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Contents

May/June 2019 | Issue #13

IN EVERY ISSUE Contributors / 8 From the Editor / 9 New in Nash / 28 Fitness Directory / 62 Events + Races / 64

FITNESS + EXERCISE Pure Barre Class Intro / 14 Pull-ups: Kipping vs. Strict / 18 Upgrade Your Workout / 20 FOOD + NUTRITION Cilantro Lime Chicken Tacos / 22 Summer Cocktails / 24 Intermittent Fasting / 26 PEOPLE + LIFESTYLE Summer Reading List / 30 Flowing with Grace Good / 32 Summer Styles / 38 Dani D. Fitness: Fight For What You Want / 54 HEALTH + WELLNESS Sweating For The Wedding, The Right Way / 48 How to Refuel After A Workout / 50 Talking Back To Your Inner Voice / 52 6

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22 ON THE COVER

Kate Dial is a CrossFit Coach and athlete at CrossFit East Nashville. When we took this shot at a home in Belle Meade, she was due within the week. She has recently given birth to a baby boy Logan James Dial.

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May/June 2019 | Issue #13

Nashville is home to some of the best health and wellness gurus in the industry. Without their support, we would not be able to do what we do. Thank you to our contributors who make this magazine a dynamic and worthy source of health and fitness information and advice in the Greater Nashville Area.

Tim Boje

Tim has a passion for helping others learn, grow and reach their full potential. He is the Head Trainer at Southern Sculpt Fitness and a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (NSCA). His coaching is built upon helping others live life to the fullest. Check out his blog timboje.com for more insights.

Haley Brandstater

Haley is a previous elementary teacher turned blogger and stay at home mother of two beautiful girls. She is a proud graduate of the University of Alabama and Birmingham, Alabama native. She spends her time chasing two little girls and exploring content for her lifestyle and fitness blog. Follow her @haleybrandstater

Ross Gentry

Ross is completing Belmont University’s Doctor of Physical Therapy program and is a CrossFit Level 2 trainer at CrossFit Forte in Nashville. With over 6 years of experience in training and coaching, Ross’ aim is to establish a culture of excellence in physical therapy and fitness that is proven by the success of his athletes.

Brittani Wood

Brittani is a financial analyst turned Bulletproof Human Potential Coach who turned her passion into work. She is an aspiring beam of light, wellness warrior, and companion to fuel high performance, resilience, and vibrant health. You can follow her @thenourishedme.blog or on her website: thenourishedmeblog.com

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BEHIND THE SCENES PUBLISHER Ryan Freebing ryan@nashvillefitmagazine.com EDITOR IN CHIEF Lindsay Miller lindsay@nashvillefitmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR Brittany Phelps brittany@stlouisfitmagazine.com ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Liz Melton, Jeff Waller PHOTOGRAPHERS Sam Carbine ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTORS Jill Merkel, Kayla O'Nan GENERAL INQUIRIES + STORE DISTRIBUTION info@nashvillefitmagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES jeff@nashvillefitmagazine.com liz@nashvillefitmagazine.com EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS lindsay@nashvillefitmagazine.com EVENT LISTINGS nashvillefitmagazine.com/events SUBSCRIPTIONS nashvillefitmagazine.com/subscribe

Nashville Fit Magazine is published by Xert Media LLC. Nashville Fit Magazine and its publisher assume no responsibility for the content of articles or advertisements. The views and opinions expressed by the contributors within this magazine may not represent the views of the publisher or our employees. This publication and all of its contents are copyrighted. All prices quoted within the publication are in USD and are approximate at time of print. The content published within is not intended to be substituted for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your health care provider with any questions you have regarding your health. For all subscription inquiries, please visit NashvilleFitMagazine.com or email us at info@nashvillefitmagazine.com.

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PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


his issue isn’t about loving the way your body looks. The Body Issue is just like any other issue - it is meant to connect, educate, and inform our community. It’s not about finding confidence and selfesteem in “all shapes and sizes”. Nothing we write will do that - and I cannot stress this enough - you have to do that for yourself. What we can do is provide knowledge, stories of experience, and all the good vibes necessary to guide you into understanding and enjoying your body for its amazing capabilities. Digestion, detoxing, converting food to fuel, recovering and building, to name a few. How the body can change, the millions of ways it can feel, how it performs and the profound impact your physical health has on our mind and overall vitality. Your body can be a reflection of self-respect and an outward representation of your lifestyle. Confidence and self-esteem come with the process. That does not mean the end goal is a “good looking” figure. It means the journey has taught you something important about yourself. You are proud of the changes made and the struggles you’ve overcome. This process will test our limits. We change our mindset and we can change our body, we change our body and we change our mindset. However, by gratifying and appreciating our body we can surely change our life (and maybe even others). From cocktails to enjoy this summer to hydrating after workouts to consistently stretching your muscles, we have attempted to touch on all aspects of the body’s function. This issue will target limitations and grant ways to surpass them. Our cover is an intentional, direct, and powerful expression of these statements, but most importantly it is an expression of a happy, healthy, and strong woman pushing her body to the ultimate limitation while creating life. From cover to cover our content is supportive. We should not fear any limits, instead, be thankful the body is a complex machine, capable of much more than we repeatedly believe.

Lindsay Miller Editor in Chief

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Things I’m into right now:

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Lindsay's Letter

@lmiler34

ChallengeMe App: Ever wonder where you rank in the world on your favorite movements, lifts, or workouts? Need a challenge but don’t want to pay the money for 6 weeks and fat loss? Turn your fitness journey into a game or simply achieve your goals in a fun, constantly varied, quantifiable approach. Find the support and accountability with a like-minded online community. Find me on the app!

Athleta Tights: Yin 7/8 Tight In Powervita These pants have a solid waistband that is high enough to not slip or fall but not too tight or uncomfortable around the ankles or hips. It has pockets on the sides that have become my addiction. It's a soft naked feel that I could seriously sleep in! Plus the color blocking is flattering on any body type and comes in a few colors. Honestly, get any of the softer fabric tights from Athleta. Pick your color and style and I promise they won’t disappoint. NOBULL Jogger These are silky soft and hug in all the right places. Pockets sit a little forward in front of the hips so they don’t flare out and make you look wider like most joggers I’ve found. They are warm over tights or light enough to wear all spring!

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Event Calendar YOGA ON THE FIELD

Kick off Mother’s Day Weekend under the lights at Nissan Stadium for twilight yoga, cocktails and shopping at the fifth annual Yoga on the Field event on Saturday, May 11th. After a one-hour yoga class on the Tennessee Titans’ field, the evening continues on the concourse with a cocktail party and fun activities. Proceeds go to Soles4Souls. Get more information at yogaonthefield.com.

NASHVILLE FIT GAMES

Registration is closed for the 2019 Nashville Fit Games, but you can still come out on Saturday, May 18th at Ted Rhodes Fields and cheer on your friends as they compete. Hosted by Nashville Fit Magazine, the Nashville Fit Games is a unique fitness competition designed to test your physical and mental toughness. Each challenge is carefully assembled to evaluate a different athletic ability such as speed, strength, endurance, and power. Compete as an individual or on a team against some of the top athletes in the Nashville area. Visit nashvillefitgames.com for more details.

YOGA ON THE DIAMOND

Yoga on the Diamond is happening again on Sunday, June 2nd on the Nashville Sounds baseball field in downtown Music City. Each ticket gets you a hour yoga session and a free ticket to the Sounds game later that day at 1:05pm against the New Orleans Baby Cakes. A portion of each ticket will be benefiting Small World Yoga, a non-profit helping to grow the yoga community in Nashville. Purchase your tickets at yogaonthediamond.com.

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May/June 2019

HOPS FOR POPS 5K

Are you ready to treat the Fathers in your life to a morning dedicated just to him? Join Above the Fold Events for the inaugural Hops for Pops 5K & 1 Mile Fun Run on Saturday, June 15th at the newly developed One Bellevue Place. Visit abovethefoldevents.com for more details and to sign up.

LUNG FORCE WALK

Join the American Lung Association and walk together to raise awareness and funds to defeat lung cancer and raise our voices for lung health on Saturday, May 18th. Lung Force Walks are a time to laugh, learn and imagine a world free of lung disease. Get involved today by forming a team, registering as an individual or participating virtually at lungforcenashville.org.

NASHVILLE PREDATORS FANGTASTIC 5K

The Nashville Predators Fangtastic 5K has been rescheduled to Saturday, June 29th giving you an extra opportunity to join! Show your #PredsPride and support the Nashville Predators Foundation and the 365 Pediatric Cancer Fund with a 5K run through downtown Nashville. Registration is only $40 and includes some great items from the Nashville Predators, including tickets to an upcoming game. Don’t miss it!

