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Nari Park Sophomore Portfolio 2010-2011


Table of Contents Dave Hickey Book Jacket Series Pierre L’Enfant Poster Series Flight of Fancy The 13th Zodiac Sign Baskerville Poster Transition: the Autobiography Near the Wheels A Week in a Postcard Sound Problem Point of View Typographic Diary Typographic Portraits Zen Circle/ Square It’s Only a Paper Moon

Instructors Basic Graphic Design Peter Ahlberg Basic Typography Sara Giovanitti, Nicolaus Taylor Computer Studio Laina Leckie Digital Photography Abby Robinson Drawing Stephen Gaffney Graphic Designer as Image Maker Viktor Koen Visual Literacy Richard Wilde


Dave Hickey Book Jacket Series Book jackets for Dave Hickey’s short stories. Typography was to capture the sense of the music that are prevalent in each of the stories.


Dave Hickey Book Jacket Series Bottom: detail of the cover design. Right: the spines of the book series.


Dave Hickey Book Jacket Series

Back view with the black book band, and without the book band.


Pierre L’Enfant Poster Series Two posters for the civil engineer/ architect Pierre L’Enfant. First poster follows the style of Pierre L’Enfant, and the other was done in a style that is the complete opposite.


Pierre L’Enfant Poster Series Poster A. Inspired by the style of Pierre L’Enfant. The goal was to be mechanical and precise, like L’Enfant’s city plan for Washington D. C.. The circular motif and the straight lines that lead to the center of the circle represents the circular plazas and grid-like streets of Washington D.C..


Pierre L’Enfant Poster Series

Poster B. Done in the opposite style of Pierre L’Enfant. The intention was to be impulsive and child-like.


Flight of Fancy

The first page of a train timetable shows how towns lie haphazardly across the land, linked by the black lines of the railway network. We tuck the train ticket in the top pocket of our jacket and place our suitcase on the luggage rack. There we are. Now we can get down to thinking about this network of lines that connects the dots of the towns. Let’s imagine a land flat as a sheet of paper, in fact let’s take a sheet of paper and a black felt-tip pen and mark some dots at random on the paper, skipping about with the pen held upright.  It isn’t necessary to give town name to these dots spread a random on the paper. Let’s look at them as reference points around which and with which we will establish clusters connections— formal relationship—using straight lines, curved lines or lines of dots, or whatever. The game consists in inventing lots of different ways of connecting, linking, grouping together these dots.  Endless green fields pass by out of the window. In the distance a group of cottages act as the pivot around which the green plain rotates like a merry-go-round.

On our train (which in actual fact is the train of life of each of us) there is even a photocopier. Let’s get some copies done of this group of dots right away (twenty? twenty-seven? eighteen? thirty-five?…) Here’s the pack of copies which I’m about to place on the table. I take my pen out of the right-hand pocket of my jacket and I start connecting the dots. The sun disappears behind a large grey cloud. The dots that mark towns on flat land are connected by straight lines, mountain villages are linked by winding roads that curve upwards around the mountain. On the printed circuits of electronics systems, the dots are connected in the shortest way considering the number of connections that mustn’t overlap. Grape seeds (considered as dots) are all linked to a vertical axis. The constellations are luminous dots in a dark sky, connected by imaginary straight lines to form meaningful wholes. It is raining, the first drops fall on the window pane. Slowly they fall in straight lines that the speed of the train distorts. —Bruno Munari


THE HUMAN RELATIONS

FLIGHT OF FANCY The first page of a train timetable shows how towns lie haphazardly across the land, linked by the black lines of the railway network. We tuck the train ticket in the top pocket of our jacket and place our suitcase on the luggage rack. There we are. Now we can get down to thinking about this network of lines that connects the dots of the towns. Let’s imagine a land flat as a sheet of paper, in fact let’s take a sheet of paper and a black felt-tip pen and mark some dots at random on the paper, skipping about with the pen held upright. It isn’t necessary to give town name to these dots spread a random on the paper. Let’s look at them as reference points around which and with which we will establish clusters connections—formal relationship—using straight lines, curved lines or lines of dots, or whatever.The game consists in inventing lots of different ways of connecting, linking, grouping together these dots. Endless green fields pass by out of the window. In the distance a group of cottages act as the pivot around which the green plain rotates like a merry-go-round.On our train (which in actual fact is the train of life of each of us) there is even a photocopier.Let’s get some copies done of this group of dots right away (twenty? twenty-seven? eighteen? thirty-five?…)Here’s the pack of copies which I’m about to place on the table. I take my pen out of the right-hand pocket of my jacket and

