Page 1


Contents

March/April 2019 | Issue #12

IN EVERY ISSUE Contributors / 8 From the Editor / 9 #MusicCityFit / 13 New in Nash / 30 Fitness Directory / 58 Events + Races / 62

FITNESS + EXERCISE HIIT Boxing Workout / 14 Rest Day Brags / 18 Running from the Hip / 22 FOOD + NUTRITION Tahini 3 Ways / 24 Eating for Fuel / 26 PEOPLE + LIFESTYLE NFL Draft Preview / 28 Training with the Stars / 34 Mike Bires / 40 Balancing Extremes / 44 Toss the Tax / 51 Julie Roberts / 60 HEALTH + WELLNESS Am I Hearing That Right? / 52 Back on Track / 54

6

60

24 ON THE COVER:

Kyle Whalum is a talented musician and bass player for Kelly Clarkson living in Nashville. When he's not on the road, Kyle enjoys getting lost on a local trail. Read his full story on pg. 44.

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


March/April 2019 | Issue #12

BEHIND THE SCENES Nashville is home to some of the best health and wellness gurus in the industry. Without their support, we would not be able to do what we do. Thank you to our contributors who make this magazine a dynamic and worthy source of health and fitness information and advice in the Greater Nashville Area.

Holly Darnell is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) and has been in practice for 8 years. She has a passion and love for fostering healthy relationships with food and cultivating community around the table. Holly provides 1:1 medical nutrition therapy with a non-diet approach. She practices from a weight-neutral approach and health at every size (HAES). Visit goldenrootsnashville.com to find out more.

EDITOR IN CHIEF Lindsay Miller lindsay@nashvillefitmagazine.com MANAGING EDITOR Brittany Phelps brittany@stlouisfitmagazine.com ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS Liz Melton, Jeff Waller PHOTOGRAPHERS Sam Carbine, Preston Leatherman

Holly Darnell Ana Reisdorf, MS, RD is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and freelance writer with 12-years of experience in the field of nutrition and dietetics. Through her writing, she demonstrates her passion for helping people achieve ideal health and make transformational changes in their lives. Visit anareisdorf.com for health and nutrition services.

Ana Reisdorf Dr. Randi Davis Yontz owns Ascent Audiology and Hearing in Nashville and is certified by the American Board of Audiology (ABA), and is a Fellow in the American Academy of Audiology (FAAA). She was a 2018 finalist for a Nashville Emerging Leader Award(NELA) and a board member of Hear Nashville and The Sign Club. She can most often be found running or attending a yoga class.

Dr. Randi Yontz

PUBLISHER Ryan Freebing ryan@nashvillefitmagazine.com

ADDITIONAL CONTRIBUTORS Christi Beth Adams, Ross Gentry, David Jennings GENERAL INQUIRIES + STORE DISTRIBUTION info@nashvillefitmagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES jeff@nashvillefitmagazine.com, liz@nashvillefitmagazine.com EDITORIAL SUBMISSIONS lindsay@nashvillefitmagazine.com EVENT LISTINGS nashvillefitmagazine.com/events SUBSCRIPTIONS nashvillefitmagazine.com/subscribe

Nashville Fit Magazine is published by Freebing Publishing and Media. Nashville Fit Magazine and its publisher assume no responsibility for the content of articles or advertisements. The views and opinions expressed by the contributors within this magazine may not represent the views of the publisher or our employees. This publication and all of its contents are copyrighted. All prices quoted within the publication are in US dollars and are approximate at time of print. The content published within is not intended to be substituted for professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of your health care provider with any questions you have regarding your health. For all subscription inquiries, please visit NashvilleFitMagazine.com or email us at info@nashvillefitmagazine.com.

8

PLEASE RECYCLE THIS MAGAZINE

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


Lindsay's Letter

O

n any given night in Nashville, you can walk down Broadway and hear the newest and oldest songs from familiar and unfamiliar voices streaming through the air and lofting from taverns and honkytonks. As the Nashville music scene continues to grow, famous names from the radio have elevated our namesake by opening bars of their own. Dierks Bentley, Blake Shelton, Jason Aldean, and Florida Georgia Line, have more recently helped to build a plethora of new venues that are quickly becoming a way to further spread our culture to the ears of tourists every single weekend. But do you know the history of why Nashville is called “Music City”? The credit lies at the heart of Fisk University. The 1800s established Nashville as a hub for music publishing and during this time, the infamous Fisk Jubilee Singers embarked on an around-theworld tour that helped to fund the school’s mission of educating freed slaves after the Civil War. Further contributing to Nashville’s name on a global map, the Fisk Jubilee Singers played for the Queen of England, in which she commented, “these singers must come from the ‘Music City’.” With historic venues like the Ryman Auditorium, the Country Music Hall of Fame, and the Grand Ole Opry, along with hosting the annual CMA Fest and Pilgrimage Festival, and having hosted the most notorious country music award shows in the world, Nashville continues to be the heart of the country music industry. Even spots like the Bluebird Cafe

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

@lmiler34

and the Listening Room have helped to give us yet another honor, “the songwriting capital of the world.” We can also thank CMT and GAC for airing country music videos and shows like Nashville on cable television that contribute to a wider variety of people being exposed to Music City’s lifestyle. This issue’s theme, The Music Issue, is long overdue, to say the least. Nashville’s recent growth has come from the foundation of music. Music is said to be “the universal language,” but it has proven to be the language that connects the life and soul of its community. However, our Music Issue is more than just highlighting musicians and their successes. It is a realization that the common thread of music is not the only thing we share in common. Even though we recognize the stars on a national level as sharing our home, they also share our community of health and wellness. It's easy to forget that the famous faces of music still struggle with the everyday process of working out and eating healthy. In all honesty, this is my favorite aspect of health. We all suffer from the stresses of making the right choices on a daily basis. No amount of popularity, money, or career success allows you to avoid the hard work, dedication, and consistency that a healthy body and mind requires. No matter the differences, backgrounds, body type, or fame, we are all working toward a similar outcome - to reach our goals in being the best version of ourselves. We wanted to bring you this issue in order to do just that - prove to our community that we are strong and relentless in the pursuit of happiness. Along with our musician spotlights, we are sharing some knowledge for our runners, as usually this issue is released before the St. Jude Rock 'N' Roll Marathon. We’ve highlighted some running experts, provided some advice, and taken into consideration our large community of runners by featuring an ambitious, hard-working, bass player who runs ultra-marathons named Kyle Whalum on the cover. We hope we’ve blended our traditional runner’s issue with the new music issue through continuing to educate and entertain our readership. This is a wonderful time in Nashville, as the weather begins to change, the flowers bloom, and we start to see our neighbors come out of hibernation to enjoy the outdoors in this sunshine. This issue gives us so many ways to truly be #musiccityfit!

Lindsay Miller Editor in Chief

9


Happenings

March/April 2019

FORCE FOR FAMILIES

CrossFit Forte and Youth Villages are teaming up to bring you Force for Families on Saturday, April 6th. A community-wide partner competition will be open to RX and Scaled, Men and Women Athletes. All proceeds will go to Youth Villages of Middle Tennessee, a private, nonprofit organization dedicated to helping emotionally and behaviorally troubled children and their families live successfully. For more details, visit bit.ly/forte4families19.

WELLNESS 360 RETREAT

Werk Your Curves is hosting a Wellness Retreat April 12-14 at Meet+Greet. The event will be centered around all aspects of wellness including, finance, movement, food, mindset, and self care. This unique event is intended to extend wellness to all women, regardless of shape, size, color or current wellness knowledge. For more informaiton and to sign up today, head to werkyourcurves.com

NASHVILLE VEGFEST

Promoting a plant based, healthy, cruelty free lifestyle, Nashville Vegfest is hosting it's 4th annual event on April 6th at the Nashville Fairgrounds. This event is jam-packed with the best local, regional, and national exhibitors and features several prominent guest speakers. Check their website for full details and to grab your tickets nashvillevegfest.com.

12

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


how are you

#MUSICCITYFIT? Follow us on Instagram @NASHVILLEFIT. Tag us or use the hashtag #MusicCityFit for a chance to be featured.

@amandaratkowski

@beretty

@chelseayoungyogi

@kyleauckland

@nikki_2f resh

@vlex_coyr

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

13


7 ROUND

TOUCH RIGHT

HIIT BOXING WORKOUT

LOCATION: QNTM FIT LIFE TRAINER: KIMBERLY GILFUS

JUMP

TOUCH LEFT

ROUND 1 POWER JACKS

Perform 3 sets for 10 reps on each side to help warm up the body Set-Up: Begin by standing with your feet flat on the ground, shoulder width apart, arms at your side. Movement: Perform a body weight squat and touch the ground with your right hand/glove, remembering to breath and keep your chest high. Explode up and out of your squat with a jump. On the way down, "fall" into another body weight squat and touch the ground with your opposite hand/glove. Find your rhythm and repeat this movement until you've completed the desired rep count.

LUNGE LEFT

UPPERCUT RIGHT

UPPERCUT LEFT

ROUND 2 LUNGE TO UPPERCUT

Perform 3 sets for 10 reps on each side Lunge Set-Up: Start with your left leg in front on you and your right leg back in a lunge position. Your shoulders, hips and feet should be facing forward. Bend your knees, keeping the shoulders on top of your hips as the back knee moves toward the floor. Make sure your front knee is directly over the top of your front ankle in the lunge position for stability. Movement: Slowly lunge into the bag by keeping your left arm close to your face and the right arm back for an uppercut. Once you're at the bag, perform an uppercut to the bottom of the bag, then reverse the movement, keeping your weight on the forward leg. Switch to the opposite leg for a rep on the other side. Find a rhythm.

14

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


BURPEE

JAB

CROSS

ROUND 3 BURPEE TO JAB-CROSS

Perform 3 sets for 10 reps Burpee Set-Up: Begin with your feet shoulder width apart, squat down, and plant your hands on the ground in front of your feet. Jump back with your feet into a plank position with your arms straight underneath your shoulders. Jump your legs right behind your hands and stand up, moving your hands in front of your face. Movement: Extend your left hand from your face straight out in front of you, using the body for power and turning the glove over at the end (thumb parallel to the ground). As the left arm comes back to the face, repeat the same movement with the right hand. Continue straight into the burpee. Advanced option to add a push-up at the bottom of the burpee.

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

15


fitness+exercise

HOOK LEFT JUMP

SQUAT

HOOK RIGHT

ROUND 4 SQUAT + JUMP TO HOOK

Perform 3 sets of 10 reps quick but controlled Set-Up: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and turned slightly out. Keeping your weight heavy in the heels, squat as deep as possible while keeping the back straight and chest up. Then explode up for a jump getting your knees up and as high as you can. Movement: After the jump, hook to the left, rotating the entire body towards the right, pivoting on the left foot, hip, and shoulder toward the right side of the body. Extend the right hand in the same path of rotation, keeping the arm bent at about 90 degrees, elbow up and out, parallel with the ground. Come back to the starting position and perform another squat. Repeat this movement until you've completed the desired rep count.

ROUND 5 SQUAT HOLD TO JAB-CROSS

Perform 3 sets of 20 reps quick while holding a squat Set-Up: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and turned slightly out. Keeping your weight heavy in the heels, squat until your thighs are parallel with the ground while keeping the back straight and chest up. Hold this position. Movement: While holding the squat position, peform a jab-cross combo with your left and right hands, remembering to breath with every punch and keep your core tight and back straight. Perform these punches quick but controlled.

SQUAT HOLD

*Advanced option to perform a jump then get back down into the squat hold position and jab-cross.

JAB

CROSS

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


ROUND 6 HIGH KNEES TO ROLL + JAB-CROSS

RAISE LEFT

RAISE RIGHT

ROLL

JAB-CROSS

Perform 10 reps but controlled High Knee Set-Up: Start with feet shoulder-width apart facing the bag. With both hands, hold the top of the bag for support. Movement: Staying light on your toes, perform a knee raise and tap the bottom of the bag with the top of your left knee. Lower and repeat on the other side. Continue for 10 reps, quick but controlled. After 10 reps, stand back in your fighting stance. Lower your body and perform a roll to one side of the bag. After the roll, extend your left arm to the outside of the bag and "miss the jab". Then, with the right arm, "miss the cross". You won't actually hit the bag. In boxing, when you "miss a punch", it is intended to distract your opponent from your next punch. For this exercise, we are teaching you the technique so you feel a full extension miss. Stand back up for another round of high knees and repeat. Remember to breath and keep your core strong.