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fitness+exercise

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class intro Pure Barre is one of the fastest and most effective ways to change your body. In just 50-minutes, you will achieve a full-body workout concentrating on all of the key areas: hips, thighs, seat, abs and arms. It's low-impact and small isometric movements help create long, lean muscles. The concentration involved also provides you with some mental benefits as you connect mind-body during class. The community also has some inspiring, strong and inclusive women in the Greater Nashville Area!

WARM-UP

Every class will begin with a warm-up. This will ready your body for class, increase your heart rate, as well as strengthen and tone abdominals while strengthening your lower back. Some examples might include flutter kicks, holds and slow crunches, as seen below.

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WEIGHT WORK

Every class will include some form of weight work. This helps strengthen and define your arms, upper back, shoulders and chest. This is also where you will get those toned Pure Barre arms! Warming up our thighs and seat will prepare you for the next movements too. Shoulder Presses

THIGHS

There are a variety of exercises to help target all areas of your legs, toning and strengthening your quads, inner and outer thighs to help create long, lean muscles.

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fitness+exercise SEAT

Each class has 2 types of seat exercises to create a toned, lifted backside! One to shape and tone the hips and outside of the seat, as well as building flexibility in the hips. The other to lift and strengthen the base or “ledge� of the seat and the hamstring.

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Benefits of cross training. Three class styles include a variety of toning, cardiocentered, strength and balance-focused movements, providing more options to cross-train your body.

CORE FOCUS

Sometimes only lasting 2-3 minutes, this section of each class targets the deepest layers of the abs, strengthening the back and warming up the core for the more targeted abdominal work. It can be quick but very effective.

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ABS

Ab work is meant to strengthen and tone the entire abdominal wall. All classes will perform exercises that will specifically focus on your upper and lower ab muscles as well as your obliques.

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STRETCH

Stretching and cooldown are important parts of each Pure Barre class. We stretch after each section, to create long lean muscles, build flexibility and support overall health of joints and muscles.

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Did you know there are more than 500 Pure Barre studios across the country? The Greater Nashville Area is home to 7 of those locations.

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fitness+exercise

PULL-UPS Kipping Strict

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by ROSS GENTRY SPT, CF-L2, CSCS

pull-up is pretty simple. You hang from a bar and pull yourself up to that bar. However, with the rising popularity of the kipping pullup, often associated on social media with CrossFit gyms and various fitness competitions, battle lines seem to have been drawn with one side pledging allegiance to the strict pull-up, and the other advocating for this newer variation. To someone unfamiliar with the movement, kipping pull-ups may seem fairly nonsensical. With so many moving parts, can we even call them “pull-ups” at all? The debate has surged, but clarity still seems to be lacking. The two pull-ups are very different, and, the truth is – one of them is better. A strict pull-up is marked by an individual keeping the midline of their body, or “core”, rigid and unmoving as pulling force is generated from the upper body and arms alone. Classically, most gym-goers use this as an effective exercise to develop strength in the lats (latissimus dorsi), biceps (biceps brachii), and in hand grip. 18

A kipping pull-up is distinct in that one will see the individual utilizing a swinging motion at the bottom of the movement to generate additional upward force toward the bar, thereby reducing the pulling strength required to bring the body up to the bar. These pull-ups often allow athletes to perform more repetitions at a faster rate.

Are kipping pull-ups even real pull-ups? A. By the simple definition of a pull-up, of course kipping pull-ups are real pull-ups. You start at the bottom, and you pull your way to the top. Pull-up.

So which variation is better?

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n order to improve your fitness, one of these two pullup variations is the better option for you as you get in the gym and start putting in the reps. The catch is, the variation you need to work on in order to get better may not be the same variation your gym buddy needs. Both movements have important aspects of fitness to offer. The answer simply lies in what an individual’s current needs are. As stated earlier, one would be hard-pressed to find N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


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"Kipping pull-ups aren’t fantastic for developing strength. They do allow you to do more reps."

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trainer or some gymnastic rings. There are plenty of fantastic strict pull-up progressions out there. Find one (preferably one that uses compound, multi-joint exercises), and get to work. Kipping pull-ups aren’t fantastic for developing strength. They do allow you to do more reps, but if strength is your goal, it would be more prudent to spend extra time under tension with strict pull-ups. There is a lot happening in a kipping pull-up. Arms, torso, hips, legs – everything is moving, and that’s partially the point. The best way to sum it up is this: The kipping-pull up is not a strengthening exercise, it is a gymnastic movement. Gymnastics is about body control. If a person doing kipping pull-ups seems to be flailing wildly, they are probably still working toward more efficient reps, or at least we hope they are. In order to perform any gymnastic movement, an athlete must possess a certain consciousness of where their body is in space and also have to ability to make corrections if anything is out of place. A kipping-pull up is, comparatively, a simple gymnastic movement and provides beginner athletes with a great opportunity to get exposure to this type of athletic demand. Gymnastics is also about core-toextremity power. Core-to- extremity describes an athlete’s ability to generate most of the power of a movement from their torso and hips and translate that power to their arms and legs which finish the work. For example, to swing a baseball bat, an athlete generates most of their power from the fast rotation

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of their core (abdominal obliques and spinal erectors) and the arms follow through with the swinging motion. In a kipping pull-up, an athlete must use two quick instances of core and hip generated power to effectively drive their body up toward the bar. The first instance is at the bottom of the kip swing. Once the athlete is hanging from the bar, they initiate a swing from their shoulders that pulls their head and chest in front of the bar and feet behind the bar. With the body now in this “C” shaped arch, the athlete must maintain tightness in their abdominals and use them to store elastic energy from this position. They can then use this elastic energy to forcefully swing into an opposite arch that mirrors the first – with their head and chest behind the bar and feet in front. This is similar to if you took a wooden ruler, bent it back slightly, and then released it with a quick “thwack”. The second instance is when the athlete, now in this reverse “C” position, rapidly extends, or straightens out, their hips, creating an upward thrust power. This drive from the hips may make the athlete feel weightless for a moment, which is a great time for the arms to take over and pull the body up the remaining distance to the bar. The end result: Pull-up. If an individual lacks this global (total) body coordination, kipping pull- ups may be a helpful way to create body-awareness and control. Additionally, if an athlete wants a higher overall intensity and work output in their workout, there is no doubt that the increased reps and speed kipping pull-ups afford you will accomplish the task. There is one caveat to kipping pull-ups. Most well-informed gymnasts, coaches, and trainers do agree - an athlete should be able to perform at least one strict pull-up before attempting a kipping pull-up. Possessing this requisite strength and stability helps to ensure that when an athlete does attempt their first kip swings on the bar, their shoulders will be better adapted to this new dynamic movement. So yes, to all you pull-up fans, there is a better pull-up for you. What’s best for you depends on your goals and your current ability. Get that first strict pull-up under your belt. Get multiple. Load some extra weight on your back and do a few more. Don’t, however, forget or underestimate the benefits of the increased control, coordination, and work output that the kipping pull-up has to offer. Now, go forth and pull-up.

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a better movement than a strict pull-up for developing compound strength of upper body pulling motion and core stiffness. Not the mention the fact that if you ever find yourself precariously hanging on fingertips off the edge of a cliff, you’ll be glad you got those extra reps in at the gym. If you are a person who struggles with general upper body strength, strict-pull ups should definitely be one of your biggest time investments in the gym. Can’t get that first strict rep yet? Grab some bands to assist you, place a stool under you to lighten the load, or knock out some horizontal rows on a TRX

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fitness+exercise

how to upgrade your workout

by TIM BOJE, CSCS

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f you are serious about your fitness, optimizing your workouts and maximizing your training time should be a top priority. Time is our most precious resource and no one likes doing hard work that doesn’t pay off. It is essential to create a training plan that focuses on fundamentals, builds on strengths, and ensures that you make progress every day. It’s time to upgrade your workout.