I start connecting the dots. The sun disappears behind a large grey cloud.The dots that mark towns on flat land are connected by straight lines, mountain villages are linked by winding roads that curve upwards around the mountain. On the printed circuits of electronics systems, the dots are connected in the shortest way considering the number of connections that mustn’t overlap. Grape seeds (considered as dots) are all linked to a vertical axis. The constellations are luminous dots in a dark sky, connected by imaginary straight lines to form meaningful wholes. It is raining, the first drops fall on the window pane. Slowly they fall in straight lines that the speed of the train distorts. —Bruno Munari Types of human relationships shown: All for One and One for All, Complicated, Outsider, Teacher and Students, Relatives, Long Distance, Union, Family, Opposition, Autonomous, Lost Connections, Siblings, Trio, Spiritual, Cliques, Virtual, Guardian and Child, One Way, Secretive, Soulmates, Conflicting. Presented by Nari Park


Flight of Fancy The objective: develop 25+ different linear solutions to the 21-dot problem using black pen only. Design a poster using 21 best solutions. The dots were used to display 21 different types of human relationships. Bottom: 6 different solutions which shows different kinds of human relationships. Left: first poster about the human relationships.


THE HUMAN RELATIONS FLIGHT OF FANCY The first page of a train timetable shows how towns lie haphazardly across the land, linked by the black lines of the railway network. We tuck the train ticket in the top pocket of our jacket and place our suitcase on the luggage rack. There we are. Now we can get down to thinking about this network of lines that connects the dots of the towns. Let’s imagine a land flat as a sheet of paper, in fact let’s take a sheet of paper and a black felt-tip pen and mark some dots at random on the paper, skipping about with the pen held upright. It isn’t necessary to give town name to these dots spread a random on the paper. Let’s look at them as reference points around which and with which we will establish clusters connections—formal relationship—using straight lines, curved lines or lines of dots, or whatever.The game consists in inventing lots of different ways of connecting, linking, grouping together these dots. Endless green fields pass by out of the window. In the distance a group of cottages act as the pivot around which the green plain rotates like a merry-go-round.On our train (which in actual fact is the train of life of each of us) there is even a photocopier.Let’s get some copies done of this group of dots right away (twenty? twenty-seven? eighteen? thirty-five?…)Here’s the pack of copies which I’m about to place on the table. I take my pen out of the right-hand pocket of my jacket and I start

connecting the dots. The sun disappears behind a large grey cloud.The dots that mark towns on flat land are connected by straight lines, mountain villages are linked by winding roads that curve upwards around the mountain. On the printed circuits of electronics systems, the dots are connected in the shortest way considering the number of connections that mustn’t overlap. Grape seeds (considered as dots) are all linked to a vertical axis. The constellations are luminous dots in a dark sky, connected by imaginary straight lines to form meaningful wholes. It is raining, the first drops fall on the window pane. Slowly they fall in straight lines that the speed of the train distorts. —Bruno Munari Types of human relationships shown: All for One and One for All, Complicated, Outsider, Teacher and Students, Relatives, Long Distance, Union, Family, Opposition, Autonomous, Lost Connections, Siblings, Trio, Spiritual, Cliques, Virtual, Guardian and Child, One Way, Secretive, Soulmates, Conflicting. Presented by Nari Park


Flight of Fancy Bottom: 6 different solutions which shows different kinds of human relationships. Left: Another poster depicting the 21 different types of human relationships.


Personal Logotype This logotype was inspired by my childhood memories. Paper folding was a big part of my childhood. My mother was interested in the art of paper folding and she taught mentally disabled children how to fold paper. In our house, we had stacks of paper –all kinds of paper, from ordinary printing paper to handmade traditional Korean paper– and I spent hours each day, folding those paper and turning them into anything from abstract shapes to everyday objects. Additionally, the simple shapes and subtle shadows of this logotype represents my love for simple, minimalistic design. It also represents me well because I like doing tactile work.


The13th Zodiac Sign There has been an ongoing debate about the inclusion of the thirteenth sign –Ophiuchus– to the already existing 12 sign zodiac system. However, it is not as easy as it seems to include another sign to the existing system. The zodiac system, is created in such a way that every element and every aspect of the system is in perfect balance and harmony. When closely observed, one can clearly see that there is a great amount of logic behind it, and is very mathematical. The following pages show a poster series about the 12 signs of the zodiac, and why the 13th sign does not belong in the zodiac system.


The 13th Zodiac Sign Side A. The Twelve Zodiac Signs in Perfect Balance.


The 13th Zodiac Sign Side B. The Zodiac Balance Disrupted by the Inclusion of Ophiuchus.


The 13th Zodiac Sign Detail views of the poster.


Baskerville Poster A poster which showcases the beauty of Baskerville, with the letter ‘P’ as the star.