ROUND 7 SIT-UP TO JAB-CROSS

Perform 3 sets for 20 reps Set-Up: Start by lying face-up, knees slightly bent. Your waist should be directly underneath the bag. Hands should be on the opposite sides of your head like a crunch. Movement: Roll up until you are at the top of the sit-up. At the top, quickly extend the left arm up to the bag, straight out from the shoulder, then bring it back down to your face, and immediately follow with the right. Roll down to the starting position. Exhale as you lift. *Advanced option to add more than two reps at the top.

CRUNCH M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

LEFT

RIGHT 17


fitness+exercise

REST DAY BRAGS by CHRISTI BETH ADAMS RRCA Certified Coach Mother Runner

A

s runners and athletes of all types, we’ve grown up with the “no pain, no gain” message that pushing ourselves to go hard and fast 24/7 is the hallmark of a dedicated athlete. Brownie points for putting in the work when the “other guy or gal” isn’t. But that’s old school mentality and if you haven’t already heard, rest and recovery is the name of the game when it comes to making physical gains. Newsflash: You don’t gain fitness while running or working out; you gain fitness during recovery. We tend to place an emphasis on our hard workouts assuming they are the most important days of training, but a day off is what your body needs to make the magic happen. Micro tears in muscles repaired, inflammation quelled, hormones balanced, nutrients replenished - the list goes on. To build fitness, you have to give your body time to heal. Taking time off from running is just as important as the miles you log. But all off time isn’t created equal. If you want to maximize your recovery so that you can come back feeling strong and reenergized, you need a deliberate approach. It’s no surprise that sleep needs to be a priority. If you want to maximize your body’s

18

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


ability to rejuvenate, be sure you’re coupling those days off with an early bedtime. Obviously, being intentional about your sleep habits throughout your entire training cycle is imperative so don’t work your ass off and then skimp on the sleep. Another way to step up your rest and recovery game is to pay attention to other stresses on your body. If you put in a marathon day at work or decided to hit the town because you had the extra time from not working out, you’re not respecting the rest day. If you’re increasing your time sitting at the computer or on social media, you’re simply trading the physical stress of that day’s workout for emotional stress. On your next scheduled rest day, take it next level and legit relax by minimizing other emotional and physical stresses within your control. If you’re the type that can’t wrap your head around how doing nothing can make you fitter, take an active approach

to your day off. Take the block of time you would normally run or workout and schedule a massage or check out a vinyasa yoga class that focuses on stretching. Wear compression socks to work and drink water like it’s going out of style. If you’re competitive, show the world how you can be the best at taking a rest day (I see you, @restdaybrags). We ask so much from our bodies and if you expect yours to keep answering the call to go faster and longer, be sure you’re listening to what your body is telling you. Go hard when it’s time to go hard. Go easy when it’s time to go easy. And when something feels a little off or you’re exhausted or you’re simply preparing yourself to add workload the following week, take the rest day. And when you do, brag about it.

65% 5%

The average boost of speed increased when athletes got an extra two hours of sleep. https://www. sleep.org/ articles/howsleep-affectsathletes

The average number of all runners who are injured in a given year due to a lack of rest. http:// chaserunners. com/commoninjuriesmarathonrunners

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

75% The average number of Americans that are chronically dehydrated. Although many people drink about eight servings of hydrating beverages a day, this is typically offset by the amount of caffeinated beverages, alcohol and high sodium diets. Survey of 3003 Americans, Nutrition Information Center, New York HospitalCornell Medical Center 19


20

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


runningfromthehip by DAVID JENNINGS, PT, DPT, SCS, CMTPT, ATC

R

unning is a complex movement that is made to look simple. Trying to get from point A to point B fast by putting one foot in front of the other while not falling down or getting hurt sounds simple enough, right? In reality, the running movement requires strength, power development, appropriate stabilization, and precise timing of muscular contractions through the entire body; not just the legs. For me, as a sports physical therapist, everything relates back to the pelvis and hips. If we focus the majority of our effort in this region, everything else becomes easier and more effective. In my opinion, the hip is the most important joint in running. The hip is a strong and stable joint that can produce more power than any other joint in the body. This power comes from the gluteal muscles and hip flexors that work primarily at the hip joint. They are aided in power production by the quadriceps and hamstrings that partially attach to the pelvis or femur. Each step taken during running places up to 3x your body weight on each leg, so that leg needs to be strong. In order for the hip muscles to exert their force, they need a solid frame to work from. That’s why put so much emphasis on “having a strong core.” The “core” includes the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hips. The hips and core are interdependent when it comes to running but today we are just focusing solely on the hip. During optimal running, there is 15-20 degrees of hip extension (knee

3x

The amount of pressure your body weight places on each leg while running.

22

behind the hip joint) when the foot leaves the ground. This is important as it lengthens the stride allowing the powerful gluteal muscles to help propel the body forward, stores elastic energy in the front of the hip to be used during the swing through phase of the leg, and maximizes the push-off from the ankle muscles. Some of the most common compensations I see with limited hip extension are excessive lumbar lordosis, forward lean, or overstriding. Over-striding (the foot too far in front of the body) promotes hamstring dominance during the stance phase. The hamstrings aren’t as powerful as the gluteal muscles, are less efficient, and don’t help you run as fast. Over-striding will also only accentuate the deceleration force placed upon the body with each foot contact and rob you of speed or cause you to work harder to hold speed. We not only need to look at front to back motions but also rotation at the hip. Healthcare and fitness professionals are notorious for saying, “keep your knees out” while doing exercises, but during running there is a normal amount of rotation. When the foot hits the ground, approximately 12-15 degrees of hip internal rotation is normal. Problems will arise when this rotation happens uncontrolled though. “Knocked knees” during running or the medical termed “valgus” can lead to several different injuries in the lower extremities such as hip bursitis, knee IT Band tendinopathy, patellofemoral pain syndrome, posterior tibialis tendionpathy, and plantar fascia pain, among others. Contrary to popular belief the “knocked knees” position is not a result of weak hip abductors, but actually due to weakness of the gluteus maximus. The gluteus maximus attaches to the femur laterally and at the knee via the IT Band. It is very powerful muscle. It will not only prevent excessive hip rotation but forward pitching of the

trunk. If the gluteus maximus is not firing properly, its effects are seen throughout the gait cycle. That is why it is one of the most important muscle in running. At the hip, the most common issues are hip flexor tightness and gluteal power dysfunction. Hip flexor tightness will restrict hip extension and produce excessive lumbar extension, which is evident at toe off. Gluteal weakness will limit the explosiveness developed with each step and reduce your speed. Additionally weakness will lead to issues controlling the forward pitch of your trunk, and rotation of the hip as you land during each step. These two things will deprive you of speed, efficiency, and possibly set you up for injuries in other body parts. These issues can be addressed easily with corrective exercises, but first we need to find the stiff or weak link in the chain. Here are a few selfassessments I look at with runners I work with every day.

SELF ASSESSMENT Hip extension mobility

Hip Flexor Length: Lie down on your back with one knee to chest and the other leg straight out. If you can keep your back flat against the floor with your leg fully extended, your hip flexor length is OK. If your back arches up or you can’t keep your leg out without pain, you should stretch your hip flexor and reassess. Quad Length: Lie on your stomach and bring your heel toward your buttocks. If you can get your heel within 6 inches of your buttock, your quad length checks-out. If this is uncomfortable, or your back extends (arches), try stretching your quads.

Active Movement

I like to assess dynamic mobility via the split squat. A proper split squat requires the front knee to stay directly over the ankle, back hip stays in at least a neutral or hip extended N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


position, with the trunk upright. Some common compensations would be the front knee coming too far forward of the foot, the back hip staying in a flexed position, or the trunk pitching forward. If this is a difficult position for you, try stretching your quads and hip flexors and limiting the depth of the squat. Hip Extension Strength Single Leg Hip Bridge: Perform a bridge with feet flat on the floor, then straighten one knee and try to hold your pelvis level. A glass of water placed on the stomach wouldn’t fall off. If you can’t do this and hold for 10s, work on these hip extension exercises and use this as a progress check. Hip Abduction Strength Side Plank: Lie on your side with your shoulders, hips and feet in a straight line. Keep your hips stacked. Rise up into a side plank from the elbow. From this position, try lifting the top leg and hold the straight line. If the trunk

fitness+exercise rotates, the leg moves forward, or you can’t hold for 10s, work on the hip abduction strengthening exercises and use this as a progress check. Hip Rotation Motor Control Lie on your side, flex your hips and knees so your hips are at a 30 degree angle forward, and knees are at 90 degrees. Feet will be in line with your trunk. Keep your hips stacked. Open up your top knee, keep your hips stacked, and feet together. If you can’t get the knee up to 45 degrees above the horizontal, use this movement as an exercise (Clamshell).

CORRECTIVE EXERCISES Hip Extension: Prone Hip Extension

Hip extension: Hip Bridge

Lay on your back with both feet flat on the ground, knees bent. Squeeze your gluteals and raise your hips off the ground to the point where your knees, hips, and shoulders form a straight line. Don’t overarch the back; feel the gluteal muscles performing the movement, not the hamstrings.

Hip Extension: Hip Thrust

This is a similar position to the hip bridge but your shoulders will be placed on a bench to allow you to move through a wider range of hip motion. The ending position for this exercise is the knees at 90 degrees, with the knees, hips and shoulders forming a “table top”.

Split Squat

Stand with the feet split, R foot in front and L foot behind the body. Focus on letting your body drop straight down. The R knee should stay directly above the R ankle and the L knee should be at least directly below the L hip. If this is difficult, limit the depth of the movement.

Hip Flexor Stretch Kneel on R knee with the L foot placed out front, L knee at a 90 degree angle. Think about “tucking your tail” which will rotate the pelvis under, shift your hips forward so you feel the stretch in the front of your R hip. You can deepen the stretch by raising the R arm up over your head.

This exercise can be performed lying face down on the ground or on an exercise ball. In this face down position, bend the knee to isolate the gluteals, raise up the leg and focus on extending from the hip. Don’t arch the lower back and squeeze the gluteal muscles to produce this motion.

Deadlift

Stand with feet shoulder width apart, knees slightly bent. Keep the back flat and bend forward from the hips. Through the descent don’t let the back arch or round, squeeze the gluteal muscles on the way back up to standing. This can be performed with a stick on your back, a kettlebell, barbell, or any other weight. The movement is the same no matter than hand position.

Single Leg RDL

Standing on the L leg with a slight knee bend, bend forward from the hips while keeping the R leg in line with the trunk. Don’t let the lower back arch or round. Try reaching straight down without bending the knee. Only go as far as can be controlled. This is my favorite exercise to prescribe to runners. It works the body across all 3 dimensions of motion. This versatile exercise can also be performed with a weight in the R hand, a cable column row, or even with a barbell.

Cronin B, Johnson ST, Change E, Pollard CD, Norcross MF. Greater hip extension strength but not hip abduction explosive strength is associated with lesser hip adduction and knee valgus motion during a single-leg jump-cut. Orthop J Sports Med. 2016;4(4):1-8. Dicharry J. Clinical examination of the runner: Assessment, testing, gait correlations, and corrections. Video Presentation: Medbridge.com. Accessed November 22, 2017. Dicharry, J. (2018). Running Rewired. Boulder: VeloPress. Macadam P, Cronin J, Contreras B. An examination of the gluteal muscle activity associated with dynamic hip abduction and hip external rotation exercise: a systematic review. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015;10(5):573-591. Taylor-Hass J, Hugentobler JA, Dicesare CA, Hickey Lucas KC, Bates NA, Myer GD, Ford KR. Reduced hip strength is associated with increased hip motion during running in young adult and adolescent male long-distance runners. Int J Sports Phys Ther. 2015;9(4):456-467. Willy RW, Davis IS. The effect of a hip-strengthening program on mechanics during running and during a single-leg squat. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther. 2011;41(9):625-632

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

23


food +nutrition Tahini is a condiment made from hulled sesame seeds that have been used for thousands of years in the Middle East and parts of the Mediterranean. Studies have shown Tahini can aid heart and bone health along with providing a good source of healthy fats and amino acids. These recipes feature tahini in three diversified ways. From the classic and traditional hummus recipe to newer and innovative ideas that add this ingredient to your favorite sauces and desserts.