BALANCE A good program should include mobility, strength, and conditioning. Starting your workout with a mobility based warm-up will prepare the body for the movements you will be performing. Both the strength training and conditioning should be specific to your training goals. Your training will require different intensity, volume, and other variables depending on what you are trying to achieve – whether it be strength, muscle building, fat loss, or performance in a sport or activity. Find a balance of strength and conditioning – you tend to favor one or the other. Aim to build a solid foundation of general strength and movement, along with developing both your aerobic and anaerobic systems. Varying the mode and intensity is the key to finding a good balance. Once you have a solid base in each, it is much easier to progress toward more challenging movements. Address and improve your weak areas and build on your strengths. Evaluate your program to see if there are any major movement patterns you may be missing. Squats, hinges, lunges, bridges, pushes, pulls, rotations and planks are fundamental patterns you should be skillful at. You need adequate mobility, stability and strength to perform them properly. If you

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have any past injuries or pain during certain movements, that is a good place to start. Seek out a knowledgeable fitness professional or physical therapist to perform a movement screen if needed. Continue to perform the exercises you are best at while getting the rest up to par. Focus on movements, not muscles. Move well, then load. The optimal movement should be your primary goal. Performing major movement patterns should be coordinated and controlled – even at faster speeds and heavier loads. Practice quality movement with your own body weight, or with light bands, cables, or free weights before you start to add heavier loads. Mobility and stability throughout the body is a prerequisite to moving well. If you don’t have enough range of motion around a joint or stability to control a movement, you may have weakness or tightness. You need to work on these, or you may need to correctly (re)learn the pattern. Your joints are designed to alternate between stability and mobility to keep your body moving efficiently. If one of your joints lacks either, it can be a recipe for injury. Design an individualized training plan. An individualized approach to training is paramount to achieving an optimal workout. Determine a training split based on your goals and current capabilities. Take into account your goals, schedule, training age, and energy system requirements to determine how many days per week you can commit to training. Then decide the frequency, intensity, volume, and mode for desired movements. If you are training 2-4 days per week, use a full-body routine which includes non-competing supersets and circuits to maximize training efficiency. Any additional days you have to train should be spent developing your aerobic base, working on flexibility and mobility, or adding in extra

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strength or muscle building where you may be lacking. Recovery and rebuilding are just as important as the work you’re putting in, make sure that your sleep and nutrition are aiding this process, not hurting it.

UPGRADE Train in all three planes of motion; don’t forget about the transverse and frontal plane movements. Most of the traditional movement patterns are in the sagittal plane. Add more lateral and rotational movements to your training to ensure that you are strong and stable in all environments. Train all three phases of muscle action; the eccentric and isometric phases are just as important as the concentric. Typical training has an emphasis on the contracting (concentric) phase of muscle action. Include slow eccentrics and isometric holds to keep your muscles active and strong throughout the movement continuum. Start lighter and progressively overload within your sets; “ramp up” the intensity. Instead of jumping right into heavy loading, add a few lighter “warm up sets” to prime your muscles and groove your movement patterns. This will improve the brain to muscle connection, ensuring better coordination and activation of your muscle fibers that are needed to lift heavier weights. Develop your energy systems on a broad spectrum, then specialize depending on your goals. Commonly lumped together under the term “cardio,” your cardiovascular system is made up of three distinct energy pathways (oxidative, phosphagen and glycolytic - referring to the way they make energy) that must be trained specifically. Build efficiency in all three, then focus on the one you want to improve the most. Ditch the “leg day” and incorporate multiple modes of lower

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body training each workout. Your legs contain some of the largest and strongest muscles in your body and therefore should be trained often to maximize their development and build endurance. Just because you train lower body doesn’t mean it has to be exhaustive. The goal is not to walk like a penguin after each workout. It’s to build strength, stability, and stamina in the limbs you use the most. Train multiple lower body movements each session – just use a variety of squats, lunges, bridges, deadlifts, jumps, crawls, and lateral walks to keep the legs fresh each session. Use cluster sets and supersets to increase strength and build muscle mass. By combining exercises into supersets (typically with opposing muscle groups) you can do more sets in a shorter amount of time. This helps maximize time under tension (which is how your muscles grow) for a specific muscle group, leaving time to complete more exercises in a given workout. Cluster sets help you get more quality reps at higher intensities because you allow the muscles to recover between reps and between sets. Both methods add efficiency to your strength and muscle building goals. Finish the workout strong by adding finishers, carries, or crawls. Add an intense combo exercise or circuit of exercises at the end of your workout that ramps up the heart rate and gets the muscles burning one last time. This can be specific to your training goals or just for a “fun” challenge at the end of the day. It trains your brain and muscles to “start strong, and finish stronger.” Maximize your workout time by sharpening your movement, building on your strengths, and improving your weaknesses. The proper mix of mobility, strength, and conditioning will create a balanced training plan and optimize your progress. Upgrade your workout, and you’ll upgrade your life.

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food +nutrition

Cilantro Lime Chicken Tacos Ingredients:

◊ 1½ pounds boneless skinless chicken breasts ◊ ¼ tsp. salt ◊ 8 to 10 flour or corn tortillas

Marinade:

◊ Juice of 2 limes + zest of 1 lime ◊ 1 Tbsp olive oil ◊ 2 cloves garlic, minced ◊ ½ tsp honey ◊ 2 Tbsp cilantro, chopped

Coleslaw:

◊ 2 cups coleslaw mix ◊ 1 cup shredded red cabbage ◊ ½ cup chopped cilantro ◊ ½ cup chopped green onions ◊ Juice of 2 limes ◊ 1 Tbsp olive oil ◊ 1 tsp honey ◊ Dash of salt

Avocado Crema:

◊ 1 avocado ◊ ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt ◊ ¼ cup cilantro leaves ◊ 1 garlic clove ◊ 3 Tbsp lime juice ◊ 1 tsp. Sriracha or favorite hot sauce ◊ Salt and pepper, to taste ◊ 2 Tbsp olive oil ◊ ¼ cup water (may add more for thinner consistency)

s oke Stephen

recipe by Bro

ndrew Lazo

photos by A

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recipe: @honeyb_healthy photos: @lazo.photo

Directions:

1) Place chicken in a large ziplock bag or shallow dish. 2) Whisk marinade ingredients in a small bowl, then pour over the chicken breast.Cover and marinate for 1-4 hours. 3) To prep coleslaw, combine slaw mix, cabbage, green onions, and cilantro in a large bowl. In a separate bowl, whisk together lime juice, olive oil, honey, and salt. Pour mixture over slaw and toss together. 4) To make the avocado crema, in a food processor combine the avocado, garlic, cilantro, yogurt, lime juice, Sriracha/hot sauce, and salt/ pepper. Begin blending then add in the olive oil and water slowly until you achieve the desired consistency. 5) To cook chicken, pre-heat a pan on medium-high heat and add marinated chicken breast. Season with salt and pepper. Allow chicken to cook for 5 minutes on each side until done. Transfer chicken to a cutting board and let rest for 5 minutes before slicing. 6) Assemble tacos by placing chicken on a tortilla and top with slaw and a dollop of the avocado crema. Enjoy!

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food +nutrition

A

lthough the importance of caloric intake and sugar content should always be considered in a healthy diet, our summer cocktail series is depending on a more positive approach to “healthy”. We are enforcing the idea of balance and incorporating to our readers the existence of a social life that is quite popular in Music City. We are well aware (and being explicit) that there isn’t necessarily such a thing as a “healthy” cocktail due to the fact that alcohol is processed by the body as a toxin to be filtered, and as such, there's not a way to make an alcoholic beverage that's truly healthy. With that being said, this summer, let’s try focusing on what we gain instead of limits and restrictions. We asked some of our favorite hot spots around town, including talented bartenders you may already know, to supply us with their version of a light and creative recipe perfect for quenching our thirst and adding some nutritional flavor to our fun in the sun!

SUMMER CLARITY

Created by Akinde Olagundoye, the bartender at Skull's Rainbow Room Recipe: .75 oz Tequila .75 oz Mezcal .75 oz Aperol .75 oz Fresh Squeezed Lemon Juice .75 oz Agave Nectar .75 oz Hibiscus Tea Fresh Ginger Root 2 Rosemary Sprigs photos by SAM CARBINE 24

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Photo by Mitzi Murphree

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Egg White Lemon

Instructions: Add Agave and two thin slices of ginger to shaker tin. Muddle the ginger to release flavor. Add all ingredients, leaving one rosemary sprig aside. Add ice and shake vigorously. Fine strain over fresh ice. Garnish with remaining rosemary.

Created by The Dream Hotel

THE GATEWAY

Provided by Cafe Roze Recipe: Fords Gin Hemp Syrup CBD Oil from Yuyo Botanics Nux Alpina

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GIN & CHRONIC

Recipe: 1.5oz Beefeater Gin 4oz Strawberry Rhubarb Tonic Tsp of LabCanna CBD Tincture Hint of Lime Instructions: Build in swizzle glass with ice then roll it. Top with a Strawberry Garnish

SIMMER DOWN

Provided by Virago Recipe by Wes Taylor

Recipe: 1.5 oz Apple-Celery-Black Pepper Infused Hangar 1 Vodka .25 oz Don Ciccio Finocchieto .50 oz House Vanilla Syrup .50 oz Lemon Juice 3.0 oz Soda Water Garnish with lemon wheel

NATURE'S CALL

Provided by Old Glory Recipe: 1.5 oz Bahnez Mezcal .75 oz Honey syrup .5 oz fresh lime juice .5 oz fresh Parsley/Celery Juice Barspoon Yellow Chartreuse Pinch salt Garnish with bourbon smoked salt, a lime wheel, and a parsley sprig

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food +nutrition

INTERMITTENT

FASTING basics

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ntermittent fasting might seem miserable to some since you aren't eating for hours at a time, but sticking to this routine can actually produce the opposite result! It is common to assume this plan can result in low energy and potential grumpiness. Ever heard of the term “hangry”? But there are numerous positive results that could be a game changer in your life. Let's begin with the basics.

