of her strengths as a leader. She feels that this  knowledge will serve her well as she progress in her career 

Region 4E Michael Baumhardt

aspira ons.

University of Scranton

In this economy, employee training and professional  development are the first programs to lose funding. The program  offered through the SLC is in credibly cost effec ve – because it’s  free to any campus affiliated group. To date, the SLC has worked  with over 1300 individuals including student groups and 

Region 4W Gretta Mincer

Metropolitan State College Region 5 Eric Alexander

Oregon State University Region 6 Steven Lerer

organiza ons, Greek chapters, university departments, and  faculty members. The value of the program and its impact on  campus has increased since its incep on in 2010 and is 

University of CaliforniaRiverside

con nuing to promote leadership and team work within the UNI  community.     Bibliography  Play therapy. (n.d.). Retrieved from Wikipedia: h p:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Play_therapy 

Get Featured! We welcome ar cles that discuss trends, original ideas, and  detail best prac ces in student leadership in higher educa‐ on.       For more informa on about submi ng to our newsle er,  please e‐mail your inquiry to SLPKC.NASPA@gmail.com.    Submission Deadline               Issue Date                      June 17, 2011                            July 8, 2011  September 16, 2011                  October 7, 2011                          December 9, 2011                     January 6, 2012               March 16, 2012                          April 7, 2012 


Leadership Program Certificate Warrington College of Business Administra on, University of Florida    Horace Tucker, Associate Director, School of Business  Joshua Funderburke, Assistant Director for Career & Leadership Programs  Leanna Mcclellan, Program Assistant, Career & Leadership Programs  Patricia Allshouse, Graduate Assistant for Career & Leadership Programs  Chris na Wan, Graduate Assistant for Career & Leadership Programs  The School of Business at the University of Florida is dedicated to crea ng innova ve programs  to challenge students to enhance their leadership strengths through coursework while also  requiring them to apply their strengths through leadership and service experiences, and giving  them the opportunity to reflect on their learning through interac ons with professional staff  members. To accomplish this, the Career & Leadership Programs division of the School of  Business created the Leadership Development Cer ficate Program, which gives students the  opportunity to work through three levels of cer fica on.    

SLPKC Resources Leadership Team Resources Chair Matt Garrett Emory University

Technology Team Leader Dex Tuttle Southeast Missouri State University

Literature Review & Pre-Conference Workshop Joseph Ginese Babson College A.J. Stramaski Texas A&M University

Webinars & Speaker Series James Beitzel Amy Hecht Auburn University

A er reviewing the Na onal Associa on of Colleges and Employers Job Outlook Survey, we  recognized that students may want to go above and beyond their major requirements to gain  important leadership skills. To help them find these courses, we created an “academic matrix”  that incorporates courses from various colleges around the University in areas such as  leadership, ethics, communica on, and career planning & personal development. In addi on,  we have included foreign language in this program to foster an understanding of the importance  of intercultural competency and global awareness. The courses provide the founda onal  knowledge in areas that students can then make use of in the experien al component of the  program. The academic matrix also gives students an alterna ve to simply choosing innocuous  elec ves to fulfill their degree requirements.  Furthermore, this program differs from our  University’s Leadership Minor in that it does not prescribe a certain set of courses, but instead  allows the student to customize the course selec on to help them develop their own unique  strengths.    

We are adding more online leadership resources so please share your favorite leadership link with


(Continued from page 7)

The second component of the program encourages students to engage in service and leadership experiences that will  give them the opportunity to put into prac ce the knowledge and skills they are gaining in the classroom. Through the  service component, we challenge our students to integrate into their worldview the idea of the leader as servant, as  ar culated by Robert Greenleaf (1973). Students comple ng this program will understand that no ma er which field  they enter, they have a responsibility to use their leadership skills in their communi es, and with the people they will  manage, to help them grow and “become healthier, wiser, freer, [and] more autonomous.”     We require students to complete two years in a leadership posi on to earn the highest level of cer ficate, which allows  students the opportunity to advance through the stages of experien al learning as described by Kolb (1984).  Our belief  is that students will take their knowledge and skills into their first leadership posi on to gain the “concrete experience”  that is the founda on of the experien al learning cycle. We have also built reflec on in to the program, by requiring the  student to meet with a professional staff member of our Career & Leadership Programs a er the comple on of the  second and third levels of the program. This facilitated discussion allows the students to cri cally analyze themselves  and their experiences to develop a more abstract concept of the role of the leader and their own unique leadership  style. Finally, we encourage them to con nue their leadership and personal development journey through the final  stage of the experien al model  by ac vely experimen ng in their future leadership posi ons to fully integrate their  learning and experience into a cohesive ideology that will guide their transi on into their careers.         We believe that guiding students through a process of skill building and prac cal experimenta on in leadership roles, as  well as engagement in their communi es, will increase a student’s personal and professional development as well as  their ability to a ain their career goals. The reflec on we require will also give them a sense of accomplishment, and  hopefully an apprecia on  for the fact that they received more than just a degree from their college experience: they  gained the opportunity to make an amazing life for themselves while enriching their communi es and the followers  whom they will serve.      

April 2011 - SLPKC Newsletter  

April 2011 - Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you