TAHINI

3WAYS

by HOLLY DARNELL

Creamy Roasted Garlic Hummus (GF, DF)

Servings: 12 servings Prep + Cook Time: 50 minutes Ingredients 2 heads garlic 2 (15 oz) cans chickpeas, drained ⅓ cup tahini ⅓ cup lemon juice ½ tsp cumin ½ tsp paprika ¼ cup water or reserved chickpea liquid 1 tsp salt Directions 1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 2) Remove the loose, papery skin from the garlic heads, but keep cloves intact. 3) Place the garlic cloves in a piece of foil, lightly drizzle with olive oil, and close the foil up. 4) Bake in the oven for 40-45

24

minutes, or until garlic is very soft. Remove from the oven, let cool and then peel. 5) In the bowl of a food processor or blender, place the roasted garlic, chickpeas, tahini, lemon juice, cumin, paprika. Add the water or reserved chickpea liquid and blend until smooth. Add a little more water as needed, until you achieve your desired smooth texture. Taste and adjust for salt and spices. 6) Place the hummus in a bowl and serve with assorted vegetables, gluten-free crackers, or pita bread. You can top with extra olive oil, paprika, or parsley. *Recipe note: If you are pressed for time, you can use 2 heads minced garlic and omit the roasting step. This will change the flavor of the hummus slightly, but it will still be delicious.

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


Maple Tahini Vinaigrette (GF, DF, V)

Servings: 4 Cook + Prep Time: 5 minutes Ingredients â…“ cup tahini 2 Tbs maple syrup 2 Tbs lemon juice 2 Tbs dijon mustard water to thin to desired consistency

Directions 1) Mix together all ingredients in a small bowl or mason jar. 2) Start mixing with 2 Tbs water to thin out until desired consistency is reached. 3) Serve with your favorite salad and enjoy! *Recipe note: Dressing keeps for up to 2 weeks when covered and stored in the refrigerator.

Baked Chocolate Tahini Donuts with Coconut Milk Ganache (GF, DF)

Servings: 6 regular donuts or 12 mini Prep + Cook Time: 45 minutes Ingredients 1 1/4 cups King Arthur Gluten Free Flour Blend 2 Tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder 1 1/4 tsp baking powder 1/4 c + 3 Tbsp coconut sugar 1/3 cup chocolate tahini or regular tahini

3 Tsp melted ghee or coconut oil 1 egg 1/2 tsp vanilla extract 1/2 cup almond milk (or any other nut milk of choice) Coconut Milk Ganache 10 oz dairy free chocolate chips 2/3 cup coconut cream Optional toppings: cacao nibs, sprinkles, nuts, etc Directions 1) Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Mix dry ingredients in a large mixing bowl. Add in wet ingredients and mix until smooth. 2) Spray donut pan with coconut oil spray. 3) Spoon in batter until 3/4 of the way full. Bake for 7-9 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean and let cool. 4) Make the ganache while the donuts are cooling. Place the chocolate in a heatproof bowl and set aside. 5) Pour the coconut cream into another heatproof bowl. Microwave on high for 30-second increments until fully melted. 6) Pour the cream over the chocolate and stir until it completely melts. Stir until completely smooth. 7) Line parchment paper on a flat surface, dip donuts into the chocolate and lay on the parchment to dry. 8) Top with toppings of choice (nuts, sprinkles, cacao nibs, etc) and enjoy.

The flavor takes on a mildly nutty, creamy and savory taste, similar to nut butter. Add it to smoothies or use as a sauce for stir-fry noodles and vegetables. Swirl it into cakes or bake it into donuts or cookies. Use it as a simple spread over toast with honey or add it into your favorite frozen dessert or ice cream recipe. M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

25


food +nutrition

EATING FOR

FUEL by ANA REISDORF

Food is fuel for our workouts and our every day life. Eating right can have a significant impact on every thing from our mood to how we look to our strength. Use food to stay strong and healthy and you will always be one step ahead of your training plan.

S

o maybe you’ve decided to challenge yourself and have recently signed up for an athletic event. Whether it is a marathon, triathlon, or another type of competition, you are ready to get moving and start your training. It is easy to find multiple training plans online for almost any type of athletic event, but a lot of people don’t realize the major values and benefits of creating a nutrition plan. A solid nutrition plan leading up to the race and a plan for fueling and refueling on race day can make all the difference in your success. Sarah Schlichter, Registered Dietitian of The Bucket List Tummy states, “I find that people often put so much focus on their running plan, but not enough on their nutrition plan. It goes without saying to never go into a marathon or any other race without practicing your nutrition beforehand.” So, how can you maximize your nutrition during training to ensure your success?

26

NUTRITION

The first thing you want to do when training for any athletic event is to make sure you are eating enough to support the increase in activity. Sarah Gold Anzlovar, Registered Dietitian and owner of Sarah Gold Nutrition, recommends always eating a quick digesting carb about an hour before you start your workout. This could be a piece of fruit, toast, or a granola bar. The important thing is to give your body something to use for energy. Then you will want to eat a balanced meal that includes carbs, protein, and healthy fats within an hour after your workout to prevent you from getting ‘rungry’ (runner’s hungry) and to help with recovery. A few examples would be salmon with a baked potato or a turkey sandwich with avocado. In the few weeks before the event, Jaymar Saniatan, Registered Dietitian of Nutrition Phitness stresses the importance of starting

to increase your carbohydrates a little at a time. She states, “properly carb loading will have the greatest impact on your endurance performance.” She suggests starting to experiment with carb-loading at least five weeks before your event to see how your body and your performance react to the change in your diet. Slowly add in a few more servings of high carb foods like an extra piece of bread or an additional serving of rice in order to help your body begin storing carbs for energy on race day. In the five days before the event, aim at least 4.25 grams of carbohydrate for every pound of body weight or make 80 percent of your calories come from high carb foods. So, let’s say you weigh 150 pounds, you will need to eat around 638 grams of carbs in the few days leading up to race day. This will mean eating carb-dense foods like pasta, bread, cereals, and rice at every meal. Real food works great, but you can also try specialized gels, gummies, or bars to help get in some extra N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


carbs. These types of products are not necessary, but are convenient, especially on the go.

HYDRATION

Staying properly hydrated is easy to forget about, but targeted hydration is one of the most important factors in making sure you are successful during training and on race day. Dehydration can significantly impact performance. About 2-3 hours before you start training, drink at least 16 ounces of water and then 15 minutes before drink 8 ounces. During your workout, aim to take in about 4 ounces every 20 minutes or more if you are exercising outside in the heat. It is important to hydrate after also. Aim to replenish with 16 ounces of water for every pound you might have lost during your workout. Amanda Hibshman, Registered Dietitian, says hydration is not just about water, it is also about the right balance of electrolytes. She says, “while we normally think to limit salt in our foods, the sodium actually helps to retain the water you drink, instead of having it go right through you (which is the last thing you want during a long run). So make sure you are getting enough electrolytes during your long runs.” Alternating water with sports drinks may help you find the balance between adequate hydration and getting enough electrolytes.

SUPPLEMENTS

Supplements can also help support your training efforts. Here are a few that you may want to consider due to their ability to lower inflammation and increase performance. Beetroot A study found that beetroot powder before exercise makes high-intensity exercise feel easier, allowing subjects to workout 14 percent longer. Beets help increase levels of nitric oxide in the body so you are able to use oxygen more efficiently. Add beetroot powder to your preworkout smoothie, have some beet juice prior to training, or even

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

munch on freeze-dried beets. Omega-3 Fats Exercise increases inflammation and during training, you will need something to help keep it at bay. Omega-3 fats are ideal for helping to lower inflammation levels, reduce soreness, and speed up recovery. When choosing an omega-3, consider a supplement made from algae instead of fish. It will likely be less contaminated with mercury and other heavy metals and will be more concentrated in omega-3 fats. Caffeine Caffeine has been shown to boost exercise performance. But the response is dose-related, meaning there is a balance between it helping your performance and making you feel jittery and anxious. The response to caffeine seems to be personalized and based on the individual, so you need to experiment a bit to find the right dose for you. For most people, a cup of coffee about an hour before training is probably enough to give them a performance boost.

FOR RACE DAY

You have been training for months and you are totally ready for race day! Is your nutrition plan ready? Schlichter recommends trying different brands of gels, gummies, dried fruit, or other fast-acting carbohydrates before race day and having a nutrition and hydration plan ready in advance. She states, “Looking at the course ahead of time will tell you what products they’ll have available, (important to know if those work for you, otherwise you’ll want to bring your own options) and where the water stations are.” With a little bit of preparation and a solid training and nutrition plan in place, you can make race day a success by fueling with the right nutritional diet.

14

%

The amount of time subjects were able to work out longer after supplementing with beetroot

27


nfl draft preview by RYAN FREEBING The pick is in. For the first time ever, Nashville has been chosen to host the 2019 National Football League Draft. This upcoming spectacle will be a one of a kind event and resemble a dowtown music festival as much as any die-hard football fan’s ultimate dream. Around-theclock live musical performances and events will transform Broadway and Nissan Stadium into an outdoor sports festival for the ages. The draft will primarily take place on April 25-27 at the end of lower Broadway near the Cumberland River. “An enormous stage will be constructed at the intersection of First Avenue and Broadway where players will emerge to hug Commissioner Roger Goodell and pose for photos after they are drafted,” reports the Tennessean. Over the years, the NFL Draft has evolved from a two-night television broadcast inside a relatively small New York theater, to a multi-day expo-like extravaganza attracting around 30,000 tourists and fans and a combined 45 million television and online viewers across multiple networks. Here's everything you need to know before this soon-to-be epic event.

When is the event? April 25-27

Where will it be?

The draft will be spread out across multiple venues in downtown Nashville, but most events will be on lower Broadway and Nissan Stadium.

28

How can I watch the event?

In Nashville, fans can attend the entire event free of charge and watch on a first-come, first-serve basis. Space will be limited. Large viewing screens will be arranged all along lower Broadway. President and CEO of the Nashville Convention and Visitors Corp Butch Spyridon has high expectations and is expecting a crowd of over 100,000 fans to join the event. If you prefer to watch from home though, the NFL Draft will be simultaneously broadcasted on ABC, ESPN and the NFL Network.

What are the other event sites?

On the east bank of the Cumberland River adjacent to Nissan Stadium, the NFL will also set up a draft village called the NFL Draft Experience with a plethora of interactive games, food trucks, and more live music. Just like Broadway, the draft village is available to everyone for free. "I can't say this enough,” stated Spyridon, “Everything is free and open to the public." While honky-tonks will be rocking with pre and post-show entertainment, the event will also feature two stages with live music located on each side of the river. Names of the artists who will perform during the draft, including performances during the television broadcasts, have not been released, but Spyridon said the lineup will include “A-list acts and cover multiple genres to highlight all the best Nashville has to offer,” the Tennessean reports.

What is the NFL Draft Experience?

The NFL Draft Experience is a free, three-day festival where football fans can gather and enjoy games, interactive exhibits, virtual reality experiences, and more. No tickets are required for entry. The area will include an autograph stage with current players and legends, interactive games, football clinics and a Play 60 Zone for small fans. The Lombardi Trophy will also be on display for photographs too.

Why is this a big deal?

Simply stated by Nashville Mayor David Briley, “The NFL Draft will be one of the biggest sports events in the history of Tennessee - another great opportunity for Nashville to welcome the world and show fans, players and media what we’re all about.” Nashville beat out virtually every other NFL city for the right to host this event and it will put Nashville on display for millions of people during one of the biggest entertainment events Nashville has ever seen. From 1964 to 2014, the NFL Draft has been exclusively hosted in New York City. In 2015 and 2016, Chicago hosted the event, its eight and ninth time to host the event. Philadelphia hosted for the 13th time in 2017, and Arlington, Texas, hosted this past year. It was the first time the event was held in a football stadium and Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones didn’t disappoint. On top of that, Nashville has been putting its name in the hat to host the draft for nearly a decade.

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


How does this affect me?

Die-hard football fans can expect to be showered with a bewildering show, one they will remember for a lifetime. Unrelated to football, if you’re not a fan of the NFL, you might be affected by the traffic. The St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Nashville Marathon is scheduled for the same weekend, April 25-28. The Saturday morning race itself will end at Nissan Stadium, as it has in the past.

To top it off, if the Predators advance to the second round in the Stanley Cup playoffs (Go Preds), there will no doubt be a game scheduled around that time as well. So odds are the streets of Nashville will be flooded with locals and tourists alike. If you’ll be out during this weekend, plan ahead and expect road closures in the area.

A Bridgestone Arena Jimmy Buffett concert on Saturday night will bring even more fans to the downtown area.

