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IN THE POCKET

The overwhelming majority of members who make it their business to pay in a timely fashion are being done a disservice by those who don’t.

As

I write this column, the spring season is upon us and new growth abounds. There are also signs that our local is experiencing some new growth of its own.

2018 financial reports

I‘ve received the 2018 year-end financial reports from our CPA, Ron Stewart, who has been providing these and many other forms of professional accounting with Local 257 for many years. The financial statements can be found on pages 32 and 33. I urge you to look them over as I do, in search of trends and the like. In comparing 2017 to 2018 we enjoyed a meaningful increase in both annual dues and work dues. Although there’s plenty more that can be accomplished with work dues, the local dues increase is a positive occurrence. I’m not as pleased with our collection of nonmember service charges, though. Those have dropped by about $4500 as these folks, some of whom you may know, are much more comfortable thumbing their noses at our efforts on their behalf, behind the bizarre veil of right-to-work (for less) laws. Either that or they are conveniently ignorant of what we do for them. On the expense side of the ledger our property taxes did go up but the real culprit this year — that which made an otherwise consistent expense report come up short — was our professional fees, which increased by $23,000 over what they were in 2017. An unforeseen loss, for the most part, but in our efforts to hold bad actors’ accountable we inevitably spend more on legal fees. If that one expense was more in line with 2017 legal fees, our balance sheet would read surprisingly identical to 2017.

Needless to say, our president, Dave Pomeroy, is constantly beating the pavement and holding musician employer feet to the fire on behalf of all of us. His efforts bring in the money that is due to those who’ve earned it. He continues vigilant focus on folks who either unknowingly break the rules, or knowingly do it in hopes that no one notices. The funds recovered in his diligence do help the bottom line, but the most problematic issue still remains our own members’ unpaid work dues and nonmembers unpaid service charges. It would obviously be great to see that trend broken but until it is, I and this office will have to stay on point with this message: The overwhelming majority of members who make it their business to pay in a timely fashion are being done a disservice by those who don’t. It really is that simple, and all the great players who have been a part of this union would be proud to know we had our house in order. Speaking of great players, we lost one recently, all too soon.

Losing a legend but keeping his spirit alive

On a personal note, I had the honor of playing with Reggie Young during my time with The Highwaymen — touring Australia, Southeast Asia and the U.S. over the course of a couple years. His passing earlier this year struck me particularly hard as I’m sure it has many others. Just being able to say I knew him gives me such great pleasure. Through osmosis — just being around him — I learned about grace and respect, character traits that often go unheralded. I never saw him lose his temper or even raise his voice. His kindness and sense of humor

BY VINCE SANTORO

were always present and he made me feel accepted among our diverse group. Reggie was one of the most talented, accomplished guys I knew. He always remained humble, down to earth, and just “one of the guys.” The music he made with his guitar — vibrant bell tones and fiery, heartrending solos — you’d never imagine could come from this gentle, unassuming spirit who selflessly manned the background, eschewing the spotlight. One day, while we were rehearsing for our Australian tour, I was suddenly floored by the uncanny riffs he was playing. I thought he must’ve practiced them quite a bit previously. I soon realized that these gems came to him like you and I breathe. Brilliance was natural and no struggle for Reggie. Plenty has been and will continue to be said about his many memorable musical contributions. However, it’s his example, as a man, that I’ll carry in my heart for the rest of my life. I would like to somehow repay or pay forward what he unknowingly gave me. I want to emulate his generous persona, to encourage someone who may need my support, to be kinder. I hope to be a kindness conduit. This is how I’ll honor Reggie Young’s legacy. TNM

Next General Membership Meeting 2 p.m. May 14, 2019 APR – JUN 2019 7

Profile for Kathy Osborne

The Nashville Musician — April - June 2019  

The official journal of the Nashville Musician Association, AFM Local 257. This issue features Del McCoury, Tracy Silverman, and more.

The Nashville Musician — April - June 2019  

The official journal of the Nashville Musician Association, AFM Local 257. This issue features Del McCoury, Tracy Silverman, and more.

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