What is intermittent fasting? Intermittent fasting (IF) does not necessarily focus on changing what you eat but more importantly it focuses on when you eat. When exploring the topic, you will commonly see the phrase “Delay, Don’t Deny” referred to often, referencing a well-

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by HALEY BRANDSTATER

written IF book by Gin Stephens. When following an IF routine, calorie counting is eliminated, you do not isolate food groups, and you do not have to cut alcohol. IF is a time-restricted eating cycle executed through periods of eating and fasting. There are plenty of informative resources, however, The Intermittent Fasting Podcast, cohosted by Gin Stephens and Melanie Avalon is one of the best places to start. The podcast is grounded in information about IF and is also quite humorous.

What are the benefits? You may be wondering what all the craze is about. What can it do for you and what are the benefits? Honestly, the answers are endless while the results are fairly quick. Some of the most common benefits are weight loss, higher levels of energy, and lower risk for diseases. Weight loss can happen rapidly if you stick to your fasting window and come directly from your body running off of fat stores versus food.

How does IF work? To oversimplify, when your body goes 12 hours without food, it starts making changes. When you are eating (not in a fasting state) your body gets energy from the food you eat. However, during a fasting state, your body gets energy from its last reserve - fat. Therefore, the longer you fast, the more fat your body will burn. When you fast you are depleting your body of glycogen stores. Once glycogen stores are gone, fat stores are released into your bloodstream to be converted into energy molecules in the liver. These are called “ketones”. Ketones suppress our hunger hormones and that is why you have intense energy highs when you normally might not. N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


It seems counterintuitive to think you will experience higher energy levels while fasting but it is a proven study nonetheless. When your body is running on food or a high amount of sugar it will burn those items first because they give our system a quick source of energy. You will most likely experience a drop in blood sugar shortly after, and in turn, feel a significant drop in energy. However, if you deprive your body of food/sugar for a certain amount of time, your body will revert to burning stored fat. When your body is burning stored fat for fuel it does so without a drop in blood sugar, meaning no drop in energy according to Dr. Anne Zauder. There are many ways to practice IF and it can be adjusted to fit your lifestyle. You can open your “window” for eating whenever you choose. I typically fast on a 16:8 schedule - this is also a great routine for beginners. My window opens at noon and closes at 8 pm. Therefore, I fast for 16 hours (your eating window is 8 hours).

If you live a highly active lifestyle, this should yield good results for you. On the other hand, if you are forced to sit for the majority of the day, you may need to shorten the feeding window to 4-6 hours to yield better results. Commit to a realistic schedule depending on your goals and lifestyle. Some people choose to exclude the weekend for the purpose of balance. While this is a personal choice, the decision should again be based on your goals and lifestyle. Results will be directly correlated to the level of commitment. If you want to see fat loss quickly, practicing IF on a daily basis is a proven successful program. There are endless ways to incorporate it’s routine no matter what type of schedule, career, or social life you lead. Just like anything else, you have to prioritize, plan ahead, and commit to your windows.

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people+ lifestyle

NEW

New gyms, stores, restaurants and more, all with the fitness fanatic in mind.

in NASH

.................................................................................................................................................................................................. Evergreen Chiropractic

1222 16th Ave South, Nashville, TN 37212 evergreenchironash.com Located on Music Row, Evergreen Chiropractic is a family-centered Chiropractic office that strives to provide children and families with gentle chiropractic care. Evergreen’s owner Dr. Brittney McGetrick is a Gonstead Chiropractor, a Registered Dietitian and a Yoga Instructor. Of the hundreds of different chiropractic techniques practiced all over the world, one of the most wellknown and highly respected is the Gonstead Method. Before adjusting your spine, the Gonstead technique analyzes and investigates how your spine works and what it needs to function in the most efficient way. The more you understand about a patient’s spine, the better a chiropractor is able to serve patients and their healthcare needs. Whether you are trying to conceive, expecting a baby, experiencing uncomfortable symptoms, already leading a healthy lifestyle or simply want more out of life, Evergreen Chiropractic is here to offer you the ability to find optimal health and well-being.

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Fahrenheit Yoga

2909 12th Ave S. Nashville, TN 37204 fahrenheityogastudio.com Fahrenheit isn't defined by the walls that create a physical space for their community and their students. It isn't measured by the number of steps people take within its structure. She is a brilliant and courageous entity that is only made whole because of the unique and palpable energy the students and teachers bring her. Fahrenheit protects her integrity with carefully chosen instructors that embody her same spirit to gift the students, community, and one another. She fosters charisma, strength, and dignity and asks for nothing in return. Fahrenheit is proud to be a part of 12 South. She is thrilled to welcome the narratives, mantras, challenges, and celebrations of our community, and is excited to grow, breathe, and love with you.

......................................................................................................................... HOTWORX

1806 Chet Atkins Place, Nashville, TN 37203 hotworx.net HOTWORX is a virtually instructed exercise program created for users to experience the many benefits of infrared heat absorption, while completing a 30 minute isometric workout or a 15 minute High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) session. HOTWORX (HWX) was created for customers who want to flush toxins from their body and burn massive amount of calories in the process. As the infrared heat penetrates your system causing you to sweat, the isometric postures further accelerate detoxification by physically removing the toxins from your organs through muscle contraction. HOTWORX can help improve strength, cardio, flexibility, circulation, immunity, while also burning fat, decreasing workout recovery time, increase metabolism, and much more! Whether you are looking to polish off your regular workout routine or looking for new ways to live a healthier lifestyle, HOTWORX will be a major component of your beauty, wellness, and fitness program. HOTWORX is coming soon to the Midtown district of Nashville. We’re looking forward to taking a class soon!

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people+ lifestyle

SUMMER

by LINDSAY MILLER

Reading List As Many Reps As Possible

by Jason Khalipa Jason is no stranger to hard work. He’s been an affiliate owner for 10 years, competed at the CrossFit Games for eight years and stood on the podium three times. In total, he operates 20 gyms in seven countries, deeming him a successful businessman as well as an accomplished athlete and one of the most notable personalities to come out of the sport. Through these years of hard work, Khalipa developed the AMRAP (As Many Reps As Possible) Mentality. It has become a sort of mental mantra housing competitive, laser focus he applies to all aspects of his life.

Can't Hurt Me: Master Your Mind and Defy the Odds

by David Goggins Goggins’s Commanding Officer told him, “In a society where mediocrity is too often the standard and too often rewarded. There is an intense fascination with men who detest mediocrity, who refuse to define themselves in conventional terms, and who seek to transcend traditionally recognized human capabilities.” Goggins writes that many of us live at 40% of their true capability. Only when we callous our mind through stepping out of our comfort zone on a regular basis can we move beyond it. This is his incredible story.

Starting Strength: Basic Barbell Training, 3rd Edition

by Mark Rippetoe Rippetoe is forward in thoroughly explain the basics of using a barbell, the distinct movements, muscle groups, safety, and technique, but with his blunt expertise comes the same brash humor. Although there is little insight into his personality or story-telling, this book should absolutely be used for textbook lifting and advanced education on barbell use.

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Eat to Sleep: What to Eat & When to Eat It

by Karman Meyer, RDN, LDN Available on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Whether you have the occasional night of insomnia or regularly experience restless sleep, this book provides natural sleep solutions & guidance about what to eat & when to eat it for a good night’s sleep. Includes 50 foods for better sleep, 25 recipes, and expert nutrition advice on the food-sleep relationship.

The Laws of Human Nature

by Robert Greene Living your best life is a lot easier when you understand other people's feelings, behavior and motivation. If you aren’t exactly here yet, this book can help. It offers insight into mastering self-control, developing empathy, and understanding others. It's a wonderful read for narrowing in on these essential human qualities.

Less

by Andrew Sean Greer (Winner of the Pulitzer Prize) The book follows gay writer Arthur Less while he travels the world on a literary tour, as his fiftieth birthday looms. The book covers themes such as romantic love, same-sex relationships, aging, and travel. But despite all these mishaps, missteps, misunderstandings and mistakes, Less is, above all, a love story. A scintillating satire of the American abroad, a rumination on time and the human heart, a bittersweet romance of chances lost.