Sources: Organ, Mike. (2018, Nov. 28) NFL draft, Nashville marathon planners coordinate two gigantic events happening at same time. https://www.tennessean.com/story/ sports/nfl/titans/2018/11/28/nfl-draft-2019-date-nashville-marathon-abc-espn-collegegameday/2118960002. Kennedy, Eleanor. (2019, Feb. 4) Scouting report: What to expect when the NFL descends on Nashville. https://www.bizjournals.com/nashville/news/2019/02/04/scouting-report-what-to-expect-when-the-nfl.html. Rau, Nate. (2019, Jan. 30) First look: Music and football will transform Lower Broadway, Nissan Stadium into NFL Draft spectacle. https:// www.tennessean.com/story/sports/nfl/draft2019/2019/01/30/nfl-draft-2019-nashville-broadway-nissan-stadium-experience/2705852002.`

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

29


people+lifestyle

NEW

New gyms, stores, restaurants and more, all with the fitness fanatic in mind.

in NASH Clean Juice Five Points

962 Woodland St, Nashville, TN 37206 cleanjuice.com/locations/five-points East Nashville, Clean Juice Five Points is the juice bar you have been waiting for! The entire Clean Juice brand revolves around the idea of making it easy for busy people to provide their bodies with the organic fuel it needs to thrive. Conveniently located in the Five Points area, their menu boasts fresh, healthy, and delicious juices, smoothies, and snacks. As a certified organic juice bar, they strive to provide the highest quality foods with ingredients including vegetables, fruits, superfoods, and more. They are a business dedicated to promoting a healthy way of life in our healthy and fitness community. Outside of East Nashville, you can find them at events all over the city. Stop by and enjoy a healthy treat that your body craves.

Triluna Wellness

trilunawellness.com Triluna is a wellness company dedicated to creating programs, events, and curriculums with the ability to transform you from the inside out. By combining their three core services - movement, cooking classes, and health coaching - Triluna creates comprehensive workshops that are as fun as they are transformative. Their team believes health should be accessible, sustainable, and tinged with a bit of magic. Whether you have a private party, a corporate retreat, or a community event, Triluna can help bring wellness straight to you. Founded by Elizabeth Moore and Ashley Brooke James, Triluna also conducts free yoga classes for the community. To learn more, visit trilunawellness.com or follow them on Instagram @triluna_wellness.

30

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


F45 Hendersonville

112 Saundersville Rd Suite C-316, Hendersonville, TN 37075 f45training.com/easthendersonville F45 is a fitness studio with a twist of technology. Their workouts are for any fitness level and any fitness experience in a group setting with a personal training feel. Their 45-minute functional workouts are designed to challenge you but not make you feel overwhelmed. They have over 3,500 different exercises in a state of the art technological system. And what's great about F45 is their components of each workout are interchangeable, so you will never repeat a workout. Every F45 location also has digital display screens for each movement so you never get lost in a workout. They also have a worldwide network of over 1,300 studios dedicated to providing world-class training and a fitness experience unlike any other. Team Training, Life Changing. F45 has training packages to fit any and all types of fitness goals. Contact them at easthendersonville@f45training.com or visit their website above.

Verticity West

2302 Elliston Place Nashville, TN 37203 verticitynashville.com You know them well for their dimly lit room full of passion, drive, inspiration and the notion that sweat is essential for a healthy body & a full life. VERTICITY’s communityfirst, full-body cycling style has been thriving in East Nashville for the past two years. Now, they’re ready to bring the high energy, spirit-stirring cardio party to the other side of town. The indoor cycling studio’s second location on Elliston Place opened earlier this year to double their class offerings and welcome more members into their family. The brand new buildout features 36 bikes in a dark, LED & candlelit room, where instructors are both motivational and inspirational. You'll better having been here—body & soul. If you’re willing to scream, cry, hoot, & holler as you sprint your way to a better understanding of self, VERTICITY is for you. If you’re looking for a pack, a tribe, or a family in Nashville, VERTICITY is for you. If you’re willing to show up, work hard, and push the limits of your mind and body, VERTICITY is for you. M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

31


CODE

100 Madison St, Suite #119, Nashville TN 37208 fortheother23.com CODE is the one hour workout designed to make the other 23 hours of your day better. Their first location just opened in Downtown Nashville within the LC Germantown neighborhood, and hosts group workouts in both the mornings and evenings during the week and on Saturday mornings. Their group fitness workouts combine strength training, cardio conditioning and flexibility exercises in a functional fitness format that challenges members both physically and mentally. Set in a supportive group atmosphere and led by professionally certified fitness coaches, the workouts utilize partner and group challenges that connect members to each other for an added push. The workouts focus on using the human body as the most important piece of equipment, and utilize other pieces like dumbbells, kettlebells, jump ropes and rowing machines to mix up the routine every day. Monthly memberships are available to take part in the group workout program, which hosts classes in both the mornings and evenings during the week and on Saturday mornings. The Coaches on the team are also available for 1-on-1 personal training and small group training by appointment. No matter what your goals, CODE is there to support you in overall physical, mental and social well-being.

Barbell Voodoo (Warehouse)

3710 John Lunn Rd, Spring Hill, TN 37174 barbell-voodoo.com One of your favorite apparel companies just got a new warehouse location! Barbell Voodoo has always been known for their over-the-top tanks and tees and bright colored booty shorts, and they just moved into a new warehouse location in the Spring Hill area. A regular in the functional fitness community, Barbell Voodoo has expanded it's apparel line to many other genres within the fitness industry. They sell everything from your standard tanks and tees to hats, socks, wrist wraps, lifting belts, sports bras, capris and much more. And they even have sizes for children too. If you need shirts or hoodies made with your logo on them, check out the Barbell Voodoo Private Label line. They'll customize any thing you see on the internet or help you craft your own look to stand out from the crowd, for a great price. The Barbell Voodoo podcast was also just named the #1 Best Local Podcast in Nashville recently too. Find the Barbell Voodoo tent at various fitness competitions across the Greater Nashville Area on the weekends or visit their online store to shop new products at barbell-voodoo.com. They just released a Louis "VooDoo" booty short. Check them out!

32

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


Trumav Fitness

603 9th Ave. South, Nashville, TN 37203 trumavfitness.com Tim McGraw’s personal fitness transformation lies at the heart of TRUMAV, a health and fitness brand designed to reflect the straightforward, independent style he brings to all his projects, music and otherwise. Using his own passion for fitness and a team of experts in the field, McGraw worked with Snap Fitness to design TRUMAV Fitness signature clubs. TRUMAV Fitness is unique in that it will provide instructional exercise classes and a personal boutique fitness space. At the new Nashville-based flagship, members can work out on their own, with a trainer, or in a group class setting. TRUMAV features custom equipment and programs based on Snap Fitness’s 15-year fitness expertise and Tim McGraw’s personal workout routines. TRUFIT and TRUPOWER are the club’s signature boot camp-style workouts, delivering full body results with a standalone group training experience that focuses on heart rate training through wearable technology. TRUFIT is the standard high energy 45-minute workout and is designed to increase metabolic rate post workout helping clients continue to burn calories throughout the day. TRUPOWER is an elite level workout that TRUMAVs can test into, lasting 35 minutes and following a variety of military-based fitness challenges that are completed as a team.

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

33


HEIDI NEWFIELD by LINDSAY MILLER photos by SAM CARBINE

Y

ou might know Heidi Newfield as the lead singer, rhythm guitarist, and harmonica player for the group Trick Pony, alongside Keith Burns and Ira Dean from 1996 until 2006. Heidi pursued a solo career and debuted in 2008 with the single, "Johnny & June," but she is currently working on her most diversified album to date. Her petite stature and endless energy are only small references to her vibrant personality. She has made health and wellness a priority in life despite her busy schedule, largely due to the dedication and determination she has practiced for years to perfect her career and reputation in the music industry.

Q +A

Q. What was it like deciding to pursue music and moving to Nashville? A. Since my first memories, I was always a singer. I stepped in front of a big audience when I was 6 years old and sang “Delta Dawn” in front of 300 people - that was the end to my personal search for passion. I went back and forth to Nashville starting at the age of 13. It was a natural transition. I don’t ever remember a time in my life when country music wasn’t a dream of mine. Q. What has been your go-to source for fitness? A. I like it all! Even though I hate leg and butt day while it's happening, I feel better after doing it. But I truly love a combination of things. I love the way my body responds to weights. I’m not a big runner, but I would like to be. At some point, a goal of mine is to run a marathon.

34

Q. What has fitness taught you about yourself and your career? A. I think the key to everything I’ve learned is finding a balance. No matter who you are or what you do, you still have to do life. Enjoy your food and drinks and also be an adult. I’m not a fanatic about fitness, but I’ve learned that I naturally handle everything better when I move and sweat. I’ve learned to not punish myself for enjoying special moments. Having an active family has influenced that. Even though I get home and want to rest and relax, we’ll go for hikes or horseback rides together.

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


TRAINING WITH THE STARS Q. What is your overall outlook on living a healthy lifestyle? A. For myself and the everyday person, it's just about the idea of living my best life. My schedule involves a lot of travel, which means I am in cities where they tend to have “the best of something” and I don’t want to restrict myself and end up missing an experience or making a memory. Regularly, I eat a healthier diet and try to move my body, but I make a point to not punish myself because of choices. That creates balance for me and it helps me stick to my goals. Q. What's the first thing you eat or drink in the morning? A. My fiance is the sweetest and makes me tea in the morning. He puts it by the bed. It’s a black breakfast tea with vanilla, soy milk, and honey. After that, it's usually oatmeal for complex carbs and fuel in the morning. Q. What is your favorite song to cover or wish you could cover? A. The list of songs I wish I could cover is endless! Right now I’m loving Brandi Carlile, Ashley McBryde, Kacey Musgraves, and Caitlyn Smith. I’m a big fan of the classics as well though. The current record I'm working on is the most electric thing and also the most soulful country music I've ever done. Q. Any embarrassing moments on stage? A. So many of them! If you haven’t fallen hard on stage or had a full-on wardrobe malfunction, you haven't been on stage long enough, because trust me, it will happen. I’ve been shocked by mics. I ripped my jeans before going on stage in Vegas - ripped them right under both butt cheeks. I broke my tooth in half on a harmonica mic in Canada. I felt it pop off and I just watched it bounce around the stage. It was 3 days before I could get it fixed. Once, while on tour with Brooks & Dunn and ZZ Top, I went to grab my harmonica mic, and the toe of my boot caught one of the cables and I made the mistake of trying to catch myself. The whole crowd sort of went, “Oh! Oh! Oohh…”

Q. Do you have any aspect of your body or personality that you’re self-conscious about? How has health and wellness helped you combat that? A. Absolutely, I’m human. I’m always trying to work on getting a bigger booty, so tons of squats or some version of that. However, the older I get, the more comfortable I am in my skin. The best feeling is when you are at a place in life where you can set goals, obtain those goals, and be okay with changes like aging. In my 30’s, I made my looks a bigger deal than they should have been. I guilted myself over small details. Everyone deals with that. Now, instead of picking things apart, I feel blessed to be able to do each and every little thing that I love. I lost my mother and father far too young. Losing them makes me feel like I have to take it upon myself to live my life out loud. Because I don’t have them to go to anymore, I feel as though I am doing things for those that can’t or for those that no longer have the chance. I’m just grateful for a healthy perspective and it keeps moving forward, rather than lingering with self-doubts. Q. After-show snack? A. I always have turkey jerky, fruit, or nibble on leftovers. After a show is my time to unwind and I’m usually not hungry. That is probably my biggest issue. I'm still wired, or I’m doing signings, or I’m wanting to change back into my sweats. When I’m finally settled into the hotel room, I’m starving at 2 am. So what do you eat at 2 am? I’m not ashamed to say I have pulled over the bus a time a two for Taco Bell. Q. What is the weirdest thing you’ve ever eaten? A. There was one time my sister ran over a rattlesnake while we were driving home. She threw it in the back of the truck and skinned and broiled it. It was not good. Q. Favorite place to eat in Nashville? A. Lately, my go-to place has been the Barcelona Wine Bar. One of my favorite trips I've ever taken was to Spain, so I like how you can have fun with your food and try different things. There is such a plethora of places in Nashville. I’m always trying to find time to try new ones.