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abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

1234567890!@#$%^&*

ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTU

Pp abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

12 1122 33 44 55667 78 98 09 12 0 abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz

abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz 1234567890!@#$%^&*()-=+/[]<>’”;:,.?


Transition: the Autobiography Book Jacket of my autobiography called Transition. Created using both Korean and English words for â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;transitionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;. The background texture of handmade paper reflects my Korean heritage.


Transition: the Autobiography Bottom: the spine, inside flaps. Right: the back cover.


Near the Wheels A photo book about strange findings near the bicycle wheels.


Near the Wheels Bottom: a photograph from Near the Wheels. Right: the front cover and title page of the book.


Near the Wheels Photographs from Near the Wheels.


Near the Wheels Bottom: A photograph from the book. Left: inside pages of the book.


Near the Wheels A photograph from Near the Wheels.


Near the Wheels Bottom and left : photographs from Near the Wheels


Sound Problem Right (clockwise from top right): gargling, firecrackers, singing off-key, headache. Bottom: opening a bag of chips.


Point of View A dot from the point of view of... Bottom (clockwise from top left): Piet Mondrian is Boogie-Woogie. Paul Signac is kaleidoscopic. Yayoi Kusama is Obsession. Chuck Close is finger prints. Right: Jackson Pollock is spontaneity.


Typographic Diary Sunday: Procrastination Monday: Woke up too early Wednesday: Very productive day Thursday: Wrote midterm paper Saturday: Insomnia


Typographic Portraits My name is Nari and... Bottom: I do needle point, I have Seasonal Affective Disorder. Right: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a crime scene investigator, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m obsessive compulsive, I won the lottery.


Zen In an attempt to touch oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s inner self, be present to where ideas arise and to develop a more intuitive and insightful creative process which enhances your capabilities of problem solving. Experiment in the twelve grids by creating images without thinking. Rely on your feelings. This is an activity to bypass habitual thought, where playing with the freedom of a child becomes paramount. Allow yourself to enter a way of working where one form indicates the next in a spontaneous and unpredetermined way.


Circle/ Square Using a circle to represent the earth and a square to represent us, the image expresses how we are slowly destructing the earth with our wastes and pollutants.


It’s Only a Paper Moon

It’s a Barnum and Bailey world Just as phony as it can be But it wouldn’t be make-believe If you believed in me It’s Only a Paper Moon E.Y. Harburg and Harold Arlen


It’s Only a Paper Moon

Research and consider book(s); conceptualize and develop a design project around one aspect of books which you find interesting, exciting, and worth of your time and effort; meticulously archive and organize your process; execute your design project; using the InDesign template provided to you document the development and execution of your design project. When I began researching about books, I first divided the book into two major parts– the paper, and the text. I was drawn to the typographical aspect and I researched more about how the type was printed on the paper. Through research, I learned about different methods of printing, but what interested me the most was the movable type. While researching about the movable type, which was used to print books, I noticed that these blocks of type are the reflected image of the actual letters. Continuing with this idea, I came up with an idea to design an installation piece, with the word ‘reflection’ as its theme. I further developed this idea by making a connection to 1Q84 by Murakami Haruki and It’s Only a Paper Moon by E.Y. Harburg and Billy Rose.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon Sketches and Brainstorming.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon The Process. The words are printed in reverse on white paper. Then they are cut-out with an xacto knife, and pasted onto the paper lanterns.


It’s Only a Paper Moon

In 1Q84 by Haruki Murakami, there are two separate story lines that alternate by chapter. The stories takes place in the year 1984 and In both of these story lines, the protagonists – Tengo and Aomame– enters the parallel world. As the story unfolds, Aomame has several bizarre experiences, and she finally concludes that she must be living in an alternate reality and names this parallel world 1Q84. The novel relates to the theme of reflection because the parallel world is the exact duplicate, or the reflection of our own world. In the novel, the moon is a recurring symbolism of the parallel world because in 1Q84, two moons exist. Also, in the epigraph of this novel, the author quoted It’s Only a Paper Moon by E.Y. Harburg and Billy Rose. It’s a Barnum and Bailey world Just as phony as it can be But it wouldn’t be make-believe If you believed in me In addition, the moon is a perfect representation of the theme reflection, because the moon is only visible when it reflects light from the sun. Connecting all of these ideas, I decided to make paper orbs that has the above quote on them. The words of the quote will be paper cut-outs that are pasted on the lantern, and they will only be readable when the lanterns are illuminated.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon The Process. Book. A book which documents every stage of the project, along with the explanation of the concept.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon The alternate views of the cover of the process book.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon The pages of the process book.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon The final outcome of the project. The illuminated paper moons are floating in space.


Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Only a Paper Moon Alternate view of the paper moons hanging in space.


Nari Park's Portfolio  

This portfolio contains best 14 of the work created during my sophomore year at SVA,

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