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people+ lifestyle

Flowingwith

Grace Good T

he term "flow arts" encompasses the emerging movement-based art forms that integrate dance and creative exploration of movement with skillbased prop manipulation. The broad category Flow Arts includes a variety of pursuits that harmonize skill-based techniques with creative expression to achieve a state of present-moment awareness known as Flow. “The Flow Arts are its own entity, although it might be a little nerdier than what most think,” she jokes. Grace has become a popular face through social media platforms and global festivals with her Flow Arts practices along with her expertise in ariel acrobatics and fire dancing with a local company she co-owns here in Nashville called Beyond Wings Circus. She performs around the area with her company and other groups but also travels for solo performances across the world. New props and expressions are emerging all the time as flow artists cross-pollinate with martial arts, yoga, circus, belly dance, and beyond - Grace Good is one of these innovators. And guess what?… she is really good at it! So good that she will be performing in Japan

by LINDSAY MILLER photos by SAM CARBINE

while this article is published. “You feel like a total badass when you use fire,” she admits and says, “no matter what you look like, you are playing with fire and you feel powerful.”

We call them fire kisses. The Flow Arts are at once a sport and a leisure activity, a hobby, and an obsession - a new way to dance, explore and interact with the physical world, a movement meditation practice, a fun and creative outlet, and a serious technical pursuit. For many of its practitioners, it is a way to achieve the mind-state known as “flow”, a state of optimal experience, also known as getting in a groove. Many people first encounter the Flow Arts through contemporary fire dancing, in which people dance with objects on fire. This “zone” is similar to most grueling physical activity in which everything else melts away (but not literally, even though Grace says she has slightly caught her hair on fire before). “We call them ‘fire kisses’,” Grace says when

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WATCH THE BEHIND-THE-SCENES VIDEO ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9 NA S HVI LLE FIT M AGAZINE

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referring to the slight heat involved with each movement. Fire dancing has inspired and attracted many to the art form and the thrill is undeniable. The Flow Arts draw from a multitude of ancient and modern movement disciplines including hula hooping. Interestingly, hula hooping was the skill that originally drew Grace to practice in the first place. Today she uses the hula hoop in a variety of ways from adding LED lights to fire and is up to using four at once. At the age of 18, she experienced her first Bonnaroo where she discovered others hula hooping and wanted to learn. After some time on her college campus, she saw people practicing with the hula hoop and decided to jump in thinking, “Hey! I do this too! I can join this group and find a community here.” From the connections through friends she eventually came across more and more aspects to add to her repertoire. The days of practice and building friendships elevated to Printer’s Alley in Downtown Nashville where she says she used to perform outside the bars. “You can’t do this anymore,” Grace says, as we believe this is illegal today. However, this is also where Grace met her business partner whom she works with today in Music City. The existing intimidation factor is something that must be removed, Grace explains, which more so becomes a part of the journey. As you progress from any tool or object with any movement, you also meet more people with similar interests and begin to build your own skill-set. She never wants anyone to feel intimidated,

34

however, there is an aspect that requires you to get out of your comfort zone. “You can scale back to use an object, or you can level-up by adding new movements or maybe that is when people start to add fire,” Grace states. One of the reasons she initially started with circus performing and Flow Arts was because she had major anxiety problems, which led to sleep apnea. “I was able to focus on something by learning through online tutorials. “Something just clicked in my brain,” she says. She has found her tribe with the Flow Arts community and says, “It’s empowering, it’s also physical, but the mental aspect is important too. You have to train your mind for the coordination and your body for stamina.” The physical activity is demanding and as a professional, she says her outside training is extremely intentional and programmed daily. Every five minutes is another adrenaline rush even though Grace explains the extreme safety precautions she and others are always using. “Any body can do it!” Grace describes, “Anybody that is the coolest thing about the Flow Arts and circus performing.” She is passionate about growing the community that allowed her to feel accepted during her own health struggles. “I never want anyone to scroll online and think ‘I can’t do this’,” she says. Even though she has found her niche, her career, and passion in one community, she now aims to strengthen and pay forward the same acceptance and positivity to anyone that has ever felt anxious, different, or even the same.

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goo

vi


od

ibes

only.


style+apparel

r e m m u s styles

we can't live without!

If you’re anything like us, you have a few essential styles you never leave home without. Sure, you love changing it up every now and then, but comfort is key. We've carefully selected a few more favorites to add to your list. The sun is out, the water is warm. Summer styles are here to stay!

Athleta Cloudbreak Rib Strappy Bikini Top Black $60 Shop at Athleta Nashville in Green Hills athleta.gap.com Model: Kate Dial

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photos by SAM CARBINE

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style+apparel

(left) Lavender Sports Bra $40 Watercolor Leggings $50 (right) VooDoo Muscle Tank $25 PacMan Women's Shorts $35 (box) Long Sleeve Open Back Top $42 Shop at Barbell Voodoo barbell-voodoo.com Models: Sarah Willis (left) and Dominique Jacoy (right)

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Goodr Sunglasses A Ginger's Soul $25 Chubbies Shorts The Aquatic Libations 5.5" Stretch $65 Yeti Cooler Hopper Flip 12 Field Tan/Blaze Orange $250 Olukai Sandals 'Ohana Black $65 Shop at Mountain High Outfitters Hillsboro Village and Franklin mountainhighoutfitters.com Model: Lukas Maki

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style+apparel

(left) Chaser Snakeskin One-Piece $88 (right) Billabong Last Sun Tropic Bikini Two-Piece Citrus $95 Shop at Posh Nashville poshonline.com Models: Lauren Farina (left) and Carissa Boone (right)

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(left) Repeat Tee Olive/Orange $25 (right) Repeat Tee Black/Mint $25 (box) Repeat Tee Royal/Pink $25 Shop at Ambition Threads ambitionthreads.com Models: Michael Richardson (left) and Tylor Gentry (right)

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style+apparel

Namaste At The Beach Shorts 8" Amazonite/Light Cast $88 (box) Metal Vent Tech Surge Tank Ceramic/White $68 Shop at lululemon Hill Center shop.lululemon.com Model: Marcus Whitney

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(left) Crop Crewneck Mauve $35 (right) Crop Crewneck Dusty Blue $35 (box) Women's Tank Military Green $22 Shop at Ambition Threads ambitionthreads.com Models: Morgan Sheehan (left) and Ansley Pittman (right)

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health+ wellness

Sweating for the Wedding, theRight Way W

e’ve all been there. You have a big event coming up and you want to look your best, inside and out. The pressure is on, so you whip out your planner and begin scheduling weekly sweat sessions to help you "work off" those extra calories. Let me stop you right there though. You should never guilt yourself into losing weight for a special occasion. Trust me, I am here to save the [wedding] day! Sweating is the body’s safe and natural way to heal and stay healthy and has been known to help flush the body of substances like alcohol, cholesterol, and salt. When we sweat, the body releases these toxins by using sweat as the conduit. Although sometimes embarrassing if you’re at school, work, or spending a night out on the town, sweating is a necessary part of protecting ourselves from overheating. The sometimes satisfying drips of perspiration are proof our bodies have a built-in mechanism for keeping cool, 48

which can help open up and unclog pores. Sweating also increases blood circulation. When you sweat, you green-light some positive reactions in your body too. For example, a infrared sauna’s gentle, 120-degree warmth can relax your mind and loosen up your muscles, an after effect similar to the high of a yoga class, minus the advanced poses and mantras. One of the new ways to detox our bodies and live #thesweatlife is to use infrared saunas. You may have used a traditional sauna in the past where heat is warming the air, which in turn warms your body. By using infrared heat therapy that releases electromagnetic radiation, an infrared sauna heats your body directly without warming the air around you, which can be absorbed by the body as much as 1.5 inches under the skin. The appeal of saunas, to most, is that they cause reactions similar to those elicited by moderate exercise,

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such as vigorous sweating. An infrared sauna produces these results at lower temperatures than a regular sauna, thus making it more accessible to people who can't tolerate the heat of a traditional sauna. An infrared sauna produces sweat that is 70 percent water and 30 percent toxins, as opposed to other sweat from workouts of traditional saunas that is 97 percent water and 3 percent toxins. No strangers to the power of sweat, CYL Sauna Studio in Green Hills is a luxury infrared sauna studio where clients enjoy sweating in their own personal infrared sauna pod in a private sauna suite. Owner, Kayla O’Nan, has been operating her location for 5 years and has seen a steady growth in the infrared trend. “Infrared saunas over the past few years have gained popularity for their anti-aging and wellness benefits. Health focused celebrities like Jennifer Aniston, Lady Gaga and Gweneth Paltrow are big promoters of this natural wellness method too.” Although paying to sweat may seem like an odd idea when you could go outside and run around in the heat, perspiring on purpose has many benefits. “It’s very popular for brides and grooms to seek us out when they are trying to lose weight and detox before their big day. We also book a lot of private events in case a larger wedding party might like to participate as well.” The stress of having to deal with family, wedding planners, guests and much more on your big day can sometimes be overwhelming. Unwinding in a soothing, stress-releasing, warm environment is definitely a recovery routine we can get on board with. An average infrared session takes about 30- to 40-minutes, during which time the body is exposed to heat and what is called “far” infrared light. "Far infrared light is part of the sun’s invisible spectrum and has the ability to penetrate human tissue. It is completely healthy and safe for skin exposure," Kayla explains. In fact, there is a growing body of clinical evidence that supports the use of far infrared as a non-invasive health-promoting therapy. Many researchers have also found convincing evidence that when far infrared is applied to local areas or to the entire body, there was a beneficial blood circulation-enhancing effect in human skin. "It's just a great place to find Zen and relax as well too," Kayla says. Each room at CYL Sauna Studio contains a custom sauna table with the solo sauna pod on top and has soothing spa music playing throughout. “Sweating at CYL along with your normal workout routine can also help speed up the process of getting your body to your ideal wedding weight,” Kayla adds. With more and more options becoming available in our area to recover, sweating it out in an infrared sauna should not be overlooked. "I hope more and more people will find it a valuable addition to their regular health and fitness routines."