Q. How about the most embarrassing moment at the gym? A. I haven’t fallen on a treadmill yet, but I took my first spin class at the Green Hills YCMA. I never asked what level the class was, but I’m pretty sure it was full-on advanced. I got off the bike, walked towards the stairs, felt a little dizzy and just puked all over the stairs. I had all these strangers patting me on the back like, “Yeah girl, let it out.” Q. What movements do you dread from your trainers? A. My least favorite thing is working my butt and legs. But also, when the weather gets cold and we have surpassed the holidays and all the food and drinks, I’m used to laying around and watching football. It's a tougher time to get motivated. It is difficult to jump back into those movements after my hibernation, especially when I know I’ll be sore.

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

35


WALKER

HAYES

by LINDSAY MILLER photos by PRESTON LEATHERMAN

W

alker Hayes wears his emotions on his sleeves. In case you haven't heard his popular lyrics from songs like "You Broke Up with Me,” and his latest hit, “90’s Country,” he's an open book on more topics than music. His honesty and determination are genuine and refreshing in a sometimes brutal industry laid in the heart of Music City. Growing up, Walker excelled as a runner but also participated in school sports like track and field, cross country, soccer, basketball, and says he dabbled in football and baseball. He remembers working out and running as something he routinely did, however, he admits as the years went by, it became less and less of a priority. He had fallen off the routine of fitness and it was then that alcohol became more routine than anything else. Today, he admittedly says he traded his addiction for a much healthier one. And as a father to six children with his wife Laney, his prouder moments lean more towards the choices and actions he is passing down to his family. He often shares his time at the gym with his daughter these days, but for no reason other than the fact that fitness makes us feel better. His message is simple but profound - when your body feels good, you should whole-heartedly enjoy it.

36

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


QA +

TRAINING WITH THE STARS Q. How long as you lived in Nashville? A. I’ve been living in Franklin for 15 years now. Q. Usual place to workout? A. Planet Fitness

Q. What prompted you to become sober? A. A few years ago, I was working at Costco the majority of the day, writing as much as I could and then I'd play shows in the evenings. I was able to admit I had a problem, but I was afraid of not being able to function sober like I did when I was drunk. Physically, my body had never been more tired. One day in October 2015 I just woke up on a Saturday, went to work and I thought, ‘If I do this one more day, my body is going to just turn off. It couldn't take it anymore.’ I was drinking half a case or more a day. After not drinking for only one day, my body immediately felt better. One day turned into two and then a week and that sober high disappeared and I clearly could see who I was and who I had been and I didn’t want to go backwards. I realized how much time I had spent in the bars, so I channeled it into time at the gym instead. Q. How did sobriety lead you to fitness? A. It was a natural transition. Fitness is like a church to me. I am a different human when I have those endorphins. I’m sensitive to whatever that provides me. I quickly became addicted to it. Looking back, early on, whatever it was that working out created in me, was addictive, but it was a healthy addiction. That time alone to think is something I enjoy and something I need. Q. What’s your go-to workout song? A. Honestly, I don’t listen to music much at the gym. Maybe it's a runner's mentality but without distractions I can see clearly and acknowledge the journey. I like to focus on testing my body to the limit. Q. Any embarrassing moments in the gym? A. I always crack my shins on the benches and try to act like no one saw it. I’ve also set off the “lunk alarm” before at Planet Fitness because I dropped the weights.

there was no coming back from that. I finally had to back away and just play the next song. Q. Favorite restaurant in Nashville? A. Sushi is one of my favorite foods, for sure! Miso in Franklin is our regular spot. Q. Favorite home cooked meal? A. We usually have Banana or Pumpkin Bread in the house. Q. Any tour snacks? A. Cereal is my after-show snack, but I also like these Complete Cookies. We’ll go to Waffle House while we’re on the road, but if I want something healthier we like to look for local smoothie or juice bars. Q. Favorite type of workout? A. Surprisingly, I rarely run these days. I really like upperbody workouts. Q. Do you use any supplements? A. I’ll drink Fairlife products (ultra-filtered, lactose-free protein shake). If I’m being good and have the midnight hunger I’ll have a TERA’s Whey shake. They are delicious. Q. Best workout gear? A. I own zero cold weather items. Not even gloves. I really love Jogger Sweats and these shoes that are velcro cross trainers called Lebron James Soldiers. Q. Salt or sugar cravings? A. I always dip Wendy’s fries in a frosty. One makes me want the other! So I guess that means both. Q. Boxers or briefs? A. Boxer-briefs guy. Both again! Q. Favorite sports teams? A. Oh, I’m an Alabama fan! But I also like the UNC Tarheels. Q. Cowboy hat or Ballcap? A. Ballcaps. Q. Would you rather run in the cold or in the heat? A. The heat! I’d rather run a mile and sweat than burn my lungs in the cold air.

Q. Any embarrassing moments on stage? A. Yes! I sang half a show with my zipper down once. The girls on the front row kept pointing and laughing and I thought they were loving the show and just having a good time until my drummer was like, “Naw, it's your fly.” Another time I was opening for Eli Young Band and a little girl was sitting on the front row with her arms crossed. I really thought, ‘I’m on fire tonight,’ and I thought I’d try and make this little girl’s day. So through the microphone, I said something about the little girl being “the prettiest little girl in the room” and the mom went stone cold. She said, “He’s a boy!” Then I kept trying to comfort the kid and make him feel better by saying I had long hair when I was young too, but M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

37


TRAINING WITH THE STARS

this realization that I didn’t look as good as I thought I did. Q. Are you competitive? A. Yes! I am and I truly get it from my father. Q. Did you play any sports as a kid? A. My Dad played football in college so I was raised on that sport. But I played lacrosse in high school and then later into college.

Q +A

Q. What has made the biggest difference in your health? A. Diet.

Q. Did anything trigger that change? A. I’ve always worked out and I love being active, but gaining the weight at 21 and going on stage meant I started seeing pictures of myself afterward. I sort of had

Q. What is your connection with a healthy lifestyle and what is your connection with music? Are there any similarities? A. Absolutely. It is important as a songwriter to be regimented. I go to the gym and then go to the studio and write a song. My fitness routine is in sync with my music because the healthier I feel the more creative I am. There is clarity in my life when I am eating healthy and not binging on the road. So it translates to when we travel because I know how to make better choices in general. It creates a routine, instills hard work, and keeps me awake. A lot of times songwriting can be like flexing a muscle it’s daily - and the ability to write a song is like the ability to turn something on. Constantly having a regimen and getting to the gym is a way of controlling my life when other things might be out of control. So it has created good habits for me. The music business is uncertain and you don’t always know where you are going to be because of schedule changes. Often times, people tell you, “no” or that they don’t like your music. So feeling good about yourself and having confidence helps combat that. I can’t control what people say or do, but I can control my outlook and how I feel about myself. Q. Any embarrassing moments on stage? A. Oh yes, in Birmingham, I turned around to take a selfie with the whole crowd and I ripped the seat of my jeans, like the whole thing, but luckily I had on black boxers because I couldn't change during the show. I had to wear them like that the rest of the time I was on stage.

38

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


LEVIHUMMON

by LINDSAY MILLER photos by SAM CARBINE

Q. Any embarrassing moments at the gym? A. Well, it was more scary than embarrassing, but we were doing push jerks and I was trying to keep up with some of the strongest guys in the gym. I went to put 225 pounds over my head and dropped it on the back of my neck. I was terrified and thought I might be paralyzed because I couldn’t pick up my phone, but I ended up being fine. Just sore the next few days. Q. What is a workout you want to try but haven’t yet? A. I would really love to try a hardcore boxing class. Like in a grungy, dirty gym. Maybe with Sylvester Stallone. Q. Do you have any superstitions? A. If a light goes out around me, like a street light for example, I will cross my heart three times. I think I saw it on that old MTV show, “Real Life: OCD,” or something similar and it just always stuck with me. Q. Why is your health so important to you at this age? A. When I first got my publishing deal I was 21 years old and I had put on some beer weight. I remember just feeling like I was a little unhealthy. The moment fitness came into my life, I just felt better. I felt more confident in general but even more so when I got on stage. Q. Dream vacation? A. Japan. I’d like to experience some real, authentic sushi. Or China, because I want to see a panda in the wild.

Q. Salt or Sugar? A. Salt. Q. Supplements? A. Just Whey Protein. Q. The most important thing you’ve learned from your trainer? A. A lot of wisdom from my trainer, Jeff Waller, has been about mobility and hip engagement. Q. Wine or whiskey? A. Lately, it’s been red wine because I don’t like it that much. That way I will drink less of it. Up until now, it had always been whiskey though. Q. The hardest workout you’ve ever done? A. The workouts at Iron Tribe about a year ago were really hard. We did one that was 5 rounds for time. 800-meter run, 5 muscle-ups and 12 deadlifts. Q. TV show you can't stop watching? A. Vikings. Q. Guilty pleasure? A. Spicy Chick-fil-A biscuits, Game of Thrones, Fudge Ice-cream, Peanut M&Ms, Corona, and I actually listen to Justin Beiber at the gym.

Q. Sandwiches or wraps? A. Wraps. I’m actually not a big fan of bread. Q. College food you use to binge on? A. Carrots and ranch. Totino's Pizza Rolls. I couldn’t afford anything else in college. Q. Current food you binge on? A. Thai Curry. I’ve been cooking my own lately with low-fat coconut milk and cauliflower gnocchi. Q. Favorite Restaurant in Nashville? A. Urban Grubb. Q. The least favorite thing your trainer makes you do? A. Bulgarian Split Squats. Q. Books or podcasts? A. Podcasts. I’ve recently been listening to these True Crime case files. When I’m on the road for hours, stuff like that helps me pass the time. M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

39


MIKE BIRES by RYAN FREEBING photo by SAM CARBINE

M

ike Bires is the owner of Nutrition Faktory, Munch Meals, Ambition Threads, and a host of other start-up companies in the Nashville area. He’s seen tremendous growth in a short period of time, opening 11 Nutrition Faktory stores in less than 16 months. But it didn’t always start out that way. Mike grew up in a small town in northern Ohio with roughly only 13,000 people with a dad who worked his tail off at Ford Motor Company to provide for him and his sister. At a young age, Mike followed in his dad’s footsteps by getting a job at the local plastics factory hoping to save money for college. He started as a temp but a year later they

40

interviewed over 100 temps for just 3 full-time openings, and Mike was one of them. “When I got that job, I thought, I’ve just gotten my dream job and I’m still thankful to have had that experience,” Mike remembers with a laugh. “I have been fortunate my entire life,” Mike recalls, “and it started there at that factory. The supervisor at the plastics factory took me under his wing, and I tried my best to be a sponge, learning everything I could about the business." “Early on, I started breaking records on the factory floor, getting good feedback from my superiors and it looked like I was going to be there for the long haul, but one day

I overheard a conversation about how the business was being run and it made me think a little differently. Essentially, even though I was doing great work, busting my ass and putting in long hours, if some of the guys in the ‘front-office’ weren’t, I could lose my job. So I quit and went to school. I didn’t want someone else's actions controlling my destiny.” "To earn some extra money while I was in school, I went to work at a local health food store and was blessed to have another great boss and mentor. The owner, Barry, taught me everything he knew about the industry.” “Funny enough, people respected Barry so much that while I was still

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


people+lifestyle learning, when a customer asked about a particular supplement, I would just say, ‘Well this is what Barry recommends and they were good,” Mike laughs. “I’ll never forget the one day an elderly woman walked into the store and was looking for something to help with her arthritis pain. I could tell she was in pretty bad shape. So I told her, ‘Well this is what Barry recommends.’ And I sold her a few items.” “About a month later, the same woman came back into the store and asked specifically for me. Barry was shocked because no one had ever done that before. The woman said she was feeling much better, thanked me for the recommendation I had made and said that I had ‘changed her life.’ She had been going through a rough time and said she felt excited to get out of bed again. This was crazy to me that I could change someone’s life for the positive by simply ‘doing my job!’ This was the moment I fell in love with the industry.” “Shortly after, Barry was so impressed with my willingness to take ownership and learn the business that he asked me if I wanted to help open another store. I was honored, said yes and within a few months this new store was already breaking sales records. A few months later, I bought the store that I had built and a few months after that I bought all of Barry’s stores. I was in my mid 20s and owned three nutrition stores in Ohio." “Eventually I decided to test what I had learned and packed up and moved to Southern California. It was a big culture shock, but I settled in soon and opened my own supplement store in SoCal. My goal right out of the gate was to sell national brand products at wholesale prices.” “After some early success, I became good friends with the CEO of a top chain of nutrition stores in SoCal. He offered me the VP of Operations position over all of his stores in Southern California. I was ecstatic and I learned a ton about the industry while running 30+ locations, and I eventually became interested in the ‘brand’ side of the industry. Luckily I had great relationships in the industry and I became National Sales Director of a top brand.” “This was another amazing experience as I learned so much about building a company and a brand. I also traveled all over and got to visit the top retailers in all of

Oct 2014 Oct 2017

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

the top cities. It was great to be able to learn from the best retailers across the country. But again, I wanted more out of my career and I wanted to be a part of building a special culture.” “At this point, I had to ask myself what I really wanted out of life and a job, so I quit in 2014, not really having a plan in place. All I knew was that I wanted the freedom and stability to work closer to my family in Ohio while controlling my own destiny and building my legacy.” “So in October of 2014, I sat down with two of my closest friends to discuss working together on a brand, Motiv8 Performance. We started with one product and slowly grew from there. At lot of supplement companies were focused on the NPC and bodybuilding world, which is a great, hard-working group of people. But not many were offering products to people that also needed them, the ‘everyday’ person. We celebrated everyday people that were transforming their lives and were willing to share their stories with us. This resonated throughout social media so much that we had contestants from TV’s The Biggest Loser and American Ninja Warrior join our team. It was a great time.” “I eventually found Nashville because one of Motiv8’s top retailers was based in this area, Mid 10 Nutrition. We came out to visit them and my girlfriend, Sonia, fell in love with the city and said ‘Let's move here’ very nonchalantly one night,” Mike recalls. “Two months later, in December of 2016, we packed up and found a place in Murfreesboro.” “When I got here, I enjoyed it so much that I wanted to do more to give back to my community. I noticed it was hard to find the top vitamin and supplement brands at low pricing here in Tennessee.” “Given my experience, I opened a supplement store in Murfreesboro called Nutrition Faktory. I was buying direct from all the brand owners that had become my friends from my days in southern California, so our prices were much lower than the local competition and we even beat internet pricing.” “Then on Black Friday 2017, I had someone come in and want to open a Nutrition Faktory store of their own. I loved the idea and our first franchise location opened in

jan 2018

aug 2018 mar 2018

oct 2018

41


people+lifestyle Smyrna in May 2018. Then our third store in Hendersonville opened in June 2018. Our fourth store was an acquisition of Mid 10 Nutrition in July of 2018 in Nashville. Then came Cool Springs shortly after in December and Cookeville in January 2019. We were really on the move.” “Since then, I’ve met so many great people that I felt I could help which has led to other successful business ventures such as, Munch Meals, Ambition Threads, Ruck Nutrition, and the Protein Shack Shop. All have seen significant growth in just a short period of time. I owe all of that to the support of my team and the people that originally launched each business.” “Overall my experience here in Middle Tennessee has been nothing short of unbelievable. Tennesseans are the best people I’ve ever met and they are the reason that we have built something so special in such a short period of time. I can’t wait to see what’s next, but I know this is crazy ride is just beginning.” Throughout his time in Nashville, Mike has used his experience to better his community and those around him, whether they be in or outside of the supplement industry. "We just want to be known as one of the better companies in town that surrounds itself with good people. The rest will take care of itself. That's why we like to offer unique giveaways to our customers like Titans football tickets or we will take all of our ambassadors to a Predators hockey game. We're a community, just like the rest of the fitness industry in Nashville and that's what makes us grow. We want to offer the best service and best pricing to the best people we can."

42


43


by LINDSAY MILLER photos by SAM CARBINE

Kyle performs one of his signature moves he uses on stage wearing one of his favorite jackets Kelly Clarkson gave him as a gift.

44

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


people+lifestyle Kyle Whalum is a peculiar type of human being: He is humble and talented, smiley yet willing to have a deep conversation, reserved but also energetic, stylish but connects with a primal instinct. He possesses a certain physical and mental toughness that, while seems outwardly non-threatening, still borders on insane.

K

yle Whalum is not only a successful musician and family man, but he is also an ultrarunner. Fitness, of course, plays a major role in one's success at the ultra distance, but the best runners are said to be the ones who are most adept to suffering; the ones who, after body and mind begin to fail, embrace the darkness. Most importantly, despite his seemingly unbalanced qualities, he is a realistic slice of an actual human attempting to navigate a well-balanced life. After all, balancing extremes still requires stability. Although Kyle was introduced to the violin at 7 years old and grew up around music, he found that he enjoyed dabbling more in the visual arts. When his family moved to Nashville in 1997, he was 12 years old. The Nashville culture wasn’t as diverse as it is now. With the absence of an artistic and digital society, music became his new form of creative expression. Kyle’s father is an acclaimed musician and saxophone player, touring with Whitney Houston, Luther Vandross, and Celine Dion. “Even though my dad was a jazz musician, I fell in love with rock music,” Kyle admits. He started by creating and actually listening to his own music in order to form, what he recalls as, his own identity. He is talented with drums, guitar, and vocals, but it was at the age of 14 when he discovered the bass guitar. The bass guitar is a bigger and longer instrument with fewer strings. The bass guitar and the drummer create a groove that lay the basic foundation for music. He explains, from a harmonic standpoint, this part of the beat is the structure in which the house is built on. The underlying purpose of the bass guitar is, where Kyle says, people find their rhythm. But more importantly, it is where Kyle found his place, himself, and where his musical gifts would fit in.

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

Kyle attended school at Belmont University for music but was working on tour at the same time. He was already immersed in his desired field of study outside of the formal education. He never did graduate from Belmont

An extremely good sport, Kyle allowed us to fling mud all over him during the second half of his shoot. Given his sport of choice, luckily he said he was used to it.

45


"If we're on the bus pulling into a new city and I see a hill or a mountain I want to get on top of, I'll make an effort to conquer it on one of my off days."

46

because the job opportunities continued to get better. He realized, “The actual degree meant less than the actual experience.” And he valued that experienced because it would further lead him to unparalleled knowledge of the music scene and industry. While still attending school, Kyle’s first artist to offer a touring opportunity was Nicole C. Mullen, a Christian musician that would later cross over into mainstream genres. His first gig would lead to multiple opportunities and grow his name and talent. Other credits include collaborating and touring with Stacie Orrico, Brett Eldredge, Billy Currington, Hunter Hayes, LeAnn Rimes, and Zac Brown Band as both a bass guitarist and/or background vocalist. His current touring schedule is a prominent and stable position with Kelly Clarkson. The rarity of stability in the ever-changing and unpredictable music industry is something he does not take for granted. We live in an era where anyone can become an expert on anything. Music is just like any art form, Kyle says, the playing field has evened due to online tutorials and well, Google. But also like anything else, the factors of talent and dedication will always play a role. “People can be world class at one thing, for me, that's music,” he believes. He also appreciates the distinction between music as a passion and career but still having his form of fitness as a passion that helps him escape and manage some aspect of balance. Although Kyle found athletics a little later in life, his current training regimen is geared towards running ultra marathons. Ultrarunning is a dedicated niche sport that requires an absurd amount of mental toughness. It is devoted

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


people+lifestyle to covering the sport of long distance running, also known as ultramarathoning. Kyle’s preferred standard distances are the 50-mile and 100-mile races that involve considerable difficulty and time and commonly on severe terrain. He particularly loves mountain races that are not known for fast times. For full race times, he averages around 26 hours. He claims to not be driven by work or money, in fact, he revolves his fitness routine around whatever 100-miler he has picked for the year, always attending a different race. It may sound extreme - to run for more hours than there are in a day - but well, that's because it is. However, balancing life can include extremes. Kyle says, “A balanced day could mean a 5-mile run or a couple drinks,” because balancing life also includes the things that help you unwind. After a month of preparing with 12 to 16-hour days for his next tour, he travels for about 3 months. He has a little alone time when he chooses to run, eat, and play. It is a highrisk, high-reward life. Likely why there are addictive tendencies in the industry. Things can become unhealthy if not managed. The entirety of Kyle’s life and schedule is a balancing act. “When I was a younger man,” he explains, “it was all the typical rock trappings - girls, alcohol, drugs - and although I never went too far out on a limb, I was off balance.” He admits it requires a certain type of person to be in the music industry. Intriguingly, everyone advised, “Go exercise, it feels good.” Kyle says both running and his family have kept him from being a road monster. He and his wife have known one another since the age of 18. They met at Belmont and dated on and off for 15 years, now married for 3. They have a 2-yearold daughter named Wendell (Winnie for short) and just recently welcomed their second baby, a boy, they named West. “[Fatherhood] makes you prioritize things,” Kyle says. “Before kids, I would go on big runs, do strength training, and then yoga. Now I have to really balance my time, because I love my wife and I want to be around my children,” he explains. He sometimes finds himself appreciating the simple M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

truth that some exercise is better than none. Our personal journey to a healthier self can often times feel like a selfish act. But before we jump to the cliche of self-care talk, it is important to understand the difference between “self-care” and “caring for yourself.” What self-care describes, in its true form, is a deliberate act to take care of our mental, emotional, and physical health. Good self-care is key to a good relationship with oneself and others. It does not include the disregard of others (i.e. “caring for yourself”), in fact, it improves upon our ability to support and care for the ones we love. Kyle’s top inclination is to be present and helpful. “I want to [physically] be there for my family, because if I just did things for myself I would end up on long runs,” he says. “I get my time to myself now on tour.” Even though the

47


people+lifestyle

picture has changed or the priorities may have shifted, the whole picture is still whole. Now, there are more people in it. He understands the reality of doing what is personally realistic and the necessity in prioritizing. Kyle has harmonized his time when it comes to family, career, and fitness, but this last fall he decided to add a structured diet into his euphony. “It's like balancing a basketball on a basketball,” he says, “you have to constantly adjust.” His body has responded well to the Keto diet, as Kyle says he has trouble staying lean. But he assures, “I get most my carbs from beer.” Any time we see results, we are instantaneously encouraged to stick with our plan. For Kyle, he says, “I just want to drive home the idea that it should entirely depend on what works for you.” Personally, he has found what works for himself and his body in order to be

48

healthy. “Maybe that is why I’m not an elite athlete,” he jokes, but his rational outlook keeps him positive and allows him to continue chasing his passion. He says, “If you want the result you have to go through the process.” Even though in life, much like ultrarunning, that process can sometimes be quite dark. “We all have things we are tortured by - haunted by - like bad habits or toxic relationships - but our fitness practices help us to deal with those issues. We can use whatever hashtags we want, #suffermore, #embracethesuck, #nopainnogain, but Kyle believes the truth of the matter is this: none of us actually like it. The training, maybe. The process, at times. The accomplishment, of course. But it is in those truly difficult moments that we have nothing left to do but face our fears and overcome. Nonetheless, it is pushing through our lowest and most painful thoughts that make us appreciate the person we are becoming. “In the 100-miler the darkness comes up more than once. You have to deal with those moments over and over,” Kyle portrays. In distances at such length, there are multiple walls to break through. He welcomes the trail and embraces the battle. “We say we need the darkness to balance the light, but it's a difficult moment of truth when it actually comes up,” Kyle says. The act of corralling your mind and pulling things back to the center is the art of mindfulness. You need the chaos but you also need the discipline. There is a romantic notion of quieting the noise in your head that's all part of the process - the discipline and practice

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


in emptying our thoughts. Kyle asserts one of his favorite quotes, “The only way forward it through.” He is reminded of the time he encountered trench foot with 60 miles to go. He recalls thinking, “The only way I’m going to get the buckle (the accomplished race medal) is if I put myself through more pain than I ever have.” While there may be a vain side to fitness, as we are all aware, Kyle says, “80 percent is a spiritual aspect of mindfulness - partly due to the simple joy of finding your breath.” After Kyle’s first 100-mile race, he says, “I thought I would come back a new enlightened version of myself. But really I'm still me, just becoming a better version all the time.” Many of us can relate to Kyle’s outlook - his expectations. However, the beauty of fitness lies in the process - the journey - as Kyle discovered. Because even when we don’t quite meet the idea in our head of how it is meant to be, we are still learning something. “I become a wiser version of myself after each race,” he admits. He says he wouldn't be where he is today if he hadn’t learned the real meaning of endurance. Running is a sense of humility

for Kyle. “I do this because I want to get broken,” he explains. Fitness strips us of everything - all our comforts and surface-level thoughts. We struggle and we push until the only thing left are the things we have not dealt with yet. The lessons at the end of each mile teaching us something new, helping us to face each demon and every daunting task, mentally enduring the conflict to keep moving forward. “I would have never been able to rise to the occasions in my life if I haven't learned the endurance aspect of my inner self.”