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health+ wellness by JILL MERKEL, MS, RD, CSSD

How to Refuel Your Body After A Workout

Refueling after a workout is an important component for athletes and avid exercisers. As a sports dietitian, I often tell my clients that the physical workout breaks the body down and the nutrition component builds the body back up. It’s really a combination of training AND nutrition that allows you to see the results you are aiming for. Carbohydrates, protein, and fluids are the key pieces of recovery nutrition. Higher intensity and longer duration workouts require more carbs to replenish what was used. Protein needs are based on body size and stay relatively the same regardless of the workout although they will change slightly based on your goals. Fluid needs are individualized based on sweat rate, if you’re a salty sweater, and the training conditions such as temperature, humidity, indoor/outdoor, etc. A good starting place is a 2:1 carb to protein ratio. For example, if you need 20g of protein, a 2:1 carb to protein ratio would be 40g carbs + 20g protein. If the workout was high intensity or of long duration, that ratio may change to 3:1 or 4:1 meaning the amount of carbs could go up to 60g or even 80g while the protein would stay the same. Some recovery nutrition examples 50

include chocolate milk, Greek yogurt with fruit and granola, smoothies made with frozen fruit and Greek yogurt (or protein powder), or scrambled eggs with toast and 100% fruit juice.

........................................................................................................................................................................................

T

he three components for optimal athletic performance are training, nutrition, and sleep. Typically, people hone in on the training aspect, whether they hire a coach, take an instructor-led fitness class, or find a training plan online to follow. It is relatively easy to complete a workout and check that task off for the day. The nutrition piece is a bit more complex because it’s not just one good choice that equals success but rather it’s being consistent and making good decisions most of the time.

The fluids piece of recovery becomes even more important as the temperature outside continues to rise. Going into a workout adequately hydrated, drinking during the workout, and replenishing fluids after the workout are all important. There is no benefit to performing a workout while dehydrated. Consuming salty foods before a workout can also help your body retain the fluids drank. Goldfish crackers, pretzels, soups, and jerky are examples of good preworkout foods. Additionally, drinking fluids that contain carbs and sodium such as a sports drink can also help your body retain the fluids. Consuming foods with high water content can also be a useful strategy. Many fruits and vegetables have a high water content such as watermelon, strawberries, grapefruit, cantaloupe, tomatoes, zucchini, and cucumber. Increasing your intake of these foods during warmer months can help you to stay hydrated. The general rule of thumb for hydration is to drink half of your body weight in ounces of fluids per day. For example, a 150-pound individual would need to drink a minimum of 75 ounces of non-caloric beverages throughout the day. This does NOT include what is needed during and after a workout. Also, be mindful of how humidity affects your body and hydration status. When humidity is high, your body has a harder time cooling itself down, which can lead to increased body temperature and potential dehydration and overheating. Make sure to take the humidity

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into account when you are preparing for a workout during the summer months. An easy way to monitor your hydration status is to look at your urine. The color of your urine is a good indicator of your hydration status. Aim for a pale yellow color and you should be needing to use the restroom every couple of hours if you are adequately hydrated. Another option is to weigh yourself before and after a workout. For example, if you go on a two-hour training run, weighing yourself before and after can allow you to see if you consumed enough fluids during that workout. Keeping a training journal where you make note of how much you drank

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or ate, what the weather and humidity were, how you felt, etc. can help you identify patterns and areas for improvement. If you are looking to improve your athletic performance and enhance your recovery, refueling post-workout is going to be a key aspect to your training. Postworkout is a crucial time when your body is primed for nutrition and consuming carbs and protein will allow your muscles to absorb those nutrients and use them for recovery.

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health+ wellness

TALKING BACK INNER TO YOURVOICE

Girl, they are going to think you’re crazy. Are you really going to bring up this topic? Out of all the things you could write about, this is what you choose?” Meet the words of my fearful, yet protective inner voice whilst brainstorming for this article. Now before you flip the page or roll your eyes, stay with me for a moment. As I am confident this internal voice has appeared at least once since you opened this issue. This is the same voice that takes over your peaceful shower time to rant about anything and everything. The one that plants the seeds of doubt or fear when someone doesn’t respond to your text or call right away. The same one that develops all the elaborate stories and beliefs that could alter the way you go about experiencing life. This inner voice, gone unchecked, has the power to make you feel less than or too much. Becoming aware of this voice and the authority you’ve allowed it to have is just as important as learning to not let it control you. To ensure we’re all on the same page, let’s pause here to say, “hi.” Yes, we’re actually going to say, “hello” to our pesky inner chatterbox. To assist in this exercise, go ahead and read this prompt or switch up the vocab for whatever feels right to you: “Hey voice… uhh this gal is asking me to say hi to you, are you there?” As I wrote that, my inner voice responded with “no” – such a jokester. What did yours say? Stay with me, I promise now that we’ve addressed and become aware of it, I invite you to take it a step further in understanding your inner voice. As you continue to peruse this magazine and go about your day, remain mindful of the inner voice you just said, “hello” to. Pay attention to not only what it is saying, but when. Lean into the words and determine how those words make you feel. Are these words you would confidently say out loud? To your best friend or even to the little child walking past you at the grocery store? Look at it this way: Would you dare say those words to your cherished and lovable pet when you get home? If you’re anything like me, which you are since you’re human, this inner voice may need to be held accountable every once in a while.

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by BRITTANI WOOD

Here is my point: The most efficient way to hold your inner voice accountable is to first, simply acknowledge the rumbling inside. Generally, this means taking a moment to listen, accept, maybe thank your inner voice for her perspective and then provide her permission to let it go. With practice, this can be done with a few deep breaths and less than a minute of focus. Other times, it takes more effort to calm the inside. When these moments arise, it is useful to physically write it down the very feelings, emotions or overwhelming thoughts that demand attention. Just remember to be gentle and to be kind. The stories, the fears, the harsh words we may say to ourselves, exist because they are trying to protect you – however misguided and unwarranted they might be. Once you provide your inner voice, your inner pal, the opportunity to be heard, understood and nudge it to only speak kindly of you and others, the lens in which you see and experience life will alter forever. You are whole, complete, and perfect just as you are and this is your time to step into your power, with peace and love for yourself through a little bit of listening.

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discover+more

by LINDSAY MILLER photos by SAM CARBINE WATCH THE BEHIND-THE-SCENES VIDEO ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL 54

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fight FOR WHAT YOU WANT You've got a dream. You've got to protect it. You've got a goal. You've got to execute it. Pray for what you need. Fight for what you want.

T

he term “body positivity” is popping up in publications everywhere. Runways, magazines, and the entertainment industry have recently been making an effort to represent all sizes, ages, races, and genders. Dani Dyer has made a valiant choice to use her platform as a voice and opportunity to help others see the light inside themselves by becoming a fitness professional and using her own experiences to led the positive movement. After years of hard experiences and dealing with the same struggles as many of her clients, she promotes self-confidence, self-care, and persistent love for our own inner beauty. It is never easy, but for Dani, it is always worth it. “The main thing is embracing your body. Not just loving your body on the outside but embracing your own image. What makes you, you?” She says it is much more than just saying, “Oh I love my body…” in the mirror - it is how we treat the entirety of our health. Through her teenage years, self-confidence lowered to the point of revolving around food, or really the lack of nutrition. As a dancer, Dani was constantly compared to others. Instead of celebrating what made her unique and special in a crowd of young, slim, teens, she felt like more of a hassle to her teachers rather than being recognized and accepted for her talents. Nonetheless, dance gave her a time to perform - a time to let go of the outside world and other’s opinions. “It was a chance to enjoy something I loved, which has now translated to Strongman competition.” Although Dani has transitioned from dancer to heavy lifter, she intentionally harbors the confidence she felt she was lacking at a younger age. Everyone wants to be happy, healthy, and confident individuals. But that’s often easier said than done, especially during the teen years when our bodies are changing, self-confidence is fragile, and we are trying to make that tricky transition out of childhood. She tried to eat low-calorie diets and drastically restricted her diet to the point of stomach issues. Because of these “comments” or “looks” or the things people considered “wrong,” Dani altered her lifestyle. It wasn’t until she consciously let go of the limitations others had placed on her that she was able to stop caring about outside opinions allowing her to grow as her best self.

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“I was always told what to fight for,” she remembers. Her goals were set for her. Telling her clients to “fight for what you want,” is now her message to explain that your goals are personal and you don’t owe anyone an explanation for the things you want. Start to look at all the things that make you different in a positive light instead of all the reason you are different, she encourages. Being different isn’t negative. It is the reason you stand out, says Dani, versus any idea we might have of fitting in. She often uses the motto, “Turn a negative into a positive,” and suggests everyone to simply “get your movement in,” because that is where it all starts. Today, she remembers her major changes stemming from being fed up with the negativity and disapproval in an industry she believed in. “I had been beaten down too much,” she says. And when you try for so long to break someone, it is inevitable - they will break. When she couldn’t exactly find that person to look up to, she decided to become that version of herself. Of course, inspiration has a role to play, but she explains, “it is a very real thing that is difficult and it often comes down to how we talk to ourselves and even others.” Since starting Dani D. Fitness, she has embraced her body’s abilities but more importantly, the person she has become. Her goal is to embed in her clients the same self-preservation that she found on her own. She says, “I try to set an example in my own life and I love my body for what it can do, not what it looks like.” She also highly recommends surrounding yourself with the right people - the ones that believe in you and support your goals. For Dani, right now, this is her team of Strongmen (and women). Dani states, “When you allow yourself to love who you truly are, you open up to other's loving you the same way.” Once you agree to your own self-worth, the way you look isn’t who you are. How you treat yourself and the process of evaluating the reasons for why you feel strong or healthy - that is when you’ll see that you don’t need outside approval and the way you look truly doesn’t matter through someone else's perspective.

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2019 NASHVILLE FIT GAMES WHAT TO EXPECT

On Saturday, May 18th, all participants should arrive about 45-minutes prior to their heat’s start time to check-in and warm up. All athletes will be responsible for warming up on their own. The check-in table will be located near the entrance to the first field. After check-in, all participants should meet under the black Nashville Fit Magazine tent 10-minutes prior to their scheduled heat start time. A Pack Leader will be present to lead you from challenge to challenge. After roll call, athletes should not leave the start zone. You will not be allowed to start the event after your heat has started the first challenge.

HEAT NO.

DIVISION

START TIME

APPROX. FINISH TIME

1

40s, 50s, 60+ Women

9:00 AM

10:30 AM

2

50s, 60+ Men

9:15 AM

10:45 AM

3

40s Men

9:30 AM

11:00 AM

4

20s, 30s, Women

9:45 AM

11:15 AM

5

30s Men

10:00 AM

11:30 AM

6

20s Men - A

10:15 AM

11:45 AM

7

20s Men - B

10:30 AM

12:00 PM

8

Teams (Open)

10:45 AM

12:15 PM

9

Team (Gym - A)

11:00 AM

12:30 PM

10

Team (Gym - B)

11:15 AM

12:45 PM

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After each challenge, athletes must sign their written scores before proceeding on to the next. Pack Leaders will turn in score cards to the appropriate officials at the end of the day. Athletes will not take scorecards with them at any point during the day. Some age groups may be combined with other heats for efficiency on the day of the event. If you are competing in a different age group, please know you will be scored only to your category at the end of the day. Please stay with your heat and do not stop to visit with spectators in between challenges. This is to respect the other athletes in your division, make sure you hear the instructions from the head judge, and avoid causing delays.

*Please know, this schedule is subject to change. Competitors will receive an email prior to the event with their official heat time. You can also refer to nashvillefitgames.com for an up-to-date event schedule.

SHARE your experience

On the day of the event, athletes will move through each challenge in order with their assigned heat. (See challenge descriptions on the next page.) Each heat has an assigned Pack Leader. As athletes approach a challenge, they will be given instructions regarding the event from the head judge. Judges will take score each athlete based on their performance, which they will record on a score card along with the athlete’s bib number.

Once your heat is finished, athletes are welcome to come and go as they please. Visit the Paleo Works booth for food, relax and cool down. Spectators are free to move from one challenge to the next to cheer on competitors, much like in a golf tournament.

SHARE YOUR EXPERIENCE ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Post your photos to @NashvilleFit and include

#NASHVILLEFITGAMES #MUSICCITYFIT N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


2019 NASHVILLE FIT GAMES

TEAM COMPETITION Teams can be made up of any combination of competitor. There is no requirement other than a minimum of two or maximum of four athletes per team. All competitors must be at least 18 years of age or older. Each team member must do at least one challenge, however, teams can divide up the challenges how they see fit. The team’s score will be a compilation of each athlete's rank based on his or her performance on each event. The overall winning team and the winners in each category will be featured in Nashville Fit Magazine’s July/August issue in the “Nashville Fit Games” coverage. Teams must be registered in one of the following categories:

INDIVIDUAL COMPETITION

OPEN DIVISION Individual competition will be based on age groups. Each age group will be assigned a heat time and go through all challenges together.

MEN

WOMEN

18-29

18-29

30-39

30-39

40-49

40-49

50-59

50-59

60+

60+

The Open Division is for teams of any group of people who would like to enter the team competition. No affiliation with a gym is required. This is an ideal scenario for family, friends, coworkers or any combination of those that wish to come out and have fun by working together as a team.

GYM DIVISION

The Gym Division is a little more competitive and comprised of gym members representing the place where they typically might workout. Multiple teams per gym are allowed to enter. All team members must be a friend or current member of the gym. *To keep an even and competitive playing field, if your team falls into the Gym category but has signed up for the Open Division, your team will be moved at the host's discretion. You will be notified prior to the event start.

(Athletes must be a resident of the Greater Nashville Area in order to be eligible to win the Nashville Fit Games)

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2019 NASHVILLE FIT GAMES

See full rules at nashvillefitgames.com

NUTRIFITT SLED PULL, PUSH AND SPRINT

1

CITY FIT CONCIERGE VERTICAL JUMP

2

ORANGETHEORY FITNESS DISTANCE ROW

3

CAMP GLADIATOR BURPEES FOR TIME

4

NUTRITION FAKTORY - FAKTORY 5

5

Athletes will start by pulling a weighted sled 50 feet toward them using a battle rope. During the pull, athletes must stand and cannot run, crawl backwards or leave the designated area while pulling the sled. Once the sled has crossed the designated line, athletes will then push the sled back to its starting position. After the sled crosses that line, athletes will immediately sprint back to their original starting position, which is now the finish line. Time is recorded by the judge when the athlete crosses the finish line. The weight of the sled is 170 lbs for Women and 220 lbs for Men, but will be scaled for 60s Division. Athletes will get two attempts, if desired. Athletes must step back up to the starting line immediately for the second attempt. Best of two attempts is circled.

Athletes will start in a standing position with both feet in the designated area. When ready, athletes will jump up as high as they can to reach and hit the highest level they can on the vertical jump test equipment using their hand to record their vertical distance. Athletes must push off the ground with both feet at the same time and cannot get a running start. Best of two attempts is recorded.

Athletes will start in the seated position on one of the available water rowers. Once a judge sets the rower at 500 meters, the athlete may begin their distance row for time. Athletes must keep an overhand grip at all times during the row and must maintain a rowing motion throughout. Once the distance on the monitor reaches zero, the timer will stop and be recorded to two decimal places. On average, athletes will be rowing for two and a half minutes or less. Athletes will receive one attempt.

Athletes will start by standing on one side of the hurdle ready to perform a lateral facing burpee (as opposed to bar facing). When the judge announces go and starts the timer, athletes will perform a lateral facing burpee on the same side they started, then jump over the hurdle to perform another lateral facing burpee on the other side. This process will be repeated until the timer ends, counting down from 2 minutes. Athletes may jump or step over the hurdle with one or two feet and land with one or two feet. It is not required to jump and land with both feet. Athletes do not have to face the bar when jumping. The athlete's chest and thighs must touch the ground for a clean burpee to be recorded. It is not required that both feet step back or rise at the same time during the burpee. A “no rep” will be called when performed incorrectly. Athletes will receive one attempt. The judge will record the achieved number.