ACCORDING TO KYLE These are the top 5 must have albums and/or artists for long distance runs.

No. 1) Radiohead: In Rainbows, Hail to the Thief, King of Limbs, Ok Computer, Kid A “For any run that starts or includes significant time in the dark, Radiohead’s haunting melodies and surreal textures get your psyche ready to just embrace the weird and go with the flow.”

No. 2) Kendrick Lamar: Untitled Unmastered, DAMN, Black Panther Soundtrack “Hip-hop pairs so well with exercise: this is a no brainer. As long as the MC is spitting truth (meet Kendrick Lamar), your low moments are sure to segue into moments where you find yourself shadowboxing in the street.”

No. 3) Deftones: Around the Fur, White Pony, Koi No Yokan “Metal is great for hard efforts, workouts, and that much needed surge of energy to kick through the wall. If you’re afraid of heavy music, don’t be. Chino Moreno’s soaring, melodic vocals always add a sweet counterpoint to the at times brutal, but beautifully rhythmic stew.”

No. 4) Kanye West: Yeezus, Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy, Watch the Throne “Love him or hate him, Kanye West has provided the soundtrack of the last 16 years. The level of detail in his compositions and collections makes Yé a perfect go-to when you have no idea what your run for the day might entail.”

*Tie for No. 5) Anything by Deerhunter or TV on the Radio

A few shots of Kyle running the Pinhoti 100 in Alabama. Photos by Jamie Jean.

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

“Some runs require something extra special to help eat up the miles. If you need music that keeps things interesting but goes down smooth, look no further than either one of these prolific indie rock outfits.” [“Runners”-up: Drake, Queens of the Stone Age, Kacey Musgraves, Janelle Monae, Tribe Called Quest, Tame Impala, Fleet Foxes, Kenneth Whalum, Black Keys, Kings of Leon, Maren Morris]

49


SPECIAL PROMOTION Make your voice heard! It’s time we let our elected officials know how this tax is hurting both Tennesseans who want to get physically fit and Tennessee small business owners who are providing these important services. Visit TosstheTax.com today!

If you own or go to a small gym in the Nashville area, you’re probably aware of a new “amusement tax” on gym memberships in Tennessee. The 10 percent tax only affects gyms smaller than 15,000 sq. ft, but it could be deterring some local Tennesseans from getting into shape. If you own or go to a small gym in the Nashville area, you’re probably aware of a new “amusement tax” on gym memberships in Tennessee. The 10 percent tax only affects gyms smaller than 15,000 sq. ft, but it could be deterring some local Tennesseans from getting into shape.

THE ISSUE Tennessee has recently begun enforcing a 10 percent Amusement Tax on all types of fitness centers, health clubs, gyms, and their members that meet certain size standards. This tax includes regular services like classes, memberships, and personal training sessions. The extra tax could be discouraging some Tennesseans who want to stay physically fit from paying the extra fee. The tax could also be putting some small business owners who are running bootcamp, HIIT, barre, spin and yoga studios, among others, in some tight situations. “The tax has had more of an impact on us than we originally anticipated,” says Amize Williams of SHED Fitness. “An additional $10-$20 added to a monthly membership is enough to

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

raise some eyebrows and can really hit home hard for some. We’ve lost a few members and had to have serious conversations with others. It hasn’t been a fun adjustment.” Americans at large – and Tennesseans specifically – are becoming increasingly unhealthy. Tennessee is now the fourth highest ranked state in the nation for obesity, leads all other states in childhood obesity, and is the fifth highest state for diabetes. An additional amusement tax that taxes wellness programs and gyms could be a step in the wrong direction. "The tax creates an additional financial barrier to entry for people who want to buy a membership in a boutique studio," says Brigette Edwards of Orangetheory Fitness. "These small studios tend to get to know their customers and are invested in their improvement. We create accountability and a community that generates success and improvement. At our studios, people improve their blood sugar levels, weight, cholesterol levels and much more, and we feel it’s wrong for the state to tax people for wanting to improve their health.

THE LONG RUN Losing the tax means the state will be getting less money, but the long term gain outweighs the short term burn. On top of that, Tennessee taxpayers will continue to pay more in healthcare costs if we don’t make changes and become a healthier state. The last thing we should be doing is taxing those who are working to improve their health.

HOW CAN YOU HELP? Get Involved. Eliminating the Amusement Tax on small fitness centers will encourage more Tennesseans to find a local gym that will help improve their health and fitness while also cutting healthcare costs across the entire state. There have been several bills filed this year in the Tennessee legislature to repeal this tax, but it's important to let your elected officials know how important this issue is. Visit TosstheTax.com to quickly contact your State Legislators and ask them to Toss the Tax on Tennessee Fitness. It's time to make our voices heard.

51


health+wellness

by DR. RANDI YONTZ

AM I HEARING

I

THIS RIGHT? AND HEALTHY BODY

love Nashville’s fitness community and recently attended a high energy class at one of my favorite studios. Unknowingly, this new instructor cranked up the volume over the speakers and I spent half the class trying to hear and understand the directions as well as hope I would have my hearing when I left. After bringing this up to several friends, I realized how many others are noticing the increasing noise levels in these high-energy classes. Whether it’s cycling, kickboxing, HIIT classes, or another high-energy activity, these classes often crank up the music to harmful levels. Research from George Mason University in Virginia has found that music played during spin classes at fitness centers in the US has reached 100 to 110 decibels. Meaning, an hour of working out surrounded by sounds at 100 to 110 decibels have the potential to permanently damage your hearing. If you’re a fitness instructor, you’re exposed to these sounds for an even longer period throughout the day. This can lead to instant or gradual hearing loss that could be permanent. Here are five tips to help protect your hearing:

KEEP YOUR DISTANCE

The closer you are to the sound source, the bigger the burden on your ears. Try to pick a spot as far away from the speakers as possible. If the speakers surround the room, try to stay towards the middle of the space or classroom.

SPEAK UP

If the music seems too loud, consider asking the instructor before class begins or during a cooldown period to lower the volume. You might also want to explore different gyms and fitness studios and their approach to noise management before

52

HEARING

committing to a facility.

WEAR EARPLUGS

Keeping earplugs in your car or gym bag helps ensure you’ll have a pair on hand. If you have trouble keeping them in during sweat and movement, consider a customized set from your local audiologist to help ensure a secure fit during high-intensity exercise. These secure, custom fit earplugs have noise filters that allow you to hear the instructor and music but cut down on the harmful loud sounds.

TAKE A BREAK

Per public-health recommendations, keep your noise exposure to 15 minutes or less amid 100plus decibel levels and no more than a minute amid 110-plus decibel levels. This might seem like a lot to ask but frequent and prolonged noise exposure increases the chance of lifelong hearing damage. Thus, consider leaving class for a water break or an alternate activity during the loudest moments. It might do you good to step outside for a breather. Not sure how loud your gym or class is? There are plenty of free sound level meter apps to download. If you start to notice any issues or changes in your hearing, get a hearing test just to be on the safe side. If you leave your workout with ringing in your ears, feeing of fullness, muffled hearing or dizziness, contact an audiologist immediately to get your hearing tested. An audiologist will be able to access the damage and recommend the next steps to take in order to find a solution. Remember, healthy body and hearing. N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


health+wellness

BACK ON

TRACK

by ROSS GENTRY featuring CHRIS WOLFE, PT, CERT MDT, OCS, OWNER AND FOUNDER OF WOLFEPT

RECOVERING FROM RUNNING-RELATED INJURIES

F

or most runners, being injured at some point is a reality. Sometimes reality stinks. Devoted runners know that running helps you stay fit, it helps you stay sane, and can be a defining way of life. When the thing you love brings you heartache, or worse, knee pain, it can be immensely difficult to navigate the path back to where you want to be, which for many is running more distance in less time with no pain. The road to recovery is arduous and many people don’t know where to start. Others may think they know where to start but end up heading in the wrong direction. Here to get injured runners back on track is Chris Wolfe. Chris Wolfe is a different breed of running specialist. He isn’t the type of expert who will hastily tell you to “stop running”. He isn’t the running coach who will make you adhere to his cookie-cutter performance program. He isn’t the salesman with “5 Quick Tips”. Chris is the guy who figures out what matters to you most and gives you the tools to get there. And it surely helps that he knows a whole lot about running. Local to Nashville, Chris is a physical therapist who spent years doing PT the traditional way before setting up his own clinic, Wolfe PT, located within PhysioFit, a gym in South Nashville. With experience in running as a Boston Marathon qualifier and Ironman finisher, Chris has devoted himself to evidence-based treatment and peoplecentered care. As one of the top minds on running in our city, Chris recently shared some of the principles he utilizes to ensure his patient’s success.

WHAT DO INJURED RUNNERS DO THAT MAY MAKE HEALING DIFFICULT? 1. Not approaching running as a higher-level skill. People usually start running with the best of intentions. You want to be more fit and there happens to be a sidewalk nearby. Running is incredibly accessible. However, many novice runners sooner find themselves in pain rather than at the finish line they signed up for in January. Chris makes the case that running is a higherlevel skill. Skills require practice, intention, and time. Signing up for a half-marathon three

54

months away when you are yet to see the high five at the end of a fun run doesn’t allow for skill development. A would-be weightlifter doesn’t decide one day that they will clean & jerk two times their own body weight in a few months. Having the right mindset toward training may help you get where you are going. 2. Putting your body on mute as race day approaches. It takes time to learn how to listen to your body’s cues in training. In order to get better, there are absolutely certain pains and thresholds you need to push through. Other pains are red flags for a recovery day or two. Making unscheduled changes

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


to your training program can be irritating, especially when race day is a few weeks away. As he discussed this idea Chris laughed and said, “Recovering and showing up in a non-injured state to the race is better than showing up somewhat trained but hurt”. 3. Quitting running to get better at running? The one phrase a runner never wants to hear is “stop running”. Take my wallet, take my keys, but do not take my running. Breathe easy, runners. Nobody here will tell you that without truly understanding your situation. Quite the opposite, in fact, do what you can to stay out there. Chris took time to really hit this point home. He explained that the body is catabolic. This means that without any external intervention the body is in a constant state of breaking down. The only way to “build up” the body rather than “break it down” is to load it. Load means weight, force, and stress. If

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

you stop running, you are taking away your body’s load. Under-loading leads to breakdown over time, so the more time you take off the less ready you are to run. “If you send an under-loaded person back to running, they will break again. Maybe not the exact same injury, but something will break”. This starts to make sense when you think about a runner with plantar fasciitis or IT band issues who take a few weeks off to let pain settle down just to lace backup and dishearteningly find the pain readily return with a vengeance. Rest is not an intervention; it’s a window for intervention. We’ll have more on that later.

WHAT CAN INJURED RUNNERS DO THAT HELPS LEAD TO SUCCESS? 1. Follow the 80/20 Rule. To be good at running, you need to go running. That’s a given, but with that said, running isn’t enough. When Chris talks with his patients

about requirements outside of running, he offers the 80/20 rule. 80 percent of your time investment should be doing what you love most; getting out there and putting one foot in front of the other. The other 20 percent is what takes your 80 percent to the next level. There are plenty of items that can count for that 20 percent. Many of you may already have visions of rest days, foam rolling, and yoga sessions filling your mind as you dream up your 20 percent. When Chris thinks about his runners’ 20 percent, his mind is filled more with barbells, kettlebells, and resistance bands. Have you ever seen those articles online with 3 to 5 handy exercises for runners? A lot of them give a few quick bodyweight movements to throw into your crosstraining. This isn’t wrong, but Chris explains that in order to create a true adaptation in his athletes, he has to load their bodies with more than the bodyweight they are accustomed to. Each time a runner takes a stride they strike the ground with roughly

55


health+wellness 2.5 times their own bodyweight. It makes sense then if your cross-training is going to be effective, you need to get well above bodyweight to adequately prepare for the loading demands of running. 2. Get creative. No, this doesn’t mean to use swimming as your new running. With emphasis, Chris tells runners to get creative. Can’t run long distances without a flare up? Run some shorter intervals at a quicker pace. Your body doesn’t hold up to a fast pace? Do some alternating walk/ runs. Do what you can. Continue to challenge your body. Find a coach or doctor who understands the physical demands of running and the facets of your injury. An injury isn’t a death sentence to your dream of completing a half-marathon or your long-term career as an elite athlete, it is part of learning and adapting as you figure out the discipline of this high-level movement. 3. Remember the Injury Ground Rules. Chris wouldn’t let the interview end until this was clear. If you need a quick way to interpret the pain you’re feeling during and after a run and how to be smart about it, here you go.

Ground Rule #1 If an injury or pain noticeably alters

your stride, you need to modify something. Try a change in your cross-training, recovery, running mechanics, or find someone with more experience who can take a look.

Ground Rule #2 Running pain that hurts and disturbs your daily life for longer than 24 hours means you need to modify something (see above). If the pain goes away in less than 24 hours and doesn’t get progressively worse, they are likely normal stresses from a challenging run.

Ground Rule #3 Running pain that requires medication means you also need to modify something (see above). Try a change in your cross-training, recovery, running mechanics, or find someone with more experience who can take a look. 4. Understand that your running is composed of many factors.

interpret and organize your training. Notice you were able to keep up a slightly faster mile time today? It may be the result of your success at work yesterday. Do your knees feel like they are made of glass? Maybe the kids are getting you up at 1 am, 2 am, and 3:47 am could partially be at play. Chris encourages each of his runners to keep a journal. Nothing fancy, just rate your day, run or no run, on a scale of 1 to 10 in three categories: Energy, Fatigue, and Soreness. When you look back on your week, try to see if you can pick out some patterns. Maybe runs on Mondays feel great because you had Sunday relaxing with family, but Wednesday runs always feel off because you aren’t able to get a full breakfast before heading to an early weekly meeting, and so on. More simply put by the man himself, “Go beyond running to help your running”.

WHAT MAKES WOLFE PT DIFFERENT? When asked what sets him apart from any other traditional PT, chiropractor, or coach who has “running injuries” listed as a bullet point in their brochure, without hesitation Chris remarked, “I actually watch them run”. There are lots of people who can check hip alignment, test strength, and pop your back, but somehow completely miss the main thing. Chris invites his patients into the process. He calls this the “brainstorming approach”. With this brainstorming approach, you have ownership in your own treatment rather than being a bystander. Chris figures out what matters to you - why you run, how your injury affects you - and brings that to the table to design the intervention. Not every runner runs the same. Wolfe PT takes this into account. You don’t need to run correctly, you need to run how you are made to run. We love running and want to keep doing it. If you are struggling with injuries, try out some of Chris’s principles. Reach out to Wolfe PT and Chris himself for help if you’ve hit a wall in your healing or would like to avoid that wall, especially if you are looking for programming and advice on your current regimen. If you’d like to get some time with Chris yourself, you can find him at wolfept.com. Now, go forth, and run-along.

Your body is crazy smart but it’s not smart about everything, particularly about stress. Your body doesn’t always know the difference between a hard run, a bad day at work, or not getting enough sleep, it just knows it feels beat up. Becoming an elite runner isn’t only about nailing down the perfect training regimen and executing it week after week; it’s also about understanding that you are a whole person. A whole person has a lot of stressors, both good and bad. Accounting for stress can help you

56

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


IN EVERY ISSUE

NASHVILLE FIT MAGAZINE'S

FITNESS DIRECTORY Beretty Bravo Personal Trainer Health/Life Coach beretty@gmail.com @beretty

Tim Boje Head Trainer Southern Sculpt Fitness tim@southernsculptfitness.com 615.592.5045 @timboje_ssfitness

Chris Byford Yoga Instructor/Teacher and Leadership Director chrisbyfordyoga@gmail.com @chris_byford_yoga

David Cook "Cookie" Personal Trainer and Boxing Coach Founder of Cookie Cuts cookiecutsfitness@gmail.com @coach.cookie

Jerry Davis Personal/Group Trainer jdworkout@yahoo.com 615.582.2943 @drummajorfitness

Dani Dyer Fitness Event Coordinator Personal Trainer dani@danidfitness.com @danidfitness1

58

Steven Earwood Personal Trainer Health/Life Coach earwoodfitpro@gmail.com @earwood_fitness

Conrad Goeringer IRONMAN Triathlon Coach workingtriathlete.com theworkingtriathlete@gmail.com @coach_goeringer

Andrea Kay MS, ACSM, ACE, AEA Aquatic Therapy, Pilates, Power Plate Fitness Training - Personal & Group additin@lwol.com @additin3

Deena Prichard Head Trainer and Owner at Fit3Fitness, Personal Trainer deena@fit3fitness.com @fit3fitness

Laurie Rice Life Coach claritycoachingnash.com laurie@claritycoachingnash.com @claritycoaching_

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


Nashville is home to a number of different health and fitness fields and experts. We’re proud to be your go-to source to help you find the perfect personal trainer, instructor, nutritionist, dietitian or health coach to fit your daily needs. Stay #MusicCityFit

Katie Spruell Physical Therapist ksfitnessco.com katie@ksfitnessco.com @missphysiofit

Joyce Veronica Certified Personal Trainer/ Fitness/Nutrition Coach jvftnss@gmail.com @joyceveronica

Jeff Waller Personal Trainer jeffreyallenwaller@gmail.com 812.568.7890 @helloyeffrey

Kate Wilke Integrative Nutrition Health Coach kate@meditatekate.com @meditatekate

Zerian Williams Zenfinite Training Lead Trainer/Founder zerian@zenfinitetraining.com @zenfinitetraining

Want to join this list? Get your name familiar with and in front of the largest audience of health and fitness-minded individuals and groups in the Greater Nashville Area. Send an email to info@nashvillefitmagazine.com with "Fitness Directory" in the subject line for more details. M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

59


60

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


JULIEROBERTS

DISCOVER

by LINDSAY MILLER | photo by SAM CARBINE

J

ulie Roberts discovered early in life that her dreams were big. Sadly, when Julie reached those big dreams, she abruptly lost them. When so much of her life was out of her control, she did the only thing she knew how to do - find another way to get those big dreams back. She might still be fighting, and facing new battles along the way, but she’s not giving up, and she sure-as-hell ain’t skeerd. Julie is a recording artist, known for her incredible voice, but she is also an activist, dog-lover, newlywed, and creator of Ain’t Skeerd Records. She is the author of “Beauty in the Breakdown,” a title that plays off her first and most popular album and song to date, “Break Down Here.” Her book follows the highs and lows of her career and life, the personal struggles she’s endured, the lessons she’s learned, and her sense of purpose as she rebuilds her singing career. Despite the darkness of domestic violence in their home, Julie’s mother, her sisters, and herself, found solace in one another. Julie has addressed it served a major purpose in her story. It made her familiar with keeping secrets, but it also strengthened the bond between mother and daughter. It was from those hardships difficulties that Julie formed her biggest dream: To create a life where she could take care of her mother the way her mother had taken care of her. “Country music saved our lives,” Julie admits. As a little girl she would pray, “Dear God, please give me a record deal so I can buy mama a happy home.” Many years later, Julie moved her mother to a townhome in Bellevue. But 2010 had all but happy plans for the city of Nashville. “We lost everything in the flood,” Julie recalls. “We were rescued by a boat; our dogs were rescued by a boat, our cars floated away.” Feeling like there was nothing left to lose, Julie felt the strength and absolute necessity to reveal a secret she had been keeping for five years. Flares brought on by the many current stresses, Julie’s multiple sclerosis showed symptoms again. Her fans accepted her news and supported her just the same; however, the music industry did not. All in one week, Julie lost her home and her record deal; the two things in life she had worked and prayed for relentlessly. Julie is quick to remind me that MS symptoms are different for everyone. But on a stage in Asheville, she discovered her own. “In the middle of the show my vision went blurry and my right hand, holding the microphone, went numb and weak. I switched to the left hand and it has lost feeling too.” She sat the mic on the upright stand and sang blindly. She says, “I called mama that night. She was the only one that knew, besides the dogs... and they

M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

were going to tell anybody.” She went home and was sent straight to a neurologist but left the appointment holding onto her secret in fear. When symptoms arose after the flood, she visited the doctor again. She told them, “I’m sorry I didn’t read any of the pamphlets you gave me. They are floating in the Harpeth River with everything else I own.” Apparently, being rescued by boat had given Julie the outlook she needed to rescue herself. Once she was open about her disease, it was difficult to work in the industry due to people thinking she was fragile or sickly or likely to bail on a contract. The underlying issue is the stereotype or misinformation surrounding MS. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system that disrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. There are a range of levels that results in a range of signs and symptoms. There is no known cure, but Julie says, “I can live with this by taking care of myself,” and the National MS Society agrees. More research than ever has shown that diet and exercise positively influence affects, although, everyone’s circumstances are different. Julie is no stranger to battling with health. In fact, it wasn’t until her days at Belmont University that the required health classes opened her eyes to the world of fitness. Unfortunately, her first record label also required a certain “health,” expecting Julie to attend boot camp and begin a calorie-restricted diet. Her determination to please the music industry meant two and sometimes three workouts a day. The idea that her health meant looking a specific size forced Julie’s outlook on fitness to change. “That’s why I choose to do things I enjoy now. Back then, there was no balance and I wasn’t happy,” she states. “Fitness has always been the one constant in my life good, bad, or ugly. More recently it has been the constant thing I look forward to.” She has always turned to fitness for whatever reason. “It helps me get rid of everything that keeps me up at night,” she says. But things aren’t keeping her up at night quite like they used to, not since she decided her mind and faith would take the lead. Being honest with herself, her disease, and her community directed her to accepting her diagnosis and a therapy to manage the disease. When so much was out of her control - an industry holding her back, a disease that had no cure, a fear of losing it all, and the need to stay safe in her shell – she decided to be honest, control her outlook, and every now and then, raise her voice.

61


RACES + EVENTS

MARCH APRIL

Event dates are subject to change. Check local websites for final dates, times and locations.

FEATURED EVENT MARCH 3/5/19 Tennessee Flavors Nashville State Community College Nashville, TN 3/7/19 From the Ground Up Handstand Series Steadfast and True Yoga Nashville, TN 3/9/19 Kids Yoga Series with Mandi Byford Shakti Power Yoga Nashville, TN 3/10/19 Puppy Yoga lululemon lululemon Green Hills Nashville, TN

62

3/16/19 Boro Yoga Fest Main Street Music Murfreesboro, TN

3/23/19 Yoga Under the Stars Adventure Science Center Nashville, TN

3/16/19 UNPLUGGED IN NASHVILLE Hike+Yoga+Meditation Long Hunter State Park

3/24/19 Yoga at Diskin Diskin Cider Nashville, TN

3/16/19 St. Patrick's Music City Half, 10k, 5k, & 1-mile Wag 'n Walk Team Magic Nashville, TN

3/30/19 Music City Blitz Nissan Stadium Nashville, TN

3/16/19 Yoga + Brews Jackalope Brewing Company Nashville, TN 3/16/19 Nashville St. Paddy's 7K/5K Tennessee Runs Wave Country Nashville, TN

3/30/19 10th Annual SportsFest featuring Music City Blitz 1045 The Zone Nashville, TN 3/30/19 Row for a Reason CrossFit East Nashville Nashville, TN

N AS HVIL L E F IT MAG AZIN E M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9


Submit your events for the next issue to info@nashvillefitmagazine.com to be included.

APRIL 4/3/19 Yoga Sculpt Teacher Training CorePower Yoga Green Hills Nashville, TN 4/6/19 Nashville Vegfest The Nashville Fairgrounds Nashville, TN 4/6/19 BNA 5K on the Runway Nashville International Airport Nashville, TN 4/6/19 9th Annual Nashville Outdoor Recreation Festival & Expo Bells Bend Park Nashville, TN 4/6/19 Nashville Hammer Down 1K/5K/10K Race Nashville, TN 4/13/19 TennSpeed Ride TennSpeed Ride Whites Creek High School Nashville, TN

4/13/19 UNPLUGGED IN NASHVILLE Hike+Yoga+Meditation Long Hunter State Park 4/16/19 DairyPure Dash Purity's Moosic City DairyPure Dash Nashville, TN 4/20/19 Shade Tree Trot Vanderbilt Football Stadium Nashville, TN 4/20/19 Richland Creek Run XIII The Cohn Learning Center Nashville, TN 4/25-28/19 NFL Draft Lower Broadway and Nissan Stadium Nashville, TN 4/28/19 St. Jude Rock 'n' Roll Nashville Marathon and Half Marathon Rock 'n' Roll Marathon Series Nashville, TN

FEATURED EVENT M A R / A P R 2 0 1 9 NAS HVI LLE FIT M AGAZIN E

63


Profile for Xert Media

Mar/Apr 2019 - The Music Issue  

Training with the Stars, Kyle Whalum, and more

Mar/Apr 2019 - The Music Issue  

Training with the Stars, Kyle Whalum, and more