This challenge has 5 stations. Athletes will start in a standing position at station #1. When the judge says go and starts the timer, athletes will complete 10 hand release push-ups, then sprint 10 yards to station #2. At station #2, athletes will complete 10 mountain climbers (each knee to elbow is 1 rep), then sprint 5 yards to station #3. At station #3, athletes will perform 10 “ball over the bar” tosses. The bar will be 10 feet off the ground and the ball will weigh 10 lbs for Women and 14 lbs for Men. See full rules at nashvillefitgames.com. 60

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2019 NASHVILLE FIT GAMES TRAINOD ODD OBJECT HOLD

6

QNTM FIT LIFE AGILITY LADDER

7

DANI D. FITNESS TIRE FLIP

8

NUTRISHOP 3 CONE L-DRILL

9

Athletes will start by holding the base of the odd object out in front of their chest with both hands and straight arms at a 90-degree angle from their body. Athletes must grip the object with staggered hands, one on top of the other. Athletes will hold the odd object with straight arms for as long as they physically can while the timer counts up. If the athlete drops or raises the object or their arms below or above the 90-degree threshold (as described by the judge), they will get a warning and must return back to the 90 degrees. If the Athlete breaks the threshold a second time, the timer will stop and be recorded. The object is weighted at 40 lbs for Men and 20 lbs for Women, but will be scaled for 60s Division. See full rules at nashvillefitgames.com

For this event, cones have been placed at 16, 18, 20, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, and 34 yards from the starting line. Athletes will begin their run with a whistle from the judge. Athletes will run to the first cone at 16 yards (cone #1) and touch the line with their foot, then turn and run back, crossing the starting line with any part of your body. The judge will blow the whistle to signify the finish of the first level which also designates the start of the 10-second rest period to return to the starting line. The timing judge will then whistle to start the run to the next cone. See full rules at nashvillefitgames.com

Athletes will start by flipping a heavy rubber tire (250 lbs for Women 20s, 30s and 40s / 500 lbs for Men 20s, 30s and 40s) over and over again for 90 seconds. Women 50s and 60s will use 150 lbs. Men 50s and 60s will use 250 lbs. Athletes must jump in one side of the hole (or center of the tire) and out the other with both feet after each complete tire flip before attempting another one. Athletes can use any part of their body to hold and flip the tire. A full rep is completed when an athlete successfully flips the tire, jumps in the hole and out the other side, touching the ground with both feet. A judge will use a stopwatch to count down from 90 seconds. Athletes will get one attempt and the total number of successful tire flips will be recorded. See full rules at nashvillefitgames.com.

Athletes will start by standing in a ready position at the starting Cone A. On the judge’s signal, athletes will run from Cone A to Cone B (as shown in image #1) in a down and back sprint. Athletes must touch the line at Cone B with their foot before pivoting back to Cone A. Upon reaching Cone A again and touching the line with their foot, athletes will pivot a second time and run back around Cone B toward Cone C. From there, athletes must run around Cone C in a figure 8 like route (shown in image #2). Run around Cone C, back around Cone B, and finish by crossing the line at Cone A. Athletes may request a second attempt if desired, but must immediately step back up to the line. Best attempt is recorded and circled by the judge. Athletes must initial their score before leaving the area.

FLEET FEET WEIGHTED HALF MILE

Athletes will race around the designated area and complete a half mile run while carrying a weighted sandbell, making sure to stay within the designated area at all times. The weight is 10 lbs for Men and 5 lbs for Women. Time is recorded by the judge when the athlete crosses the finish line. Scoring is to two decimal places. Athletes must initial their score before leaving the area.

M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9 NA S HVI LLE FIT M AGAZINE

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IN EVERY ISSUE

NASHVILLE FIT MAGAZINE'S

FITNESS DIRECTORY Chris Byford Yoga Instructor/Teacher and Leadership Director chrisbyfordyoga@gmail.com @chris_byford_yoga

David Cook "Cookie" Personal Trainer and Boxing Coach Founder of Cookie Cuts cookiecutsfitness@gmail.com @coach.cookie

Jerry Davis Personal/Group Trainer jdworkout@yahoo.com 615.582.2943 @drummajorfitness

Dani Dyer Fitness Event Coordinator Personal Trainer dani@danidfitness.com @danidfitness1

Steven Earwood Personal Trainer Health/Life Coach earwoodfitpro@gmail.com @earwood_fitness

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Conrad Goeringer IRONMAN Triathlon Coach workingtriathlete.com theworkingtriathlete@gmail.com @coach_goeringer

Andrea Kay MS, ACSM, ACE, AEA Aquatic Therapy, Pilates, Power Plate Fitness Training - Personal & Group additin@lwol.com @additin3

Rena Ooi RN, RCR Board Certified Functional Medicine Health Coach, Reflexologist, Grief Recovery Specialist and Reiki Master turningyourleaf@gmail.com 615.497.7286 @turningyourleaf

Laurie Rice Life Coach claritycoachingnash.com laurie@claritycoachingnash.com @claritycoaching_

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


Nashville is home to a number of different health and fitness fields and experts. We’re proud to be your go-to source to help you find the perfect personal trainer, instructor, nutritionist, dietitian or health coach to fit your daily needs. Stay #MusicCityFit

Katie Spruell Physical Therapist ksfitnessco.com katie@ksfitnessco.com @missphysiofit

Joyce Veronica Certified Personal Trainer/ Fitness/Nutrition Coach jvftnss@gmail.com @joyceveronica

Jeff Waller Personal Trainer jeffreyallenwaller@gmail.com 812.568.7890 @helloyeffrey

Kate Wilke Integrative Nutrition Health Coach kate@meditatekate.com @meditatekate

Zerian Williams Zenfinite Training Lead Trainer/Founder zerian@zenfinitetraining.com @zenfinitetraining

Want to join this list? Get your name familiar with and in front of the largest audience of health and fitness-minded individuals and groups in the Greater Nashville Area. Send an email to info@nashvillefitmagazine.com with "Fitness Directory" in the subject line for more details. M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9 NA S HVI LLE FIT M AGAZINE

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RACES + EVENTS

MAY JUNE

Event dates are subject to change. Check local websites for final dates, times and locations.

FEATURED EVENT MAY 5/4/19 Girls on the Run 5k Girls on the Run of Middle Tennessee gotrmiddletn.org/5k Shelby Park, Nashville, TN 5/11/19 Yoga on the Field yogaonthefield.com Nissan Stadium 5/11/19 Hero's Challenge Nashville Firefighters operationwarm.org Nashville Fire Department Training Academy 5/11/19 GORUCK Constellation 12 GoRuck goruck.com Nashville, TN

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5/11/19 Free Community Bridge Workout Camp Gladiator Nashville campgladiator.com John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge Nashville, TN 5/11/19 Titans 5K: Finish on the 50 Tennessee Titans titans5k.enmotive.com/events/ register/2019-titans-5k Nissan Stadium 5/11/19 Tour de Nash Walk Bike Nashville walkbikenashville.org/ tourdenash Public Square Nashville 5/11/19 Dream Center 5k West Nashville Dream Center westnashdc5k.com

5/11/19 Diaper Dash 5K Race Stroller Strong Moms Shelby Park, Nashville, TN 5/18/19 Nashville Fit Games Nashville Fit Magazine nashvillefitgames.com Ted Rhodes Fields 5/18/19 Green Beret Challenge The Fit Farm fit.farm/challenge-weeks Castalian Springs, TN 5/18/19 Lung Force Walk American Lung Association lung.org Public Square Nashville 5/18/19 Rhythm Run 5k Project Heart projectheart.org/blog/tag/5k Vaughn’s Creek Cross Country Course N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZ IN E M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9


Submit your events for the next issue to info@nashvillefitmagazine.com to be included.

5/18/19 Full Moon Paddle & Meditation Nashville SUP & Yoga nashvillesupandyoga.com Gallatin, TN 5/19/19 Meditate & Caffeinate Kettner Coffee Supply 5/19/19 Mutt Strutt Nashville Humane Association 5/25/19 Yoga Under the Stars Adventure Science Center JUNE 6/2/19 Yoga on the Diamond lululemon, Small World Yoga yogaonthediamond.com First Tennessee Park 6/5/19 The Big Run Nashville Fleet Feet Nashville fleetfeet.com The Park at Harlinsdale Farm Franklin, TN

6/7/19 Nashville Yoga with the Phoenix The Phoenix Tennessee Small World Yoga 6/15/19 5k at Fontanel Fontanel Nashville runfontanel.com The Woods at Fontanel 6/15/19 Hops for Pops 5k & 1 Mile Fun Run Above the Fold abovethefoldevents.com/ events One Bellevue Place 6/29/19 Preds Fangtastic 5k Nashville Predators nashvillepredators.com/5k Nashville, TN 6/29/19 Yoga Under the Stars Adventure Science Center

FEATURED EVENT M A Y / J U N E 2 0 1 9 NA S HVI LLE FIT M AGAZINE

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Profile for Xert Media

May/June 2019 - The Body Issue